Top Line

Greetings from Kilkenny, in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland until October 9th. I plan on doing the puzzle each day (with a pint, no doubt), although I may be a little late due to time zone differences. I am sure that you understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 19 May 13, Sunday





CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan Arbesfeld
THEME: PG-13 … we have 13 themed answers today, each of which is made from two words starting with the letters P&G:
23A. It's designed not to be noticeable PLATE GLASS
25A. Lawman who killed Billy the Kid PAT GARRETT
30A. Ibsen play with music by Grieg PEER GYNT
37A. Subject with no depth? PLANE GEOMETRY
50A. Former park near the Harlem River POLO GROUNDS
53A. Fun-loving female PARTY GIRL
68A. Where to see an inflation index? PRESSURE GAUGE
85A. Co-chair of John McCain's 2007-'08 presidential campaign PHIL GRAMM
88A. View from Kuwait City PERSIAN GULF
96A. Hardly luxury boxes PEANUT GALLERY
102A. Military monetary scale PAY GRADE
115A. Court quarterback POINT GUARD
119A. Fictionary, e.g. PARLOR GAME
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 34m 33s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
5. Earthy tone OCHRE
Ochre is often spelled "ocher" in the US (it's "ochre" where I come from). Ocher is a light, yellowy-brown color, although variations of the pigment are possible such as red ocher and purple ocher.

15. Riot control weapon MACE
Mace is actually a brand name, originally introduced by Lake Erie Chemical when they started to manufacture "Chemical Mace", with the name being a play on the club-like weapon from days of old. Mace was originally a form of tear gas, but Mace today uses a formula that is actually a pepper spray.

20. Kansas City athlete ROYAL
The Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball team was founded in 1969. The team takes its name from the American Royal, a livestock show and rodeo held annually in Kansas City since 1899.

21. Cole Porter classic from "Can-Can" I LOVE PARIS
The Cole Porter musical "Can-Can" was first produced on Broadway, in 1953, where it ran for two years. There was a very successful film adaptation (which I saw recently ... it's good stuff) released in 1960, starring Shirley MacLaine, Frank Sinatra and Maurice Chevalier. During filming, the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev visited the set as part of a tour of 20th Century Fox studios. He made a big splash in the media at the time describing what he saw as "depraved" and "pornographic".

23. It's designed not to be noticeable PLATE GLASS
Plate glass quite simply is glass produced in the form of a plate, as opposed to container glass which is produced in the form of say a bottle or a jar.

25. Lawman who killed Billy the Kid PAT GARRETT
Pat Garrett was the sheriff of Lincoln County, New Mexico when he was charged with the capture of Billy the Kid, someone that many say used to be a friend of Garrett. Garrett arrested the Kid, but he escaped from the Lincoln County jail soon after being convicted, killing two guards in the process. A few months later, Garrett tracked down the Kid again and this time killed him. The Kid’s death is still considered controversial, with some believing that Garrett shot the Kid when he was unarmed and perhaps even asleep in bed. After he finished his term as sheriff, Garrett wrote a book called “The Authentic Life of Billy the Kid”, a publication that helped bolster the image of the outlaw posthumously.

I'm guessing that Billy the Kid was of Irish stock as his family name was McCarty. Another indication of an Irish connection is that he also used the aliases, William Antrim, Henry Antrim, and Kid Antrim. “Antrim” is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland.

30. Ibsen play with music by Grieg PEER GYNT
Henrik Ibsen's play "Peer Gynt" is based on a Scandinavian fairy tale "Per Gynt". The incidental music to the play, written by Edvard Grieg, is some of the most approachable classical music ever written, at least in my humble opinion ...

36. -y plus -y? -IES
The plural of a word ending in “-y” often ends with “-ies”.

37. Subject with no depth? PLANE GEOMETRY
The geometry that most of learned at school is plane geometry, the geometry of figures existing only in one plane. A more advanced form of geometry deals with three dimensions, and is called solid geometry.

43. Dewlapped critter IGUANA
An iguana is a lizard, and as such is cold-blooded. There are times when pet iguanas need heat from a UV lamp to maintain body temperature.

Dewlap is that flap of skin that hangs below the neck of some creatures. Dewlaps are found on anything from dogs to iguanas.

47. Grafton's "__ for Alibi" A IS
Sue Grafton writes detective novels, and her "alphabet series" features the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with "A Is for Alibi" in 1982 and is working her way through the alphabet, most recently publishing "U Is for Undertow" in 2009. What a clever naming system!

48. Bistro CAFE
"Bistro" was originally a Parisian slang term for a "little wine shop or restaurant".

50. Former park near the Harlem River POLO GROUNDS
The original Polo Grounds in New York city was built in 1876 and as one might expect, it was used to play polo. The property was leased in 1880 by the New York Metropolitans and was converted into a baseball stadium. Over the years, the stadium was replaced, three times in all, but the "Polo Grounds" name was retained.

58. "Angela's Ashes" sequel ‘TIS
"'Tis" was Frank McCourt's sequel to "Angela's Ashes", the story of his life growing up in Ireland. Frank McCourt passed away in 2009.

60. Jewish campus organization HILLEL
Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life is a Jewish campus organization that operates throughout the world. Hillel was founded at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1923. The organization is named for a first century Jewish sage called Hillel the Elder.

67. Union in D.C., e.g. STA
There are a lot of stations called "Union Station" in the US. This is because the generic "union station" was one built by two or more railroad companies acting in concert or "union", sharing tracks and facilities.

75. Political theorist Hannah ARENDT
Hannah Arendt was studying and working the field of philosophy when she had to flee her native Germany in the runup to WWII because of her Jewish heritage. She ended up in the US in 1941, and took posts in various schools here. In 1969 she was appointed full professor at Princeton, the first woman to win such a position, and a decade before women students were admitted to the college.

78. Actress Dahl ARLENE
Arlene Dahl is an American movie actress, quite famous during the 1950s. Among her screen credits was playing the female lead in 1959's "Journey to the Center of the Earth", alongside James Mason and Pat Boone.

81. School in Big D SMU
Southern Methodist University (SMU) is located in University Park, Texas (part of Dallas), and was founded in 1911. In 2008, President George W. Bush agreed to the selection of SMU as the site for his Presidential Library. The building is currently under construction and is expected to open in 2013.

“Big D” is a nickname for the city of Dallas, Texas.

82. River isles AITS
Aits are little islands found in a river. Aits aren't formed by erosion, but by the deposition of silt over time. As a result, aits often have a long and narrow shape running parallel to the banks as the sediment builds up with the flow of the water. Many of the islands in the River Thames in England have been given the name "Ait", like Raven's Ait in Kingston-upon-Thames, and Lot's Ait in Brentford.

85. Co-chair of John McCain's 2007-'08 presidential campaign PHIL GRAMM
Phil Gramm is a former US Senator for Texas. Gramm ran unsuccessfully for the Republican Party nomination in the presidential election of 1996. Gramm is an economist, and was one of the leader’s in the movement to deregulate the financial services industry that arguably led to the 2007 subprime mortgage crisis and subsequent global economic crisis.

88. View from Kuwait City PERSIAN GULF
The Persian Gulf is in effect an inland sea although it technically is an offshoot of the Indian Ocean. The outlet from the Persian Gulf to the Indian Ocean is one of the most famous maritime “choke points” in the world: the Strait of Hormuz. About 20% of the world’s supply of petroleum passes through the Strait of Hormuz.

91. French suffix with jardin -IERE
“Jardinière” is the feminine form of the French word for “gardener”. In English, a jardinière is a decorative container for flowers that is usually located outdoors.

96. Hardly luxury boxes PEANUT GALLERY
“Peanut gallery” is a term dating back to the days of vaudeville. The peanut gallery was where the cheap seats were located in a theater. The cheap seats were usually occupied by the rowdiest patrons, and when they were particularly rowdy those patrons would throw the cheapest snack onto the stage: peanuts.

101. Toledo time-outs SIESTAS
We use the word “siesta” to describe a short nap in the early afternoon, taking the word from the Spanish. In turn, the Spanish word is derived from the Latin “hora sexta” meaning “the sixth hour”. The idea is that the nap is taken at “the sixth hour” after dawn.

Toledo is a city in central Spain.

107. Petulance SPLEEN
The spleen has a couple of functions in the human body. It removes old red blood cells, and recycles the iron contained therein. The waste product of this recycling is bile. It also holds a reserve of blood that can be released when necessary (if the body goes into "circulatory shock"). Greek and Roman physicians ascribed to the theory that the body had four basic substances, the so-called four humors. All diseases were caused by these four substances getting out of balance. The four humors were:
- Black bile (melancolia)
- Yellow bile (cholera)
- Phlegm (phlegma)
- Blood (sanguis)
Out terms "splenetic" and "venting one’s spleen"are derived from this concept of have the humors out of balance.

114. Caught congers EELED
Conger eels can grow to be very, very large, perhaps up to 10 feet in length.

119. Fictionary, e.g. PARLOR GAME
Fictionary is a word game in which a player tries to guess the correct definition of a word picked from the dictionary, when faced with the true definition and fake definitions presented by other players.

123. Egyptian deity AMON
Amun (also Amon and "Amun-Ra") was a god in Egyptian mythology. Amun lends his name to our word "ammonia". This is because the Romans called the ammonium chloride that they collected near the Temple of Jupiter Amun, "sal ammoniacus" (salt of Amun).

124. Winter Palace resident TSAR
The Winter Palace is a magnificent building in St. Petersburg in Russia, home to the Russian tsars (and tsarinas). The Winter Palace houses the famous Hermitage Museum. I was lucky enough to visit the Palace and museum some years ago, and I have to say that I have rarely been more impressed by a historical building.

Down
2. Pooh penner MILNE
Alan Alexander (A.A.) Milne was an English author, best known for his delightful "Winnie-the-Pooh" series of books. He had only one son, Christopher Robin Milne, born in 1920. The young Milne was the inspiration for the Christopher Robin character in the Winnie-the-Pooh stories. Winnie-the-Pooh was named after Christopher Robin's real teddy bear, one he called Winnie, who in turn was named after a Canadian black bear called Winnie that the Milnes would visit in London Zoo. The original Winnie teddy bear is on display at the main branch of the New York Public Library in New York.

5. Web address ending ORG
The .org domain was one of the seven first generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:
- .com (commercial organizations, but unrestricted
- .info (informational sites, but unrestricted)
- .net (network infrastructures, but unrestricted)
- .mil (US military, restricted)
- .org (other organizations, but unrestricted)
- .gov (US government entities, restricted)
- .int (international organizations governed by treaty, restricted)

7. __ Regency HYATT
The Hyatt hotel chain takes its name from the first hotel in the group, that was purchased in 1957 i.e. Hyatt House at Los Angeles International Airport. Among other things, Hyatt is famous for designing the world's first atrium hotel, the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta.

11. Motor add-on? -OLA
The original Motorola is now two independent companies called Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions. Motorola started in 1928 as the Galvin Manufacturing Corporation in Chicago. The founder created the brand name “Motorola” for a car radio the company developed in 1930. He linked “motor” (meaning “car”) with “-ola” (meaning “sound”), implying “sound in motion”.

13. Part of DJIA: Abbr. AVG
Dow Jones & Company was founded as a publishing house in 1882 by three newspaper reporters, Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. Today, the company's most famous publication has to be "The Wall Street Journal". In 1884, Charles Dow started reporting the average dollar value of the stock of eleven companies, an index which spawned a whole host of metrics that carry the Dow Jones name to this day, including the renowned Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA).

15. Romans' 16-Down MARS
16. Greeks' 15-Down ARES
The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of blood-lust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos, Deimos and Eros. The Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

28. Nutrition letters RDA
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

33. They follow springs by about seven days NEAPS
Tides of course are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon's effect. At spring tides, the sun and the moon's gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

34. Former Belgian camera brand AGFA
Agfa was founded in Germany in 1867, a company focused on the manufacture of dyes. The full name of the enterprise was Aktiengesellschaft für Anilinfabrikation, shortened to Agfa, and translating as "Corporation for Aniline (a dye) Production". Agfa merged with the Belgian company Gevaert in 1894, getting them into the photographic business. Agfa 35mm film hasn't been produced for a few years now, but there is still inventory out there and purists are buying it when they can.

38. Cause of some '60s trips LSD
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn't until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man ...

39. Giant rival EAGLE
The NFL’s New York Giants (NYG) are longstanding rivals of the Philadelphia Eagles (PHI).

41. Outback order RARE
Outback Steakhouse is a chain of restaurants that was established in 1987, with the first Outback opening in Tampa, Florida. Outback serves largely American food in an Australian-themed dining locale.

42. Dixie group? Y’ALL
“Dixie” is a nickname sometimes used for the American South, and often specifically for the original 11 states that seceded from the Union just prior to the Civil War. It’s apparently not certain how the name “Dixie” came about. One theory is that it comes from the term “dixie” which was used for currency issued by banks in Louisiana. The 10-dollar bills had the word “dix” on the reverse side, the French for “ten”. From the banknote, the French speaking area around New Orleans came to be known as Dixieland, and from there “Dixie” came to apply to the South in general.

54. Hood with a rod THUG
There used to be a band of of murderers and robbers in India, famous for their use of the weapon called a garrote. These felons were known locally as "thuggees" (from the Hindi word for "thief"). This gave us our contemporary word "thug" meaning a brute.

59. Auteur's starting point IDEE
In French, an author (auteur) might start his or her novel with an idea (idée).

64. Largest of the Mariana Islands GUAM
Guam is a US territory in the western Pacific Ocean, the largest of the Mariana Islands. Guam is also the first territory in the United States to see the sun rise on any particular day. As such, the territory has adopted the motto, "Where America's day begins". During WWII, the US territory of Guam was occupied by the Japanese for 31 months until it was liberated in the Battle of Guam in July 1944. Of the 18,000 Japanese men holding the island, only 485 surrendered, so almost all perished in the invasion. One Japanese sergeant hid out on the island for an incredible 28 years, finally surrendering in 1972!

65. Cruel type SADIST
A sadist is someone who derives pleasure from inflicting pain, with that pleasure often being sexual in nature. The term “sadist” comes from the Marquis de Sade who was known to exhibit such tendencies.

The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat with a reputation for a libertine lifestyle. De Sade was also a writer, well known for his works of erotica. He fell foul of the law for some of his more extreme practices and for blaspheming the Catholic church. On an off, de Sade spent 32 years of his life in prison and in insane asylums.

66. All, in scores TUTTI
"Soli" (the plural of "solo") are pieces of music performed by one artist, whereas "tutti" are pieces performed by all of the artists.

71. Actress Aimée ANOUK
Anouk Aimée is a French film actress. Aimée's most famous film outside of France is probably the internationally successful 1966 French hit "A Man and a Woman", in which she played the female lead.

72. Agave fiber ISTLE
Istle is a fiber that is obtained from various tropical plants, including the agave and yucca tree.

74. Oscar winner Mirren HELEN
Helen Mirren, one of my favorite English actresses, won her Best Actress Oscar for playing the title role in the marvelous 2006 film “The Queen”.

I watched the 2006 movie "The Queen" again not too long ago. What a great film it is, and what a superb performance from Helen Mirren in the title role of Queen Elizabeth II. It must have been a difficult film for Queen Elizabeth to watch, as it rehashes the PR disaster that surrounded her following the death of Princess Diana. But, she was gracious enough to invite Helen Mirren around to the Palace for dinner after the film was released. Mirren declined however, citing filming commitments in the US. Mirren was invested as a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire back in 2003, an honor presented to her by Prince Charles. I wonder will she get another title?

77. Ga. Tech grad ENGR
The Georgia Institute of Technology is located in Atlanta. The school was founded in 1885 as part of the reconstruction effort to rebuild the infrastructure in the South after the Civil War. President Theodore Roosevelt delivered an address to the school in 1905, and then shook hands with every single student. Back then the school didn’t have over 20,000 students as it does today …

78. "Edith, you're __": Archie Bunker A PIP
Archie Bunker's wife, Edith, was played by Jean Stapleton on the 1970s sitcom "All in the Family". By 1980, Stapleton was growing tired of playing the role and appeared in fewer and fewer episodes. When the show's spin-off series "Archie Bunker's Place" premiered, the storyline revealed that Archie Bunker had just lost his wife, setting the tone for the new show.

79. South Korea's first president RHEE
Syngman Rhee was born in Korea, but received much of his education in the US, including a Ph.D. from Princeton. The very much westernized Rhee returned to Korea in 1910, a Korea that by then had been annexed by Japan. Soon after he found himself President of a Provisional Government of Korea based in Shanghai, but was eventually ousted for misuse of power. After WWII, Rhee was installed as President, heavily backed by the United States. However, Rhee's rule proved to be more like tyranny and during the Korean War his relationship with the US Government became very strained. He stayed in power until 1960 when student revolts became popular enough to force him out of office. The CIA flew him out of the country and he went into exile in Hawaii, where a few years later he died of a stroke.

80. Former capital of Italy LIRA
The word "lira" is used in a number of countries for currency. "Lira" comes from the Latin for "pound" and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro.

81. Process, as ore SMELT
Metals are found in ore in the form of oxides. In order to get pure metal from the ore, the ore is heated and the metal oxides within are reduced (i.e. the oxygen is removed) in the chemical process known as smelting. The oxygen is extracted by adding a source of carbon or carbon monoxide which uses up the excess oxygen atoms to make carbon dioxide, a waste product of smelting (and of course, a greenhouse gas).

83. Skewered Thai dish SATAY
The dish known as “satay” originated in Java, Indonesia and is marinated pieces of meat served on a skewer in a sauce, often a spicy peanut sauce.

86. Auréole wearer ANGE
An auréole is a "halo" in French, so would be seen around the head of an angel (ange).

87. "The Valachi Papers" author Peter MAAS
Peter Maas was journalist and author. Maas wrote a couple of books that were adapted into successful movies. He wrote a biography of New York City Police officer Frank Serpico that was made into the 1973 “Serpico” starring Al Pacino in the title role. He also wrote a biography of a low-level Mafia informant called “The Valachi Papers” that was was made into a 1972 film of the same name starring Charles Bronson as Valachi.

89. Hammer home? EAR
The middle ear is the portion of the ear immediately behind the eardrum. The middle ear contains three small bones called the ossicles, the three smallest bones in the human body. The ossicles' job is to transmit sound from the outer ear to the inner ear. The shape of the bones gives rise to their common names: the hammer, anvil and stirrup.

99. Computer terminal? -ESE
Computerese is “techie” language.

100. 1986 Best Actress Matlin MARLEE
Marlee Matlin won her well-deserved Oscar for the role she played in "Children of a Lesser God". Matlin played opposite William Hurt in the movie, and won her Academy Award in in 1986 when she was just 21 years old. My favorite performance of hers though, was the recurring role she had in "The West Wing".

102. One of three 1994 Peace Nobelists PERES
Shimon Peres is an Israeli statesman who was born in Poland. A former prime minister, Peres is the current President of the State of Israel. He is 89 years old, making him the oldest head of state in the world.

104. It shares its airport shuttle with National ALAMO
The third largest car rental company right now is Alamo, a relative newcomer founded in 1974. Alamo made inroads (pun intended!) into the market by popularizing the idea of "unlimited mileage". Alamo is owned by the same company that owns National and Enterprise.

109. Alaska senator Murkowski LISA
Lisa Murkowski is the first Alaska senator that was actually born in the state. In 2002 she was appointed to the US Senate, by her father, then Governor Frank Murkowski, but then won the seat in her own right in the 2004 election. In 2010 she narrowly lost the Republican primary election to Joe Miller, a candidate famously supported by former Governor Sarah Palin. Senator Murkowski has put herself forward as a "write-in" candidate in the November 2010 election, meaning that anyone who wants to vote for her may do so by simply writing in her name on the ballot.

110. __'acte ENTR
The term entr'acte comes to us from French, and is the interval between two acts ("entre" deux "actes") of a theatrical performance. It often describes some entertainment provided during that interval.

112. Recess near an altar APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

113. Spanish snack TAPA
"Tapa" is the Spanish for "lid", and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one's glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

117. Rhine tributary AAR
The Aar (also called the "Aare" in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the Aar is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are renowned in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in "The Adventure of the Final Problem").

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Within AMID
5. Earthy tone OCHRE
10. In the neighborhood LOCAL
15. Riot control weapon MACE
19. Grabber's cry MINE!
20. Kansas City athlete ROYAL
21. Cole Porter classic from "Can-Can" I LOVE PARIS
23. It's designed not to be noticeable PLATE GLASS
25. Lawman who killed Billy the Kid PAT GARRETT
26. Single UNWED
27. Significant ones? OTHERS
29. Bad-mouthed DISSED
30. Ibsen play with music by Grieg PEER GYNT
32. Rulers in a line DYNASTS
36. -y plus -y? -IES
37. Subject with no depth? PLANE GEOMETRY
43. Dewlapped critter IGUANA
47. Grafton's "__ for Alibi" A IS
48. Bistro CAFE
49. Battery that's 8.3 millimeters in diameter AAAA
50. Former park near the Harlem River POLO GROUNDS
53. Fun-loving female PARTY GIRL
56. Env. directive ATTN
57. Wise SAGE
58. "Angela's Ashes" sequel ‘TIS
60. Jewish campus organization HILLEL
61. Begets SIRES
63. Swollen TURGID
65. Dummy STUPE
67. Union in D.C., e.g. STA
68. Where to see an inflation index? PRESSURE GAUGE
71. Support AID
74. Vex HAUNT
75. Political theorist Hannah ARENDT
76. Have a feeling SENSE
78. Actress Dahl ARLENE
81. School in Big D SMU
82. River isles AITS
84. "Don't look at me!" NOT I!
85. Co-chair of John McCain's 2007-'08 presidential campaign PHIL GRAMM
88. View from Kuwait City PERSIAN GULF
91. French suffix with jardin -IERE
92. Scottish turndowns NAES
94. PC key ALT
95. Dud TURKEY
96. Hardly luxury boxes PEANUT GALLERY
100. Ticked off MAD
101. Toledo time-outs SIESTAS
102. Military monetary scale PAY GRADE
107. Petulance SPLEEN
111. More cool, man NEATER
114. Caught congers EELED
115. Court quarterback POINT GUARD
119. Fictionary, e.g. PARLOR GAME
121. "You had your chance" IT'S TOO LATE
122. Leadoff hitter's asset SPEED
123. Egyptian deity AMON
124. Winter Palace resident TSAR
125. Bold type DARER
126. Mitigated EASED
127. Insurance policy contingency LOSS

Down
1. Energize AMP UP
2. Pooh penner MILNE
3. Amazed IN AWE
4. Block DETER
5. Web address ending ORG
6. Ratio indicators COLONS
7. __ Regency HYATT
8. Not at all patient RASH
9. Ultimatum ending ELSE
10. Fake it, in a way LIP SYNC
11. Motor add-on? -OLA
12. Crash site? COT
13. Part of DJIA: Abbr. AVG
14. Result in LEAD TO
15. Romans' 16-Down MARS
16. Greeks' 15-Down ARES
17. Ticket CITE
18. Founded, on signs ESTD
22. Rainbow maker PRISM
24. Trim EDGING
28. Nutrition letters RDA
31. Quite a spell YEARS
33. They follow springs by about seven days NEAPS
34. Former Belgian camera brand AGFA
35. One looking ahead SEER
37. Yearning ones PINERS
38. Cause of some '60s trips LSD
39. Giant rival EAGLE
40. Follow TAIL
41. Outback order RARE
42. Dixie group? Y’ALL
43. "No thanks" I PASS
44. "I follow" GOT IT
45. Extreme ULTRA
46. Exceptional A-ONE
47. What "8" may stand for AUGUST
51. Like granola OATEN
52. Mounting aid STIRRUP
54. Hood with a rod THUG
55. "Egad!" YIPES!
59. Auteur's starting point IDEE
62. Smack-dab SPANG
64. Largest of the Mariana Islands GUAM
65. Cruel type SADIST
66. All, in scores TUTTI
69. One wishing for a real-life "undo" button? RUER
70. Really cool GNARLY
71. Actress Aimée ANOUK
72. Agave fiber ISTLE
73. Respect and then some DEIFY
74. Oscar winner Mirren HELEN
77. Ga. Tech grad ENGR
78. "Edith, you're __": Archie Bunker A PIP
79. South Korea's first president RHEE
80. Former capital of Italy LIRA
81. Process, as ore SMELT
83. Skewered Thai dish SATAY
86. Auréole wearer ANGE
87. "The Valachi Papers" author Peter MAAS
89. Hammer home? EAR
90. Poker? NUDGER
93. Bad-mouth SLANDER
97. Be of __: help USE TO
98. Self-important authority figure TIN GOD
99. Computer terminal? -ESE
100. 1986 Best Actress Matlin MARLEE
102. One of three 1994 Peace Nobelists PERES
103. Fit for a king REGAL
104. It shares its airport shuttle with National ALAMO
105. Distributions to DJs DEMOS
106. Idyllic places EDENS
107. Jutting shoreline formation SPIT
108. Kitchenware POTS
109. Alaska senator Murkowski LISA
110. __'acte ENTR
112. Recess near an altar APSE
113. Spanish snack TAPA
116. Form follower -ULA
117. Rhine tributary AAR
118. Way to get there: Abbr. RTE
120. Perplexing ODD



Return to top of page

Posted by Bill Butler
Google+

No comments:

Tell a Friend about LAXCrossword.com:

Facebook Twitter Google Email

Adsense Wide Skyscraper

About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

Blog Archive

Bottom Nav