LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Apr 13, Tuesday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Amy Johnson
THEME: Ice First … today’s themed answers are made up of two words, each of which can be preceded by the word ICE:

39A. With 40-Across and “Baby,” a 1990’s hip-hop hit that answers the question, “What can precede both parts of the answers to starred clues?” ICE
40A. See 39-Across ICE

17A. *Protective fuse container BREAKER BOX (“icebreaker” & “icebox”)
61A. *Tailgater’s brew chiller BEER BUCKET (“ice beer” & “ice bucket”)
11D. *Flood control concern STORM WATER (“ice storm” & “ice water”)
29D. *Era of mass production MACHINE AGE (“ice machine” & “ice age”)

COMPLETION TIME: 08m 22s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
10. __ Spumante ASTI
Asti is a sparkling white wine from the Piedmont region of Italy, and is named for the town of Asti around which the wine is produced. The wine used to be called Asti Spumante, and it had a very bad reputation as a “poor man’s champagne”. The “Spumante” was dropped in a marketing attempt at rebranding associated with a reduction in the amount of residual sugar in the wine.

14. 50+ group AARP
AARP is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

15. Verdi aria ERI TU
The aria “Eri tu” is from Verdi’s opera “Un ballo in maschera” (A Masked Ball). The opera tells the story of the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden during a masked ball.

16. Trans Am roof option T-TOP
A T-top is a car roof that has removable panels on either side of a rigid bar that runs down the center of the vehicle above the driver.

The Trans Am was a specialty version of the Pontiac Firebird produced from 1969 to 2002.

23. Gift for el 14 de febrero ROSAS
In Spanish, a gift of roses (rosas) might be given on the 14th of February (14 de febrero).

Saint Valentine’s Day was chosen by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saints’ day was dropped by the Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

26. Tree for which New Haven is nicknamed ELM
The city of New Haven, Connecticut was founded in 1638 by Puritan immigrants from England. New Haven is of course home to Yale University. The city also initiated the first public tree planting program in the country. The large elms included in the program led to New Haven being called “the Elm City”.

30. Native American weapons TOMAHAWKS
The Native American axe known as a tomahawk takes its name from the Virginia Algonquian term for the tool: “tamahaac”.

37. MSN alternative AOL
Founded as Quantum Computer Services in 1983, the company changed its name in 1989 to America Online. As America Online went international, the acronym AOL was used in order to shake off the “America-centric” sound to the name. During the heady days of AOL’s success the company could not keep up with the growing number of subscribers, so people trying to connect often encountered busy signals. That’s when users referred to AOL as “Always Off-Line”.

MSN was originally called The Microsoft Network, introduced in 1995 as an integral part of Microsoft’s Windows 95 operating system. MSN is a whole bundle of services including email, instant messaging, and the MSN.com portal (which is the 9th most visited site on the Internet).

38. Partners’ legal entity: Abbr. LLC
A limited liability company (LLC) is a company structure that limits the liability of the owner or owners.

39. With 40-Across and “Baby,” a 1990’s hip-hop hit that answers the question, “What can precede both parts of the answers to starred clues?” ICE
40. See 39-Across ICE
“Ice Ice Baby” is song released by rap artists Vanilla Ice and DJ Earthquake.

41. Lao Tzu’s “path” TAO
Lao Tse (also Lao-Tzu) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism.

42. July 4th reaction OOH!
On 11 June 1776, the Continental Congress appointed a committee of five people to draft a declaration of independence. Included in the five were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Adams persuaded the other committee members to give Jefferson the task of writing the first draft. A resolution of independence was passed by the Congress on 2 Jul 1776. The final draft of the declaration was approved by the Congress two days later, on July 4th. John Adams wrote a letter to his wife that included an assertion that July 2nd (the date of the resolution of independence) would become a great American holiday. Of course Adams was wrong, and it was actually the date the Declaration of Independence was finalized that came to be celebrated annually.

43. Early Florida explorer DE SOTO
Hernando de Soto was a Spanish conquistador who led expeditions throughout the southeastern US. De Sotos travels were unsuccessful in that he failed to bring gold or silver back to Spain, and nor did he found any colonies. What de Soto did achieve was the exposure of local populations to devastating Eurasian diseases.

46. School term TRIMESTER
“Semester” is a German word from the Latin “semestris”, an adjective meaning “of six months”. We of course use “semester” in a system that divides an academic year into two roughly equal parts. A trimester system has three parts, and a quarter system has four.

50. Groupon offerings DEALS
Groupon is a relatively young company, a deal-of-the-day type website that was started in 2008. The concept behind the business is illustrated by the company name, a portmanteau of “group coupon”. Each day a discount coupon is offered to website members who sign up knowing that the coupon requires a minimum number of “takers” in order for it to be valid. If too few buyers sign up, then the coupon is void. When sufficient buyers sign up the coupon is honored, and the retailer benefits from the large volume of business generated. Groupon was very successful for a couple of years and predictions were made that the company would reach $1 billion in sales faster than any other company in history. That forecast has changed dramatically, and the CEO was ousted in February 2013.

52. Rodeo hat STETSON
Stetson is a brand name of hat, manufactured by the John B. Stetson Company of St. Joseph, Missouri. The so called “cowboy hat” that Stetson pioneered was such a success that the company became the largest hat maker in the world, producing over 3.3 million hats per year.

56. With 48-Down, Felipe’s outfielder son MOISES
Jesus Alou played major league baseball, as did his brothers Matty and Felipe, and as does Felipe’s son, Moises.

60. Keister in a fall? PRAT
“Prat” is a new word for me, a slang term for the buttocks apparently …

Back in the early 1900s a keister was a safe or a strongbox. It has been suggested that this term was then used as slang by pickpockets for the rear trouser pocket in which one might keep a wallet. From this usage, keister appeared as a slang term for the buttocks in the early 1930s.

61. *Tailgater’s brew chiller BEER BUCKET (“ice beer” & “ice bucket”)
Ice beer is a type of lager that has undergone a process called fractional freezing. This means that the beer has been chilled to the point that ice crystals form. The ice is frozen water, and can be filtered off. This lowers the water content in the beer, hence raising the concentration of alcohol.

66. “The Clan of the Cave Bear” heroine AYLA
As Jean Auel prepared her first book in the “Earth’s Children” series, she did a lot of research about the Ice Age, the setting for her stories. She went as far as taking a survival course in cold conditions, learning to build an ice cave and how to make fire, tan leather and knap stone.

Down
1. Broccoli __ RABE
Broccoli Rabe is perhaps better known as rapini, and is a vegetable often used in Mediterranean cuisines. It is quite delicious sauteed with garlic …

3. Novelist __ Easton Ellis BRET
Bret Easton Ellis wrote a trio of novels that were made into very successful movies: “Less Than Zero” (1987, starring Andrew McCarthy), “American Psycho” (2000, starring Christian Bale) and “The Rules of Attraction” (2002, starring James van der Beek).

5. Marshmallowy Easter treats PEEPS
Peeps are marshmallow candies usually in the shapes of chicks and bunnies, primarily sold around the Easter holiday. Peeps were introduced in 1952 by a Russian immigrant called Sam Born whose company “Just Born” makes the candies to this day. The original candies were yellow and hand-shaped to look like little chicks, hence the name “Peeps”.

8. “Click __ Ticket”: seatbelt safety slogan IT OR
There is only one state in the US that does not require drivers to wear seat belts by law, and that is New Hampshire.

9. Elegance LUXE
Luxe is another word for luxury. The term came into English via French from the Latin “luxus” meaning “luxury”.

10. Hun honcho ATTILA
In his day, Attila the Hun was the most feared enemy of the Roman Empire, until he died in 453 AD. Attila was the leader of the Hunnic Empire of central Europe and was famous for invading much of the continent. However, he never directly attacked Rome.

18. “Get Smart” evil agency KAOS
The satirical comedy series called “Get Smart” was the creation of Mel Brooks and Buck Henry, and starred Don Adams as Agent 86, Maxwell Smart. It was on the air from 1965 to 1970. Smart’s shoe phone was a hilarious prop used in almost every episode. When Smart dialed the number 117, the shoe converted into a gun. Cool stuff …

25. Sevillian sun SOL
The city of Seville is the capital of Andalusia in southern Spain. Seville is a favored setting for many operas including “The Barber of Seville” by Rossini, “Fidelio” by Beethoven and Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” and “The Marriage of Figaro”.

31. __ d’hôtel: headwaiter MAITRE
The full name of a maitre d’ is “maitre d’hotel”, which means “master of the hotel”.

32. With the bow, to a cellist ARCO
“Arco” is a musical direction instructing a string player to return to normal bowing technique after a passage played using some other technique (perhaps pizzicato).

33. Cuddly-looking marsupial KOALA
The koala really does look like a little bear, but it’s not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope.

34. Casino attractions SLOTS
The “casino” originated in the 1700s, first describing a public room for music or dancing. The name “casino” is a diminutive of “casa” meaning “house”.

39. Inventeur’s list IDEES
In French, an inventor (inventeur) might have a list of ideas (idées).

44. U.K. lexicological work OED
The “Oxford English Dictionary” (OED) contains over 300,000 “main” entries and 59 million words in total. It is said it would take a single person 120 years to type it out in full. The longest entry for one word in the second edition of the OED is the verb “set”. When the third edition was published in 2007, the longest entry for a single word became the verb “put”. Perhaps not surprisingly, the most-quoted author in the OED is William Shakespeare, with his most quoted work being “Hamlet”. The most-quoted female author is George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans).

45. Many a Tony winner MUSICAL
The full name for the Tony Award is the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre. Antoinette Perry was an American actress and co-founder of the American Theatre Wing, one of the organizations that selects the award recipients.

51. Jewelry resin AMBER
Amber’s technical name is “resinite”, reflecting its composition and formation. Amber starts out life as soft sticky tree resin but then under high temperature and pressure from overlying layers of soil, it fossilizes. The sticky resin can trap organisms or other plant matter, and this material can sometimes remain virtually intact inside the amber fossil giving us a unique gift from the past.

52. Pet adoption org. SPCA
Unlike in other countries, there is no “umbrella” organization in the US with the goal of preventing cruelty to animals. Instead there are independent organizations set up all over the nation using the name SPCA. Having said that, there is an organization called the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that was originally intended to operate across the country, but really it now focuses its efforts in New York City.

54. Final bio? OBIT
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

55. Detective Wolfe NERO
Nero Wolfe is a fictional detective and the hero of many stories published by author Rex Stout. There are 33 Nero Wolfe novels for us to read, and 39 short stories. There are also movie adaptations of two of the novels: ” Meet Nero Wolfe” (1936) which features a young Rita Hayworth, and “The League of Frightened Men” (1937). One of Wolfe’s endearing traits is his love of good food and beer, so he is a pretty rotund character.

57. Largest of the Inner Hebrides SKYE
The Isle of Skye is off the northwest coast of Scotland in the Inner Hebrides. It is the second largest island in the country, and has been linked to the mainland by a road bridge since 1995. I’ve never been there, but I hear the views are spectacular.

63. 66, notably: Abbr. RTE
The famous old highway called Route 66 has largely been replaced by modern interstates. It ran from Chicago to Los Angeles, right through the heart of America, and so it was often called the “Main Street of America”. The road gained notoriety because of Nat King Cole’s song “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66”, and also because of the sixties TV show called “Route 66”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. 1860s Grays REBS
5. Danger PERIL
10. __ Spumante ASTI
14. 50+ group AARP
15. Verdi aria ERI TU
16. Trans Am roof option T-TOP
17. *Protective fuse container BREAKER BOX (“icebreaker” & “icebox”)
19. Mower brand TORO
20. Set up for a fall ENTRAP
21. Part of 14-Across, originally RETIRED
23. Gift for el 14 de febrero ROSAS
26. Tree for which New Haven is nicknamed ELM
27. Summits ACMES
30. Native American weapons TOMAHAWKS
35. “Get a __ of this!” LOAD
36. Loud, like sirens ABLARE
37. MSN alternative AOL
38. Partners’ legal entity: Abbr. LLC
39. With 40-Across and “Baby,” a 1990’s hip-hop hit that answers the question, “What can precede both parts of the answers to starred clues?” ICE
40. See 39-Across ICE
41. Lao Tzu’s “path” TAO
42. July 4th reaction OOH!
43. Early Florida explorer DE SOTO
45. Get gooey MELT
46. School term TRIMESTER
48. Saintly circles AURAS
49. “Uh-uh, lassie!” NAE
50. Groupon offerings DEALS
52. Rodeo hat STETSON
56. With 48-Down, Felipe’s outfielder son MOISES
60. Keister in a fall? PRAT
61. *Tailgater’s brew chiller BEER BUCKET (“ice beer” & “ice bucket”)
64. Bird house CAGE
65. Really miffed IRATE
66. “The Clan of the Cave Bear” heroine AYLA
67. Thumbs-up votes AYES
68. Bellhop, at times TOTER
69. Out of concern that LEST

Down
1. Broccoli __ RABE
2. Be worthy of EARN
3. Novelist __ Easton Ellis BRET
4. Trained with gloves SPARRED
5. Marshmallowy Easter treats PEEPS
6. Miscalculate ERR
7. Curved bone RIB
8. “Click __ Ticket”: seatbelt safety slogan IT OR
9. Elegance LUXE
10. Hun honcho ATTILA
11. *Flood control concern STORM WATER (“ice storm” & “ice water”)
12. Ran fast TORE
13. Apple for a music teacher? IPOD
18. “Get Smart” evil agency KAOS
22. Little chuckle TEHEE
24. In a perfect world AT BEST
25. Sevillian sun SOL
27. Portion out ALLOT
28. Enjoy crayons COLOR
29. *Era of mass production MACHINE AGE (“ice machine” & “ice age”)
31. __ d’hôtel: headwaiter MAITRE
32. With the bow, to a cellist ARCO
33. Cuddly-looking marsupial KOALA
34. Casino attractions SLOTS
36. Unreturned serves ACES
39. Inventeur’s list IDEES
44. U.K. lexicological work OED
45. Many a Tony winner MUSICAL
47. Unglossy finishes MATTES
48. See 56-Across ALOU
51. Jewelry resin AMBER
52. Pet adoption org. SPCA
53. Printer paper holder TRAY
54. Final bio? OBIT
55. Detective Wolfe NERO
57. Largest of the Inner Hebrides SKYE
58. Wiggly swimmers EELS
59. On-base pct., e.g. STAT
62. Have a meal EAT
63. 66, notably: Abbr. RTE

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Posted by Bill Butler
Google

LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Apr 13, Monday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Patti Varol
THEME: Golden Brown Finish … each of the themed answers ends with something that might be described as GOLDEN BROWN:

17A. Lacking a strong foundation, metaphorically BUILT ON SAND
24A. Snoopy’s WWI plane SOPWITH CAMEL
38A. Shutterbug PHOTOGRAPHY BUFF
48A. Farina-based hot cereal CREAM OF WHEAT
60A. Ideal toast color, and a hint to the ends of 17-, 24-, 38- and 48-Across GOLDEN BROWN

COMPLETION TIME: 07m 56s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
10. Tight-lipped MUM
The phrase “mum’s the word” has been around since the early 1700s. “Mum” has been used to mean “silent” for centuries, the idea being that “mum” is the sound made when the lips are tightly sealed.

13. Dubuque natives IOWANS
The city of Dubuque, Iowa is named for a pioneer from Quebec who arrived in the area in 1785, a pioneer named Julien Dubuque.

16. Chowed down ATE
“Chow” is an American slang term for food that originated in California in the mid-1800s. “Chow” comes from the Chinese pidgin English “chow-chow” meaning “food”.

22. Florence’s country ITALY
“Firenze” is the Italian name for the city that we know in English as Florence.

24. Snoopy’s WWI plane SOPWITH CAMEL
The Sopwith Camel is a biplane that was used by the British during WWI. The Camel was the most effective fighter during the conflict, shooting down 1,294 enemy planes.

Snoopy, the famous beagle in the “Peanuts” comic strip, has a number of alter-egos and is sometimes depicted as a World War I flying ace piloting a Sopwith Camel biplane. Snoopy’s arch-enemy in the air is Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, and Snoopy can often be seen shaking his fist and crying out, “Curse you, Red Baron!”

31. Hors d’oeuvre cracker RITZ
I’ve always liked Ritz crackers. They’ve been around since 1934 when they were introduced by Nabisco. The name Ritz was chosen because the marketing folks felt that the association with Ritz-Carlton would evoke images of wealth and the high life.

An hors d’oeuvre is the first course in a meal. “Hors d’oeuvre” translates from French as “apart from the work”, really meaning “not the main course”.

32. Northwestern Canadian territory YUKON
Canada’s federal territory known as Yukon takes its name from the Yukon River. “Yukon” means “Big Stream” in the local Gwich’in language.

Canada is made up of ten provinces and three territories. The three territories lie to the north of the country, and are Yukon, Northwest Territories (NWT) and Nunavut. Territories differ from provinces in that they only have governmental powers that are delegated to them by the federal government, whereas the provinces have constitutional powers in their own right.

33. Naval hoosegow BRIG
A brig, short for brigantine, is a type of ship. It was the use of brigantines as prison ships that led to use of “brig” as the word for a jail or prison cell on a seagoing vessel.

“Hoosegow” is a slang term for “jail”. “Hoosegow” is a mispronunciation of the Mexican-Spanish word “juzgao” meaning “court, tribunal”.

42. Mork’s planet ORK
“Mork & Mindy” was broadcast from 1978 to 1982. We were first introduced to Mork (played by Robin Williams, of course) in a special episode of “Happy Days”. The particular episode in question has a bizarre storyline culminating in Fonzie and Mork having a thumb-to-finger duel. Eventually Richie wakes up in bed, and alien Mork was just part of a dream! Oh, and “Nanu Nanu” means both “hello” and “goodbye” back on the planet Ork. “I am Mork from Ork, Nanu Nanu”. Great stuff …

48. Farina-based hot cereal CREAM OF WHEAT
Farina is semolina, or cream of wheat. It is made from wheat grain in which much of the nutritious ingredients are removed leaving a fine “flour”. The name “Farina” is the Latin word meaning “flour”.

53. Egypt neighbor LIBYA
The name “Libya” comes from the Ancient Greek “Libúē”, the historical name for Northwest Africa.

54. Subway whose first line had a terminus at NYC’s City Hall IRT
The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the original private operator of the New York Subway when it opened in 1904. The city took over ownership of the system in 1940, but the lines originally operated by the IRT are still known by the IRT moniker.

55. Suffix with wagon -ETTE
A wagonette is a relatively small horse-drawn vehicle with two lengthwise passenger seats facing each other behind the drivers seat.

64. Hamlet, to Gertrude SON
“Hamlet” is William Shakespeare’s longest play, and was also one of most popular of the playwright’s works during his lifetime.

66. “I, Robot” author ASIMOV
Isaac Asimov was a wonderful science fiction writer, and a professor of biochemistry. He was a favorite author as I was growing up and I must admit that some hero worship on my part led me to study and work as a biochemist for a short while early in my career. My favorite of his works is the collection of short stories called “I, Robot”, although Asimov’s most famous work is probably his “Foundation” trilogy of novels.

68. 2013 Oscars host MacFarlane SETH
Seth MacFarlane is best known for creating the very successful (although they don’t get my vote!) animated TV shows “Family Guy” and “American Dad”. My kids love ’em …

Down
1. Light-green lettuce BIBB
Bibb is a variety of lettuce in the cultivar known as butterhead. All butterhead varieties have loose-leafed heads and a buttery texture.

2. Disreputable fellow ROUE
“Roue” is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. “Roue” comes from the French word “rouer” meaning “to break on a wheel”. This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

4. Rogaine target BALD SPOT
Rogaine is a brand name for the drug Minoxidil. It was developed as an oral medication to treat high blood pressure, but was found to have an exploitable side-effect. It caused an increased in the rate of hair growth. A topical solution was marketed to promote growth of hair especially in balding men. The drug seems to work well, but when the application is stopped, things go back to normal in about 60 days. Wouldn’t dream of touching the stuff myself …

5. Dr. who treats snorers ENT
Ear, Nose and Throat specialist (ENT).

6. Bite-size raw Asian dish SUSHI
Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If you want raw fish by itself, then you have to order “sashimi”.

7. Water quality org. EPA
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was set up during the Nixon administration and began operation at the end of 1970.

12. Streep of “The Iron Lady” MERYL
Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an academy award than any other actor, a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend “Mama Mia” (you’ll either love it or hate it!), “Julie & Julia”, “It’s Complicated” and ”Hope Springs”.

“The Iron Lady” is a 2011 biopic about Margaret Thatcher, former British Prime Minister. The marvelous Meryl Streep does a wonderful job playing the title role. I had great expectations for this film and found that it didn’t quite deliver, despite a great cast.

23. Whirling toon devil, for short TAZ
The “Looney Tunes” character known as the Tasmanian Devil, or “Taz”, first appeared on screens in 1964 but gained real popularity in the 1990s.

The carnivorous marsupial known as the Tasmanian devil is aptly named, in the sense that the only place the animal is found in the wild is on the island of Tasmania. The “little devils” are about the size of a small dog, and they have the strongest bite for their size of any known mammal.

27. “__ Noon”: Gary Cooper Western HIGH
I am not a fan of western movies, but “High Noon” works for me. The film has a great cast, with Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly in the lead roles. I suppose I like the film because it doesn’t fit the mold as a typical western with lots of predictable action sequences. That said, when “High Noon” first hit theaters it was not popular with audiences, largely because moviegoers were expecting the formulaic western film.

29. German mining region RUHR
The Ruhr is a large urban area in western Germany. The region is heavily populated and is the fifth largest urban area in the whole of Europe after Istanbul, Moscow, London and Paris.

35. “Black Swan” skirt TUTU
The word “tutu”, used for a ballet dancer’s skirt, is actually a somewhat “naughty” term. It came into English from French in the early 20th century. The French “tutu” is an alteration of the word “cucu”, a childish word for “cul” meaning the “bottom,” or “backside”.

I have yet to see the 2010 movie “Black Swan”, which I’ve assumed is a psychological thriller set against the background of a ballet company staging Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake”. However, I’ve just seen “Black Swan” also described as a “horror film”, and that worries me as I am not a fan of the horror genre. Still, I’ll give it a chance …

36. Immature newts EFTS
Newts wouldn’t be my favorite animals. They are found all over the world living on land or in water depending on the species, but always associated with water even if it is only for breeding. Newts metamorphose through three distinct developmental stages during their lives. They start off as larvae in water, fertilized eggs that often cling to aquatic plants. The eggs hatch into tadpoles, the first developmental form of the newt. After living some months as tadpoles swimming around in the water, they undergo another metamorphosis, sprouting legs and replacing their external gills with lungs. At this juvenile stage they are known as efts, and leave the water to live on land. A more gradual transition takes place then, as the eft takes on the lizard-like appearance of the adult newt.

39. Ratón chaser GATO
In Spanish, a cat (gato) might chase a mouse (ratón).

40. Org. that usually has a community pool YMCA
The YMCA is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of “a healthy spirit, mind and body”. The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

41. Neosporin target BACTERIA
Neosporin is an over-the-counter antibiotic ointment, one that is a little controversial. It seems that Neosporin is about as effective as petroleum jelly in preventing infection. Also, the low level of antibiotic in the cream has little effect in killing any bacteria and in fact contributes to antibiotic resistance. On top of that, reports of contact dermatitis caused by Neosporin are relatively common. I’m going to stop using it …

45. Mary __ cosmetics KAY
Mary Kay Ash founded her skincare and cosmetics company, somewhat ominously on Friday 13th, 1963. In 1968, Mary Kay Ash bought herself a pink Cadillac, specially painted to match the color of one of her compacts. The car became so famous that she gave away five of them to her top saleswoman, a tradition that lasts to this day.

47. Blue Cross rival AETNA
When the health care management company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

The Blue Cross association of health plans was established in 1929 in Dallas, Texas. The first plan put in place was for teachers, and guaranteed 21 days of hospital care if needed, for a premium of $6 a year. One can only dream …

50. Dense black wood EBONY
Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned …

52. Otto I’s realm: Abbr. HRE
The Holy Roman Empire (HRE) existed from 962 to 1806 AD and was a territory of varying size over the centuries that centered on the Kingdom of Germany. The HRE was a successor to the western half of the Ancient Roman Empire.

Otto I the Great, ruled the Holy Roman Empire in the 10th century.

57. What Noah counted by TWOS
Genesis 6:19-20 states that Noah was instructed to take two animals of every kind into the ark. Later, in Genesis 7:2-3 Noah was instructed to take on board “every clean animal by sevens … male and female, to keep offspring alive on the face of all the earth”. Apparently “extras” (7 rather than 2) were needed for ritual sacrifice.

61. “__ to Joy” ODE
“Ode to Joy” is a poem written in 1785 by German poet Friedrich Schiller. Ludwig van Beethoven gave the poem great notoriety when he used it in his Ninth “Choral” Symphony first performed in 1824.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Under-the-table money BRIBE
6. Teamster’s rig SEMI
10. Tight-lipped MUM
13. Dubuque natives IOWANS
15. “Once __ a time …” UPON
16. Chowed down ATE
17. Lacking a strong foundation, metaphorically BUILT ON SAND
19. Corp. board member DIR
20. __ over backward BEND
21. “That feels good!” AAH!
22. Florence’s country ITALY
24. Snoopy’s WWI plane SOPWITH CAMEL
28. Prize on the mantel TROPHY
31. Hors d’oeuvre cracker RITZ
32. Northwestern Canadian territory YUKON
33. Naval hoosegow BRIG
35. Brew in a bag TEA
38. Shutterbug PHOTOGRAPHY BUFF
42. Mork’s planet ORK
43. Senate staffer AIDE
44. Lusterless finish MATTE
45. Windy day toy KITE
47. Put the blame on ACCUSE
48. Farina-based hot cereal CREAM OF WHEAT
53. Egypt neighbor LIBYA
54. Subway whose first line had a terminus at NYC’s City Hall IRT
55. Suffix with wagon -ETTE
59. Before today AGO
60. Ideal toast color, and a hint to the ends of 17-, 24-, 38- and 48-Across GOLDEN BROWN
64. Hamlet, to Gertrude SON
65. Change a manuscript EDIT
66. “I, Robot” author ASIMOV
67. Butt in PRY
68. 2013 Oscars host MacFarlane SETH
69. Pert SASSY

Down
1. Light-green lettuce BIBB
2. Disreputable fellow ROUE
3. “Heads __, tails you lose” I WIN
4. Rogaine target BALD SPOT
5. Dr. who treats snorers ENT
6. Bite-size raw Asian dish SUSHI
7. Water quality org. EPA
8. Start of a wk., workwise MON
9. Formally charge, in court INDICT
10. Sir’s counterpart MADAM
11. More than decorative UTILE
12. Streep of “The Iron Lady” MERYL
14. All lathered up SOAPY
18. Folksy negative NAW
23. Whirling toon devil, for short TAZ
25. “How awful!” OH NO!
26. Hogwash TRIPE
27. “__ Noon”: Gary Cooper Western HIGH
28. Printing error, perhaps TYPO
29. German mining region RUHR
30. “Quit nagging! I’ll do it!” OK! OK!
33. To the point BRIEF
34. “Way cool!” RAD
35. “Black Swan” skirt TUTU
36. Immature newts EFTS
37. Set __: name the price A FEE
39. Ratón chaser GATO
40. Org. that usually has a community pool YMCA
41. Neosporin target BACTERIA
45. Mary __ cosmetics KAY
46. Publicists’ concerns IMAGES
47. Blue Cross rival AETNA
48. Anklet fastener CLASP
49. Strictness RIGOR
50. Dense black wood EBONY
51. Boot spec WIDTH
52. Otto I’s realm: Abbr. HRE
56. Male turkeys TOMS
57. What Noah counted by TWOS
58. Covet ENVY
61. “__ to Joy” ODE
62. Set ablaze LIT
63. Undergrad tech degs. BSS


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Posted by Bill Butler
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