Top Line

Greetings from Dundalk, County Louth in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Oct 12, Sunday





CROSSWORD SETTER: Amy Johnson
THEME: High Jinks … each of the theme answers is a well-known expression with the word “UP” inserted to make an answer that suits the clue:
23A. Dear John? BREAKING-(UP) NEWS
34A. Extortion amount, perhaps? COVER-(UP) CHARGE
66A. Raise some prices in the 19th-century literature section? MARK (UP) TWAIN
97A. Revolting Oscar also-rans? (UP)RISING STARS
116A. View from the Transamerica Tower? BALTIMORE SUN(UP)
COMPLETION TIME: 31m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Saucers in the air UFOS
In 1952, the USAF revived its studies of reports of UFO sightings in a program called Project Blue Book. There were two prior USAF studies of the UFO phenomenon, namely Project Sign and Project Grudge. Project Blue Book ran from 1952 until it was shut down in 1969 with the conclusion that there was no threat to national security, and that there were no sightings that could not be explained within the bounds of modern scientific knowledge.

10. You won't see them in N.L. ballparks DHS
Designated hitter (DH).

13. Shanghai ABDUCT
To shanghai someone is to compel that person to do something against their will. “Shanghai” is actually an American term as it was first used to describe the practice of kidnapping men to work as crew on merchant ships, a practice engaged in initially on the West Coast of the US. The word “shanghai” was chosen as Shanghai was a common destination for the ships.

19. Raise Cain RANT
As Cain was the first murderer according the Bible, he is associated with evil or trouble. The idiom "raise Cain" is the equivalent of "raise Hell" and "raise the Devil". In all cases the meaning is to bring back evil or to cause trouble.

26. Alice Walker title color PURPLE
Alice Walker is an author and poet. Walker’s best known work is the novel “The Color Purple”, which earned her the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. “The Color Purple” was of course adapted into a very successful film of the same name, directed by Steven Spielberg.

27. Playing marble AGATE
A playing marble made from agate is called just that, an agate. Steelies on the other hand, are made from solid steel.

32. Mordor monster ORC
According to Tolkien, Orcs are small humanoids that live in his fantasy world of Middle-earth(also called “Mordor”). They are very ugly and dirty, and are fond of eating human flesh.

33. Colorado-based sports org. USOC
The United States Olympic Committee (USOC) has a federal charter but it doesn't receive any funds from the US government. As such, it has to engage in fundraising just like any other charitable organization.

43. James and Natalie's "Rebel Without a Cause" co-star SAL
Sal Mineo's most famous role was that of John "Plate" Crawford, the kid who was in awe of the James Dean character in "Rebel Without a Cause". Sadly, Mineo was murdered in 1976 when he was just 37 years old. He was attacked in the alley behind his Los Angeles apartment and stabbed through the heart. When an arrest was made it was discovered that the murderer had no idea that his victim was a celebrity, and that his plan was just to commit robbery.

46. Yemeni seaport ADEN
Aden is a seaport in Yemen, located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967.

48. Star of the 1981 revue "The Lady and Her Music" HORNE
Lena Horne was an American jazz singer, actress, dancer and civil rights activist. Horne started out her career as a nightclub singer and then began to get some meaty acting roles in Hollywood. However, she ended up on the blacklist during the McCarthy Era for expressing left wing political views. One of her starring roles was in the 1943 movie "Stormy Weather" for which she also performed the title song.

49. "Ice cream castles in the air," in a Mitchell song CLOUDS
Joni Mitchell is a Canadian singer and songwriter from Fort McLeod in Alberta. Mitchell is perhaps best known for her recordings “Big Yellow Taxi” and “Woodstock”.

54. Fabled flier ROC
The mythical roc is a huge bird of prey, reputedly able to carry off and eat elephants.

55. Frito-Lay chip DORITO
Doritos are a brand of flavored tortilla chips launched in 1964. The name "Doritos" means "little bits of gold" in Spanish.

59. Graduate's award SHEEPSKIN
In ancient times, diplomas issued by educational institutions were made of thin sheepskin, as paper wasn't an economically viable material back then.

62. Stocking shades ECRUS
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word "ecru" comes from French and means "raw, unbleached". "Ecru" has the same roots as our word "crude".

65. Steinbeck title starter EAST
John Steinbeck considered "East of Eden" his magnus opus. Most of the story-line takes place near Salinas, just south of where I live here in the Bay Area. Two of the characters in the story are brothers Cal and Aron, representative of the biblical Cain and Abel.

66. Raise some prices in the 19th-century literature section? MARK (UP) TWAIN
Samuel Langhorne Clemens was the real name of the author Mark Twain. Twain wasn’t the only pen name used by Clemens. Early in his career he signed some sketches as “Josh”, and signed some humorous letters that he wrote under the name “Thomas Jefferson Snodgrass”. The name of Mark Twain came from the days when Clemens was working on riverboats on the Mississippi. A riverboatman would call out “by the mark twain” when measuring the depth of water. This meant that on the sounding line, according to the “mark” on the line, the depth was two (“twain”) fathoms, and so it was safe for the riverboat to proceed.

70. Where Brigham Young settled UTAH
Brigham Young was the second President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Later-Day Saints. Young believed in and practiced polygamy, so he has a large family of descendants. One of his more famous great-great-great-grandsons is Steve Young, the retired quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers.

74. Bio lab gel AGAR
Agar is a jelly extracted from seaweed and has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

76. Glad alternative SARAN
What's known as plastic wrap in America, we call cling-film in Ireland. Plastic wrap was one of those unintended inventions, a byproduct of a development program to create a hard plastic cover for cars.

84. Boosters, often ALUMNI
An "alumnus" (plural ... alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is "alumna" (plural ... alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil.

85. Once in a blue moon SELDOM
As there is a full moon once every four weeks, approximately monthly, there are usually twelve full moons in any given year. However, every 2-3 years, depending on the phase of the moon at the beginning of the calendar year, there may be a thirteenth full moon. The "extra" full moon is called a "blue moon", although no one seems to really know why the term "blue" is used, as far as I can tell. Which of the thirteen full moons that is designated as the blue moon varies depending on tradition. My favorite definition is from the Farmer's Almanac. It states that as each of the seasons normally has three full moons (twelve divided by the four seasons), then the season with four full moons is designated as "special", then, the THIRD (and not the fourth) full moon in that "special" season is the blue moon. Complicated, huh?

90. "American Psycho" author ELLIS
Bret Easton Ellis wrote a trio of novels that were made into very successful movies: "Less Than Zero" (1987, starring Andrew McCarthy), "American Psycho" (2000, starring Christian Bale) and "The Rules of Attraction" (2002, starring James van der Beek).

91. Aweigh ATRIP
When an anchor is “aweigh” or “atrip”, it is just clear of the bottom, having just been lifted.

93. NASDAQ competitor NYSE
The roots of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) go back to 1792 when a group of 24 stock brokers set up the New York Stock & Exchange Board. They did so in an agreement signed under a buttonwood tree outside 68 Wall Street. That document became known as the Buttonwood Agreement.

95. "__ Grew Older": Hughes poem AS I
Langston Hughes was a poet active in the Harlem Renaissance, and someone who helped develop the literary form known as "jazz poetry".

96. Vivacity ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

101. H.S. dropouts may earn them GEDS
The General Education Diploma (GED) is a substitute for a high school diploma, available perhaps for high school dropouts or students who are home-schooled.

103. Cat lead-in SNO-
The brand name Sno-Cat is owned by the Tucker company. All "snowcats" are tracked vehicles built to work in snow, famously used in expeditions to the polar regions. The modern Sno-Cat from Tucker differs from its competitors in that it has four, independently-mounted tracks.

108. Beatles hit with a four-minute coda HEY JUDE
"Hey Jude" was originally a song called "Hey Jules", written by Paul McCartney. He wrote the original song for John Lennon's son Julian, as a way of comforting the child during his parents divorce.

114. Household cleanser BORAX
Borax is also known as sodium borate, a salt of boric acid. Borax is a white powder that dissolves easily in water. The compound has many uses, for example as an anti-fungal agent and an antiseptic.

115. Fútbol shout OLE OLE!
"Fútbol" is the Spanish word for football, soccer.

116. View from the Transamerica Tower? BALTIMORE SUN(UP)
Maryland’s largest-circulation newspaper is “The Baltimore Sun”. “The Sun” has been around for a long time, founded in 1837.

The Transamerica Tower in Baltimore, Maryland was completed in 1973. The Tower is the tallest building in the city, and indeed in the state. The building has 40 stories and is over 500 feet in height.

119. Quad bike, for one ATV
An all-terrain vehicle (ATV).

120. Pigeon shelters COTES
The Old English word "cote" was used for a small house. Our modern word "cottage" comes from "cote", as does "cote", the word for a small shelter on a farm for sheep or birds.

121. Two-time All-Star Martinez TINO
Tino Martinez has retired from Major League Baseball. Martinez played first base for a number of teams including the Mariners, Yankees, Cardinals and Devil Rays. Martinez was born and raised in Tampa, Florida and as a boy he worked in his father's cigar factory.

Down
2. Wells's partner FARGO
Back in the mid-1800s, Henry Wells founded an express package delivery service called Wells and Company. Around the same time, William Fargo founded Fargo and Company as a competitor. The two decided to join forces instead of competing, and took on a partner and formed the American Express Company (which is still around today). Fargo and Wells then decided to set up a company in California to provide express delivery and banking services, a company they called Wells Fargo.

5. Inflation no. CPI
The Consumer Price Index (CPI) measures changes in the price of services and goods purchased by households. The United States CPI fell in 2009, for the first time since 1955. That’s how bad the 2009 recession was …

7. Cogito __ sum ERGO
The great French philosopher Rene Descartes made the famous statement, in Latin, "Cogito ergo sum" ... "I think, therefore I am".

10. "Happily Divorced" star DRESCHER
Fran Drescher's real name is Francine Jane Drescher, a comedian and comic actress best known for playing Fran Fine on the sitcom "The Nanny". Fran was born in Queens, New York (go figure!). Her big break came with a small role, but in a huge movie. You might recall in "Saturday Night Fever" that John Travolta was asked by a pretty dancer, "Are you as good in bed as you are on the dance floor?", well, that young lady was Fran Drescher.

14. German philosopher Bauer BRUNO
Bruno Bauer was a philosopher from Germany. One of Bauer’s positions was that early Christianity was less related to Judaism than it was to ancient Greek philosophy.

17. Gael or Breton CELT
The Celts were a very broad group of people across Europe, linked by common languages. The Celts were largely absorbed by other cultures, although a relatively modern revival of the "Celtic identity" is alive and well in the British Isles. Such Celtic peoples today are mainly found in Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Brittany in France..

18. Small diamond TREY
The trey (three) of diamonds is a small card.

24. Popular bar game KENO
The name "Keno" has French or Latin roots, with the French "quine" being a term for five winning numbers, and the Latin "quini" meaning "five each". However, the game actually originated in China. Keno was introduced into the West by Chinese immigrants who were working on the first Transcontinental Railroad in the 1800s.

29. Half of XOXO HUGS
In the sequence XOXO, I think the X represents a kiss, and the O a hug. Hugs and kisses ...

31. Sailor's "Stop!" AVAST
Avast is a nautical term, used to tell someone to stop or desist from what they are doing. The word comes from the Dutch "hou vast" meaning "hold fast".

37. "Famous" cookie creator AMOS
Wally Amos was a talent agent, one who was in the habit of taking home-baked cookies with him as an enticement to get celebrities to see him. He was urged by friends to open a cookie store (the cookies were that delicious, I guess) and this he did in Los Angeles in 1975 using the name "Famous Amos". The store was a smash hit and he was able build on the success by introducing his cookies into supermarkets. The brand was eventually bought up making Wally a rich man, and Famous Amos cookies are still flying off the shelf.

38. Drummer Buddy RICH
Buddy Rich was a jazz drummer and bandleader from Brooklyn, New York. In his day, Rich was known as “the greatest drummer in the world”.

40. Christine's phantom admirer ERIK
In Gaston Leroux’s novel “The Phantom of the Opera”, the young Christine Daaé is obsessively admired by Erik, the “phantom” who lives below the Paris Opera House.

41. Prefix with knock ANTI-
The difference between a premium and regular gasoline is its octane rating. The octane rating is measure of the resistance of the gasoline to auto-ignition i.e. it's resistance to ignition just by virtue of being compressed in the cylinder. This auto-ignition is undesirable as multiple-cylinder engines are designed so that ignition within each cylinder takes place precisely when the plug sparks, and not before. If ignition occurs before the spark is created, the resulting phenomenon is called "knocking".

42. "Exodus" author Uris LEON
"Exodus" is a wonderful novel written by American writer Leon Uris, first published in 1947. The book was incredibly well received by the public, and is the second biggest bestseller in the US, after "Gone with the Wind". The hero of the piece is Ari Ben Canaan, played by Paul Newman in the 1960 film adaptation directed by Otto Preminger.

44. "Be-Bop-__": Gene Vincent hit -A-LULA
"Be-Bop-A-Lula" is an early rock and roll song, recorded in 1956 by Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps. The unusual name is probably related to the song "Be-Baba-Leba" recorded just over ten years earlier, in 1945 by Helen Humes. Both these titles derive from a similar sounding phrase common in jazz circles in the forties, which gave the name to the "bebop" style of music. And the original jazz term "bebop" probably came from "Arriba! Arriba!", words of encouragement from Latin American bandleaders to their musicians.

45. Meditative position LOTUS
"Asana" is a Sanskrit word literally meaning "sitting down". The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose, or "padmasana".

48. Navajo neighbor HOPI
The Hopi nation live on a reservation that is actually located within the much larger Navajo reservation in Arizona.

53. Spiritual leaders GURUS
“Guru” is a Hindi word meaning “teacher” or “priest”.

58. Rapper __ Shakur TUPAC
Rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur adopted the inventive stage name "2Pac". He was a hard man, spending eleven months in prison for sexual assault. At only 25 years of age he was killed in a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas.

60. Yale Bowl rooter ELI
Eli is the nickname for a graduate of Yale University, a term used in honor of the Yale benefactor Elihu Yale.

63. Longtime senator Thurmond STROM
Strom Thurmond was a US Senator for the state of South Carolina for 48 years, until he stepped down in 2003. Thurmond was the oldest-serving senator in US history. He retired from his office at the age of 100-years-old, and passed away just a few months after leaving Washington.

71. Florida city on the Gulf Coast TAMPA
Tampa has been known as the Big Guava since the seventies. The term is imitative of New York’s “Big Apple”, and refers to the unsuccessful search for the reported wild guava trees that were once hoped to be the basis of a new industry for the area.

72. Mother Teresa's birth name AGNES
Mother Teresa was born in 1910 in the city that is now called Skopje, the capital of Macedonia. At birth she was given the names Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu ("Gonxha" means "little flower" in Albanian). She left home at the age of 18 and joined the Sisters of Loreto, and headed to Loreto Abbey in Rathfarnham in Dublin, Ireland in order to learn English. Her goal was to teach in India, and English was the language used there for instruction by the nuns. After Mother Teresa passed away in 1997 she was beatified by Pope John Paul II, a step on the road to canonization. In order for her to be beatified there had to be documented evidence of a miracle that was performed due to her intercession. The miracle in question was the healing of a tumor in the abdomen of a woman due to the application of a locket containing a picture of Mother Teresa. Documentation of a second miracle is required for her to be declared a saint.

73. "Project Runway" host Klum HEIDI
German-born Heidi Klum is married to the successful English singer, Seal. Klum is a talented lady and has built a multi-faceted career based on her early success as a model. She is the force behind the Bravo reality show called "Project Runway" that has been on the air since 2004. Klum has been nominated 4-5 times for an Emmy for her association with the show.

75. Souped-up Pontiacs GTOS
GTO stands for Gran Turismo Omologato.

78. Following words I SEE
I see … I follow …

79. HP competitor DELL
Dell, the computer manufacturer, is named after the company’s founder Michael Dell. Michael Dell started his company in his dorm room at college, shipping personal computers that were customized to the specific needs of his customers. He dropped out of school in order to focus on his growing business, a decision that I doubt he regrets. Michael Dell is now one of the richest people in the world.

80. Big name in scat ELLA
Ella Fitzgerald, the "First Lady of Song", had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Ella's mother died while she was still a schoolgirl, and around that time young Ella became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow she managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

Scat singing is a vocal improvisation found in the world of jazz. There aren't any words as such in scat singing, just random nonsense syllables made up on the spot.

82. Petty of "A League of Their Own" LORI
Lori Petty is the actress that played the character Kit Keller in the fabulous movie "A League of Their Own".

91. Notre Dame recess APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

Notre Dame de Paris is the spectacular Gothic cathedral that sits on the Île de la Cité, one of the islands in the middle on the River Seine in Paris. Notre Dame is home to many beautiful and significant artifacts, the most famous of which is the Crown of Thorns supposedly worn by Jesus Christ at his execution, placed in the cathedral in 1239. It's also home to some magnificent gargoyles on the roof, and you can climb up to the roof and take a very close look at them.

92. Red choice PINOT
The Pinot noir wine grape variety takes its name from the French for “pine” and “black”. The grapes grow in tight clusters shaped like pine cones, and are very dark in color. The Pinot noir grape is most closely associated with Burgundy wines in France, although in recent years the popularity (and price) of California Pinot noir wine has soared after it featured so prominently in the wonderful, wonderful 2004 movie “Sideways”. Grab a bottle of Pinot, and go rent the DVD…

102. Swiss mathematician EULER
Leonhard Euler was a brilliant Swiss mathematician and physicist, a pioneer in the fields of logarithms and graph theory.

105. Masters champ between Gary and Jack ARNIE
Arnold Palmer is one of the greats of the world of golf. Palmer is very popular with many fans of the game, and his followers are usually referred to as “Arnie’s Army”.

108. Five-sided plate HOME
In baseball, home plate is five-sided.

109. Author Wiesel ELIE
Elie Wiesel is a holocaust survivor, best known for his book "Night" which tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald.

112. Valentine's Day deity AMOR
Eros, the Greek god of love, was also known as Amor.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Saucers in the air UFOS
5. Jewelry holder CHEST
10. You won't see them in N.L. ballparks DHS
13. Shanghai ABDUCT
19. Raise Cain RANT
20. Miniseries opener PART I
21. Turn state's evidence RAT
22. Book with Dick and Jane, say PRIMER
23. Dear John? BREAKING-(UP) NEWS
26. Alice Walker title color PURPLE
27. Playing marble AGATE
28. Response to "Was it that bad?" DON’T ASK
29. What liars lack HONESTY
30. So-called NOMINAL
32. Mordor monster ORC
33. Colorado-based sports org. USOC
34. Extortion amount, perhaps? COVER-(UP) CHARGE
39. Greenish blue hue TEAL
43. James and Natalie's "Rebel Without a Cause" co-star SAL
46. Yemeni seaport ADEN
47. Rest stop sights SEMIS
48. Star of the 1981 revue "The Lady and Her Music" HORNE
49. "Ice cream castles in the air," in a Mitchell song CLOUDS
52. H.S. math course ALG
54. Fabled flier ROC
55. Frito-Lay chip DORITO
56. Manufactured goods OUTPUT
57. Sullen look POUT
59. Graduate's award SHEEPSKIN
61. Opulent PLUSH
62. Stocking shades ECRUS
64. Of the flock LAIC
65. Steinbeck title starter EAST
66. Raise some prices in the 19th-century literature section? MARK (UP) TWAIN
70. Where Brigham Young settled UTAH
74. Bio lab gel AGAR
76. Glad alternative SARAN
77. Screen partner STAGE
78. Not even slightly different IDENTICAL
83. New Eng. state CONN
84. Boosters, often ALUMNI
85. Once in a blue moon SELDOM
86. Landscaper's purchase SOD
88. Mine in Rome MIO
89. Took a short trip HOPPED
90. "American Psycho" author ELLIS
91. Aweigh ATRIP
93. NASDAQ competitor NYSE
95. "__ Grew Older": Hughes poem AS I
96. Vivacity ELAN
97. Revolting Oscar also-rans? (UP)RISING STARS
101. H.S. dropouts may earn them GEDS
103. Cat lead-in SNO-
104. School EDUCATE
108. Beatles hit with a four-minute coda HEY JUDE
111. Measure that's often square FOOTAGE
114. Household cleanser BORAX
115. Fútbol shout OLE OLE!
116. View from the Transamerica Tower? BALTIMORE SUN(UP)
118. Dairy worker MILKER
119. Quad bike, for one ATV
120. Pigeon shelters COTES
121. Two-time All-Star Martinez TINO
122. Fishermen with pots EELERS
123. Raised golf course feature TEE
124. Strengthen's opposite ERODE
125. Film crew locales SETS

Down
1. __ sprawl URBAN
2. Wells's partner FARGO
3. Late show hr. ONE AM
4. At a standstill STATIC
5. Inflation no. CPI
6. Dealt with HANDLED
7. Cogito __ sum ERGO
8. __ gun STUN
9. Best of the best TIPTOP
10. "Happily Divorced" star DRESCHER
11. Aggressive type HAWK
12. Part of USA: Abbr. STS
13. Place beside APPOSE
14. German philosopher Bauer BRUNO
15. Hired prankster on the set? DIRECTOR’S CUT(UP)
16. Out callers UMPS
17. Gael or Breton CELT
18. Small diamond TREY
24. Popular bar game KENO
25. Busters NARCS
29. Half of XOXO HUGS
31. Sailor's "Stop!" AVAST
35. Grim guy? REAPER
36. Open, in a way UNLOCK
37. "Famous" cookie creator AMOS
38. Drummer Buddy RICH
40. Christine's phantom admirer ERIK
41. Prefix with knock ANTI-
42. "Exodus" author Uris LEON
43. Check (out) SCOPE
44. "Be-Bop-__": Gene Vincent hit - A-LULA
45. Meditative position LOTUS
48. Navajo neighbor HOPI
50. One-liner from the pulpit? (UP)STANDING JOKE
51. Cry with a head slap DUH
53. Spiritual leaders GURUS
55. List maker DEAN
58. Rapper __ Shakur TUPAC
60. Yale Bowl rooter ELI
63. Longtime senator Thurmond STROM
66. Seriously impair MAIM
67. Crescent component ARC
68. Diminishing WANING
69. Rattles one's cage ANNOYS
71. Florida city on the Gulf Coast TAMPA
72. Mother Teresa's birth name AGNES
73. "Project Runway" host Klum HEIDI
75. Souped-up Pontiacs GTOS
77. __-mo SLO
78. Following words I SEE
79. HP competitor DELL
80. Big name in scat ELLA
81. Celestial sci. ASTR
82. Petty of "A League of Their Own" LORI
84. Winning AHEAD
87. Break up, as a union DISSOLVE
91. Notre Dame recess APSE
92. Red choice PINOT
94. Guided STEERED
97. 118-Across targets UDDERS
98. It may be given before leaving NOTICE
99. Massages RUBS
100. Youngsters in uniforms SCOUTS
102. Swiss mathematician EULER
105. Masters champ between Gary and Jack ARNIE
106. Tease TAUNT
107. Olympic Stadium team through 2004 EXPOS
108. Five-sided plate HOME
109. Author Wiesel ELIE
110. Hardly one's library voice YELL
111. It can be cruel FATE
112. Valentine's Day deity AMOR
113. Good kind of guy to have around GO TO
116. Belfry denizen BAT
117. Oakland-to-Vegas dir. ESE


Return to top of page

No comments:

Tell a Friend about LAXCrossword.com:

Facebook Twitter Google Email

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive

Bottom Nav