Top Line

Greetings from Blackrock, in Dublin, Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland until October 9th. I plan on doing the puzzle each day (with a pint, no doubt), although I may be a little late due to time zone differences. I am sure that you understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 21 Jul 13, Sunday





CROSSWORD SETTER: Amy Johnson
THEME: Child’s Play … each of today’s themed answers ends with a child’s toy:
22A. Obstacles STUMBLING BLOCKS
32A. Wild pair, sometimes ONE-EYED JACKS
50A. "The Phantom of the Opera" setting MASQUERADE BALL
65A. Morsel mentioned in '80s Australian tourism ads SHRIMP ON THE BARBIE
85A. Abstained, in a way WENT ON THE WAGON
97A. Take the gold COME OUT ON TOP
114A. Snap LOSE YOUR MARBLES
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 28s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Tie-dye locale CAMP
I guess tie-dye is an activity seen a lot at summer camps. We didn’t have camps when I was growing up in Ireland, so I may be wrong.

5. "Sonic the Hedgehog" developer SEGA
Sega is a Japanese video game company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out 1940 in the US as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

Sonic the Hedgehog is a title character in a videogame and the mascot of Sega the game developer. Sonic was set up as a rival to Nintendo’s mascot “Mario”.

9. Skunk Le Pew PEPE
Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of "l'amour" and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe painted down her back accidently.

13. Pileggi of "The X-Files" MITCH
The actor Mitch Pileggi played FBI Assistant Director Walter Skinner on the “The X-Files”.

"The X-Files" is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history.

19. Sea once fed by the Amu Darya River ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad ...

20. Round Table array ARMOR
King Arthur (and his Round Table) probably never really existed, but his legend is very persistent. He was supposedly a leader of the Romano-British as they tried to resist the invasion of the Anglo-Saxons in the late 5th and early 6th centuries.

21. Cape Cod vacation destination TRURO
Truro is a town in the Outer Cape, close to the northern tip of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. The area was settled in the late 1600s by English colonists who named it for the city of Truro in Cornwall, England.

28. Barroom disorder MELEE
Our word “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means a "confused fight".

29. Special Olympics founder Shriver EUNICE
Eunice Kennedy was the sister President John F. Kennedy. Eunice married Sargent Shriver, the running mate of George McGovern in the 1972 presidential race (which was won by the incumbent President Nixon). Shriver founded Camp Shriver in 1962, a day camp for children with intellectual disabilities. Camp Shriver became an annual event and was extended to communities across the country with funding from the Kennedy Foundation. A 1968 Chicago derivative of Camp Shriver developed the first “Olympics-style” competition, and at this competition Shriver announce the formation of the Special Olympics Games that we known so well today.

32. Wild pair, sometimes ONE-EYED JACKS
There is a poker game that’s popular in home games in which one-eyed jacks are chosen as wild cards. The one-eyed jacks and the Jack of Spades and the Jack of Hearts.

36. Playwright Ensler EVE
Eve Ensler is a playwright whose most famous work is “The Vagina Monologues”. When Ensler was only 23 years of age she adopted a 15 year old boy. We are familiar with that boy on the big screen these days … actor Dylan McDermott.

37. Technology in Pixar films, briefly CGI
Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

Pixar Animation Studios started out as part of Lucasfilm in 1979, George Lucas’s production company. Lucas sold what was to become Pixar to Apple CEO Steve Jobs in 1986. Pixar produced its first feature film in 1995, the fabulous “Toy Story”, and followed up with a string of hits. The company was then sold to Walt Disney in 2006, when valued at $7.4 billion. That transaction resulted in Steve Jobs becoming the biggest shareholder in Walt Disney.

38. "Wicked Game" rocker Chris ISAAK
Chris Isaak is not only an American rock musician, but also has had a lot of acting parts. Isaak had small roles in movies like "Married to the Mob" and "The Silence of the Lambs", but I remember him as astronaut Ed White in the fabulous HBO miniseries "From the Earth to the Moon".

41. Boastful opening VENI
The oft-quoted statement "Veni, vidi, vici" ("I came, I saw, I conquered") is believed by many to have been written by Julius Caesar. The words date back to 47 BC and refer to the short war between Rome and Pharnaces II of Pontus.

43. Civil War historian Shelby FOOTE
Shelby Foote was a historian and novelist whose best known work is his three-volume history of the American conflict “The Civil War: A Narrative”.

46. Aquarium fish OPAH
Opah is the more correct name for the fish also known as the sunfish, moonfish or Jerusalem haddock. I've seen one in the Monterrey Aquarium. It is huge ...

50. "The Phantom of the Opera" setting MASQUERADE BALL
Gaston Leroux was a French author and journalist best known for writing “The Phantom of the Opera”, first published in 1910. As a journalist, Leroux was involved in an investigation into the Paris Opera. The basement of the opera house contained a cell that was used to hold prisoners in 1871, something that Leroux featured in his most famous novel.

55. Coal industry org. UMW
The United Mine Workers (UMW) is a labor union that represents mine workers (and now other disciplines) in the US and Canada. The UMW was founded in Columbus, Ohio in 1890.

59. Amanda of "2012" PEET
The actress Amanda Peet studied acting with the celebrated Uta Hagen at Columbia University. Peet has appeared in a number of successful films including “The Whole Nine Yards” and “Syriana”. I remember her best from what I thought was a great TV show (but no one seemed to agree!) called “Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip”.

“2012” is a disaster movie released in 2009 starring John Cusack. The disaster in the storyline is a series of geological and meteorological events that are purportedly related to the “end of the world” that some said was predicted by the Mayan calendar.

61. Like drag strips LOUD
Back in the 18th century "drag" was slang for a wagon or buggy, as it was "dragged" along by a horse or horses. In the 1930s, the underworld adopted drag as slang for an automobile. This sense of the word was imported into automobile racing in the forties, giving the name to "drag racing". A drag race is basically a competition between two cars to determine which can accelerate faster from a standstill.

65. Morsel mentioned in '80s Australian tourism ads SHRIMP ON THE BARBIE
The famous Barbie doll was created by businesswoman Ruth Handler and first appeared on store shelves in 1959. Barbie was based on a German fashion doll called Bild Lilli that was introduced in 1955. Lilli had been a German cartoon character before taking on a three-dimensional form. Prior to the introduction of Bild Lilli and Barbie, children’s dolls were primarily representations of infants.

73. Pelican St. metropolis NOLA
The city of New Orleans, Louisiana has the nickname "The Big Easy". This name might come from the early 1900s when musicians found it relatively "easy" to find work there. The city is also known by the acronym NOLA, standing for New Orleans, LA.

77. Dummy on Bergen's knee SNERD
Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen's most famous character was Charlie McCarthy, but Bergen also worked with Mortimer Snerd.

80. "Herding Cats: A Life in Politics" author LOTT
Trent Lott was raised Democrat in Mississippi, but served in Congress as a Republican. Lott ran into trouble for remarks he made that were interpreted as being racially motivated, and ended up resigning in 2007.

82. Bargain basement letters IRR
Irregular (irr.)

91. Kudrow of "Friends" LISA
The character Phoebe Buffay is played on the sitcom “Friends” by the actress Lisa Kudrow. Kudrow plays the ditsy member of the troupe of friends, but I’ve always viewed her as the “smartest” of the group of actors in real life, as best I could tell. Kudrow is behind the US version of the British genealogy show “Who Do You Think You Are?” a very entertaining bit of television.

94. NYC visitor's final destination, perhaps JFK
The Idlewild Golf Course was taken over by the city of New York in 1943 and construction started on a new airport to serve the metropolis and relieve congestion at La Guardia. The Idlewild name still persists, even though the airport was named after Major General Alexander E. Anderson from the first days of the project. When the facility started operating in 1948 it was known as New York International Airport, Anderson Field. It was renamed to John F. Kennedy International Airport in 1963, one month after the President was assassinated.

95. 1998 home run record chaser SOSA
Sammy Sosa was right in the public eye in 1998 when he and Mark McGwire were vying to be the first to surpass the home run record held by Roger Maris. McGwire fell out of public favor due to stories of steroid abuse (stories which he later admitted were true) while Sosa fell out of favor when he was found to be using a corked bat in a 2003 game.

110. Pigeon shelter COTE
The Old English word "cote" was used for a small house. Our modern word "cottage" comes from "cote", as does "cote", the word for a small shelter on a farm for sheep or birds.

112. Half-pretentious? CHI
Someone who is "chichi" is showily trendy and pretentious. “Chichi” is a French noun meaning “airs, fuss”.

117. Play, as Julius Caesar ENACT
William Shakespeare’s play “Julius Caesar” is a little unusual, in that Julius Caesar is not the main character. The protagonist is actually Marcus Brutus, who plays a major role in Caesar’s assassination.

118. Curved moldings OGEES
An ogee is like an s-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S).

122. Gamer's title island MYST
In the days when I played the occasional video game, the best of the bunch was undoubtedly “Myst”. It is a game full of puzzles with the player wandering through a beautifully designed interactive world.

123. Nice sweetheart AMIE
A male friend in France is "un ami", and a female friend is "une amie".

The city of Nice lies on the Mediterranean coast of France, not far from the Italian border. Although it is only the fifth most populous city, Nice has the second busiest airport in the country (after Paris) thanks to the vast number of jet-setting tourists that flock to the French Riviera.

Down
1. Places on una avenida residencial CASAS
In Spanish, there are houses (casas) on a residential avenue (una avenida residencial).

2. Fictional Ziff infatuated with Marge Simpson ARTIE
On the animated television show “The Simpsons”, there is a recurring character called Artie Ziff. Artie is an Internet entrepreneur who is infatuated with his former classmate “Marge Simpson”.

4. Little Spitz, briefly POM
The Pomeranian is a breed of small dog, named for the Pomerania region of Europe (part of eastern Germany and northern Poland). The breed was much loved by the royalty of Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. In the 19th century, Queen Victoria owned a particularly small Pomeranian. Due to the notoriety of the monarch's pet, the Pomeranian was bred for small size, so that during the Queen's admittedly long reign, the size of the average "pom" was reduced by 50% ...

Spitz-type dogs are those with long thick fur that is usually white. Most spitz-type dogs seem to have originated in the Arctic and/or East Asia. Examples of breed described as spitz-type are the Alaskan Malamute and the Canadian Eskimo Dog.

6. "__ Brockovich" ERIN
Erin Brockovich is an environmental activists who is famous for the role she played in building a case against Pacific Gas & Electric for contaminating drinking water. Her story was told in a 2000 film title “Erin Brockovich” that starred Julia Roberts. Brockovich herself actually appeared in the film as she was given a cameo as a waitress in a restaurant scene.

8. Subj. with exponents ALG
The exponent of a number is power to which it is raised, perhaps “2” for a square and “3” for a cube.

9. Worker, informally PROLE
George Orwell introduced us to the "proles", the working class folk in his famous novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four". Collectively, the proles made up the section of society known as the proletariat.

10. Host EMCEE
"Emcee" come from "MC", an abbreviation for the Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

11. Gumby's sidekick POKEY
“Gumby” is a stop motion clay animation television series that originally ran from the fifties to the late eighties. There were 233 episodes made in total, an impressive number. Gumby was a little green man and his sidekick was Pokey, a little red horse.

13. Honshu Isl. peak MT FUJI
Mount Fuji is Japan's highest and most famous mountain. It is an active volcano, situated just west of Tokyo.

Honshu is the largest island in Japan, with the name “Honshu” translating as “Main Island”. Honshu is the seventh largest island in the world. As it is home to the principal cities in Japan, Honshu is also the second most populous island on the planet (after Java, in Indonesia).

14. Youngest of the three Prozorov sisters IRINA
Olga, Masha and Irina Prozorov were the “Three Sisters” in the play by Anton Chekhov.

Anton Chekhov was a Russian writer of short stories and a playwright, as well as a physician. He wrote four classic plays that are often performed all around the world, namely “The Seagull”, “Uncle Vanya”, “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard”. All the time Chekhov was writing, he continued to practice medicine. He is quoted as saying “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”

20. Coeur d'__ ALENE
The city of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho is named for the Coeur d'Alene People, Native Americans who lived in the area when it was first explored by French Canadian fur traders. “Coeur d'Alene” translates from French as “heart of an awl”. The Native American people were given this name as they were perceived as shrewd traders by their Canadian counterparts.

31. "Inside the NBA" analyst, to fans SHAQ
Shaquille “Shaq” O'Neal is one of the heaviest players ever to have played in the NBA (weighing in at around 325 pounds). Yep, he's a big guy ... 7 foot 1 inch tall.

35. Wii locale TV ROOM
The Wii is the biggest-selling game console in the world. Two distinguishing features are the impressive wireless remote control and its WiiConnect24 system which allows the console to get messages and updates wirelessly in standby mode. I have my kids unplug the darn thing when they aren't using it, as even in standby mode it sucks up bandwidth on my wireless network here at the house.

44. "Grumpy" film title characters OLD MEN
“Grumpy Old Men” is a wonderful romantic comedy film from 1993 starring the great actors Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau and Ann-Margret along with an excellent supporting cast. “Grumpy Old Man” was the sixth on-screen collaboration between Lemmon and Matthau, but the first in over a decade.

45. Fútbol shout OLE!
"Fútbol" is the Spanish word for football, soccer.

46. Part of a layette ONESIE
A newborn baby’s collection of clothing and accessories is called a layette.

48. __ marsala ALLA
A dish prepared “alla marsala” is made with mushrooms and Marsala wine.

Marsala is a seaport lying in the very west of Sicily. If you visit Marsala, you'll find what's called "vintage" Marsala wine, a "regular" red wine. If you buy a bottle of Marsala at your local store though, it will be a fortified wine, wine with a higher alcohol content.

51. Perry of fashion ELLIS
Perry Ellis was a fashion designer from Portsmouth, Virginia. Ellis was noted for his sportswear creations.

60. Show places? THIRDS
In a horserace, a competitor is said to place if it finishes third or better.

62. Dressed to the nines, with "up" DOLLED
The term “to the nines” means “to perfection”. The first person to use the term in literature was Robbie Burns. Apparently the idea behind the use of “nines” is figurative (pun!), with the number nine considered “ideal” as it is arrived at by multiplying three by three.

67. Eye-catching signs NEONS
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

69. Island greetings ALOHAS
The Hawaiian word "Aloha" has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently "aloha" has come to mean "hello" and "goodbye", but only since the mid-1800s.

70. __ quam videri: North Carolina motto ESSE
“Esse quam videri” translates from Latin as “to be, rather than to seem to be”.

71. Three-time All-Pro Giant lineman Chris SNEE
Chris Snee is a football player for the New York Giants. Snee is married to the daughter of Tom Coughlin, the Giants coach.

75. Half-Betazoid aboard the Enterprise TROI
Deanna Troi is a character on "Star Trek: The Next Generation" who is played by the lovely Marina Sirtis. Sirtis is a naturalized American citizen and has what I would call a soft American accent on the show. However, she was born in the East End of London and has a natural accent off-stage that is more like that of a true Cockney.

76. "Alfred" composer ARNE
“Alfred” is a sung work for the stage with music by Thomas Arne. “Alfred” was first performed as a masque in 1740. Arne further developed the piece into an oratorio that debuted in 1745, and then an opera that opened in 1753. The finale of all three versions is the stirring song “Rule, Britannia!”.

84. Grave offender? GHOUL
Our word “ghoul” comes from the Arabic “ghul”, the name for an evil spirit that feeds on corpses.

90. Fangorn Forest inhabitant ENT
Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth in his series of books "The Lord of the Rings". “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

94. Outback young JOEYS
"Joey" is the name given to all infant marsupials, not just kangaroos. No one really seems to know for sure what the etymology is of the term "joey".

96. Reason for oversleeping OUTAGE
If there is a power outage, and you use an electric alarm clock, then you might oversleep.

98. Saudi neighbor OMANI
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. The capital city of Muscat has a strategic location on the Gulf of Oman and has a history of invasion and unrest. Centuries of occupation by the Persians ended in 1507 when the Portuguese took the city in a bloody attack. The Portuguese held Muscat for much of the next one hundred years until finally being ousted by local Omani forces in 1648. A Yemeni tribe invaded the area in 1741 and set up a monarchy that has been in place in Oman ever since.

99. Bugs with weapons MORAN
Bugs Moran was a Chicago gangster, the main rival to the slightly more famous Al Capone. Moran tried twice to kill Capone. In the first attempt Moran and his gang shot at Capone from their car as their target was getting out of his own automobile. They missed Capone, and subsequent to the attack he took to driving in an armored vehicle. The second, more famous attempt (in 1926), involved Moran and a fleet of cars driving by Capone's hotel and spraying the lobby in which he was standing. Again, Capone escaped unharmed. Three years later, in February 1929, six members of Moran's gang were lined up against a wall and shot by order of Capone, an incident we now remember as the famous St. Valentine's Day Massacre.

100. Like a Siberian Husky's ears ERECT
The Siberian Husky is one of the oldest breeds of dog, and originated in northern Asia. Siberian Huskies were imported into Alaska in great numbers in the early 1900s for use as sled dogs during the gold rush.

103. Certain follower's reading TWEET
I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so. Twitter is a micro-blogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don't think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters. I believe that many people who do tweet tend to send out messages like "I'm at dinner now. I am having sushi" and "There's nothing on TV. I'm bored". Nope, I don't think so!

105. Ostentation ECLAT
Éclat can mean a brilliant show of success, or the applause or accolade that one receives. The word derives from the French "éclater" meaning "to splinter, burst out".

106. One giving Scarlett a fever? RHETT
In Margaret Mitchell’s novel “Gone with the Wind”, when Rhett Butler finally walks out on Scarlett O’Hara he utters the words “My dear, I don’t give a damn”. Most of us are more familiar with the slightly different words spoken by Clark Gable in the film adaption of the story: “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

111. Luxury hotel chain OMNI
Omni Hotels & Resorts is headquartered in Irvine, California and has properties in the US, Canada and Mexico.

114. "Ten Little Indians" actor Herbert LOM
Herbert Lom is a Czech film actor, best known for playing Chief Inspector Charles Dreyfus in the series of "Pink Panther" movies. He was born in Prague in 1917, and had his first film role in a Czech film. He moved to England in 1939, and made many appearances in British movies. He also worked for many years in Hollywood, and played the King of Siam in the original London production of "The King and I".

"Ten Little Indians" is a mystery novel by Agatha Christie. The story was adapted for the big screen several times, including a 1989 version that used the same title as the novel. An earlier 1974 version used the title “And Then There Were None”. Actor Herbert Lom appeared in both versions.

115. Today preceder USA
The title of widest circulation of any American newspaper is an honor competed for by "The Wall Street Journal" and "USA Today", with each paper selling about 2 million copies each day (including online subscribers). "USA Today" was launched in 1982.

116. Victoria's Secret buy BRA
Victoria’s Secret was founded in 1977 in San Francisco, California. The founder wanted to create an environment where men were comfortable buying lingerie for their wives and girlfriends, an alternative to a department store.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Tie-dye locale CAMP
5. "Sonic the Hedgehog" developer SEGA
9. Skunk Le Pew PEPE
13. Pileggi of "The X-Files" MITCH
18. Suffix for stink -AROO
19. Sea once fed by the Amu Darya River ARAL
20. Round Table array ARMOR
21. Cape Cod vacation destination TRURO
22. Obstacles STUMBLING BLOCKS
25. End-of-term hurdle FINAL
26. Put out there AIR
27. Pealed RANG
28. Barroom disorder MELEE
29. Special Olympics founder Shriver EUNICE
30. Picked up on SENSED
32. Wild pair, sometimes ONE-EYED JACKS
34. Biblical verb HAST
36. Playwright Ensler EVE
37. Technology in Pixar films, briefly CGI
38. "Wicked Game" rocker Chris ISAAK
41. Boastful opening VENI
43. Civil War historian Shelby FOOTE
46. Aquarium fish OPAH
50. "The Phantom of the Opera" setting MASQUERADE BALL
53. With reason SANELY
55. Coal industry org. UMW
56. Conspiracy PLOT
57. Get under the tag, hopefully SLIDE
58. Hades, to Satan REALM
59. Amanda of "2012" PEET
61. Like drag strips LOUD
63. 24-hr. convenience ATM
64. A hitchhiker might have one GAS CAN
65. Morsel mentioned in '80s Australian tourism ads SHRIMP ON THE BARBIE
70. Spots ESPIES
72. Area usually not mowed LEA
73. Pelican St. metropolis NOLA
74. Spanish 101 verb ESTA
77. Dummy on Bergen's knee SNERD
78. As a companion ALONG
80. "Herding Cats: A Life in Politics" author LOTT
82. Bargain basement letters IRR
83. Seasoned sailor SEA DOG
85. Abstained, in a way WENT ON THE WAGON
88. Cries from one standing on a chair, maybe EEKS!
89. Obeys HEEDS
91. Kudrow of "Friends" LISA
92. Navel concavity INNIE
93. "__ appétit!" BON
94. NYC visitor's final destination, perhaps JFK
95. 1998 home run record chaser SOSA
97. Take the gold COME OUT ON TOP
104. Puts into words UTTERS
108. Unprincipled AMORAL
109. Reduce LOWER
110. Pigeon shelter COTE
112. Half-pretentious? CHI
113. Shows pluck DARES
114. Snap LOSE YOUR MARBLES
117. Play, as Julius Caesar ENACT
118. Curved moldings OGEES
119. Blew the whistle SANG
120. Blows the whistle RATS
121. Shades TINTS
122. Gamer's title island MYST
123. Nice sweetheart AMIE
124. Brief writer: Abbr. ATTY

Down
1. Places on una avenida residencial CASAS
2. Fictional Ziff infatuated with Marge Simpson ARTIE
3. Wear black, perhaps MOURN
4. Little Spitz, briefly POM
5. Dieters' lunch orders SALADS
6. "__ Brockovich" ERIN
7. Turf controller GANG
8. Subj. with exponents ALG
9. Worker, informally PROLE
10. Host EMCEE
11. Gumby's sidekick POKEY
12. Relatives of ums ERS
13. Honshu Isl. peak MT FUJI
14. Youngest of the three Prozorov sisters IRINA
15. Forum wear TUNIC
16. Figure out CRACK
17. Case weaknesses HOLES
20. Coeur d'__ ALENE
23. Dissolution BREAKUP
24. Low-budget flicks B MOVIES
29. Advantages EDGES
31. "Inside the NBA" analyst, to fans SHAQ
33. Outer: Pref. ECT-
35. Wii locale TV ROOM
36. Tight position? END
38. Morning announcement I’M UP
39. Word before time and place SAME
40. At this very moment AS WE SPEAK
42. Flip over EAT UP
43. Trust FAITH
44. "Grumpy" film title characters OLD MEN
45. Fútbol shout OLE!
46. Part of a layette ONESIE
47. Hippie bus decal PEACE SIGN
48. __ marsala ALLA
49. Choir number HYMN
51. Perry of fashion ELLIS
52. Hardly inconspicuous BLATANT
54. Egyptian, usually ARAB
60. Show places? THIRDS
62. Dressed to the nines, with "up" DOLLED
64. Log holder GRATE
66. Take back to the drawing board REDO
67. Eye-catching signs NEONS
68. Nuts go-with BOLTS
69. Island greetings ALOHAS
70. __ quam videri: North Carolina motto ESSE
71. Three-time All-Pro Giant lineman Chris SNEE
75. Half-Betazoid aboard the Enterprise TROI
76. "Alfred" composer ARNE
78. It might be inspired AWE
79. Driving instructor GOLF PRO
81. Storm that's chased TWISTER
84. Grave offender? GHOUL
86. Neat finish? -NIK
87. Med sch. subject ANAT
90. Fangorn Forest inhabitant ENT
93. Toots one's horn BOASTS
94. Outback young JOEYS
96. Reason for oversleeping OUTAGE
97. Future officer CADET
98. Saudi neighbor OMANI
99. Bugs with weapons MORAN
100. Like a Siberian Husky's ears ERECT
101. Informal science OLOGY
102. Sketch artist's array NOSES
103. Certain follower's reading TWEET
105. Ostentation ECLAT
106. One giving Scarlett a fever? RHETT
107. No tough guy SISSY
110. Study all night CRAM
111. Luxury hotel chain OMNI
114. "Ten Little Indians" actor Herbert LOM
115. Today preceder USA
116. Victoria's Secret buy BRA


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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