LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Apr 17, Sunday










Constructed by: Pam Amick Klawitter

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Haiku

HAIKU are verses comprising THREE LINES. Our themed answers today also comprise THREE LINES:

  • 119A. Feature of haiku, and of the answers to starred clues : THREE LINES
  • 23A. *What it often is on a summer day : HOT OUTSIDE (hotline, outline and sideline)
  • 36A. *One-to-one conversation : PRIVATE PHONE-CHAT (private line, phone line and chat line)
  • 59A. *Scuba divers’ bash : UNDERWATER PARTY (underline, water line and party line)
  • 83A. *Highly sought-after charter captain : TOP FISHING GUIDE (top line, fishing line and guideline)
  • 99A. *Iconic suburban symbol : WHITE PICKET FENCE (white line, picket line and fence line)
  • 15D. *Awkward TV silence : DEAD AIRTIME (deadline, airline and timeline)
  • 68D. *Sale indicator : RED PRICE TAG (redline, Priceline, tag line)

Bill’s time: 20m 35s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Word heard in Bedrock : YABBA

“Yabba-dabba-doo!” is one of Fred Flintstone’s catchphrases.

6. West Point letters : USMA

West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn’t start until 1802. The first female cadets were admitted to West Point in 1976, and today about 15% of all new cadets are women.

10. Dark horses : BAYS

Bay is a reddish-brown color. The term “bay” usually describes the coat of a horse, or a horse with a coat of such a color.

14. Sam seen in bars : ADAMS

Samuel Adams was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, from Boston Massachusetts. Adams followed his father into the family’s malthouse business a few years after young Samuel graduated from Harvard. There were generations of Adams family members who were “maltsters” i.e. those producing malt needed for making beer. Samuel Adams is often described as a brewer, but he was actually a malster. The Samuel Adams brand of beer (often referred to as “Sam Adams”) isn’t directly associated with the Adams family, but it is named in honor of the patriot.

19. Scott who wrote “Island of the Blue Dolphins” : O’DELL

Author Scott O’Dell mainly wrote historical novels for young people. His best-known work is the 1960 novel “Island of the Blue Dolphins”, which is about a young girl stranded for years on an island off the California coast. The book is based on a true story of a Native American girl left alone on one of California’s Channel Islands for 18 years, before being rescued in 1853.

22. Paganini’s birthplace : GENOA

Genoa is a seaport in the very north of Italy, in the region known as Liguria. One of Genoa’s most famous sons was Christopher Columbus. Another was the violinist Niccolò Paganini.

Niccolò Paganini was a famed Italian violinist and composer. Paganini was perhaps the most celebrated violinist of the 19th century. His most famous composition has to be his Caprice No. 24 in A minor, Op. 1. This work is the basis for many derivative masterpieces by other composers, including the wonderful “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” by Rachmaninoff.

27. WWII spy gp. : OSS

The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was formed during WWII in order to carry out espionage behind enemy lines. A few years after the end of the war the OSS functions were taken up by a new group, the Central Intelligence Agency that was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

29. Tampico trio : TRES

Tampico is a port city in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas.

34. Chihuahua or Maltese, in dog shows : TOY

The toy group of dogs is made up of the smallest breeds. The smallest breeds are sometimes called “teacup” breeds.

43. Texter’s “Just a thought … ” : IMHO …

In my humble opinion (IMHO)

47. Candy aisle choice : ROLO

Rolo was a hugely popular chocolate candy in Ireland when I was growing up. Rolo was introduced in the thirties in the UK, and is produced under license in the US by Hershey. I was a little disappointed when I had my first taste of the American version as the center is very hard and chewy. The recipe used on the other side of the Atlantic calls for a soft gooey center.

48. Kid in a ’60s sitcom : OPIE

Opie Taylor is the character played by Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”. Opie lives with widowed father Andy Taylor (played by Andy Griffith) and his great-aunt Beatrice “Aunt Bee” Taylor (played by Frances Bavier). Ron Howard first played the role in 1960 in the pilot show, when he was just 5 years old. Howard sure has come a long way since playing Opie Taylor. He has directed some fabulous movies including favorites of mine like “Apollo 13”, “A Beautiful Mind” and “The Da Vinci Code”.

52. Scale starting words : ONE TO …

A map’s scale might be 1 to 15, or perhaps 1 to 50.

54. 911 responder : EMT

Emergency medical technician (EMT)

The first use of an emergency phone number nationally was in the UK in 1937, where the number 999 was introduced to call emergency services. If you need emergency services in the UK or Ireland to this day, you have to dial 999. It’s not really clear why 911 became the emergency number in the US. The most credible suggestion (to me) is that when it was introduced by the FCC in 1967, it was a number that “fit” with the numbers already used by AT&T for free services (211-long distance; 411-information; 611-repair service).

59. *Scuba divers’ bash : UNDERWATER PARTY (underline, water line and party line)

The self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) was co-invented by celebrated French marine explorer Jacques Cousteau.

63. “Wayward __”: Shyamalan TV series : PINES

“Wayward Pines” is Fox TV series that is based on a series of novels by Blake Crouch. Star of the show (for the first season) is actor Matt Dillon, who plays US Secret Service agent Ethan Burke.

M. Night Shyamalan is an Indian-American screenwriter and film producer. Shyamalan has written and directed some great films, with my favorites being “The Sixth Sense” (1999), “Signs” (2002) and “The Village” (2004).

65. Ancient region of Asia Minor : GALATIA

Galatia was an area in central Anatolia, which is now within the borders of modern Turkey. The land was settled by immigrant Gauls, which led to the name “Galatia”.

Asia Minor is also known as Anatolia. It is the geographic part of Asia that protrudes out into the west, towards Europe, and is roughly equivalent to modern-day Turkey.

66. Longship crew : NORSEMEN

The Vikings were a Germanic people from northern Europe who were noted as great seafarers. Key to the success of the Vikings was the design of their famous “longships”. Made from wood, the longship was long and narrow with a shallow hull, It was also light, so that the crew would actually carry it small distances over land and around obstacles. Longships were designed to be propelled both by sail and by oars.

69. London’s “Ye Olde Mitre,” e.g. : PUB

Ye Olde Mitre is a London pub that was built in the 1770s, although the owner’s claim that the original structure was built in 1546. That’s an old pub …

71. “The Way __”: 2007 Timbaland hit : I ARE

“Timbaland” is the stage name of rapper and record producer Timothy Zachery Mosley. Mosley was given the Timbaland nickname as a play on the Timberland brand of boot.

72. Loud speakers : STENTORS

Stentor was a figure in Greek mythology, a Greek herald during the Trojan War. He was noted for having a powerful voice, so today we describe someone with such a characteristic as “stentorian”. The original Stentor supposedly died after being defeated by Hermes in a shouting contest.

76. Travelocity enticement : LOW FARE

Travelocity is my favorite online travel agency, although it’s not the only one I use (one must shop around!). The feature I most like on Travelocity is “Top Secret Hotels”, where one can find hotel rooms at below the regular published online rates, but … the booking is made without knowing the hotel’s name. You get the general location, star-rating, facilities etc. and then “take a chance”.

79. Pooh, to Roo : PAL

Like most of the characters in A. A. Milne’s “Winnie the Pooh”, the kangaroo named Roo was inspired by on a stuffed toy belonging to Milne’s son Christopher Robin.

82. Broadway restaurant founder : SARDI

Sardi’s is a renowned restaurant in the Theater District of Manhattan that was opened in 1927 by Italian immigrant Vincent Sardi, Sr. Sardi’s is famous for attracting celebrities who pose for caricatures that are then displayed on the restaurant’s walls. After the death of actress and director Antoinette Perry in 1946, her friend and partner Brock Pemberton was having lunch at Sardi’s and came up with idea of a theater award that could be presented in Perry’s honor. The award was to be called the Tony Award. In fact, Vincent Sardi, Sr. was presented with a special Tony at the first award ceremony, held in 1947.

87. Gilbert who created TV’s “The Talk” : SARA

The actress Sara Gilbert really grew up playing Darlene on the sitcom “Roseanne” from 1988 to 1997. Today Gilbert appears fairly often on another hit sitcom, “The Big Bang Theory”. You can also see her on the daytime talk show called “The Talk”, a show that she actually created.

88. The Silver St. : NEV

The official nickname of Nevada is the “Silver State”, a reference to importance of silver ore in the state’s growth and economy. The unofficial nickname is the “Battle Born State”. “Battle Born” is a reference to Nevada being awarded statehood during the American Civil War.

89. Graphic start : ORTHO-

Orthography is the art of writing words using with correct spelling. The use of bad spelling is known as cacography.

98. Sitcom pioneer, familiarly : DESI

Desi Arnaz was famous for his turbulent marriage to Lucille Ball. Arnaz was a native of Cuba, and was from a privileged family. His father was Mayor of Santiago and served in the Cuban House of Representatives. However, the family had to flee to Miami after the 1933 revolt led by Batista.

110. Lacking : SANS

In French, “avec” (with) is the opposite of “sans” (without).

117. Chop __ : SUEY

Many believe that the Chinese dish known as chop suey was invented in America, by Chinese immigrants. In fact, by the time it showed up in the US it already existed in the Taishan district of Guangdong in southeast China, the origin of many of those immigrants. “Chop suey” translates as “assorted pieces”, and is made up of some meat and eggs quickly cooked with vegetables in a thickened sauce.

119. Feature of haiku, and of the answers to starred clues : THREE LINES

A haiku is a very elegant form of Japanese verse. When writing a haiku in English we tend to impose the rule that the verse must contain 17 syllables. This restriction comes from the rule in Japanese that the verse must contain 17 sound units called “moras”, but moras and syllables aren’t the same thing. What the difference is though, is not so clear to me. Here’s an example of a Haiku:

Haikus are easy
But sometimes they don’t make sense
Refrigerator

123. Sport with double touches : EPEE

In the sport of épée fencing, a double-touch is scored when two touches are registered almost at the same time.

125. Minnesota’s “10,000” : LAKES

An unofficial nickname for the state of Minnesota is “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. That nickname is quite apt as the state is home to almost twelve thousand lakes that are at least ten acres in size.

127. Cold War initials : SSRS

The former Soviet Union (USSR) was created in 1922, not long after the Russian Revolution of 1917 that overthrew the Tsar. Geographically, the new Soviet Union was roughly equivalent to the old Russian Empire, and comprised fifteen Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs).

Down

4. Rain-__ bubble gum : BLO

Rain-Blo bubble gum balls were introduced in 1940 by Leaf Confectionary, a company that was then based in the Netherlands.

5. Smith grad : ALUMNA

Smith College is a private women’s school in Northampton, Massachusetts. Smith was founded in 1870 using funds bequeathed by Sophia Smith, who inherited her fortune from her wealthy farmer father.

8. Satiric magazine founded in 1952 : MAD

“Mad” magazine has been around since 1952, although back then it was more of a comic book than a magazine. The original founder and editor was Harvey Kurtzman and in order to convince him to stay, the publisher changed the format to a magazine in 1955. That’s when the publication really took off in terms of popularity.

11. Hurdle for Hannibal : ALPS

Hannibal was a military commander from Ancient Carthage. Hannibal lived during a time of great conflict between Carthage and the Roman Republic, as the Romans worked to extend their influence over the Mediterranean region. Famously, Hannibal took on Rome on their own territory by marching his army, including his war elephants, over the Alps into Italy. His forces occupied much of Italy for 15 years.

13. Homeland of tennis star Novak Djokovic : SERBIA

Novak Djokovic is a Serbian tennis player, currently the world No. 1. Djokovic is quite the character off the court it seems and he is very popular on the talk-show circuit, all around the world. It also helps that Djokovic is fluent in several languages.

14. “The X-Files” extra : AGENT

“The X-Files” is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history. An “X-Files” reboot started airing in 2016 with Duchovny and Anderson reprising their starring roles.

17. Defensive ditch : MOAT

A “moat” is a protective trench that surrounds a castle, say, or a an exhibit in a zoo. A moat may or may not be filled with water.

30. Cub great Sandberg : RYNE

Ryne “Ryno” Sandberg is a former second baseman who played most of his career for the Chicago Cubs. Sandberg holds the major league fielding percentage record at second base.

32. Bubbly source : ASTI

Asti is a sparkling white wine from the Piedmont region of Italy, and is named for the town of Asti around which the wine is produced. The wine used to be called Asti Spumante, and it had a very bad reputation as a “poor man’s champagne”. The “Spumante” was dropped in a marketing attempt at rebranding associated with a reduction in the amount of residual sugar in the wine.

34. Lincoln Center attraction, familiarly : THE MET

The Metropolitan Opera (often “the Met”) of New York City is the largest classical music organization in the country, presenting about 220 performances each and every year. Founded in 1880, the Met is renowned for using technology to expand its audiences. Performances have been broadcast live on radio since 1931, and on television since 1977. And since 2006 you can go see a live performance from New York in high definition on the big screen, at a movie theater near you …

The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts takes its name from the neighborhood in which it is situated: Lincoln Square in the Upper West Side of the New York City borough of Manhattan.

35. Eastern faith : SHINTO

It is perhaps best not to describe Shinto as a religion, but more as a “spirituality of the Japanese people”, a spirituality that encompasses folklore, history and mythology. Having said that, “Shinto” translates literally as “Way of the Gods”. Most people in Japan who are described as practicing Shinto, also practice Buddhism.

36. Word in a Marines slogan : PROUD

“The few, the proud, the Marines” is a recruiting slogan used by the US Marine Corps.

38. __-France : ILE-DE

Île-de-France (literally “Island of France”) isn’t an island at all. It is the name given to the most populous of France’s 26 administrative regions. Île-de-France is roughly equivalent to the Paris metropolitan area.

40. St. Peter’s Basilica sight : PIETA

The Pietà is a representation of the Virgin Mary holding in her arms the dead body of her son Jesus. The most famous “Pietà” is probably the sculpted rendition by Michelangelo which is located in St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. In some depictions, Mary and her son are surrounded by other figures from the New Testament, and these depictions are known as “Lamentations”.

The Basilica of St. Peter in Rome was built during the late Renaissance and has the largest interior of any Christian church in the world, capable of holding 60,000 people. There is a popular misconception that St. Peter’s is the cathedral of Rome, but actually it isn’t, and instead is a papal basilica. The Basilica of St. John Lateran is the cathedral church of Rome.

41. Exile isle : ELBA

Napoléon Bonaparte was a military professional from Corsica who rose to prominence after the French Revolution during the French First Republic. He took over the country in 1799 in a coup d’état and installed himself as First Consul. Soon after, he led France in the Napoleonic Wars, conflicts between the growing French Empire and a series of opposing coalitions. He was eventually defeated at the Battle of Leipzig and was forced into exile on the Italian island of Elba off the Tuscan coast. Napoleon escaped in 1815 and regained power, only to be finally defeated a few months later at the Battle of Waterloo. The British dispatched him to the island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic where he lived out the last six years of his life as a prisoner.

44. Katahdin is its highest peak : MAINE

Mount Katahdin in Maine is the highest peak in the state. The name “Katahdin” was given by the Penobscot people, and translates as “the Greatest Mountain”.

45. Beatrix Potter’s real first name : HELEN

Beatrix Potter was an English author, famous for the children’s books she wrote and illustrated. The most famous character in her stories was Peter Rabbit, whose sisters were Flopsy, Mopsy and Cottontail. Potter put her talent as an artist to good use in the scientific world as well. She recorded many images of lichens and fungi as seen through her microscope. As a result of her work, she was respected as an expert mycologist.

51. Freudian conscience : SUPER-EGO

Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

57. Aleppo native : SYRIAN

Aleppo is the largest city in Syria and is located not far from Damascus, the nation’s capital. Aleppo owes it size and history of prosperity to its location at the end of the Silk Road, the trade route that linked Asia to Europe (and other locations). The Suez Canal was opened up in 1869 bringing a new route for transport of goods, and so Aleppo’s prosperity declined over the past one hundred years or so. The city’s population has suffered terribly since the start of the Syrian Civil War, with the Battle of Aleppo raging since 2012.

62. Eighth-century pope : PAUL I

Pope Paul I headed up the Roman Catholic Church from 757 to 767. Paul I succeeded Pope Stephen II, who was Paul’s brother.

67. Puppeteer Tony : SARG

Tony Sarg was a German-American puppeteer and illustrator. He was hired by Macy’s in 1928 to build helium-filled “puppets” for their Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, a tradition that was to last a long time. In 1935 he designed and built the puppets and displays in Macy’s windows for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

68. *Sale indicator : RED PRICE TAG (redline, Priceline, tag line)

Priceline.com is travel website providing discount prices for airline tickets and hotel stays. Priceline’s most famous spokespeople in advertisements are William Shatner and Kaley Cuoco.

70. Cap’n’s aide : BO’S’N

A boatswain works on the deck of a boat. A boatswain is unlicensed, and so is not involved in the navigation or handling of the vessel. He or she has charge of the other unlicensed workers on the deck. Boatswain is pronounced “bosun” and this phonetic spelling is often used interchangeably with “boatswain”. The contraction “bo’s’n” is also very popular.

72. Room at the Louvre : SALLE

The Musée du Louvre has the distinction of being the most visited art museum in the whole world. The collection is housed in the magnificent Louvre Palace which used to be the seat of power in France, until 1682 when Louis XIV moved to Versailles.

75. Nautical pole : SPRIT

A sprit is a pole that extends out from a mast, often supporting a special sail called a spritsail.

78. Marathon practice run : FIVE-K

The marathon commemorates the legendary messenger-run by Pheidippides from the site of the Battle of Marathon back to Athens, and is run over 26 miles and 385 yards. The first modern Olympic marathon races were run over a distance that approximated the length of the modern-day Marathon-Athens highway, although the actual length of the race varied from games to games. For the 1908 Olympics in London, a course starting at Windsor Castle and ending in front of the Royal Box at White City Stadium was defined. This course was 26 miles and 385 yards, the standard length now used at all Olympic Games. Organizers of subsequent games continued to vary the length of the race, until a decision was made in 1921 to adopt the distance used in London in 1908.

79. Spike for Hillary : PITON

A piton is a piece of mountaineering equipment, an anchor designed to protect a climber if he or she falls. It is a metal spike driven into a crack in the rock face with a hammer. The piton has an eyehole through which a rope is attached using a carabiner. “Piton” is a French word for a “hook”.

Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepalese sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

80. Like some focus groups : AD HOC

The Latin phrase “ad hoc” means “for this purpose”. An ad hoc committee, for example, is formed for a specific purpose and is disbanded after making its final report.

81. Freetown currency : LEONE

Leones are the currency of Sierra Leone. The Leone was introduced in 1964 to replace the British West African pound. The move was a practical one, as the Leone is a decimal currency and replaces the old British system of pounds, shillings and pence.

The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa, lying on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the “Black Poor” of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of “a problem”, three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were granted British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that’s today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

95. Play set on an island, with “The” : TEMPEST

William Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest” tells the story of Prospero, who was removed from the throne of Milan and banished to a deserted island along with his daughter Miranda. The island is home to a devilish character called Caliban, who is forced into slavery on the arrival of the exiles. Prospero learns sorcery while cast away, and eventually conjures up a tempest that drives those who usurped his throne onto the island’s shores (in particular his own brother, Antonio). On the island, Prospero is eventually successful in revealing Antonio’s lowly nature.

96. Cabinet department : STATE

The US Department of State is the equivalent of the Foreign Ministry in many other countries, and is responsible for international relations. Ceremonially, the Secretary of State is the highest ranking of all Cabinet officials, and is the highest ranking in the presidential line of succession (fourth, after the Vice President, the Speaker of the House and the President pro tem of the Senate). The department was created in 1789 by President Washington, and was the first of all executive departments created. The first Secretary of State was future-president Thomas Jefferson.

109. Novelist Jaffe : RONA

Rona Jaffe was an American novelist perhaps most famous for two of her books, “The Best of Everything” and “Mazes and Monsters”. “The Best of Everything” was published in 1958 and has been compared with the HBO television series “Sex and the City” as it depicts women in the working world. “Mazes and Monsters” was published in 1981 and explores a role-playing game similar to Dungeons & Dragons and the impact it has on players.

113. Self-titled 1974 pop album : ANKA

Canadian-born Paul Anka’s big hit was in 1957, the song entitled “Diana”. Anka was the subject of a much-lauded documentary film in 1962 called “Lonely Boy”.

118. FedEx rival : UPS

United Parcel Service (UPS) is based in Sandy Springs, Georgia and has its own airline that operates out of Louisville, Kentucky. UPS often goes by the nickname “Brown”, because of its brown delivery trucks and brown uniforms.

120. Otto I’s realm: Abbr. : HRE

Otto I the Great, ruled the Holy Roman Empire in the 10th century.

121. Knighted McKellen : IAN

Sir Ian McKellen is a marvelous English actor, someone who is comfortable playing anything from Macbeth on stage to Magneto in an “X-Men” movie. On the big screen, McKellen is very famous for playing Gandalf in “The Lord of Rings”. In the UK, Sir Ian is noted for being at the forefront of the campaign for equal rights for gay people, a role he has enthusiastically embraced since the eighties.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Word heard in Bedrock : YABBA

6. West Point letters : USMA

10. Dark horses : BAYS

14. Sam seen in bars : ADAMS

19. Scott who wrote “Island of the Blue Dolphins” : O’DELL

20. A golf green may be shaped like one : PEAR

21. Face cream additive : ALOE

22. Paganini’s birthplace : GENOA

23. *What it often is on a summer day : HOT OUTSIDE (hotline, outline and sideline)

25. Rodeo goad : SPUR

26. Bother a lot : EAT AT

27. WWII spy gp. : OSS

28. Big mouths : MAWS

29. Tampico trio : TRES

31. Mask wearers : BANDITS

33. Salem-to-Portland dir. : NNE

34. Chihuahua or Maltese, in dog shows : TOY

35. Slangy sib : SISTA

36. *One-to-one conversation : PRIVATE PHONE-CHAT (private line, phone line and chat line)

43. Texter’s “Just a thought … ” : IMHO …

47. Candy aisle choice : ROLO

48. Kid in a ’60s sitcom : OPIE

49. K-12, in brief : ELHI

50. Its flag features a six-pointed star : ISRAEL

52. Scale starting words : ONE TO …

54. 911 responder : EMT

56. Barbecue supply : BUNS

58. Functional : UTILE

59. *Scuba divers’ bash : UNDERWATER PARTY (underline, water line and party line)

63. “Wayward __”: Shyamalan TV series : PINES

64. Salon supply : DYE

65. Ancient region of Asia Minor : GALATIA

66. Longship crew : NORSEMEN

68. Half a track? : RAIL

69. London’s “Ye Olde Mitre,” e.g. : PUB

71. “The Way __”: 2007 Timbaland hit : I ARE

72. Loud speakers : STENTORS

76. Travelocity enticement : LOW FARE

79. Pooh, to Roo : PAL

82. Broadway restaurant founder : SARDI

83. *Highly sought-after charter captain : TOP FISHING GUIDE (top line, fishing line and guideline)

86. Office holders? : CLIPS

87. Gilbert who created TV’s “The Talk” : SARA

88. The Silver St. : NEV

89. Graphic start : ORTHO-

90. Warns : ALERTS

92. Frees : RIDS

94. They catch a lot of shrimp : NETS

97. Continue : GO ON

98. Sitcom pioneer, familiarly : DESI

99. *Iconic suburban symbol : WHITE PICKET FENCE (white line, picket line and fence line)

103. Word with link or letter : CHAIN

105. French article : UNE

106. Damage : MAR

107. Haunted house sounds : SCREAMS

110. Lacking : SANS

112. Eye opener? : OPTI-

113. Improve, in some cases : AGE

116. Cutie : TOOTS

117. Chop __ : SUEY

119. Feature of haiku, and of the answers to starred clues : THREE LINES

122. Charged : RAN AT

123. Sport with double touches : EPEE

124. Slices of history : ERAS

125. Minnesota’s “10,000” : LAKES

126. Play area : STAGE

127. Cold War initials : SSRS

128. Hide from an animal : PELT

129. Treacherous type : SNAKE

Down

1. Pirate’s syllables : YO HO

2. They’re often about nothing : ADOS

3. Adds to the pool : BETS

4. Rain-__ bubble gum : BLO

5. Smith grad : ALUMNA

6. High hairdo : UPSWEEP

7. José’s half-dozen : SEIS

8. Satiric magazine founded in 1952 : MAD

9. Kid-to-kid retort : ARE TOO!

10. Military setting : BASE

11. Hurdle for Hannibal : ALPS

12. Mirror image? : YOU

13. Homeland of tennis star Novak Djokovic : SERBIA

14. “The X-Files” extra : AGENT

15. *Awkward TV silence : DEAD AIRTIME (deadline, airline and timeline)

16. Protester : ANTI

17. Defensive ditch : MOAT

18. H.S. hurdles : SATS

24. Ma non __: not too much, in music : TANTO

30. Cub great Sandberg : RYNE

32. Bubbly source : ASTI

34. Lincoln Center attraction, familiarly : THE MET

35. Eastern faith : SHINTO

36. Word in a Marines slogan : PROUD

37. 48-Across player : RONNY

38. __-France : ILE-DE

39. Register a preference : VOTE

40. St. Peter’s Basilica sight : PIETA

41. Exile isle : ELBA

42. Make, as butter : CHURN

44. Katahdin is its highest peak : MAINE

45. Beatrix Potter’s real first name : HELEN

46. Cries after fútbol goals : OLES

51. Freudian conscience : SUPER-EGO

53. Player in a loft : ORGANIST

55. Vacation choice : TRIP

57. Aleppo native : SYRIAN

60. Reservations can help avoid one : WAIT

61. Apportions : ALLOTS

62. Eighth-century pope : PAUL I

67. Puppeteer Tony : SARG

68. *Sale indicator : RED PRICE TAG (redline, Priceline, tag line)

70. Cap’n’s aide : BO’S’N

72. Room at the Louvre : SALLE

73. Doesn’t give up : TRIES

74. Enter noisily : ROAR IN

75. Nautical pole : SPRIT

77. Word of origin : WHENCE

78. Marathon practice run : FIVE-K

79. Spike for Hillary : PITON

80. Like some focus groups : AD HOC

81. Freetown currency : LEONE

82. Slew : SCAD

84. Grow pale : FADE

85. Push : URGE

91. Did a few laps : SWAM

93. Made on a wheel : SPUN

95. Play set on an island, with “The” : TEMPEST

96. Cabinet department : STATE

100. Greets the villain : HISSES

101. Conforming : IN STEP

102. Elegant trimmings : FRILLS

104. Speed : HASTE

107. Orch. section : STRS

108. Primer layer : COAT

109. Novelist Jaffe : RONA

110. Psychic : SEER

111. Motion carriers : AYES

112. Tough test : ORAL

113. Self-titled 1974 pop album : ANKA

114. Many a techie : GEEK

115. Latin being : ESSE

118. FedEx rival : UPS

120. Otto I’s realm: Abbr. : HRE

121. Knighted McKellen : IAN

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LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Apr 17, Saturday










Constructed by: Gail Grabowski

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: None

Bill’s time: 14m 09s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

8. Wunderkinds : PHENOMS

A “wunderkind” is a child prodigy, especially in the musical arena. The term is German in origin and translates literally as “wonder child”.

19. Carnival follower : LENT

In Latin, the Christian season that is now called Lent was termed “quadragesima” (meaning “fortieth”), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term “Lent” was introduced. “Lent” comes from “lenz”, the German word for “spring”.

The celebration of carnival comes right before the Lenten period in some Christian traditions. It is thought that carnival perhaps arose from the need to “eat and drink up” any excess food and drink before the beginning of Lent.

20. Long of “In Too Deep” : NIA

Nia Long is an American actress who is probably best known for playing Will Smith’s sometime girlfriend and fiancee Lisa Wilkes on the TV show “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air”.

“In Too Deep” is a crime thriller movie released in 1999 starring Omar Epps and LL Cool J. I haven’t seen this one …

22. First AFL-CIO president : MEANY

George Meany was president of the American Federation of Labor (AFL) from 1952-55, which merged with the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in 1955. He stayed on as president of the AFL-CIO until 1979. President Johnson presented Meany with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1963.

24. Projection in the sky, briefly : ETA

Expected time of arrival (ETA)

26. One of the Visayan Islands : LEYTE

When the Spanish explorer Ruy Lopez de Villalobos discovered the islands of Leyte and Samar, he named them Felipinas, after King Philip II of Spain. Eventually, the name was used for the whole archipelago, becoming what we know in English as the Philippines.

Along with Luzon and Mindanao, the Visayan Islands is one of the three main geographical regions of the Philippines. The region consists of several islands, including Cebu and Leyte.

27. Fields with multiple “Ed Sullivan Show” appearances : TOTIE

Totie Fields was the stage name of comedian Sophie Feldman. “Totie” is a corruption of “Sophie” and was the nickname she was given as a child.

Ed Sullivan’s most famous television role was as host of the “The Ed Sullivan Show”, which ran from 1948 to 1971, a total of 23 years. In that final year, a new set of CBS executives wanted to update the image of the network and announced the cancellation of most of the “old” shows including “The Ed Sullivan Show”. Sullivan was so mad at the decision that he refused to make a “farewell” episode.

35. Vaulted alcoves : APSES

The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally, apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

36. Its site has tracking tools : FEDEX

FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it’s more catchy, abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its “SuperHub” at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world’s largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

42. It was founded to build engines for The Bull Tractor Company : TORO

Toro is a manufacturer of mainly lawn mowers and snow removal equipment based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was founded in 1914 to build tractor engines.

43. Garage sale buys : LPS

The first vinyl records designed to play at 33⅓ rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first long play (LP) 33⅓ rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm “single” the following year, in 1949.

44. Adriatic resort : LIDO

The Lido di Venezia is a famous sandbar, about 11 km long, in Venice, Italy. It may be just a sandbar, but it is home to about 20,000 residents, as well as the Venice Film Festival that takes place there every September. The Lido is also the setting for Thomas Mann’s famous novel “Death in Venice”. The name “lido” has become a term for any fashionable beach resort.

Down

3. National park SE of Bangor : ACADIA

Acadia National Park in Maine was created in 1919, although back then it was called Lafayette National Park in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette who famously supported the American Revolution. The park was renamed to Acadia in 1929.

Bangor is the third-most populous city in the state of Maine (after Portland and Lewiston). The city was given its name in 1791, after the hymn “Antiphonary of Bangor” that was written at Bangor Abbey in Northern Ireland.

4. Jewish star : MOGEN

Magen (also “Mogen”) David is Hebrew for “Shield of David”, and is another name for the Star of David. The use of the distinctive hexagram as a symbol for the Jewish community started in 17th-century Europe, and today the symbol is found at the center of the flag of Israel.

5. City near Vance Air Force Base : ENID

Enid, Oklahoma takes its name from the old railroad station around which the city developed. Back in 1889, that train stop was called Skeleton Station. An official who didn’t like the name changed it to Enid Station, using a character from Alfred Lord Tennyson’s “Idylls of the King”. Maybe if he hadn’t changed the name, the city of Enid would now be called Skeleton, Oklahoma! Enid has the nickname “Queen Wheat City” because is has a huge capacity for storing grain, the third largest grain storage capacity in the world.

Vance Air Force Base is located just a few miles south of Enid, Oklahoma. The main mission of the base is to train pilots for the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. Vance AFB is named after a Medal of Honor recipient from WWII, Leon Robert Vance, Jr.

8. Hawthorne heroine : PRYNNE

The main character in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel “The Scarlet Letter” is Hester Prynne. When Prynne is convicted by her puritanical neighbors of the crime of adultery, she is forced to wear a scarlet “A” (for “adultery”) on her clothing for the rest of her life, hence the novel’s title “The Scarlet Letter”.

10. Stirrup site : EAR

The middle ear is the portion of the ear immediately behind the eardrum. The middle ear contains three small bones called the ossicles, the three smallest bones in the human body. The ossicles’ job is to transmit sound from the outer ear to the inner ear. The shape of the bones gives rise to their names: the hammer (malleus), anvil (incus) and stirrup (stapes).

11. Feature of a two-ltr. monogram : NMI

No middle initial (NMI)

14. With equanimity : SEDATELY

“Equanimity” is the quality of being composed and calm. The term comes from the Latin”aequus” (even) and “”animus” (mind). “Equanimity” is one of my favorite words of all time …

25. The Home Depot rival : LOWE’S

Lucius S. Lowe opened the first Lowe’s hardware store in 1921, in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina. Lucius only knew the one store, as it was family who expanded the company after he passed away in 1940.

26. Service provider? : LENOX

The Lenox Corporation is a manufacturer of tableware and collectibles in Bristol, Pennsylvania. Founded in 1889 by Walter Scott Lenox, the company is the only producer of bone china in the US. Lenox has made tableware for six US presidents, from Woodrow Wilson to George W. Bush.

29. “Two Years Before the Mast” star : ALAN LADD

The last few years of actor Alan Ladd’s life were pretty rough. In 1962 he was found unconscious in a pool of blood with a bullet wound in his chest, an abortive suicide attempt. Two years later he was found dead, apparently having succumbed to an accidental overdose of drugs and sedatives. He was 50 years old.

“Two Years Before the Mast” is a 1946 movie based on a book of the same name by Richard Henry Dana Jr. The movie was filmed in 1944 at the height of WWII. The film’s star, Alan Ladd, was scheduled to be re-inducted into the army, but that was deferred so that Ladd could play his leading role.

31. Message medium : PA SYSTEM

Public address (PA) system

32. Descriptor akin to shiny, in song : RED-NOSED

We get the names for Santa’s reindeer from the famous 1823 poem called “A Visit from St. Nicholas”, although we’ve modified a couple of the names over the years. The full list is:

  • Dasher
  • Dancer
  • Prancer
  • Vixen
  • Comet
  • Cupid
  • Donder (originally “Dunder”, and now often “Donner”)
  • Blitzen (originally “Blixem”)

Rudolph was added to the list by retailer Montgomery Ward, would you believe? The store commissioned Robert L. May to create a booklet that could be handed out to children around Christmas in 1939, and May introduced us to a new friend for Santa, namely Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

36. Spark producers : FLINTS

Flint is a form of the mineral quartz. Flint can be used to start a fire. The hard edge of flint when struck against steel can shave off a particle of the metal. The particle of steel contains exposed iron that reacts with oxygen in the air creating a spark that can light dry tinder.

41. Confined, as quarters : CLOSE

We use the term “quarters” for a place of abode, especially housing for military personnel. Back in the late 16th century, quarters were a portion (quarter) of a town reserved for a military force.

47. Org. concerned with climate change : EPA

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

49. LXVII x III : CCI

In Roman numerals, LXVII x III = CCI (67 x 3 = 201)

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Chaotic : IN A MESS

8. Wunderkinds : PHENOMS

15. Classic dessert : COCONUT CREAM PIE

17. Childhood playmate, perhaps : IMAGINARY FRIEND

18. Gave up : CEDED

19. Carnival follower : LENT

20. Long of “In Too Deep” : NIA

21. Rested : LAIN

22. First AFL-CIO president : MEANY

23. Beat : BEST

24. Projection in the sky, briefly : ETA

25. Contractual arrangement : LEASE

26. One of the Visayan Islands : LEYTE

27. Fields with multiple “Ed Sullivan Show” appearances : TOTIE

28. Sushi fish : SEA EEL

29. Household current : AC POWER

32. Becomes unproductive : RUNS DRY

33. Body shop convenience : LOANER

34. Provide room for growth, in a way : REPOT

35. Vaulted alcoves : APSES

36. Its site has tracking tools : FEDEX

37. “So there!” : HAH!

40. Cons : NAYS

41. Families : CLANS

42. It was founded to build engines for The Bull Tractor Company : TORO

43. Garage sale buys : LPS

44. Adriatic resort : LIDO

45. Express __ : TRAIN

46. Find another way : ALTER ONE’S COURSE

50. Least accessible areas : DEEPEST RECESSES

51. Suit goal : DAMAGES

52. Minority legal filing : DISSENT

Down

1. Frozen formation : ICICLE

2. Dietary restriction : NO MEAT

3. National park SE of Bangor : ACADIA

4. Jewish star : MOGEN

5. City near Vance Air Force Base : ENID

6. Word with block or screen : SUN

7. Result of poor ventilation : STALE AIR

8. Hawthorne heroine : PRYNNE

9. Substantial : HEFTY

10. Stirrup site : EAR

11. Feature of a two-ltr. monogram : NMI

12. Alert : OPEN-EYED

13. Service provider : MINISTER

14. With equanimity : SEDATELY

16. Pleat feature : CREASE

22. Monthly reading : METER

23. Brute : BEAST

25. The Home Depot rival : LOWE’S

26. Service provider? : LENOX

27. Shades : TONES

28. Some caretakers, for short : SUPES

29. “Two Years Before the Mast” star : ALAN LADD

30. Get off easy, perhaps : COP A PLEA

31. Message medium : PA SYSTEM

32. Descriptor akin to shiny, in song : RED-NOSED

34. One involved in a plot? : READER

36. Spark producers : FLINTS

37. Husky : HOARSE

38. Off one’s rocker? : ARISEN

39. Frank : HONEST

41. Confined, as quarters : CLOSE

42. Bind : TRUSS

45. Ring sites : TOES

47. Org. concerned with climate change : EPA

48. Short rule? : REG

49. LXVII x III : CCI

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