LA Times Crossword Answers 22 Jan 17, Sunday










Constructed by: Matt McKinley

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Dropping In

Today’s themed answers are common two-word phrases starting with IN-, but we’ve DROPPED that IN prefix:

  • 23A. Knowing one makes the best moonshine? : (in)STILL CONFIDENCE
  • 30A. Pressing concern? : (in)CREASE QUALITY
  • 42A. Vessel for the corporate lake outing? : (in)BOARD MOTORBOAT
  • 64A. Where geese learn the ABCs of Vs? : (in)FORMATION CENTER
  • 88A. Passable publicity? : (in)DECENT EXPOSURE
  • 95A. Close examination of past and present English? : (in)TENSE SCRUTINY
  • 110A. Priest’s fashion consultant? : (in)VESTMENT ADVISER

Bill’s time: 18m 11s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

7. Heavenly bear : URSA

The constellation called Ursa Major (Latin for “Larger Bear”) is often just called the Big Dipper because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that’s what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland, the “plough”.

Ursa Minor (Latin for “Smaller Bear”) sits right beside the constellation Draco (Latin for “dragon”). Ursa Minor used to be considered the wing of Draco, and so was once called “Dragon’s Wing”.

11. East Lansing sch. : MSU

Michigan State University (MSU) is located in East Lansing, Michigan. MSU has the largest study-abroad program of any single-campus university in the US. Programs are offered on all continents of the world, including Antarctica. The MSU athletic teams are known as the Spartans.

14. Vice __ : VERSA

“Vice versa” is a Latin phrase meaning “with position turned”. We always pronounce this term “incorrectly”. In Latin, a “c” is a hard sound, and a “v” is pronounced like a “w”. The pronunciation should be something like “wee-kay wehr-sa”.

19. “Seinfeld” role : ELAINE

The character called Elaine Benes, unlike the other lead characters (Jerry, Kramer and George), did not appear in the pilot episode of “Seinfeld”. NBC executives specified the addition of a female lead when they picked up the show citing that the situation was too “male-centric”.

20. Groups on its covers included ‘N Sync and Hanson : TEEN BEAT

“Teen Beat” was a fan magazine geared towards teenagers that was published from 1967 to 2007. It was a follow-on publication to “16 Magazine” that was launched in 1956, and “Tiger Beat” launched in 1965.

25. “I Am the Walrus” was one : SIDE B

“I Am the Walrus” is a Beatles song released in 1967. It was written by John Lennon, with the Walrus being a reference to the poem “The Walrus and the Carpenter” from Lewis Carroll’s “Through the Looking-Glass”.

26. Fair instrument : CALLIOPE

A calliope is a musical instrument that was patented in 1855. It’s a pretty loud device, one that produces sound by sending steam or compressed air through large whistles. Calliopes are often seen at circuses, fairgrounds and on steamboats.

28. Land of the banshee : EIRE

A banshee is a female spirit in Irish mythology, from the Irish “bean sí” meaning “woman of the fairy mounds”. The banshee is supposedly heard wailing in the night, especially when someone is about to die.

29. Songwriter Sands : EVIE

Evie Sands is a singer from Brooklyn, New York. Sands is also a noted songwriter, having penned songs that have been recorded by the likes of Barbra Streisand, Gladys Knight, Karen Carpenter, Linda Ronstadt and Dusty Springfield.

36. Energy pricing unit : BARREL

The volume of one oil barrel is equivalent to 42 US gallons. A barrel is correctly abbreviated to “bbl”. Barrels aren’t really used for transporting crude oil anymore. Instead, oil moves in bulk through pipelines and in tankers. “Barrel” is just a quantity these days.

40. “Friendly Skies” co. : UAL

United Airlines used the tagline “Fly the Friendly Skies” in its marketing materials from 1965 to 1996. It was then replaced with “It’s time to fly”. United chose George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” as the company’s theme music in 1976, and paid the Gershwin estate a fee of $500,000 for the privilege.

41. Quicken product : E-LOAN

E-Loan used to be based just down the road from me in the San Francisco Bay Area, but after takeover by a Rosemont, Illinois company it was moved to the parent’s headquarters. E-Loan was founded in 1997 to provide customers access to mortgages over the Internet.

50. Stand __ : PAT

“To stand pat” is to resist change. The term comes from the game of poker, in which one “stands pat” if one keeps one’s hand as is, not drawing any extra cards.

58. Canonized ones: Abbr. : STS

The act of creating a saint is known as “canonization”. The term derives from the process of placing someone in the canon (or “calendar”) of saints.

64. Where geese learn the ABCs of Vs? : FORMATION CENTER

A collection of geese is referred to as a “gaggle” when on the ground. When geese are in v-formation in flight, they are referred to collectively as a “skein”.

71. Côtes du __: wine region : RHONE

Côtes du Rhône is a wine region in centered on the Rhône river in France. The name of the region translates as “Slopes (or Hills) of Rhône”. The most prevalent grapes used in Côtes du Rhône wine are Grenache (in reds and rosés) and Grenache blanc (in whites).

72. “Clickbait” was added to it in Sep. 2016 : OED

Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

“Clickbait” is trickery used by website designers to entice a reader to click on a particular link. That link may be a disguised ad, so that the website owner gets some income from the advertiser.

73. Not letting things slide, briefly : TCB

Taking care of business (TCB)

77. Some Jutland natives : DANES

Jutland is a peninsula in Northern Europe comprising the mainland of Denmark and part of northern Germany. Jutland is named for the Jutes, a powerful Germanic people that inhabited the peninsula in the Nordic Iron Age.

84. ’70s-’80s Pakistani president : ZIA

Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq was the President of Pakistan from 1978 until he died in 1988. Zia died in a plane crash along with US Ambassador to Pakistan Arnold Lewis Raphel and several other VIPs. The official Pakistani investigation into the cause of the crash concluded that the plane was likely brought down by sabotage. The official US investigation concluded that the crash was an accident.

85. NFL’s Oilers, since 1999 : TITANS

The Houston Oilers were an AFL charter team, founded in 1960. The team moved to Tennessee in 1997, and became the Tennessee Titans in 1999.

92. Emmy-winning scientist : NYE

That would be “Bill Nye the Science Guy”. Bill’s show ran on PBS for four years from 1993-97.

103. Canberra school : UNI

In Australia (Down Under) and in the British Isles the term “Uni” is routinely used for “university”.

Canberra is the capital city of Australia. The city is located in what’s called the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) an area independent of any of the other Australian territories. In this sense, there is a similarity between Canberra in the ACT and Washington in the District of Columbia. Canberra was chosen as the nation’s capital in 1908, a choice that was a compromise in deference to the two largest cities, Sydney and Melbourne.

104. Classic Cadillac : ELDORADO

The Cadillac Eldorado is a two-door luxury car that was produced by GM from 1953 to 2002.

108. Mini successors : NANOS

The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

115. Sweet-talked : WHEEDLED

“To wheedle” is to influence by flattery for one’s gain. Such a lovely verb, I think …

116. Like the pre-Easter season : LENTEN

In Latin, the Christian season that is now called Lent was termed “quadragesima” (meaning “fortieth”), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term “Lent” was introduced. “Lent” comes from “lenz”, the German word for “spring”.

118. Canon offering, briefly : SLR

SLR stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

Down

2. Utah ski resort : ALTA

Alta ski resort actually lies within the Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area. The first ski lift in the resort was opened way back in 1939. Today, Alta is one of only three ski resorts in the country that prohibits snowboarding (along with Deer Valley, Utah and Mad River Glen, Vermont. The ski resort of Snowbird located next to Alta has been in operation since 1971.

4. Game that sells consoles, say : KILLER APP

In the world of technology marketing, a “killer app” is one that is such a big hit that users are willing to purchase other items, such as a particular piece of hardware, just gain access to the app. One example is Lotus 1-2-3, one of the first spreadsheets to hit the market. I remember a company that I was working bought a lot of IBM computers, largely because access to a spreadsheet was viewed as being so advantageous.

7. __ Reader : UTNE

The “Utne Reader” is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. The “Utne Reader” was founded in 1984, with “Utne” being the family name of the couple that started the publication.

9. Cinque e uno : SEI

In Italian, “cinque e uno” (five and one) adds up to “sei” (six).

12. “__ bleu!” : SACRE

French speakers don’t really use the profanity “sacrebleu”, at least not anymore, but we see it a lot in English literature featuring native French speakers. Most famously it is uttered by Agatha Christie’s delightful Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot. There is some dispute about the origins of “sacrebleu” (sacred blue), but French dictionaries explain that it is a “softening” of the alternative “Sacré Dieu” (Holy God).

14. Bush and Gore: Abbr. : VPS

President George H. W. Bush served in the US Navy during WWII. Future President Bush postponed his entry into college after the attack on Pearl Harbor and enlisted in the navy instead. When he earned his wings, he was the youngest aviator in the US Navy at that time.

Al Gore was born in Washington DC, the son of Al Gore, Sr., then a US Representative for the state of Tennessee. After deferring his military service in order to attend Harvard, the younger Gore became eligible for the draft on graduation. Many of his classmates found ways of avoiding the draft, but Gore decided to serve and even took the “tougher” option of joining the army as an enlisted man. Actor Tommy Lee Jones shared a house with Gore in college and says that his buddy told him that even if he could find a way around the draft, someone with less options than him would have to go in his place and that was just wrong.

15. Architect Saarinen : ELIEL

Eliel Saarinen was a Finnish architect who designed entire city districts in Helsinki. He immigrated to the United States where he became famous for his art nouveau designs. He was the father of Eero Saarinen, who was to become even more renowned in America for his designs, including the Dulles International Airport terminal, and the TWA building at JFK.

17. Dik Browne dog : SNERT

“Hägar the Horrible” is a comic strip that was created by the late Dik Browne and is now drawn by his son, Chris Browne. “Hägar the Terrible” (not “Horrible”) was the nickname given to Dik by his sons. The strip’s title character is a red-bearded Viking living on the Norwegian coast during the Middle Ages. Hägar lives with his overbearing wife Helga, his sensitive son Hamlet, his pretty daughter Honi, and his clever dog Snert.

30. Bedlam : CHAOS

Bethlem Royal Hospital is a facility in London in the UK for treating mental illness. The original facility was a hospital way back in the 1300s, and had the name “Bedlam”. In the 1700s and 1800s the hospital actually made money out of its patients as it charged a penny to members of the public allowing them to visit the hospital and view the unfortunate inmates in their cells. Tens of thousands of such paid visits were made each year. Our word “bedlam”, meaning uproar and confusion, is derived from the hospital’s name, and it reflects the cruel and inhumane treatment endured by the inmates in days gone by.

31. One of the Gilmore girls : RORY

“Gilmore Girls” is a comedy show that originally aired from 2000 to 2007 on the WB. The title characters are mother and daughter Lorelai and Rory Gilmore, played by Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel.

32. St. Louis bridge architect : EADS

James Eads was an American Civil Engineer and inventor. He designed and built the first road and rail bridge to cross the Mississippi River in St. Louis, a bridge which went into service in 1874 and is still used to this day. Aptly enough, it is known as the Eads Bridge.

34. Short-lived Egypt-Syr. alliance : UAR

The United Arab Republic (UAR) was a union between Egypt and Syria made in 1958, and dissolved in 1961 when Syria pulled out of the arrangement.

35. Goya’s “Duchess of __” : ALBA

María Cayetana de Silva was the 13th Duchess of Alba. She was a favorite subject of the Spanish painter Francisco Goya. The duchess is the subject in the famous portraits known as “La maja desnuda” (The Nude Maja) and “La maja vestida” (The Clothed Maja). “Maja” translates from Spanish as “beautiful lady”.

43. Some kind of nerve : OPTIC

The optic nerve enters the eyeball at a location on the retina called the optic disc. Because there are no light-sensitive cells at the optic disc, there is a “hole” in our visual field that is called the blind spot. People with normal vision don’t usually notice this blind spot as the brain “fills in” the blind spot with information from the other eye.

46. Biblical brother : ABEL

The story of Cain and Abel not only appears in the Christian and Hebrew Bibles, it also features in the Qur’an. In the Muslim account the brothers are named Qabil and Habil.

56. Carved poles : TOTEMS

“Totem” is the name given to any entity that watches over a group of people. As such, totems are usually the subjects of worship. Totem poles are really misnamed, as they are not intended to represent figures to be worshiped, but rather are heraldic in nature often celebrating the legends or notable events in the history of a tribe.

60. IMDb.com entries : BIOS

The website called the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) was launched in 1990, and is now owned by Amazon.com. It’s a great site for answering question one has about movies and actors.

61. Director Howard : RON

Ron Howard sure has come a long way since playing Opie Taylor on “The Andy Griffith Show”. He has directed some fabulous movies including favorites of mine like “Apollo 13”, “A Beautiful Mind” and “The Da Vinci Code”.

63. Shameful fictional symbol : RED A

The main character in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel “The Scarlet Letter” is Hester Prynne. When Prynne is convicted by her puritanical neighbors of the crime of adultery, she is forced to wear a scarlet “A” (for “adultery”) on her clothing for the rest of her life, hence the novel’s title “The Scarlet Letter”.

64. __ acid : FOLIC

Folic acid is also known as vitamin B9. Folic acid occurs as folate in the human body, a substance essential in the synthesis and repair of DNA.

65. Golf great, to his “army” : ARNIE

Arnold Palmer was one of the greats of the world of golf. He was very popular with many fans of the game, and his followers were usually referred to as “Arnie’s Army”. Off the course, Palmer was an avid pilot, until his latter years. He resided in Latrobe, Pennsylvania for much of the year and the local airport is named in his honor: Arnold Palmer Regional Airport.

67. Herman’s Hermits frontman Peter : NOONE

Peter Noone is a great personality in the entertainment world, most famous as the “Herman” in the sixties group Herman’s Hermits. Noone was only 15-years-old when he started as lead singer with the band.

68. Hosp. administration : CPR

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

70. Quaint store adjective : OLDE

The word “olde” wasn’t actually used much earlier than the 1920s. “Olde” was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc. as in “Ye Olde Shoppe”.

73. Massenet opera : THAIS

“Thais” is a 3-act opera composed by Jules Massenet. The work is most famous for its “Meditation”, the beguiling entr’acte performed between scenes in Act II.

74. Symphonic strings : CELLI

The word “cello” (plural “celli” or “cellos”) is an abbreviation for “violoncello”, an Italian word for “little violone”, referring to a group of stringed instruments that were popular up to the end of the 17th century. The name violoncello persisted for the instrument that we know today, although the abbreviation ‘cello was often used. Nowadays we just drop the apostrophe.

78. Nahuatl speaker : AZTEC

Nahuatl is a group of languages spoken mainly in Central Mexico. Historically, Nahuatl was known as “Aztec”.

80. Container weight : TARE

“Tare” is the weight of a container that is deducted from the gross weight to determine the net weight, the weight of the container’s contents.

85. Spelling on TV : TORI

Tori Spelling is an American actress who made a name for herself playing Donna Martin on television’s “Beverly Hills, 90210”. Tori is the daughter of film and television producer Aaron Spelling.

89. Finger Lakes locale: Abbr. : NYS

When I first moved to the US I came to Upstate New York and was lucky enough to live near the beautiful Finger Lakes. The largest of the eleven lakes is Seneca Lake, one of the deepest bodies of water in the United States. My wife and I visited the Finger Lakes region in 2010 and stopped at one of the best wineries in the area and frankly were blown away by the quality of the wines available. Coming from California it’s very refreshing to taste great wines that are made without the benefit of artificial irrigation.

99. Oscar-winning actress Mercedes __ : RUEHL

Mercedes Ruehl is an actress from Queens, New York who is noted for her Academy Award-winning performance in the 1992 movie “The Fisher King”, and for her Tony Award-winning performance in the 1991 Neil Simon play “Lost in Yonkers”.

100. Indy 500 family name : UNSER

The Unser family seems to have racing cars in their blood. Al Unser, Sr. won the Indy 500 on four occasions. Al’s brother Jerry was the first of the Unsers to compete at Indianapolis. Al’s other brother Bobby, won the Indy three times. Al’s son, Al Junior, won the Indy twice. Al Junior’s son is also a racing driver who competes at the Indy Speedway.

101. St. with a panhandle : FLA

The Florida Panhandle is in the Central Time Zone, whereas the rest of the state is in the Eastern Time Zone.

104. LAX postings : ETDS

Estimated time of departure (ETD)

Los Angeles International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and the busiest here on the West Coast of the US. The airport was opened in 1930 as Mines Field and was renamed to Los Angeles Airport in 1941. On the airport property is the iconic white structure that resembles a flying saucer. This is called the Theme Building and I believe it is mainly used as a restaurant and observation deck for the public. The airport used to be identified by the letters “LA”, but when the aviation industry went to a three-letter standard for airport identification, this was changed to “LAX”. Apparently the “X” has no significant meaning.

105. Piedmont wine region : ASTI

Asti is in the Piedmont region of northwest Italy. The region is perhaps most famous for its Asti Spumante sparkling white wine.

106. “Paula’s Home Cooking” host : DEEN

Paula Deen is a celebrity chef from Savannah, Georgia who is noted for her Southern cooking. Deen has been criticized for the amount of salt, fat and sugar in her recipes. The criticism became even more intense when Deen disclosed that she herself has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

107. Normandy department : ORNE

Orne is a department and river in the northwest of France. Perhaps one of the most famous locations in Orne is the village of Camembert, the home of the famous (and delicious!) cheese.

The Normans were the people from the north of France, from the region that bears the name Normandy. The Normans are descended from Viking stock, so the name “Norman” derives from a translation of “North Men”.

109. Abbr. on old Eurasian maps : SSR

The former Soviet Union (USSR) was created in 1922, not long after the Russian Revolution of 1917 that overthrew the Tsar. Geographically, the new Soviet Union was roughly equivalent to the old Russian Empire, and was comprised of fifteen Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs).

110. Bug and Golf : VWS

VW stands for Volkswagen, which translates from German into “people’s car”. The original Volkswagen design was the Beetle and was built under a directive from Adolf Hitler, who wanted a cheap car built that ordinary people could afford to purchase. He awarded the contract to engineer Ferdinand Porsche, whose name (paradoxically) would forever be associated with high performance, expensive cars. The Beetle was the official name of the VW model released in North America, but it was usually referred to as a “Bug” here in the US, and a “Beetle” elsewhere in the world.

111. ER VIPs : MDS

One might find a registered nurse (RN) or a medical doctor (MD) in an emergency room (ER).

112. Yalie : ELI

Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

113. Lincoln’s place: Abbr. : NEB

The city of Lincoln is the second-largest in Nebraska, and is the state capital. In the days of the Nebraska Territory, the capital was the larger city of Omaha. When the territory was being considered for statehood, most of the population (which lived south of the River Platte) was in favor of annexation to Kansas. The pro-statehood legislature voted to move the capital nearer to that population in a move intended to appease those favoring annexation. As this conflict was taking place just after the Civil War, a special interest group in Omaha arranged for the new capital to be named Lincoln, in honor of the recently-assassinated president. The thought was that the populace south of the River Platte had been sympathetic to the Confederate cause and so would not pass the measure to move the capital if the Lincoln name was used. But the measure passed, the capital was moved, and Nebraska became the thirty-seventh State of the Union in 1867.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Harder to see : DARKER

7. Heavenly bear : URSA

11. East Lansing sch. : MSU

14. Vice __ : VERSA

19. “Seinfeld” role : ELAINE

20. Groups on its covers included ‘N Sync and Hanson : TEEN BEAT

22. Alternate strategy : PLAN B

23. Knowing one makes the best moonshine? : STILL CONFIDENCE

25. “I Am the Walrus” was one : SIDE B

26. Fair instrument : CALLIOPE

27. Many a stray : CUR

28. Land of the banshee : EIRE

29. Songwriter Sands : EVIE

30. Pressing concern? : CREASE QUALITY

36. Energy pricing unit : BARREL

39. Submerged ridge : SHOAL

40. “Friendly Skies” co. : UAL

41. Quicken product : E-LOAN

42. Vessel for the corporate lake outing? : BOARD MOTORBOAT

48. Put (on) hastily : SLAP

49. Metallic hybrids : ALLOYS

50. Stand __ : PAT

51. Green shelter : ARBOR

53. Destroys totally : TORPEDOES

55. Hitting : AT BAT

57. Moist : DEWY

58. Canonized ones: Abbr. : STS

59. Sticky stuff : GOO

60. Cook with high heat : BROIL

62. Ominous ending : … OR ELSE

64. Where geese learn the ABCs of Vs? : FORMATION CENTER

68. Vote for : CHOOSE

71. Côtes du __: wine region : RHONE

72. “Clickbait” was added to it in Sep. 2016 : OED

73. Not letting things slide, briefly : TCB

76. Influence : PULL

77. Some Jutland natives : DANES

79. Stood : STOMACHED

82. Excavate anew : REDIG

84. ’70s-’80s Pakistani president : ZIA

85. NFL’s Oilers, since 1999 : TITANS

87. “__ Land”: 2016 Stone/Gosling film : LA LA

88. Passable publicity? : DECENT EXPOSURE

91. How prancing is done : GAILY

92. Emmy-winning scientist : NYE

93. Wear : ERODE

94. Liquor from currants : CASSIS

95. Close examination of past and present English? : TENSE SCRUTINY

101. Ado : FUSS

102. Not do, maybe : OMIT

103. Canberra school : UNI

104. Classic Cadillac : ELDORADO

108. Mini successors : NANOS

110. Priest’s fashion consultant? : VESTMENT ADVISER

114. Cries from sties : OINKS

115. Sweet-talked : WHEEDLED

116. Like the pre-Easter season : LENTEN

117. Candidate’s handout : FLYER

118. Canon offering, briefly : SLR

119. Bros, say : SIBS

120. Driving force : ENGINE

Down

1. Genealogy abbr. : DESC

2. Utah ski resort : ALTA

3. Complain : RAIL

4. Game that sells consoles, say : KILLER APP

5. Pep up : ENLIVEN

6. Shrink back : RECOIL

7. __ Reader : UTNE

8. Flag thrower : REF

9. Cinque e uno : SEI

10. “Wait, there’s more … ” : AND …

11. Diner host’s stack : MENUS

12. “__ bleu!” : SACRE

13. Colorado native : UTE

14. Bush and Gore: Abbr. : VPS

15. Architect Saarinen : ELIEL

16. Circle lines : RADII

17. Dik Browne dog : SNERT

18. Monk’s home : ABBEY

21. Immobilize at sea, in a way : BECALM

24. Expose in verse? : OPE

30. Bedlam : CHAOS

31. One of the Gilmore girls : RORY

32. St. Louis bridge architect : EADS

33. Marketing target : QUOTA

34. Short-lived Egypt-Syr. alliance : UAR

35. Goya’s “Duchess of __” : ALBA

36. Outplays : BESTS

37. Give in shares : ALLOT

38. Comedy club reactions : ROARS

39. One and only : SOLE

42. Flower : BLOOM

43. Some kind of nerve : OPTIC

44. Statistician’s aid : TABLE

45. Information for a waiter : ORDER

46. Biblical brother : ABEL

47. Garage services : TOWS

49. Couldn’t get enough of : ADORED

52. White alternative : RYE

54. They may clash in debates : EGOS

55. Supreme : A-ONE

56. Carved poles : TOTEMS

60. IMDb.com entries : BIOS

61. Director Howard : RON

63. Shameful fictional symbol : RED A

64. __ acid : FOLIC

65. Golf great, to his “army” : ARNIE

66. What an unproductive worker might get : THE AX

67. Herman’s Hermits frontman Peter : NOONE

68. Hosp. administration : CPR

69. Tinged : HUED

70. Quaint store adjective : OLDE

73. Massenet opera : THAIS

74. Symphonic strings : CELLI

75. Occasions for cake, briefly : B-DAYS

78. Nahuatl speaker : AZTEC

79. Detailed analysis : STUDY

80. Container weight : TARE

81. Senior’s memento : CLASS RING

83. Hereditary code carrier : GENE

85. Spelling on TV : TORI

86. Has the stage : IS ON

89. Finger Lakes locale: Abbr. : NYS

90. Dress size : PETITE

91. Appliance with a pilot : GAS OVEN

94. Get snuggly : CUDDLE

95. Beaucoup, with “a” : TON OF

96. User’s service : EMAIL

97. Fool : NINNY

98. Fuel : STOKE

99. Oscar-winning actress Mercedes __ : RUEHL

100. Indy 500 family name : UNSER

101. St. with a panhandle : FLA

104. LAX postings : ETDS

105. Piedmont wine region : ASTI

106. “Paula’s Home Cooking” host : DEEN

107. Normandy department : ORNE

109. Abbr. on old Eurasian maps : SSR

110. Bug and Golf : VWS

111. ER VIPs : MDS

112. Yalie : ELI

113. Lincoln’s place: Abbr. : NEB

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LA Times Crossword Answers 21 Jan 17, Saturday










Constructed by: Neville Fogarty

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: None

Bill’s time: 9m 32s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Robin on ’60s TV : BURT WARD

The television show “Batman” aired from 1966-1968. Burt Ward played Robin opposite Adam West’s Batman. Supposedly, Burt Ward was offered the part taken by Dustin Hoffman in “The Graduate”, but Ward couldn’t get out of his contract for the “Batman” television series. Holy xxxx, Batman!

15. What one taking a flight doesn’t use? : ELEVATOR

Elevators (simple hoists) have been around for a long time. What Elisha Otis did was come up with the “safety elevator”, a design that he showcased at the 1853 World’s Fair in New York. At the Fair, Otis would stand on an elevated platform in front of onlookers and order his assistant to cut the single rope holding up the platform. His safety system kicked in when the platform had only fallen a few inches, amazing the crowd. After this demonstration, the orders came rolling in.

16. Mustang rival : CAMARO

The Chevrolet Camaro is a car produced by General Motors from 1966 to 2002, and reintroduced in 2009. The Camaro shared much of its design with the Pontiac Firebird, and was introduced as a potential competitor to the Ford Mustang.

17. Abomination : ANATHEMA

“Anathema” is a source of persistent annoyance. Anathema is the Latin word for an excommunicated person. Note that “anathema” does not take an article, so we say “he is anathema” rather than “he is an anathema”.

19. Coach Eric Taylor’s wife on “Friday Night Lights” : TAMI

“Friday Night Lights” is a TV series about a high school football team in Texas. The television show was inspired by the book “Friday Night Lights: A Town, A Team, and a Dream”, as well as the 2004 movie based on the book. I binge-watched a few seasons of the TV show recently, and really enjoyed the characters and the writing …

22. Hardboard brand : MASONITE

Masonite is a hardboard made by pressure-molding steam-cooked wood fibres. The product was patented in 1924 by William H. Mason, who was a friend and protégé of Thomas Edison.

24. William Donovan’s WWII org. : OSS

The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was formed during WWII in order to carry out espionage behind enemy lines. A few years after the end of the war the OSS functions were taken up by a new group, the Central Intelligence Agency that was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

William J. Donovan was the head of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during WWII. Given that the OSS was the precursor to the CIA, Donovan is known as the “Father of Central Intelligence”. Donovan was the only person to have received the Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, the Distinguished Service Model and the National Service Medal, all four of the highest awards in the US.

31. “Star Trek” rank: Abbr. : ENS

An extra in “Star Trek” is often an ensign (ens.).

When Gene Roddenberry first proposed the science fiction series that became “Star Trek”, he marketed it as “Wagon Train to the Stars”, a pioneer-style Western in outer space. In fact his idea was to produce something more like “Gulliver’s Travels”, as he intended to write episodes that were adventure stories on one level, but morality tales on another. Personally I think that he best achieved this model with the spin-off series “Star Trek: The Next Generation” (TNG). If you watch individual episodes you will see thinly disguised treatments of moral issues such as racism, homosexuality, genocide etc. For my money, “The Next Generation” is the best of the whole franchise …

32. __ St. Louis : EAST

East St. Louis is a city in Illinois that is located right across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri. East St. Louis is home to a riverfront fountain called Gateway Geyser. The fountain sits opposite the Gateway Arch and shoots water about 630 feet into the air, which is the same height as the arch.

35. Exodus pronoun : THOU

The Book of Exodus is the second book in the Bible, and deals with Moses leading the Hebrews out of Egypt. The name “Exodus” comes from the Greek “exodos” meaning “departure”.

38. “The Time Machine” race : ELOI

In the 1895 novel by H. G. Wells called “The Time Machine”, there are two races that the hero encounter in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet’s surface. The Morlocks are a race of cannibals living underground who use the Eloi as food.

40. Jethro Tull frontman Anderson : IAN

Jethro Tull is a rock band from the UK, formed in 1967 and active until 2012. The band uses the name of a 18th-century, English agriculturist.

41. Big name in printers : EPSON

Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

44. Drea de Matteo’s role on “The Sopranos” : ADRIANA

Drea de Matteo is an actress who is most familiar to me for playing Adriana la Cerva on HBO’s wonderful series “The Sopranos”. De Matteo also played Joey’s sister on the short-lived “Friends” spin-off called “Joey”, and the character Angie Bolen on “Desperate Housewives”.

48. Balderdash : UTTER ROT

“Balderdash” means “senseless jumble of words”. The original balderdash (back before the late 1600s) was a jumbled mix of liquids, like maybe beer and wine, or even beer and milk!

50. Dark personification : GRIM REAPER

The Grim Reaper one of the personifications of death, along with the Hooded One and the Angel of Death. Death has been depicted since the 1400s as a skeleton in a hooded, black cloak and carrying a scythe. The name “Grim Reaper” only dates back to the mid-1800s.

61. Toll road convenience : E-ZPASS

E-ZPASS was a technology development driven (pun!) by the tolling agencies of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The first E-ZPASS toll booth was built on the New York Thruway, and opened at the Spring Valley toll plaza in 1993.

62. Site of Napoleon’s last exile : ST HELENA

The island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic is one of the most remote islands in the world. It was discovered by Galician explorer João da Nova, who was sailing under the Portuguese flag. He name the island after Helena of Constantinople, mother of Roman Emperor Constantine the Great. Famously, the British opted to exile Napoleon on Saint Helena soon after his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. The former French emperor died on the island in 1821.

Down

2. Radius neighbor : ULNA

The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinkie-side”.

3. Office quantity : REAM

A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since the standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a “short ream”.

7. “Think Like a Man Too,” e.g. : ROMCOM

“Think Like a Man Too” is a 2014 sequel to the 2012 film “Think Like a Man”. Both movies are romantic comedies, with the original based on comedian Steve Harvey’s book “Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man”.

9. Terrier type : SCOTTISH

Scottish Terrier is another name for the Aberdeen Terrier, commonly referred to as the Scottie. One of the most famous Scotties in American history was Fala, the much-loved dog belonging to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Also, the Scottie is famous as one of the playing pieces in the original game of Monopoly.

10. Participates in a camp activity : CANOES

The boat called a canoe takes its name from the Carib word “kenu” meaning “dugout”. It was Christopher Columbus who brought “kenu” into Spanish as “canoa”, which evolved into our English “canoe”.

11. Grace closing : AMEN

A “grace” is a short prayer recited before or after a meal.

13. Hybrid hatchback : PRIUS

The Toyota Prius is still the most fuel-efficient, gasoline-powered car sold in the US, according to the EPA. The name “Prius” is a Latin word meaning “ahead, leading”. In the US we pronounce the name “pree-us”, but across the Atlantic it’s pronounced “pry-us”. Oh, and I drive one …

21. “We __ Start the Fire”: Billy Joel : DIDN’T

“We Didn’t Start the Fire” is a 1989 song by Billy Joel. The lyrics are really quite unique, consisting mainly of over a hundred newspaper headlines from 1949 to 1989. Joel chose 1949 as it was the year of his birth.

23. Shakespearean title word : ADO

“Much Ado About Nothing” is a play by William Shakespeare, and is a favorite of mine. It is a comedic tale of two pairs of lovers with lots of mistaken identities and double meanings. I once saw it performed in the fabulous Globe Theatre in London … by an all-female cast. Such a performance was somewhat ironic, given that in Shakespeare’s day the practice was to use an all-male cast.

25. Power eponym : WATT

James Watt was a Scottish inventor, a man who figured prominently in the Industrial Revolution in Britain largely due to the improvements he made to the fledgling steam engine. The SI unit of power is called the watt, named in his honor.

26. Dos cubed : OCHO

In Spanish, “dos” (two) raised to the power of three is “ocho” (eight).

34. Brown of publishing : TINA

Tina Brown is a British/American journalist and author. Brown wrote “The Diana Chronicles”, a biography of Diana, Princess of Wales, of whom Brown was a personal friend. She emigrated to the US in 1984 to become editor for “Vanity Fair”, and later took the helm at “The New Yorker”.

36. Marshland waders : BITTERNS

Bitterns are wading birds in the heron family. Unlike most of their heron cousins, bitterns tend to have short necks.

37. Dreaded figure? : RASTA

Dreadlocks are matted coils of hair nowadays usually formed intentionally, although if one lets hair grow out without grooming then it naturally forms twisted and matted dreadlocks. The hairstyle is associated with the Rastafarian movement in which “dread” is a very positive term meaning “fear of the Lord”.

41. “__ e Leandro”: Handel cantata : ERO

The Greek myth of Hero and Leander gave rise to a couple of operas (one by Giovanni Bottesini and another by Arrigo Boito) and a more famous cantata from George Frideric Handel, all called “Ero e Leandro”.

45. Longtime “Sexually Speaking” host : DR RUTH

Dr. Ruth Westheimer is a German sex therapist who made a name for herself as a media personality. Westheimer is the daughter of Orthodox Jews and was sent away from Germany by her family just before WWII. She ended up in Palestine and participated in the 1948 Palestine War serving as a scout and sniper. Westheimer was seriously wounded, and spent several months unable to walk. She moved to France in 1950, and soon after arrived in the US. It was in the US where she did her training as a sex therapist.

47. Pollo partner : ARROZ

In Spanish, “pollo” (chicken) might be served with “arroz” (rice).

54. Engine with a lot of juice : V-TEN

The engine known as a V10 is configured with two rows of five cylinders mounted on a crankcase. The rows of cylinders are offset from each other around the crankshaft at right angles, or perhaps a little less. This arrangement of ten cylinders in a V-shape gives rise to the name “V10”.

55. Slugger who began and ended his career as a Texas Ranger : SOSA

Sammy Sosa was firmly in the public eye in 1998 when he and Mark McGwire were vying to be the first to surpass the home run record held by Roger Maris. McGwire fell out of public favor due to stories of steroid abuse (stories which he later admitted were true) while Sosa fell out of favor when he was found to be using a corked bat in a 2003 game.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Robin on ’60s TV : BURT WARD

9. Mischievous kids : SCAMPS

15. What one taking a flight doesn’t use? : ELEVATOR

16. Mustang rival : CAMARO

17. Abomination : ANATHEMA

18. Common soccer result : ONE-NIL

19. Coach Eric Taylor’s wife on “Friday Night Lights” : TAMI

20. Biting criticism : ACID TONGUE

22. Hardboard brand : MASONITE

24. William Donovan’s WWII org. : OSS

25. Dropped jaws : WOWED ‘EM

28. Computer media : DISKS

30. Cold sound? : ACHOO!

31. “Star Trek” rank: Abbr. : ENS

32. __ St. Louis : EAST

35. Exodus pronoun : THOU

36. Liquid diet component : BROTH

38. “The Time Machine” race : ELOI

39. Traffic sound : TOOT

40. Jethro Tull frontman Anderson : IAN

41. Big name in printers : EPSON

42. Library exchanges : PSSTS

44. Drea de Matteo’s role on “The Sopranos” : ADRIANA

46. Sources of remote power : AAS

48. Balderdash : UTTER ROT

50. Dark personification : GRIM REAPER

52. Speeds (up) : REVS

56. More affected, in a way : ARTIER

57. More than familiar with : INURED TO

59. Arrive copiously : POUR IN

60. Some summer homes : COTTAGES

61. Toll road convenience : E-ZPASS

62. Site of Napoleon’s last exile : ST HELENA

Down

1. Overpower : BEAT

2. Radius neighbor : ULNA

3. Office quantity : REAM

4. Some breaks in the NFL action : TV TIMEOUTS

5. Nursery noise : WAH!

6. Base command : AT EASE

7. “Think Like a Man Too,” e.g. : ROMCOM

8. Exhaust : DRAIN

9. Terrier type : SCOTTISH

10. Participates in a camp activity : CANOES

11. Grace closing : AMEN

12. Fruity chip go-with : MANGO SALSA

13. Hybrid hatchback : PRIUS

14. They may leave prints : SOLES

21. “We __ Start the Fire”: Billy Joel : DIDN’T

23. Shakespearean title word : ADO

25. Power eponym : WATT

26. Dos cubed : OCHO

27. Goes wild : WHOOPS IT UP

29. Contemporary “Be yourself” : KEEP IT REAL

31. Great spell : EON

33. “Are we there yet?” reply : SOON

34. Brown of publishing : TINA

36. Marshland waders : BITTERNS

37. Dreaded figure? : RASTA

41. “__ e Leandro”: Handel cantata : ERO

43. “Yup!” : SURE IS!

44. “Nope!” : ARE NOT!

45. Longtime “Sexually Speaking” host : DR RUTH

46. Catching flies, so to speak : AGAPE

47. Pollo partner : ARROZ

49. Sweeping stories : EPICS

51. “Look, amigo!” : MIRA!

53. One of a cube’s dozen : EDGE

54. Engine with a lot of juice : V-TEN

55. Slugger who began and ended his career as a Texas Ranger : SOSA

58. Hwy., e.g. : RTE

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