LA Times Crossword Answers 25 Jun 17, Sunday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Scuse Me

Today’s themed answers are SQs (“scuse”), two-word answers starting with the letters S and Q:

  • 23A. It begins in April : SECOND QUARTER
  • 33A. Yahoo! Finance offering : STOCK QUOTE
  • 49A. Jamie Lee Curtis or Fay Wray : SCREAM QUEEN
  • 86A. Test for trivia fans : SPORCLE QUIZ
  • 100A. California prison town : SAN QUENTIN
  • 117A. Pielike veggie dish : SPINACH QUICHE
  • 15D. What screen icons exude : STAR QUALITY
  • 67D. Granite excavation site : STONE QUARRY

Bill’s time: 17m 55s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • SPORCLE QUIZ (Sporale quiz)
  • PART C (Part A)



Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Mark Cuban’s NBA team : DALLAS

Mark Cuban is a successful businessman, and the owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks. If you’ve seen the reality TV show “Shark Tank”, you’ll known Cuban as one of the investors putting up their money i.e. one of the “sharks”. If you’re a “Dancing with the Stars” fan, you might recall Cuban as a contestant on the 5th series of that show, partnered with Kym Johnson.

20. Lizard with a “third eye” : IGUANA

Iguanas have what is known as a “third eye” on their heads. Known as the parietal eye, it can sense levels of light, although it cannot make out details.

21. Like grandfather clocks : ANALOG

There are several sizes of longcase clocks, tall and freestanding clocks driven by a pendulum swinging inside a tower below the clock face. A longcase clock over 6 feet tall is called a grandfather, and one below five feet is a granddaughter, One that falls between five and six feet is known as a grandmother. The name of the clock derives from an 1876 song called “My Grandfather’s Clock”.

22. Tin mints : ALTOIDS

Altoids breath mints have been around since 1780, when they were introduced in Britain. The famous tin in which Altoids are sold is often reused for other purposes. The most famous use is as a container to hold a mini-survival kit.

28. ”__ Death”: Grieg work : ASE’S

“Ase’s Death” is a movement in Edvard Grieg’s beautiful “Peer Gynt” suite. The suite is a collection of incidental music that Grieg composed for Ibsen’s play of the same name. Ase is the widow of a peasant, and the mother of Peer Gynt.

30. Dot follower : ORG

The .org domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

33. Yahoo! Finance offering : STOCK QUOTE

Jerry Yang and David Filo called their company “Yahoo!” for two reasons. Firstly, a Yahoo is a rude unsophisticated brute from Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels”. Secondly, Yahoo stands for “Yet another Hierarchical Officious Oracle”.

43. In __ of : LIEU

As one might perhaps imagine, “in lieu” comes into English from the Old French word “lieu” meaning “place”, which in turn is derived from the Latin “locum”, also meaning “place”. So, “in lieu” means “in place of”.

45. Punk rock icon Smith : PATTI

Patti Smith is a singer-songwriter who was a big player in the seventies punk rock movement in New York City. Smith’s most successful song is “Because the Night”, a song co-written with Bruce Springsteen and recorded by Smith in 1978. Her influence in the punk rock scene earned Smith the nickname “Godmother of Punk”.

47. Trac II cousin : ATRA

Fortunately for crossword constructors, the Atra was introduced by Gillette in 1977, as the first razor with a pivoting head. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

48. Like Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 : IN G

Ludwig van Beethoven premiered his “Piano Concerto No. 4” in a private concert in 1807, along with his “Symphony No. 4”. Beethoven himself played the piano in the first performance, as he did for the public premiere the following year in Vienna.

49. Jamie Lee Curtis or Fay Wray : SCREAM QUEEN

The actress Jamie Lee Curtis got her big break when she played the lead in the original “Halloween” horror movie. She is the daughter actors Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh. Curtis married fellow actor and director Christopher Guest in 1984. Guest holds the hereditary title of 5th Baron Haden-Guest in the British peerage. That makes Curtis Lady Haden-Guest.

Fay Wray was a Canadian-American actress who was best known for her starring role in the classic 1933 film “King Kong”. When Wray passed away at the age of 96 in 2004, the lights of the Empire State Building were extinguished for 15 minutes. That fine gesture was a nod to the celebrated Empire State Building scene in “King Kong”.

53. “Blue Sky” Oscar winner : LANGE

The actress Jessica Lange is also an accomplished and published photographer. She was married for ten years to Spanish photographer Paco Grande. After separating from Grande, Lange was partnered with the great Russian dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov, with whom she had her first child.

“Blue Sky” is a film that was released in 1994, starring Jessica Lange and Tommy Lee Jones and a couple having marital difficulties. The film was actually completed three years earlier but sat on the shelf distribution company, Orion Pictures, went bankrupt. Despite the delay, Lange won a Best Actress Oscar for her performance.

59. Legend in one’s own mind : TIN GOD

A “tin god” is a person who claims authority and is full of self-importance. The use of “tin” is apt as it is a base metal with relatively little value.

60. Port of 79-Down : ADEN
(79D. Nation across the gulf from Somalia : YEMEN)

Aden is a seaport in Yemen that is located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

69. Dana of “Body of Proof” : DELANY

Dana Delaney is an actress from New York who had her big break playing Colleen McMurphy on the TV show “China Beach” in the late eighties. More recently, Delaney played Megan Hunt, the lead role on the drama series “Body of Proof”.

70. Smooching on the bus, for short : PDA

PDA is an abbreviation for “public display of affection”.

73. Some studios : ATELIERS

An atelier is an artist’s studio, with “atelier” being the French word for “studio” or “workshop”.

76. Bath buggy : PRAM

Another word used in the UK that’s rarely used over here is “pram”, which in my day was the most common term for what is called a baby carriage in the US. “Pram” is short for “perambulator”.

Bath is a beautiful city in South West England of which I have very fond memories. Bath is an old Roman spa town, and the city’s name comes from the Roman baths that have been excavated and restored.

77. Lidocaine brand : ICY HOT

Icy Hot is a topical heat rub that is used to relieve muscular discomfort and pain from arthritis and rheumatism. The active ingredient doesn’t provide any heat or cold, but it does stimulate nerve receptors in the skin causing the user to experience a cool sensation followed by warmth.

80. Sch. with a Harrisburg campus : PSU

Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was founded in 1855 as the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania. Penn State is listed as one of the “Public Ivies”, a public university that offers a quality of education comparable to that of the Ivy League.

The city of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania is the state’s capital. The city was named for John Harris, Sr. who operated a ferry across the Susquehanna River that runs through Harrisburg. Harrisburg is home to the Three Mile Island nuclear plant, which is located alongside the Susquehanna, and which had a partial meltdown in 1979.

81. Summer in Provence : ETE

Provence is a geographical region in France, in the south of the country. The region was once a Roman province called Provincia Romana, and was the first Roman province beyond the Alps. It is this Roman name “Provincia Romana” that gives Provence its name.

82. Burial isle of many Scottish kings : IONA

Although the small island of Iona lies just off the west coast of Scotland, it was the site of a monastery built in the Middle Ages by a monk from Ireland names Colm Cille (also known as Columba). Colm Cille and his followers were sent into exile from the Irish mainland and settled in Iona, as at that time the island was part of an Irish kingdom. This monastery in Iona expanded its influence over the decades and founded other institutions all over Ireland and Great Britain. It is believed that the famous Book of Kells may have been written, or at least started, at the monastery on Iona. Iona is also the burial site for Macbeth, King of Scotland who was immortalized in Shakespeare’s fictional account of the king’s life.

83. Ersatz fat brand : OLEAN

Olean is a brand name for the fat substitute, Olestra. Naturally occuring fats are made of a glycerol molecule holding together three fatty acids. Olestra is instead made of several fatty acid chains held together by a sucrose molecule. Olestra has a similar taste and consistency as natural fat, but has zero caloric impact as it is too large a molecule to pass through the intestinal wall and passes right out of the body. Personally, I would steer clear of it. Olestra is banned in Britain and Canada due to concerns about side effects, but I guess someone knows the right palms to grease (pun intended!) here in the US, and so it’s in our food.

Something described as ersatz is a copy, and usually not a good one. “Ersatz” comes from the German verb “ersetzen” meaning “to replace”.

84. Activity-tracking letters : GPS

Global positioning system (GPS)

86. Test for trivia fans : SPORCLE QUIZ

Sporcle.com is a trivia quiz website. The name is derived from the word “oracle” apparently. I like the web site’s mission statement: “We actively and methodically search out new and innovative ways to prevent our users from getting any work done whatsoever.”

90. Clyde cap : TAM

The Clyde is the second-longest river in Scotland, after the River Tay. The River Clyde passes through Glasgow, the country’s largest city.

91. Jacob’s twin : ESAU

Esau was the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When their mother Rebekah gave birth to the twins “the first emerged red and hairy all over (Esau), with his heel grasped by the hand of the second to come out (Jacob)”. As Esau was the first born, he was entitled to inherit his father’s wealth (it was his “birthright”). Instead, Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for the price of a “mess of pottage” (a meal of lentils).

94. Charlotte __ : RUSSE

Charlotte Russe is a cold dessert consisting of Bavarian cream set in a mold layered with ladyfingers. The dessert was named by its creator in honor of Princess Charlotte, daughter of British King George IV, and in honor of Czar Alexander I of Russia (“russe” is French for “Russian”).

97. Lyon lover’s word : AIME

The city of Lyon in France, is also known as “Lyons” in English. Lyon is the second-largest metropolitan area in the country, after Paris.

98. Golf phenom Jordan : SPIETH

Jordan Spieth is a young golfer from Dallas who made a name for himself in 2015 by becoming the second-youngest person to win the Masters, with only Tiger Woods being younger.

100. California prison town : SAN QUENTIN

The small town of San Quentin, California has a population of only a hundred people or so. It is located by the San Quentin State Prison, and was originally housing for the staff working in the prison and for their families.

103. Pennysaver revenue source : AD SALE

Today, “pennysaver” is a generic term for a free periodical issued in a community, offering items and services for sale. The original “Pennysaver” was published in 1948 in Ohio by Horace Greeley and Ralph St. Denny.

105. American rival: Abbr. : UAL

United Airlines (UAL) has a complicated history, but can trace its roots back to Aviation Enterprises, founded in 1944 and later called Texas International. The first use of the “United” name in the company’s history was when airplane pioneer William Boeing merged his Boeing Air Transport with Pratt & Whitney to form the United Aircraft and Transport Corporation (UATC) in 1929. The Air Mail Act of 1934 required that UATC be broken up into United Aircraft (which became United Technologies), the Boeing Aircraft Company and United Air Lines.

106. Topps figure : STAT

Topps was a relaunch of an older company called American Leaf Tobacco, with the Topps name used from 1938. The earlier company was in trouble because it could not get supplies of its Turkish tobacco, so it moved into another chewy industry, making bubblegum. Nowadays, Topps is known for including (mainly) sports-themed trading cards in the packs of gum.

108. Historic Tuscan city : PISA

The city of Pisa is right on the Italian coast, sitting at the mouth of the River Arno, and is famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

117. Pielike veggie dish : SPINACH QUICHE

The classic dish called quiche is made with eggs (“oeufs” in French). Even though the quiche is inextricably linked to French cuisine, the name “quiche” comes from “Kuchen”, the German word for cake,. The variant called “quiche lorraine” includes bits of smoked bacon as an ingredient.

121. __ à trois : MENAGE

“Ménage” is the French word for “household”. The familiar term “ménage à trois” translates as “household of three” and is used to describe a domestic arrangement in which three people having sexual relations occupy the same household.

122. Sophisticated : URBANE

We use “urbane” today to mean something courteous or refined. Back in the 1500s the term was used in the same way that we now use “urban”. Those townsfolk thought they were more sophisticated than the countryfolk, and so the usage evolved.

123. Pain reliever : ANODYNE

Something described as “anodyne” is analgesic, capable of removing pain. “Anodyne” comes from the Greek “an-” meaning “without” and “odyne” meaning “pain”.

125. Eldest Dashwood daughter in “Sense and Sensibility” : ELINOR

Elinor Dashwood is the delightful main character in Jane Austen’s novel “Sense and Sensibility”. Dashwood is played by Emma Thompson in my favorite adaptation of the story, the 1995 movie of the same name directed by Ang Lee.

Down

2. Pulitzer novelist James : AGEE

James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

3. “Peanuts” fussbudget : LUCY

In Charles Schulz’s fabulous comic strip “Peanuts”, Charlie Brown is friends with at least three members of the van Pelt family. Most famously there is Lucy van Pelt, who bosses everyone around, particularly Charlie. Then there is Linus, Lucy’s younger brother, the character who always has his security blanket at hand. Lastly there is an even younger brother, Rerun van Pelt. Rerun is constantly hiding under his bed, trying to avoid going to school.

4. Golden Triangle country : LAOS

The “Golden Triangle” is the name given to one of the main opium-producing areas in Asia. The triangular area includes part of Myanmar, Laos and Thailand.

5. Taylor of fashion : ANN

There was no actual person called Ann Taylor associated with the Ann Taylor line of clothes. The name was chosen by the marketing professionals because “Ann” was considered to be “very New England” back in 1954 when the stores first opened, and “Taylor” suggested that clothes were carefully “tailored”.

6. Seat at Churchill Downs : SADDLE

Churchill Downs is a thoroughbred racetrack located in Louisville, Kentucky that is famous for hosting the Kentucky Derby each year. The track is named for John and Henry Churchill who once owned the land on which the course was built.

7. Heaps kudos on : LAUDS

Our word “kudos” means acclaim given for an exceptional achievement. “Kudos” is both a singular and plural noun, derived from the Greek “kyddos” meaning “glory, fame”.

9. Budget choice : CAR

The Budget Rent a Car company started out in 1958 with the intent of undercutting the existing price of renting a car at airports. Budget was founded by Morris Mirkin. Mirkin enlisted Julius Lederer as a co-founder the following year. Lederer was the husband of newspaper columnist “Ann Landers”.

10. Ski resort near Snowbird : ALTA

Alta ski resort actually lies within the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area. The first ski lift in the resort was opened way back in 1939. Today, Alta is one of only three ski resorts in the country that prohibits snowboarding (along with Deer Valley, Utah and Mad River Glen, Vermont. The ski resort of Snowbird located next to Alta has been in operation since 1971.

11. “How to Succeed … ” composer Frank : LOESSER

Frank Loesser was a songwriter who was famous for penning both lyrics and music for the Broadway show “Guys and Dolls” and “How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying”. Loesser also wrote the marvelous song “Baby, It’s Cold Outside”.

“How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying” is a Frank Loesser musical based on a 1952 book of the same name by Shepherd Mead. The story centers on an ambitious young window washer who rockets through the management ranks of a private company with the help of a how-to manual.

12. Everglades bird : EGRET

Egrets are a group of several species of white herons. Many egret species were faced with extinction in the 1800s and early 1900s due to plume hunting, a practice driven by the demand for egret plumes that could be incorporated into hats.

The Everglades are a tropical wetlands that cover much of southern Florida. The area was named “River Glades” by a British surveyor in 1773, and is suggested that poor transcription of the word “river” led to the use of “ever”. The southern 20% of the Everglades is a protected region that we know as Everglades National Park. The park is the third-largest National Park in the lower 48 states, after Death Valley NP (the largest) and Yellowstone NP.

14. ”Today” weather anchor : AL ROKER

Al Roker is best known as the meteorologist on the “Today” show on NBC. He has successfully branched out from that platform though, and even co-wrote a novel called “The Morning Show Murders”, about a celebrity chef and TV host who get entangled in mystery. Topical stuff …

16. Future sound? : LONG U

The letters U in the word “future” are long Us.

18. 16th-century date : MDL

The date 1550 is written as MDL in Roman numerals.

24. Squat beneficiary : QUAD

The quadriceps femoris is the muscle group at the front of the thigh. It is the strongest muscle in the human body, and is also the leanest. The “quads” are actually a group of four muscles in the upper leg, hence the use of the prefix “quad-”.

31. __ seeds: omega-3 source : CHIA

Chia is a flowering plant in the mint family. Chia seeds are an excellent food source and are often added to breakfast cereals and energy bars. There is also the famous Chia Pet, an invention of a San Francisco company. Chia Pets are terracotta figurines to which are applied moistened chia seeds. The seeds sprout and the seedlings become the “fur” of the Chia Pet.

36. Latin ballroom dance : TANGO

The dramatic dance called the tango originated in the late 1800s in the area along the border between Argentina and Uruguay. Dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires in particular traveled to Europe and beyond in the early twentieth century and brought the tango with them. The tango craze first struck Europe in Paris in the 1910s, and from there spread to London and Berlin, crossing the Atlantic to New York in 1913.

46. Granola cousin : MUESLI

“Muesli” is a Swiss-German term describing a breakfast serving of oats, nuts, fruit and milk. “Muesli” is a diminutive of the German word “Mues” meaning “puree”. Delicious …

The name “Granola” (and “Granula”) were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

50. Baseball mascot partner reintroduced in 2013 : MRS MET

Mr. Met is the mascot of the New York Mets. He is a guy with a large baseball as a head, and has been elected to the Mascot Hall of Fame. There’s also a Mrs. Met, a mascot that was previously known as Lady Met.

51. California’s state bird : QUAIL

“Quail” is a name used for several chicken-like wild birds. Quail are common prey for hunters. The California quail is California’s state bird.

58. Mil. roadside danger : IED

Having spent much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, I am sadly all too familiar with the devastating effects of improvised explosive devices (IEDs). One has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others.

59. Christmas strands : TINSEL

The custom of decorating trees at Christmas seems to have originated in Renaissance Germany. Those first trees were placed in guildhalls and were decorated with sweets and candy for the apprentices and children. After the Protestant Reformation, the Christmas tree became an alternative in Protestant homes for the Roman Catholic Christmas cribs. The Christmas tree tradition was imported into Britain by the royal family because of its German heritage. That tradition spread from Britain into North America.

65. Medicare program offered by private insurers : PART C

Medicare is divided into four parts:

  • A: Hospital Insurance
  • B: Medical Insurance
  • C: Medicare Advantage Plans
  • D: Prescription Drug Plans

70. “In Search of Lost Time” novelist : PROUST

Marcel Proust was a French writer, noted for his enormous and much respected novel “In Search of Lost Time”. Graham Greene called Proust “the greatest novelist of the twentieth century”, and W. Somerset Maugham dubbed “In Search of Lost Time” as the “greatest fiction to date”. “In Search of Lost Time” is a very, very long novel. It is divided into seven volumes and was first published in 1913-1927. The first of the volumes is called “Swann’s Way”.

71. Breakfast pastry : DANISH

The Danish pastry that we know so well over here in the US is indeed a Danish specialty, although the recipe was brought to Denmark by Austrian bakers. A “Danish” is called “Viennese bread” in Denmark.

74. It may be served with pickled ginger : SUSHI

Gari is thinly sliced ginger that has been marinated in sugar and vinegar. Also known as sushi ginger, gari is usually served with sushi. Lovely stuff …

76. Spark : PIQUE

The words “whet” and “pique” can both be used in the sense of sharpening or awaking one’s interest or desire.

78. Santa __ : CLARA

The Santa Clara Valley, located just a few miles from me at the south of San Francisco Bay, is better known as “Silicon Valley”. The term “Silicon Valley” dates back to 1971 when it was apparently first used in a weekly trade newspaper called “Electronic News” in articles written by journalist Don Hoefler.

79. Nation across the gulf from Somalia : YEMEN

Yemen is located on the Arabian Peninsula, lying just south of Saudi Arabia and west of Oman. Yemen is the only state on the peninsula that is a republic (its official name is the Republic of Yemen). Everyone over the age of 18 gets to vote, but only Muslims can hold elected office. Yemen has seen many rebellions over the centuries, and has been suffering through a Shia uprising since February 2015.

Somalia is a country located in the Horn of Africa. Sadly, the nation is noted today for a devastating civil war and for its use as a base for pirates who prey on ships passing through the Indian Ocean along the Somali coast.

85. Masters strokes : PUTTS

Golf’s Masters Tournament is the first of the four major championships in the annual calendar, taking place in the first week of April each year. It is played at Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, and has a number of traditions. One is that the winner is awarded the famous “green jacket”, but he only gets to keep it for a year and must return it to the club after twelve months.

87. Strong cotton : PIMA

Pima is a soft cotton that is very durable and absorbent. Pima cotton is named after the Pima Native Americans who first cultivated it in this part of the world.

88. Where to see slanted columns : OP-ED PAGE

“Op-ed” is an abbreviation for “opposite the editorial page”. Op-eds started in “The New York Evening World” in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

89. Lake bordering Ontario : ERIE

Lake Erie is the fourth largest of the five Great Lakes by area (Lake Ontario is the smallest). The lake takes its name from the Erie tribe of Native Americans that used to live along its southern shore. Erie is the smallest of the Great Lakes by volume and the shallowest, something for which nearby residents must be quite grateful. Being relatively shallow, much of Erie freezes over part way through most winters putting an end to most of the lake-effect snow that falls in the snow belt extending from the lake’s edge.

92. “Lolita” (1962) actress : SUE LYON

Stanley Kubrick’s “Lolita” is 1962 film adaptation of the novel of the same name by Vladimir Nabokov. English actor James Mason stars as a middle-aged man obsessed with a teenage girl, played by 14-year-old Sue Lyon. The cast also included Shelley Winters and Peter Sellers.

93. Happy hour offerings : CANAPES

A canapé is a finger food, usually small enough to eat in just one bite. In French, “canapé” is actually the word for a couch or a sofa. The name was given to the snack as the original “canapés” were savories served on toasted or stale bread that supposedly resembled a tiny “couch”.

101. “Far from Heaven” actor : QUAID

Actor Dennis Quaid is the younger brother of fellow actor Randy Quaid. Dennis dropped out of college when he saw how successful his brother was and moved to LA to pursue his own career in acting. He has had some noted performances, including a portrayal of Jerry Lee Lewis in 1989’s “Great Balls of Fire”. Dennis is one of Hollywood’s best golfers, playing off scratch.

“Far from Heaven” is a 2002 film set in 1950s suburban Connecticut. Starring Julianne Moore, Dennis Quaid and Dennis Haysbert, “Far from Heaven” takes on the issues of race, sexual orientation and class, which are lurking below the surface of the apparently edenic life led by a successful executive and his homemaker wife. I haven’t seen this one yet, but it’s on the list …

104. Order to attack : SIC ‘EM

“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

109. Netanyahu of Israel, familiarly : BIBI

Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu has been the Prime Minister of Israel since 2009. Netanyahu is the only leader of the country to date who was born in the state of Israel. After graduating high school, he served in the Israeli special forces and participated in several combat missions, and was wounded on multiple occasions. After leaving the army in 1972, Netanyahu studied at MIT in the US, earning bachelors degree in architecture and a masters degree in business.

113. Wharf workers’ org. : ILA

International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA)

115. Narcissist’s problem : EGO

Narcissus was a proud and vain hunter in Greek mythology. He earned himself a fatal punishment, being made fall in love with his own reflection in a pool. So, take was he by his own image, that he could not leave it and wasted away and died by the pool. Narcissus gives us our term “narcissism” meaning “excessive love of oneself”.

116. Hydrocarbon suffix : -ANE

The “smaller” alkanes are gases and are quite combustible. Methane (CH4) is the main component of natural gas with ethane (C2H6) being the second largest component. Propane (C3H8) is also found in natural gas and is heavy enough to be readily turned into a liquid by compression, for ease of transportation and storage. Butane (C4H10) is also easily liquefied under pressure and can be used as the fuel in cigarette lighters or as the propellant in aerosol sprays. The heavier alkanes are liquids and solids at room temperature.

119. Bing result : URL

Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

Bing is the search engine from Microsoft. Bing is the latest name for an engine that Microsoft used to call Live Search, Windows Live Search and MSN Search.

Return to top of page

Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Mark Cuban’s NBA team : DALLAS

7. Scene : LOCALE

13. Quaint light : GAS LAMP

20. Lizard with a “third eye” : IGUANA

21. Like grandfather clocks : ANALOG

22. Tin mints : ALTOIDS

23. It begins in April : SECOND QUARTER

25. In an imposing manner : GRANDLY

26. Things on rings : KEYS

27. Lemons : DUDS

28. ”__ Death”: Grieg work : ASE’S

30. Dot follower : ORG

31. Grips : CLASPS

33. Yahoo! Finance offering : STOCK QUOTE

38. Went for a bite? : FISHED

41. Review using stars : RATE

43. In __ of : LIEU

44. Glob : WAD

45. Punk rock icon Smith : PATTI

46. Poetic measure : METER

47. Trac II cousin : ATRA

48. Like Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 : IN G

49. Jamie Lee Curtis or Fay Wray : SCREAM QUEEN

52. Steamed state : IRE

53. “Blue Sky” Oscar winner : LANGE

55. Bun contents : HAIR

56. Wish undone : RUE

57. Executed : DID

59. Legend in one’s own mind : TIN GOD

60. Port of 79-Down : ADEN

61. Brat’s output : SASS

63. What some wallow in : SELF-PITY

66. Give up the single life : WED

67. Prepared for a selfie : SMILED

69. Dana of “Body of Proof” : DELANY

70. Smooching on the bus, for short : PDA

73. Some studios : ATELIERS

75. Titles of respect : SIRS

76. Bath buggy : PRAM

77. Lidocaine brand : ICY HOT

80. Sch. with a Harrisburg campus : PSU

81. Summer in Provence : ETE

82. Burial isle of many Scottish kings : IONA

83. Ersatz fat brand : OLEAN

84. Activity-tracking letters : GPS

86. Test for trivia fans : SPORCLE QUIZ

90. Clyde cap : TAM

91. Jacob’s twin : ESAU

93. Poker pile : CHIPS

94. Charlotte __ : RUSSE

95. Is for two? : ARE

96. Stop : QUIT

97. Lyon lover’s word : AIME

98. Golf phenom Jordan : SPIETH

100. California prison town : SAN QUENTIN

103. Pennysaver revenue source : AD SALE

105. American rival: Abbr. : UAL

106. Topps figure : STAT

108. Historic Tuscan city : PISA

109. Wikipedia entries : BIOS

113. “Right on!” : I HEAR YA!

117. Pielike veggie dish : SPINACH QUICHE

120. Prisoner’s restraint : LEG IRON

121. __ à trois : MENAGE

122. Sophisticated : URBANE

123. Pain reliever : ANODYNE

124. Think highly of : ESTEEM

125. Eldest Dashwood daughter in “Sense and Sensibility” : ELINOR

Down

1. Pancake shape : DISK

2. Pulitzer novelist James : AGEE

3. “Peanuts” fussbudget : LUCY

4. Golden Triangle country : LAOS

5. Taylor of fashion : ANN

6. Seat at Churchill Downs : SADDLE

7. Heaps kudos on : LAUDS

8. Living it up : ON A SPREE

9. Budget choice : CAR

10. Ski resort near Snowbird : ALTA

11. “How to Succeed … ” composer Frank : LOESSER

12. Everglades bird : EGRET

13. Practical joke : GAG

14. ”Today” weather anchor : AL ROKER

15. What screen icons exude : STAR QUALITY

16. Future sound? : LONG U

17. Help out : AID

18. 16th-century date : MDL

19. Aspiring therapist’s maj. : PSY

24. Squat beneficiary : QUAD

29. Pool-heating option : SOLAR

31. __ seeds: omega-3 source : CHIA

32. Fill to the brim : SATE

34. Ticket for speeding, say : CITE

35. Being in debt : OWING

36. Latin ballroom dance : TANGO

37. Barely beat : EDGED

38. False impression : FACADE

39. Words of resignation : I TRIED

40. Strict : STERN

42. Looks after : TENDS

45. “Baloney!” : PSHAW!

46. Granola cousin : MUESLI

50. Baseball mascot partner reintroduced in 2013 : MRS MET

51. California’s state bird : QUAIL

52. Remains in neutral : IDLES

54. “__ takers?” : ANY

58. Mil. roadside danger : IED

59. Christmas strands : TINSEL

62. Escapes slowly : SEEPS

64. Mall handouts : FLIERS

65. Medicare program offered by private insurers : PART C

67. Granite excavation site : STONE QUARRY

68. Hosp. employees : DRS

70. “In Search of Lost Time” novelist : PROUST

71. Breakfast pastry : DANISH

72. Blow away : AMAZE

73. “I knew it!” : AHA!

74. It may be served with pickled ginger : SUSHI

76. Spark : PIQUE

77. Tiny bits : IOTAS

78. Santa __ : CLARA

79. Nation across the gulf from Somalia : YEMEN

84. Dieter’s setback : GAIN

85. Masters strokes : PUTTS

87. Strong cotton : PIMA

88. Where to see slanted columns : OP-ED PAGE

89. Lake bordering Ontario : ERIE

92. “Lolita” (1962) actress : SUE LYON

93. Happy hour offerings : CANAPES

98. Scout’s accessory : SASH

99. Inscribed tablet : PLAQUE

101. “Far from Heaven” actor : QUAID

102. Response at the door : IT’S ME

104. Order to attack : SIC ‘EM

107. Windshield option : TINT

109. Netanyahu of Israel, familiarly : BIBI

110. Volunteer’s offer : I CAN

111. “This is horrible!” : OH NO!

112. Interpreter of signs : SEER

113. Wharf workers’ org. : ILA

114. Egg source : HEN

115. Narcissist’s problem : EGO

116. Hydrocarbon suffix : -ANE

118. “Not gonna happen, lassie” : NAE

119. Bing result : URL

Return to top of page

LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Jun 17, Saturday










Constructed by: Mark Diehl

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: None

Bill’s time: 30m 52s

Bill’s errors: 4

  • TEAPOY (tea boy)
  • PEPA (Pesa!)
  • POLEAX (bole ax!)
  • SWEETSOP (sweet son!)



Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

9. Three-legged table : TEAPOY

“Teapoy” is a term of Indian origin that is used in English to describe a small, three-legged table. Just because of the letters “tea” in “teapoy”, the table has come to be associated with the serving of tea.

16. How old radios are heard : IN MONO

Monophonic sound (“mono”) is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

17. Fed with a wand : TSA AGENT

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is the agency that employs the good folks that check passengers and baggage at airports.

20. Tiny stream : RILL

The word “rill”, meaning a small brook or rivulet, has German roots. It has the same roots as “Rhine”, the name of the major European river.

25. “I Lost It at the Movies” author : KAEL

“I Lost It at the Movies” is collection of film reviews by critic Pauline Kael that was published in one volume in 1965.

Pauline Kael was a film critic who wrote for “The New Yorker” magazine from 1968 to 1991.

29. __-Tiki : KON

The Kon-Tiki is a raft used by Thor Heyerdahl in 1947 to cross the Pacific Ocean from South America to the Polynesian islands. The original raft used in the voyage is on display in the Kon-Tiki Museum in Oslo, Norway (Heyerdahl was a native of Norway).

30. One with all the answers? : ALEX TREBEK

Alex Trebek has been the host of “Jeopardy!” since the syndicated version of the game show launched in 1984. Trebek has missed just one episode since then, when he and host of “Wheel of Fortune” Pat Sajak swapped roles in 1997 as an April Fool’s joke.

34. Hodges of the Dodgers : GIL

Gil Hodges was a professional baseball player and manager. Perhaps Hodges’ most celebrated achievement was managing the New York Mets team (the “Miracle Mets”) that won the 1969 World Series. Hodges died from a heart attack just a few years later in 1972, when he was only 48 years old. By the way,

37. Certain racing vehicle : BURLAP SACK

Burlap, also called “hessian”, is a coarse woven fabric made from fibers taken from jute, sisal or hemp plants.

38. Baskin-Robbins order : CONE

The Baskin-Robbins chain of ice cream parlors is the largest in the word. The chain was founded by Burt Baskin and Irv Robbins in Glendale, California in 1945. The company started using the slogan “31 flavors” in 1953, suggesting that a customer could order a different flavor of ice cream on every day of every month.

41. Eighth of 24 : THETA

The Greek letter theta is the one that looks like the number zero with a horizontal line across the middle.

42. Many ATM deposits : CKS

Check (ck.)

43. Part of a hip-hop trio name : PEPA

Salt-n-Pepa are an all-female hip hop trio from New York, made up of “Salt” (Cheryl James), “Pepa” (Sandra Denton) and “DJ Spinderella” (Deidra Roper). Their 1991 song “Let’s Talk Sex” created quite a fuss as the lyrics explored the subject of sex, and safe sex in particular. A later version addressed the dangers of AIDS.

45. Keys on a piano : ALICIA

Alicia Keys is the stage name of Alicia Cook, an R&B and soul singer from Hell’s Kitchen in New York City.

51. Inspector in Elizabeth George mysteries : LYNLEY

“The Inspector Lynley Mysteries” is a entertaining BBC series that is based on mystery novels written by Elizabeth George. The stories are all set in Great Britain, although Elizabeth George is an American writer based here in California.

52. Two-time British Open champ : ERNIE ELS

Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

The golf tournament that we usually refer to as “the British Open” here in North America, is more correctly known as “The Open Championship”. The tournament has earned its somewhat haughty title as it is the oldest of the four major championships in professional golf. The Open was first played in 1860, at Scotland’s Prestwick Golf Club. That first tournament attracted a grand field of eight professional golfers, with Scotsman Willie Park, Sr. emerging victorious.

Down

1. Ad campaign almost dismissed by its creators for grammatical inaccuracy : GOT MILK?

The “got milk?” advertising campaign was funded originally by the California Milk Processor Board and later by milk processors and dairy farmers. The “got milk?” ads encourage us to drink cow’s milk, and lots of it.

2. Hall of fame : ARSENIO

Arsenio Hall got his big break with his role in the movie “Coming to America” with Eddie Murphy in 1988. The following year he started hosting “The Arsenio Hall Show”, which ran until 1994. He had a loyal group of fans in the audience that had the habit of almost “barking” while pumping their fists in the air. The raucous move became so popular it extended far beyond the influences of Arsenio, and to this day it is still used as a mark of appreciation in some arenas. Not by me, mind you …

3. Nine-time presidential candidate : STASSEN

Harold Stassen was Governor of Minnesota from 1939 to 1943, and is largely remembered as a perennial candidate for the Republican nomination for US president. Stassen sought the nomination nine times in all between 1940 and 1992, and never came close to winning.

5. He had a way with words : ROGET

Peter Mark Roget was an English lexicographer. Roget was an avid maker of lists, apparently using the routine of list-making to combat depression, a condition he endured for most of his life. He published his famous thesaurus in 1852, with revisions and expansions being made years later by his son, and then in turn by his grandson.

7. Bamboozle : CON

It’s thought that the lovely word “bamboozle” came into English from the Scottish “bombaze” meaning “perplex”. We’ve been using “bamboozle” since the very early 1700s.

8. Like a trenta at Starbucks : EXTRA EXTRA LARGE

Starbucks introduced us to coffee drinks in a whole range of volumes:

  • Demi … 3 fl oz
  • Short … 8 fl oz
  • Tall … 12 fl oz
  • Grande … 16 fl oz (Italian for “large”)
  • Venti … 20 fl oz (Italian for “twenty”)
  • Trenta … 30 fl oz (Italian for “thirty”)

9. The Beatles’ “Help!” is one : TITLE TRACK

“Help!” is a 1965 movie, the second film released by the Beatles. The film’s soundtrack was released under the same title. Personally, I prefered the Beatles’ first movie, “A Hard Day’s Night” …

10. Organic compound : ENOL

An enol is an alkene with a hydroxyl group, sort of part-alkene and part-alcohol. The term “enol” therefore, is a portmanteau of “alkene” and “alcohol”.

12. Weapon similar to a halberd : POLEAXE

A poleaxe (also “poleax”) is a medieval weapon. As one might expect, it is an axe on a pole. The pole could be anything from 4 to 8 feet in length.

A halberd is weapon that is similar to a poleax. It comprises an axe blade on a pole, with a long spike above the blade. There is also a hook on the side of the pole opposite the axe blade. Halberds are still used today as ceremonial weapons by the Swiss Guard in the Vatican.

13. Salary period : ONE WEEK

It has been suggested that out term “salary” comes from the Latin “sal” meaning “salt”. The idea is that a Roman soldier’s “salarium” might have been an allowance to purchase salt.

24. Fruit also called a sugar apple : SWEETSOP

The custard apple or sugar apple is the fruit of a small deciduous tree native to the New World. It is also called a “sweetsop” in some parts of the world. The soursop, the fruit of an evergreen tree that’s related to the paw-paw, has a more sour taste.

25. __ beef : KOBE

Kobe is a city on the island of Honshu in Japan. Here is North America, the city of Kobe is perhaps most famous for its beef. And yes, basketball star Kobe Bryant is named after that very same beef.

28. Santa Anita action : BETS

Santa Anita Park is a racetrack for horses located in Arcadia, California. The most famous races on the track’s calendar are the Santa Anita Derby and the Santa Anita Handicap.

30. Michigan city or college : ALMA

Alma College in Alma, Michigan was founded by Michigan Presbyterians in 1886. The school has a Scottish heritage of which it is very proud. Alma has its own Scottish marching band, a Scottish dance troupe and even its own design of tartan.

31. Decide not to call : FOLD

That would be the card game of poker.

32. “Firing Line” host : BUCKLEY

William F. Buckley, Jr. was an author and commentator. Buckley wrote spy novels a syndicated newspaper column. He also hosted the public affairs television show called “Firing Line” for over 33 years from 1966 to 1999.

34. Has a cow : GOES APE

The phrase “don’t have a cow” originated in the fifties, a variation of the older “don’t have kittens”. The concept behind the phrase is that one shouldn’t get worked up, it’s not like one is giving birth to a cow.

36. Olduvai Gorge paleontologists : LEAKEYS

Louis and Mary Leakey were a married couple who worked as paleoanthropologists in Africa, particularly in the Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania. In addition to their own work, the Leakey’s sponsored field research of primates in their natural habitats. The most famous of these researchers were Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey and Birutė Galdikas, a group that came to be known as Leakey’s Angels or the Trimates.

The Olduvai Gorge is an important paleoanthropological in Tanzania. It is home to the earliest evidence of human ancestors. Discoveries of fossilized bones and tools have led the paleoanthropological community to conclude that humans evolved in Africa.

37. “Applause” Tony winner : BACALL

What a bombshell Lauren Bacall was, with that husky voice and her quiet, suggestive manner. Bacall was born in New York City to Jewish immigrant parents from Europe. She was actually a first cousin of Shimon Peres, the former President and Prime Minister of Israel. Famously, Bacall was married to Humphrey Bogart, from 1945 until his passing in 1957.

“Applause” is a stage musical based on the 1950 movie “All About Eve”. The musical premiered in 1970 in Broadway, with Lauren Bacall playing actress Margo Channing. “Applause” won that season’s Tony Award for Best Musical, and Bacall won the Tony for Best Actress in a Musical.

38. Jack in a box lunch : CHEESE

What we now call Monterey Jack cheese was originally made by Franciscan friars in Monterey, California in the 19th century. In the 1800s, a powerful landowner called David Jack started to make the same cheese as the friars in his own dairy, and marketed it as “Jack’s Cheese” and later “Monterey Jack”.

41. Tanks cover them : TORSI

“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

“Tank top” is another one of those terms that always catches me out, as it has a different meaning on each side of the Atlantic. In the US a tank top is a sleeveless shirt, something we would call a “vest” back in Ireland (and the US “vest” is what we call a “waist coat”). A tank top in Ireland is a sleeveless sweater, which further adds to the confusion. The name “tank top” is derived from “tank suit”, an old name for a woman’s one-piece bathing suit. The use of “tank” for the bathing suit came from “swimming tank”, an obsolete term used in the 1920s for a swimming pool.

43. Frosty feature : PIPE

“Frosty the Snowman” is a song that was recorded first by Gene Autry, in 1950. The song was specifically written in the hope that it would become a follow-up hit to Autry’s “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” that topped the charts the previous year.

44. Raid shelfmate : D-CON

“d-Con” is a line of rodent control products that has been around for over 50 years.

46. __-de-sac : CUL

Even though “cul-de-sac” can indeed mean “bottom of the bag” in French, the term cul-de-sac is of English origin (the use of “cul” in French is actually quite rude). The term was introduced in aristocratic circles at a time when it was considered very fashionable to speak French. Dead-end streets in France are usually signposted with just a symbol and no accompanying words, but if words are included they are “voie sans issue”, meaning “way without exit”.

Return to top of page

Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. It can affect where you stop on a road trip : GAS PRICE

9. Three-legged table : TEAPOY

15. Customary : ORTHODOX

16. How old radios are heard : IN MONO

17. Fed with a wand : TSA AGENT

18. Plugged away : TOILED

19. Botched, with “up” : MESSED

20. Tiny stream : RILL

22. Milk source : EWE

23. Detail on a map : INSET

24. Judicious : SANE

25. “I Lost It at the Movies” author : KAEL

26. Took part in a cover-up : LIED

27. Poor working conditions : SWEATBOXES

29. __-Tiki : KON

30. One with all the answers? : ALEX TREBEK

31. Company car advantage : FLEET RATE

32. Identity verification system : BIOMETRICS

34. Hodges of the Dodgers : GIL

37. Certain racing vehicle : BURLAP SACK

38. Baskin-Robbins order : CONE

39. Breezed through : ACED

40. It’s under a foot : SOLE

41. Eighth of 24 : THETA

42. Many ATM deposits : CKS

43. Part of a hip-hop trio name : PEPA

44. Makes a good living : DOES OK

45. Keys on a piano : ALICIA

47. Give new life to : RECREATE

49. Abs strengtheners : LEG-UPS

50. It’s rarely taken home : GROSS PAY

51. Inspector in Elizabeth George mysteries : LYNLEY

52. Two-time British Open champ : ERNIE ELS

Down

1. Ad campaign almost dismissed by its creators for grammatical inaccuracy : GOT MILK?

2. Hall of fame : ARSENIO

3. Nine-time presidential candidate : STASSEN

4. Introduced in stages, with “in” : PHASED

5. He had a way with words : ROGET

6. Named : IDED

7. Bamboozle : CON

8. Like a trenta at Starbucks : EXTRA EXTRA LARGE

9. The Beatles’ “Help!” is one : TITLE TRACK

10. Organic compound : ENOL

11. “What __ bid for … ” : AM I

12. Weapon similar to a halberd : POLEAXE

13. Salary period : ONE WEEK

14. Off-peak calls? : YODELS

21. Quicker than quick : IN A TRICE

24. Fruit also called a sugar apple : SWEETSOP

25. __ beef : KOBE

27. Doesn’t toss and turn : SLEEPS EASY

28. Santa Anita action : BETS

30. Michigan city or college : ALMA

31. Decide not to call : FOLD

32. “Firing Line” host : BUCKLEY

33. Parting words : I RESIGN

34. Has a cow : GOES APE

35. All told : IN TOTAL

36. Olduvai Gorge paleontologists : LEAKEYS

37. “Applause” Tony winner : BACALL

38. Jack in a box lunch : CHEESE

41. Tanks cover them : TORSI

43. Frosty feature : PIPE

44. Raid shelfmate : D-CON

46. __-de-sac : CUL

48. Muck it up : ERR

Return to top of page