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Greetings from Kilkenny, in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland until October 9th. I plan on doing the puzzle each day (with a pint, no doubt), although I may be a little late due to time zone differences. I am sure that you understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 6 Jan 13, Sunday





CROSSWORD SETTER: Julian Lim
THEME: ‘Scuse Me … each of today’s theme answers is a well-known phrase with a “W” replaced by “SQU”:
24A. Unoiled robot's problem? SQUEAK IN THE KNEES (from “weak in the knees”)
38A. Embarrassed parrot's cry? SQUAWK OF SHAME (from “walk of shame”)
52A. Lottery winner's reaction, perhaps? SQUEAL OF FORTUNE (from “Wheel of Fortune”)
73A. Sudden storm in Hunan? THE GREAT SQUALL OF CHINA (from “The Great Wall of China”)
85A. Shout when zucchini falls off the boat? SQUASH OVERBOARD (from “wash overboard”)
101A. Escort at the farmyard ball? CHICKEN SQUIRE (from “chicken wire”)
120A. Any Mr. Magoo story? THE SQUINTER’S TALE (from “The Winter’s Tale”)
COMPLETION TIME: 26m 10s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
8. Kuwaiti, e.g. ARABIAN
The State of Kuwait sits at the northern tip of the Persian Gulf, famously sharing a border to the north with Iraq. After WWI, Kuwait was a Protectorate within the British Empire and then gained independence from the UK in 1961. Iraq annexed Kuwait in 1990, which led to the Gulf War of 1990-1991.

19. Benedict XVI, e.g. POPE
Did you know that the current Pope, Benedict XVI, released a music CD while in office? His Holiness is featured singing on an album released not too long ago by the Vatican. "Alma Mater: Featuring The Voice of Pope Benedict XVI Deluxe Edition" is a collection of sacred music. All proceeds go to help underprivileged children around the world.

26. The "O" of OWN OPRAH
The Oprah Winfrey Network replaced Discovery Health Channel in January, 2011.

What can you say about Oprah Winfrey? Born into poverty to a single mother and with a harrowing childhood, Oprah is now the greatest African American philanthropist the world has ever known. Oprah's name was originally meant to be "Orpah" after the Biblical character in the Book of Ruth, and that's how it appears on her birth certificate. Apparently folks had trouble pronouncing "Orpah", so she's now "Oprah".

28. Sign about a space shortage, briefly SRO
Standing Room Only (SRO).

30. Sinusitis-treating MD ENT
Sinusitis is an inflammation of the sinuses, usually due to a viral infection. It might be treated by an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist (ENT).

37. __ es Salaam DAR
Dar es Salaam is the largest city in Tanzania, and sits right on the east coast of Africa. The city’s name is usually translated from Arabic as “Haven of Peace”.

42. Deli selection BLT
The BLT (bacon, lettuce and tomato) is the second most popular sandwich in the US, after the plain old ham sandwich.

43. Peruvian songstress Sumac YMA
Yma Sumac was a Peruvian soprano. Sumac had a notable vocal range of five octaves.

44. Palme __: Cannes prize D’OR
The “Palme d’Or” (or “Golden Palm” in English) is the highest award given at the Cannes Film Festival. The Palme d'Or goes to the director of the film selected as the best shown at the festival that year. The palm was selected as an emblem for the award as there is a palm featured on the coat of arms of the Commune of Cannes.

45. Rattan alternative OSIER
Most willows (trees and shrubs of the genus Salix) are called just that, willows. Some of the broad-leaved shrub varieties are called sallow, and the narrow-leaved shrubs are called osier. The variety known as osier is commonly used in basketry, as osier twigs are very flexible.

Rattan is the name of a large number of species of palms, all of which look less like trees and more like vines. The woody stems are used for making cane furniture.

47. "Half-caf" was added to it in 2012 OED
The "Oxford English Dictionary" (OED) contains over 300,000 "main" entries and 59 million words in total. It is said it would take a single person 120 years to type it out in full. The longest entry for one word in the second edition of the OED is the verb "set". When the third edition was published in 2007, the longest entry for a single word became the verb "put". Perhaps not surprisingly, the most-quoted author in the OED is William Shakespeare, with his most quoted work being “Hamlet”. The most-quoted female author is George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans).

If you order “half-caf” at your local Starbucks you will be given a 50/50 mix of regular/decaffeinated coffee.

48. "Modern Family" role MANNY
On the sitcom “Modern Family”, the character called Manny Delgado is Gloria’s young son from her first marriage. Manny is played by child actor Rico Rodriguez.

“Modern Family” is a marvelous television show shown on ABC since 2009. The show’s format is that of a “mockumentary”, with the cast often addressing the camera directly. In that respect “Modern Family” resembles two other excellent shows: “The Office” and “Parks and Recreation”.

59. Et __ ALII
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact "et al." can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

60. Dickens's "__ Mutual Friend" OUR
“Our Mutual Friend” is the last novel that Charles Dickens finished, first published in 1865.

61. Religious title starter DALAI
The Dalai Lama is a religious leader in the Gelug branch of Tibetan Buddhism. The current Dalai Lama is the 14th to hold the office. He has indicated that the next Dalai Lama might be found outside of Tibet for the first time, and may be female.

62. Decked out at the Forum TOGAED
In Ancient Rome the classical attire known as a toga (plural “togae”) was usually worn over a tunic. The tunic was made from linen, and the toga itself was a piece of cloth about twenty feet long made from wool. The toga could only be worn by men, and only if those men were Roman citizens. The female equivalent of the toga was called a "stola".

The Roman forum was the public space in the middle of a city, taking it's name from the Latin word "forum" meaning "marketplace, town square".

65. Troy story? ILIAD
The Iliad is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war.

73. Sudden storm in Hunan? THE GREAT SQUALL OF CHINA (from “The Great Wall of China”)
The Great Wall of China is a series of fortifications that was built and rebuilt over the centuries to protect the northern borders of the Chinese Empire. Most of the existing wall was reconstructed during the Ming Dynasty. This Ming wall is about 5,000 miles long. There is an urban myth that the Great Wall is visible from the Moon, or from space. NASA has shown that the Great Wall can only be discerned from low Earth orbit (about 100 miles), and that is no more or less visible than any other man-made structure.

77. __ Lake, town near Lake Placid SARANAC
Saranac Lake is a village in Upstate New York that is named for three nearby lakes: Upper, Middle and Lower Saranac Lakes. The village has strong connections to the Arts. The classical composer Béla Bartók wrote some of his best-known works while spending summers in Saranac Lake. The author Robert Louis Stevenson spent the winter of 1887 in the village in a cottage that is still standing. Also Garry Trudeau, who draws the “Doonesbury” comic strip, was raised in Saranac Lake.

78. App for long-distance partners SKYPE
The main feature of the Skype application is that it allows voice communication to take place over the Internet (aka VoIP). Skype has other features such as video conferencing and instant messaging, but the application made its name from voice communication. Skype was founded by two Scandinavian entrepreneurs and the software necessary was developed by a team of engineers in Estonia. The development project was originally called "Sky peer-to-peer" so the first commercial name for the application was "Skyper". This had to be shortened to "Skype" because the skyper.com domain name was already in use.

79. Israeli tender SHEKEL
The shekel is the currency used today in Israel. The first use of the word “shekel” was in Mesopotamia around 3000 BCE when it probably referred to a specific weight of barley.

82. Prefix with caching GEO-
Geocaching is a game rather like “hide and seek” that is played outdoors using hi-tech equipment. The idea is that someone places a waterproof container in a specific location with known GPS coordinates. The container has a logbook inside, so that players who find the “cache” can record their discovery along with any notes of interest. The location of the container is listed on special sites on the Internet for anyone to access. You can check out caches near you at www.geocaching.com. You will probably be surprised at how many there are! I know I was ...

94. Hokkaido port city OTARU
The Japanese city and port of Otaru is just a 25-minute drive northwest from Sapporo. Just like Sapporo, Otaru has a famous beer that shares the city's name.

Hokkaido is the second largest island in Japan, after Honshu. It lies to the north of the country, and its largest city is the capital, Sapporo.

95. Here, to Henri ICI
"Vous êtes ici" are important words to know when navigating your way around Paris. They mean "You are here", and you'll often see them on maps in the street.

109. Omani tender RIAL
The Rial is name of the currency of Oman (as well as that of Yemen , Iran, Cambodia and Tunisia!).

111. __-Pei SHAR
The Shar Pei breed of dog is that one with the wrinkly face and really dark tongue. The breed originated in China, with "Shar Pei" being the British spelling of the Cantonese name.

112. "Mansfield Park" novelist AUSTEN
“Mansfield Park” is Jane Austen’s third novel, published after “Sense and Sensibility” and “Pride and Prejudice”. “Mansfield Park” is a rags-to-relative-riches story about the main character, Fanny Price.

117. Xhosa and Zulu are among its official langs. RSA
The Republic of South Africa (RSA).

120. Any Mr. Magoo story? THE SQUINTER’S TALE (from “The Winter’s Tale”)
“The Winter’s Tale” is a play by William Shakespeare.

Mr. Quincy Magoo is a wonderful cartoon character voiced by Jim Backus. Backus is probably equally well-known for playing Mr. Magoo as well as Thurston Howell, III on "Gilligan's Island". Mr. Magoo first appeared on the screen in a short called "The Ragtime Bear" in 1949. His persona was at least in part based on the antics of W. C. Fields. Backus originally used a fake rubber nose that pinched his nostrils in order to create the distinctive voice, although in time he learned to do the voice without the prop. My absolute favorite appearance by Mr. Magoo is in "Mr Magoo's Christmas Carol", a true classic from the sixties. There was a movie adaptation of "Mr Magoo" released in 1997, with Leslie Nielsen playing the title role.

125. Pre-'90s orchard spray ALAR
The chemical name for Alar, a plant growth regulator and color enhancer, is daminozide. Alar was primarily used on apples but was withdrawn from the market when it was linked to cancer.

126. 30 Seconds to Mars frontman Jared LETO
Jared Leto is an actor and musician. In the world of music, Leto is the lead singer and rhythm guitarist for the rock band 30 Seconds to Mars. In the film world his most critically acclaimed role was that of a heroin addict in "Requiem for a Dream". He also appeared in "American Psycho", "Panic Room" and "Lord of War".

127. Latin Mass prayer PATER NOSTER
"Our Father ..." are the opening words of the Lord's Prayer ("Pater Noster" in Latin), probably the best-known prayer in the Christian tradition.

129. Belgian river YSER
The Yser originates in northern France and flows through Belgium into the North Sea. The Yser is often associated with WWI as it figured in a major battle early in the conflict. In the first three months of the war, the German Army pushed almost completely through Belgium, inflicting heavy losses on the Belgian Army as the defenders were forced to fight a fast-moving rearguard action. The Germans were intent on pushing right through Belgium and across France in a "race to the sea". But the Belgians, with the help of their Allies, decided to make a final stand at the Yser Canal in an effort to prevent the Germans reaching the French ports of Calais and Dunkirk. The 22-mile long defensive line was chosen at the Yser because the river and canal system could be flooded to create a barrier that might be defended. The plan was successful and the front was "stabilized". As we now know, millions of lives were lost over the coming years with very little movement of that battle line.

132. Ivy growing for 300+ years YALE
The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

Down
2. 2002 HP acquisition COMPAQ
These days the Compaq brand of computers are sold by Hewlett-Packard, as the two companies merged in 2002. The original Compaq company was founded in 1982, with the name coming from COMP-atibility A-nd Q-uality.

3. Overview APERCU
An “apercu” is a first view, a glance. By extension, the term “apercu” can also be used for a detached view, an overview or a short synopsis. “Aperçu” is French for “perceived”.

4. Opera director Scotto RENATA
Renata Scotto is an Italian soprano who retired from the stage and is now working behind the scenes as a successful opera director. Amongst all the accolades for her performances onstage, Scotto did once have to deal with a hostile audience. In 1974 she was singing Eleni in Verdi's "I Vespri Siciliani" when a clique of Maria Callas fans continuously called out "Maria, Maria" and "Brava, Callas". Maria Callas was actually in a box watching Scotto perform, and refused to acknowledge the interruption. At the end of the opera, Callas rose graciously and led a standing ovation for Ms. Scotto's performance.

6. Titles in court, for short ESQS
The title "esquire" is of British origin and is used differently today depending on whether one is in the US or the UK. Here in America the term is usually reserved for those practicing the law (both male and female). In the UK, "esquire" is a term of gentle respect reserved for a male who has no other title that one can use. So a mere commoner like me might receive a letter from the bank say, addressed to W. E. Butler Esq.

7. Brad of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" DOURIF
The actor Brad Dourif is perhaps best known for playing the patient called Billy Bibbit in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”. Dourif also provides the voice for the evil doll called Chucky in the “Child’s Play” series of movies. I cannot watch those films …

8. Mental health org. APA
American Psychiatric Organization (APA).

9. Seoul protector ROK
A South Korean soldier is known as an ROK, named after the acronym for the Republic of (South) Korea.

10. Craigslist caveat AS IS
Craigslist is an online network of communities that features classified advertisements organized geographically. Craigslist was started by Craig Newmark in 1995, originally as an email distribution list for his friends who lived and worked in the San Francisco Bay Area.

14. "I will fear __": Psalm 23 NO EVIL
Psalm 23 starts out with:
The Lord is my shepherd, I lack nothing.
He makes me lie down in green pastures,
he leads me beside quiet waters,
he refreshes my soul.
He guides me along the right paths for his name’s sake.
Even though I walk through the darkest valley,
I will fear no evil,
for you are with me;
your rod and your staff,
they comfort me.

17. Cry from the flock AMEN AMEN!
The word “amen” is translated as “so be it”. “Amen” is said to be of Hebrew origin, but it is likely to be also influenced by Aramaic and Arabic.

18. Scotland Yard inspector in Sherlock Holmes stories LESTRADE
Inspector Lestrade is a policeman from Scotland Yard who appears in many of the “Sherlock Holmes” stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Doyle pinched the name “Lestrade” from a friend of his from his university days, a medical student called Joseph Alexandre Lestrade.

21. Menial laborers PEONS
A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word comes into English from Spanish where it has the same meaning.

25. Ohio's __ State KENT
Kent State University's main campus is located in Kent, Ohio. Kent State will forever be associated with student activism and opposition to the Vietnam War in the late sixties and early seventies. The fateful day was May 4, 1970 when members of the Ohio National Guard opened fire on students, killing four protesters and wounding nine.

32. "Top Hat" studio RKO
The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy's Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO acronym then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

“Top Hat” is a fun comedy musical starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. “Top Hat” is the most successful movie that the Astaire-Rogers team made.

35. "Qué __?" PASA
In Spanish, “que pasa?” literally translates as “what happened?” but is used to mean “how have things been going with you?”

41. Anti-discrimination initials EEO
Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) is a term that has been around since 1964 when the Equal Employment Commission was set up by the Civil Rights Act.

46. Mail svc. that may cover a general store RFD
Rural Free Delivery (RFD) was started in the US in 1891. Prior to RFD, rural Americans had to travel to the nearest post office to pick up their mail.

48. Quarterback Ryan et al. MATTS
Matt Ryan is a quarterback playing for the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons.

49. Island greeting ALOHA
The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

50. Landlocked African land NIGER
The Republic of Niger (often called just "Niger") is a landlocked country in Western Africa that gets its name from the Niger River. 80% of the Republic of Niger lies within the bounds of the Sahara Desert.

51. Falls for two lovers? NIAGARA
For well over a century now, the twin cities of Niagara Falls, New York and Niagara Falls, Ontario have been popular honeymoon destinations. Niagara Falls got a boost as a honeymoon destination in 1953 with the release of “Niagara”, a film noir starring Marilyn Monroe and Joseph Cotton.

54. Bookmarked addresses, briefly URLS
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

55. Gambling game FARO
Faro is a card game somewhat akin to Baccarat that was popular in England and France in the 18th century. Faro made it to the Old West, where it became a favorite of Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp. The origin of the name "Faro" is unclear. One popular theory is that Faro is a contraction of ‘pharaoh’ given that Egyptian motifs used to be common on playing cards of the period. There’s another theory involving the usual suspects: Irish immigrants and famines …

56. Five Norwegian royals OLAFS
Of the many kings of Norway named Olaf/Olav (and there have been five), Olaf II is perhaps the most celebrated as he was canonized and made patron saint of the country. Olaf II was king from 1015 to 1028 and was known as "Olaf the Big" (or Olaf the Fat) during his reign. Today he is more commonly referred to as "Olaf the Holy". After Olaf died he was given the title of Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae, which is Latin for “Norway’s Eternal King”.

57. Dressing with wings RANCH
Ranch dressing has been the best selling salad dressing in the country since 1992. The recipe was developed by Steve Henson who introduced it in the fifties to guests on his dude ranch, Hidden Valley Ranch in Northern California. His ranch dressing became so popular that he opened a factory to produce packets of ranch seasoning that could be mixed with mayonnaise and buttermilk. Henson sold the brand for $8 million in 1972.

58. Some church supporters TITHERS
A tithe is traditional payment of one tenth of a person's annual incomeand is usually given to a church. Tithing is a practice taught in many traditions, and according to a 2002 survey, about 3% of American adults donate 10% or more of their income to a church.

63. Seaside soarers ERNES
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle, and the sea-eagle.

64. Donne's "__ Be Not Proud" DEATH
I don't know about here in America, but at school in Ireland we all had to learn John Donne's "Holy Sonnet X", also known as "Death Be Not Proud".

John Donne is one of England's most celebrated poets, working at the start of the 17th century. He spent much of his life in poverty and even spent a short time in prison for having married his wife without procuring the appropriate permissions. His wife might have regretted that he was released, as she then bore him 12 children in 16 years, passing away a few days after the twelfth child was born.

67. Seaside diver AUK
Auks are penguin-like sea birds that live in colder northern waters including the Arctic. Like penguins, auks are great swimmers, but unlike penguins, auks can fly.

68. Time to seize? DAY
"Carpe diem" is a quotation from Horace, one of Ancient Rome's leading lyric poets. "Carpe diem" translates from Latin as "seize the day" or "enjoy the day".

70. "Oliver Twist" antagonist SIKES
Bill Sikes is the nasty criminal associate of Fagin in the Charles Dicken’s novel “Oliver Twist”.

"Oliver Twist" is of course a novel by Charles Dickens. It is a popular tale for adaptation to the big screen. There are two silent film versions, released in 1909 and 1922, and the first talkie version was released in 1933 with many to follow. The latest "Oliver" for the big screen is a 2005 Roman Polanski production.

72. Some latte sizes TALLS
The term “latte” is an abbreviation of the Italian "caffelatte" meaning "coffee (and) milk". Note that in the correct spelling of "latte", the Italian word for milk, there is no accent over the "e". An accent is often added by mistake when we use the word in English, perhaps meaning to suggest that the word is French.

74. Phobia beginning ACRO-
Our prefix "acro-" comes from the Greek "akros" meaning "at the top". Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

75. Natalie Gulbis's org. LPGA
Natalie Gulbis is a professional golfer from Sacramento, California who plays the LPGA Tour.

81. Ab __: anew OVO
"Ab ovo" translates literally from Latin as "from the egg", and is used in English to mean “from the beginning”.

83. Anthony Hopkins's "Thor" role ODIN
The 2011 movie “Thor” is yet another film based on a comic book hero. Even though I won’t be seeing it (I don’t do comics), I must admit it does have an impressive cast. Chris Hemsworth plays Thor, supported by Natalie Portman, Rene Russo and Anthony Hopkins. And to crown it all, the magnificent Kenneth Branagh is the director.

87. Stet UNDELETE
"Stet" is the Latin word meaning "let it stand". In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word "stet" beside the change and then underscoring the change with a line of dots or dashes.

90. Jewish ritual BRIS
A mohel is a man who has been trained in the practice of Brit milah (circumcision). Brit milah is known as "bris" in Yiddish.

92. Feeling felt in fits PIQUE
Our term "pique" meaning a "fit of ill feeling" is a French word meaning a "prick, sting, irritation".

96. Lee's letters CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in the war in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited Lee to take command of the whole Union Army but he declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

98. Big oil exporter IRAQ
The country we know today as Iraq was known by Westerners for centuries as Mesopotamia, the Greek for “land between the rivers”. The two rivers referenced are the Tigris and the Euphrates. The area between the two rivers is sometimes called ‘the cradle of civilization” as it was here that fundamental developments like the wheel, writing and the law were born.

100. Maid of fiction MARIAN
Robin Hood is a figure from English folklore, celebrated in story and song. Some stories suggest that Robin Hood the outlaw was actually a real nobleman, the Earl of Huntington. Robin Hood's famous companion was Maid Marian. Interestingly, the legend of Maid Marian (full name Lady Marian of Leaford) had been around for centuries before she became associated with Robin Hood starting in the 1700s.

103. Faux ERSATZ
Something described as “ersatz” is a copy, and usually not a good one. “Ersatz” comes from the German verb “ersetzen” meaning “to replace”.

104. "Anchors Aweigh" org. US NAVY
The song “Anchors Aweigh” is strongly associated with the US Navy, largely because it is the fight song of the US Naval Academy.

105. 1990 World Cup host, locally ITALIA
Soccer’s 1990 FIFA World Cup was held in Italy. The tournament was won by West Germany.

107. Menu listing ENTREE
Entrée of course means "entry" in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in", an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the "entry" to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America, as the entrée is the main course!

110. Allegro's opposite LENTO
A lento passage is a piece of music that has a slow tempo.

118. Away from most of the blowing ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

122. Molecular code carrier RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

123. William, to Charles SON
Prince William is second in line to the British throne, after his father Prince Charles, with Prince Harry holding the third spot. Prince Harry moves down the list should William and Kate have children. The law was changed in 2011 so that the oldest child of Prince William and Kate Middleton will be next in line, regardless of sex. Up till 2011, the sons took precedence, even over older daughters.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Fight reminder SCAR
5. Joined WED
8. Kuwaiti, e.g. ARABIAN
15. Cut (back) DIAL
19. Benedict XVI, e.g. POPE
20. Rather than AS OPPOSED TO
22. "I'll pay" ON ME
23. Red sky, to some OMEN
24. Unoiled robot's problem? SQUEAKIN THE KNEES (from “weak in the knees”)
26. The "O" of OWN OPRAH
28. Sign about a space shortage, briefly SRO
29. Feel a strong need (for) STARVE
30. Sinusitis-treating MD ENT
31. Relevant element FACTOR
33. 18-Down's rank: Abbr. INSP
36. Use an entrance GO IN
37. __ es Salaam DAR
38. Embarrassed parrot's cry? SQUAWK OF SHAME (from “walk of shame”)
42. Deli selection BLT
43. Peruvian songstress Sumac YMA
44. Palme __: Cannes prize D’OR
45. Rattan alternative OSIER
47. "Half-caf" was added to it in 2012 OED
48. "Modern Family" role MANNY
52. Lottery winner's reaction, perhaps? SQUEAL OF FORTUNE (from “Wheel of Fortune”)
59. Et __ ALII
60. Dickens's "__ Mutual Friend" OUR
61. Religious title starter DALAI
62. Decked out at the Forum TOGAED
65. Troy story? ILIAD
69. Raves about RANTS AT
73. Sudden storm in Hunan? THE GREAT SQUALL OF CHINA (from “The Great Wall of China”)
77. __ Lake, town near Lake Placid SARANAC
78. App for long-distance partners SKYPE
79. Israeli tender SHEKEL
80. Hot again RETRO
82. Prefix with caching GEO-
84. True-to-life REAL
85. Shout when zucchini falls off the boat? SQUASH OVERBOARD (from “wash overboard”)
92. Soft vocal signals PSSTS
93. Distillery container TUN
94. Hokkaido port city OTARU
95. Here, to Henri ICI
97. Embarrassed RED
98. Capital gain? -ISM
101. Escort at the farmyard ball? CHICKEN SQUIRE (from “chicken wire”)
108. Like Beethoven's Sonata Op. 109 IN E
109. Omani tender RIAL
111. __-Pei SHAR
112. "Mansfield Park" novelist AUSTEN
113. M ÷ IV CCL
114. Vegging out AT REST
117. Xhosa and Zulu are among its official langs. RSA
119. Do a legislature's job ENACT
120. Any Mr. Magoo story? THE SQUINTER’S TALE (from “The Winter’s Tale”)
125. Pre-'90s orchard spray ALAR
126. 30 Seconds to Mars frontman Jared LETO
127. Latin Mass prayer PATER NOSTER
128. Foul VILE
129. Belgian river YSER
130. Three-ball family project, typically SNOWMAN
131. Zero has one ZEE
132. Ivy growing for 300+ years YALE

Down
1. Send-ups SPOOFS
2. 2002 HP acquisition COMPAQ
3. Overview APERCU
4. Opera director Scotto RENATA
5. "I __ had!" WAS
6. Titles in court, for short ESQS
7. Brad of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" DOURIF
8. Mental health org. APA
9. Seoul protector ROK
10. Craigslist caveat AS IS
11. Proclivity BENT
12. Place for a pet name ID TAG
13. Thumping ATHROB
14. "I will fear __": Psalm 23 NO EVIL
15. Get into DON
16. "Don't leave me" I NEED YOU
17. Cry from the flock AMEN AMEN!
18. Scotland Yard inspector in Sherlock Holmes stories LESTRADE
21. Menial laborers PEONS
25. Ohio's __ State KENT
27. "Hey, Tex" HOWDY
32. "Top Hat" studio RKO
34. It's about a foot SHOE
35. "Qué __?" PASA
39. -ish OR SO
40. "Cool" sum MIL
41. Anti-discrimination initials EEO
46. Mail svc. that may cover a general store RFD
48. Quarterback Ryan et al. MATTS
49. Island greeting ALOHA
50. Landlocked African land NIGER
51. Falls for two lovers? NIAGARA
53. Stop QUIT
54. Bookmarked addresses, briefly URLS
55. Gambling game FARO
56. Five Norwegian royals OLAFS
57. Dressing with wings RANCH
58. Some church supporters TITHERS
63. Seaside soarers ERNES
64. Donne's "__ Be Not Proud" DEATH
66. 95% of them are between 70 and 130 IQS
67. Seaside diver AUK
68. Time to seize? DAY
70. "Oliver Twist" antagonist SIKES
71. "That's __ trick!" A NEAT
72. Some latte sizes TALLS
74. Phobia beginning ACRO-
75. Natalie Gulbis's org. LPGA
76. Sinister stare LEER
81. Ab __: anew OVO
83. Anthony Hopkins's "Thor" role ODIN
85. To the letter STRICTLY
86. Slakes QUENCHES
87. Stet UNDELETE
88. "You know the rest," for short ETC
89. "We're winning!" RAH
90. Jewish ritual BRIS
91. "That smarts!" OUCH
92. Feeling felt in fits PIQUE
96. Lee's letters CSA
98. Big oil exporter IRAQ
99. Fitness test components SIT-UPS
100. Maid of fiction MARIAN
102. Zippy racers KARTS
103. Faux ERSATZ
104. "Anchors Aweigh" org. US NAVY
105. 1990 World Cup host, locally ITALIA
106. Manufacturer's nightmare RECALL
107. Menu listing ENTREE
110. Allegro's opposite LENTO
115. Stressful thing to get into STEW
116. Four years, perhaps TERM
118. Away from most of the blowing ALEE
121. Campus gp. SOR
122. Molecular code carrier RNA
123. William, to Charles SON
124. Afore ERE

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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