LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Aug 13, Saturday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Doug Peterson & Brad Wilber
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
7. Window in many loft conversions DORMER
A dormer window is a window in a dormer! A dormer is a roofed structure that protrudes from the slope of the main roof.

15. Tool for hackers MACHETE
A machete is a large knife, usually 13-18 inches long. The term “machete” is the diminutive of “macho” meaning “male, strong”.

16. Name on “The Name of the Rose” UMBERTO
Umberto Eco is an Italian writer, probably best known for his novel “The Name of the Rose” published in 1980. In 1986, “The Name of the Rose” was adapted into a movie with the same title starring Sean Connery.

18. Smartphone component, for short CPU
The Central Processing Unit (CPU) is the main component on the “motherboard” of a computer. The CPU is the part of the computer that carries out most of the functions required by a program. Nowadays you can get CPUs in everything from cars to telephones.

21. Mars, for one ORB
The surface of the planet Mars has a very high iron oxide content, so Mars is red because it is rusty!

24. Old language that gives us “berserk” NORSE
Our word “berserk” meaning “deranged” comes from the “Berserkers”, Norse warriors described in Old Norse literature. Berserkers were renowned for going into battle in a fury, and some believe that they consumed drugged food to get themselves worked up for the fighting ahead.

25. Home of the Czech Republic’s Supreme Court BRNO
Brno is the second largest city in the Czech Republic (after Prague).

28. Spot in a casino PIP
A pip is a dot on a die, the gambling device.

29. Crème de __ CACAO
Creme de Cacao is a very sweet, chocolate-flavored liqueur.

34. Indoor football name NERF
Nerf is the name given to the soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

35. London arena that Pelé dubbed “the cathedral of football” WEMBLEY STADIUM
Wembley Stadium is the second largest such structure in Europe, and is the national stadium used by England’s soccer team. The stadium takes its name from Wembley Park, that part of London in which the stadium is located. The current Wembley Stadium was opened in 2007, and was built on the site of the previous Wembley Stadium that opened in 1923.

Pelé is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name Pelé for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world’s greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil.

41. Fauvist painter Dufy RAOUL
Raoul Dufy was a French painter active in the first half of the 20th century. He was classed as a “fauve”, one of the group of artists known as the “wild beasts”, who emphasized strong color over realism in their works.

42. 5, spelled out? MAY
May is the fifth month of the year.

45. Tendon attachment? -ITIS
The suffix “-itis” is used to denote inflammation, as in laryngitis (inflammation of the larynx) and sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses).

46. Pamplona runners TOROS
Pamplona, Spain is famous for its San Fermin festival held in July every year, the highlight of which is the Running of the Bulls. Every year, 200-300 people are injured in the bull run, and 15 people have been killed since 1910. If you get to Pamplona two days before the Running of the Bulls, you can see the animal-rights protest event known as the Running of the Nudes. The protesters are as naked as the bulls …

50. Like many consonants LINGUAL
Many consonants are described as “lingual” meaning that they are pronounced using the tongue.

53. Ancient Syrian HITTITE
The Hittites were a people living in Ancient Anatolia (Asia Minor) during the Bronze Age. The Hittite military is noted for the early use of chariots, the design of which can be seen in some Ancient Egyptian drawings.

55. First golfer to win the U.S., British and Canadian Opens in the same year TREVINO
Lee Trevino is an American golfer of Mexican descent, and so has the nicknames “The Merry Mex” and “Supermex”. He is well known for his great sense of humor and for playing pranks on the golf course. For many years when he played he wore a Band-Aid on his arm, covering the tattoo with the name of his ex-wife.

60. Disrespected outwardly SASSED
“Sass”, meaning “impudence”, is a back formation from the word “sassy”. “Sassy” is an alteration of the word “saucy”, with “sassy” first appearing in English in the 1830s.

Down
1. Masonry finish STUCCO
Stucco is a decorative coating that is applied to walls and ceilings. “Stucco” is the Italian name for the material, and a word that we imported into English.

3. Humidor item ROBUSTO
A “robusto” is a short cigar, just under 5 inches in length.

A humido is a box or room that has a controlled environment optimized for the storage of cigars, cigarettes and pipe tobacco. The main factor to be controlled is humidity, hence the storage area is called a humidor.

4. Island entertainment UKE
The ukulele originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

7. Poet translated by Longfellow DANTE
Dante Alighieri was an Italian poet of the Middle Ages. His “Divine Comedy” is widely considered to be the greatest literary work ever written in the Italian language.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was famous for his own work of course, like “Paul Revere’s Ride” and “The Song of Hiawatha”, but he was also the first American to translate Dante’s epic poem called the “Divine Comedy”.

8. Pi preceder? OCTO-
Octopuses and squid have the ability to release a dark pigment into the water as a means of escape. The dark pigment is called cephalopod ink (the squid and octopus belong to the class cephalopod). The dark color is created by melanin, the same substance that acts as a pigment in human skin.

9. Pi follower RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”.

10. Mediterranean island, to locals MENORCA
The island of Minorca in the Mediterranean takes its name from the larger neighboring island of Majorca. The names come from the Latin “Insula Minor” meaning “Minor Island” and “Insula Major” meaning “Major Island”. The island is known as “Minorca” in English, and “Menorca” in Spanish and Catalan.

11. Like amaranth flowers, in myth ETERNAL
Amaranth is a genus of about 60 flowering plants, also known as Amaranthus. The term “amaranth” comes from the Greek words for “unfading” and “flower”.

12. Magazine in which “The Thin Man” first appeared REDBOOK
“Redbook” is a monthly magazine aimed at women. It was introduced in 1903 as “The Red Book Illustrated”, and was focused on the publication of short fiction by established authors.

“The Thin Man” is a detective novel written by Dashiell Hammett that was first published in the magazine “Redbook” in 1934. Hammett never wrote a sequel to his story, but it spawned a wonderful, wonderful series of “The Thin Man” films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy. “The Thin Man” was the last novel that Hammett wrote.

25. Spade-shaped reef swimmer BATFISH
“Batfish” is another name for the bat ray. The larger bat rays can grow to a wingspan of almost 6 feet.

27. Alberto VO5 rival PRELL
Prell shampoo was introduced by Procter & Gamble in 1947, and was originally a clear green concentrate sold in a tube (like toothpaste).

Alberto VO5 is the flagship brand of the Alberto-Culver corporation. Within the brand is a shampoo and a market-leading hairdressing product.

29. Una __: using the soft pedal CORDA
The “una corda pedal” is the soft pedal on a piano, usually the pedal situated to the left. Normally a hammer in a piano strikes three strings tuned to the same note. When the soft pedal is depressed, all of the hammers shift slightly to the left so that only two strings are struck.

31. Brogan classification EEE
A brogan is a heavy boot, with the original brogans being boots worn by soldiers on both sides during the Revolutionary War and the Civil War. Apparently some British soldiers in the Revolutionary War wore brogans that could be worn on either foot in an attempt to get more even wear.

32. High __ TEA
Over in the UK, high tea is a major meal served in the late afternoon or early evening, and of course it should include a pot of tea!

35. Pair commemorated on North Carolina’s state quarter WRIGHTS
Wilbur was the older of the two Wright brothers, and he was born in 1867 in Millville, Indiana. By the time that Orville was born in 1871, the family was living in Dayton, Ohio. The Wrights spent a few years of their youth back in Richmond, Indiana, before settling in Dayton for the rest of their lives. The brothers both died in Dayton; Wilbur in 1912 and Orville in 1948.

Kitty Hawk is a town in North Carolina. The Wright brothers made the first powered airplane flight four miles south of Kitty Hawk, at the Kill Devil Hills.

36. Humble oneself EAT DIRT
“To eat dirt” is a slang term meaning to accept insults without complaint.

38. ’33 Chicago World’s Fair puppeteer SARG
Tony Sarg was a German-American puppeteer and illustrator. He was hired by Macy’s in 1928 to build helium-filled “puppets” for their Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, a tradition that was to last a long time. In 1935 he designed and built the puppets and displays in Macy’s windows for Thanksgiving and Christmas.

39. Beauty spots? UTOPIAS
The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More for his book “Utopia” published in 1516 describing an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek “ou” meaning “not” and “topos” meaning “place”. By calling his perfect island “Not Place”, More was apparently making the point that he didn’t think that the ideal could actually exist.

40. One-named singer/songwriter of the 1970 Woodstock-inspired hit “Lay Down” MELANIE
Melanie Safka is singer-songwriter from the Astoria neighborhood in Queens, New York. Safka used the stage name of just “Melanie”. Melanie’s most famous release is probably “Brand New Key” from 1971.

47. Author Paretsky and others SARAS
Sara Paretsky is an American author of detective fiction. Paretsky’s most famous character is a female private investigator called V.I. Warshawski. Warshawski was played by Kathleen Turner in a big screen adaptation of one of her stories in 1991.

51. “Why, then, __ soldier drink!”: Iago LET A
Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. Iago is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. He hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello’s wife. By the end of the play it’s Iago himself who is discredited and Othello (before committing suicide) apologizes to Cassio for having believed Iago’s lies. Heavy stuff …

54. Confucian path TAO
The Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

56. Old Beta rival VHS
The video standard known as VHS is more fully referred to as the Video Home System. VHS was one of many standards touted by various manufacturers in the seventies. The biggest rival to VHS was of course Betamax, but we all knew which of the two standards won the final round in that fight.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Hits the dirt? SCRUBS
7. Window in many loft conversions DORMER
13. Prepared to fire TOOK AIM
15. Tool for hackers MACHETE
16. Name on “The Name of the Rose” UMBERTO
17. Spoke like an uninspired lecturer INTONED
18. Smartphone component, for short CPU
19. Soothes, in a way SINGS TO
21. Mars, for one ORB
22. Throw CAST
24. Old language that gives us “berserk” NORSE
25. Home of the Czech Republic’s Supreme Court BRNO
26. Second to none ON TOP
28. Spot in a casino PIP
29. Crème de __ CACAO
30. “That’s the pot calling the kettle black!” YOU’RE ONE TO TALK
33. Hose holder REEL
34. Indoor football name NERF
35. London arena that Pelé dubbed “the cathedral of football” WEMBLEY STADIUM
41. Fauvist painter Dufy RAOUL
42. 5, spelled out? MAY
43. Rayed bloom ASTER
45. Tendon attachment? -ITIS
46. Pamplona runners TOROS
48. Green opening HOLE
49. Mdse. GDS
50. Like many consonants LINGUAL
52. Cat’s batter PAW
53. Ancient Syrian HITTITE
55. First golfer to win the U.S., British and Canadian Opens in the same year TREVINO
57. Overly sentimental TREACLY
58. Side effect of a bike helmet HAT HAIR
59. Pet STROKE
60. Disrespected outwardly SASSED

Down
1. Masonry finish STUCCO
2. Firm COMPANY
3. Humidor item ROBUSTO
4. Island entertainment UKE
5. Places to see a lot of spirits BARS
6. March alternative SIT-IN
7. Poet translated by Longfellow DANTE
8. Pi preceder? OCTO-
9. Pi follower RHO
10. Mediterranean island, to locals MENORCA
11. Like amaranth flowers, in myth ETERNAL
12. Magazine in which “The Thin Man” first appeared REDBOOK
14. Currency printed on only one side MONOPOLY MONEY
15. Rued years MISSPENT YOUTH
20. Put on a happy face GRIN
23. Sightseers can be seen on one TOUR BUS
25. Spade-shaped reef swimmer BATFISH
27. Alberto VO5 rival PRELL
29. Una __: using the soft pedal CORDA
31. Brogan classification EEE
32. High __ TEA
35. Pair commemorated on North Carolina’s state quarter WRIGHTS
36. Humble oneself EAT DIRT
37. More likely to win the bakeoff, maybe MOISTER
38. ’33 Chicago World’s Fair puppeteer SARG
39. Beauty spots? UTOPIAS
40. One-named singer/songwriter of the 1970 Woodstock-inspired hit “Lay Down” MELANIE
44. Paraphrase REWORD
46. Safe-deposit box document TITLE
47. Author Paretsky and others SARAS
50. Defeat LICK
51. “Why, then, __ soldier drink!”: Iago LET A
54. Confucian path TAO
56. Old Beta rival VHS

Return to top of page

LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Aug 13, Friday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeffrey Wechsler
THEME: Catchphrases … each of today’s themed answers might be defined as a CATCH:

20A. See 56-Across HIDDEN HAZARD
31A. See 56-Across BALL-TOSSING GAME
41A. See 56-Across GOOD TYPE TO MARRY

56A. Some slogans, and what 20-, 31- and 41-Across are? CATCHPHRASES

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 48s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
5. Pacific veranda LANAI
A lanai is a type of veranda, a design that originated in the Hawai’i. A kind blog reader tells me that the etymology of “lanai” seems unclear, and that the island name “Lana’i” is not related. “Lana’i” translates as “day of conquest”.

14. “__ la Douce” IRMA
“Irma la Douce” is a wonderful Billy Wilder movie, released in 1963. It stars Jack Lemmon and Shirley MacLaine. Lemmon plays a maligned Parisian policeman, and MacLaine is the popular prostitute Irma la Douce (literally “Irma the Sweet”). Don’t let the adult themes throw you as it’s a very entertaining movie …

15. Mission attacked by Santa Anna ALAMO
The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718 and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna’s camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry “Remember the Alamo!”.

16. “Betsy’s Wedding” director ALDA
Alan Alda had a great television career, especially of course on “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

“Betsy’s Wedding” is a 1990 comedy film. It was very much an Alan Alda project as he wrote the screenplay, directed and played one of the leads. The storyline was apparently inspired by the marriage of Alda’s youngest daughter.

17. Alfred E. Neuman expression GRIN
Alfred E. Neuman is the mascot of “Mad” magazine, although the image of the smiling, jug-eared youth had been around for decades before the magazine. “Mad” first used the likeness in 1955, and young Mr. Neuman has appeared on the cover of almost every issue of the magazine since then. Neuman’s name was inspired by American composer Alfred Newman, a prolific writer of film scores.

22. Winner of a record 82 PGA tournaments SNEAD
Sam Snead was probably the most successful golfer never to win a US Open title, as he won a record 82 PGA Tour events. Snead did win seven majors, but never the US Open. He was also quite the showman. He once hit the scoreboard at Wrigley Field stadium with a golf ball by teeing off from home plate.

23. Cheer from Charo OLE!
Charo is an actress, comedian and flamenco guitarist from Spain. She is quite famous for her comedic catchphrase “cuchi cuchi”. Charo’s real name is … wait for it … María del Rosario Pilar Martínez Molina Gutiérrez de los Perales Santa Ana Romaguera y de la Hinojosa Rasten.

30. Book between Micah and Habakkuk NAHUM
Nahum was one of the twelve minor prophets of the Hebrew Bible.

38. Id checker EGO
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

47. SSA IDs, e.g. NOS
A Social Security number (SSN) is divided into three parts i.e AAA-GG-SSSS, Originally, the Area Number (AAA) was the code for the office that issued the card. Since 1973, the Area Number reflects the ZIP code from which the application was made. The GG in the SSN is the Group Number, and the SSSS in the number is the Serial Number. However, this is all moot, as since 2011 SSn’s are assigned randomly.

49. Gay Nineties, e.g. ERA
When looking back at the 1890s, here in America we sometimes refer to the era as the Gay Nineties. The term is associated with a time of emerging wealth in the days before income taxes were permanently levied on citizens. Back in the British Isles, the same decade is known as the Naughty Nineties, days of society scandals and the outrageous antics of the likes of Oscar Wilde.

52. Catherine of “A Mighty Wind” O’HARA
Catherine O’Hara is an actress and comedienne from Toronto, Ontario. One of O’Hara’s more famous film roles is the mother in the Christmas classic “Home Alone”.

“A Mighty Wind” is a 2003 comedy drama movie co-written and directed by Christopher Guest. The film falls into the genre called “mockumentary”, and tells of a folk music reunion concert. Many in the cast of “A Mighty Wind” also appeared in the other successful Christopher Guest films “This is Spinal Tap”, “Waiting for Guffman” and “Best in Show”.

59. Response to an awkwardly timed call I’M NOT ALONE
It’s an awkward time for this phone call, I’m not alone …

65. Actress McClurg EDIE
Edie McClurg is a character actress from Kansas City. The role that I most associate with McClurg is secretary to the school principal in the classic “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”.

Down
2. Hatch of Utah ORRIN
Senator Orrin Hatch is a Republican from Utah. He’s also quite the musician, and plays the piano, violin and organ. He has composed various compositions, including a song called “Heal Our Land” that was played at the 2005 inauguration of President George W. Bush.

4. Unger player RANDALL
The actor Tony Randall was from Tulsa, Oklahoma. Although Randal had a long and distinguished Hollywood career, he was best known for playing Felix Unger on the TV version of “The Odd Couple” by Neil Simon. Randall was married to his first wife for fifty years, before she passed away in 1993. A few years later, the 75-year old veteran actor married his second wife, who was 50 years his junior. The happy couple had two children together.

In the Neil Simon play “The Odd Couple”, the character Felix has the family name “Ungar”. This spelling “Ungar” persists in the film adaptation but somehow morphed into “Unger” for the long-running television series.

“The Odd Couple” is a play by the wonderfully talented Neil Simon first performed on Broadway, in 1965. This great play was adapted for the big screen in 1968, famously starring Jack Lemmon (as Felix Unger) and Walter Matthau (as Oscar Madison). The success of the play and the film gave rise to an excellent television sitcom that ran from 1970-1975, starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman. In 1985, Neil Simon even went so far as to adapt the play for an all-female cast, renaming it “The Female Odd Couple”. I’d like to see that one …

5. “This skull hath __ in the earth …”: Hamlet LAIN
“Hamlet” is William Shakespeare’s longest play, and was also one of most popular of the playwright’s works during his lifetime.

9. Eastern segment of the Louisiana Purchase IOWA
The state of Iowa was part of the French colony known as New France until it was acquired by the US in the Louisiana Purchase. The state’s name comes from the Ioway Native American people who lived there at the time European’s started exploring the area.

19. Sumatran ape ORANG
Orangutans are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. They are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like most species in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word “orangutan” is Malay, meaning “man of the forest”.

Sumatra is a very large island in western Indonesia, the sixth largest island in the world and home to 22% of the country’s population.

26. Ancient Mesopotamian kingdom SUMER
Iraq is often called the “Cradle of Civilization” as it was home to Sumer, which was the earliest known civilization on the planet. By 5000 BC the Sumerian people were practicing year-round agriculture and had a specialized labor force. For the first time, a whole race were able to settle in one place by storing food, instead of having to migrate in a pattern dictated by crops and grazing land.

Mesopotamia was the land that lay between two rivers, the Tigris and the Euphrates, that flow through modern-day Iraq. The name “Mesopotamia” means “between the rivers”.

27. Buffing board EMERY
Emery is a very hard type of rock that is crushed for use as an abrasive. Emery paper is made by gluing small particles of emery to paper. Emery boards are just emery paper with a cardboard backing. And emery boards are primarily used for filing nails.

29. Flat-bottomed boat DORY
A dory is a small boat, around 20 feet long with a shallow draft, a flat bottom and a sharp bow. Dories are commonly used for fishing.

32. Ancient gathering place AGORA
In early Greece the “agora” was a place of assembly. Often the assemblies held there were quite formal, perhaps for the reading of a proclamation. Later in Greek history, things became less formal as the agora evolved into a market place. Our contemporary word “agoraphobia” comes from these agorae, in the sense that an agoraphobe has a fear of open spaces, a fear of “public meeting places”.

34. Conciliatory offering SOP
Cerberus is a dog with three heads that appears in both Greek and Roman mythology. Cerberus had the job of guarding the gates of Hades and preventing those who had crossed the River Styx from ever escaping. A sop is a piece of food that has been dipped in some liquid, as one might sop a piece of bread in soup. There is an idiomatic expression, “to give a sop to Cerberus”, which means to give someone a bribe, or pay someone off. The idea is that if one could bribe Cerberus, give him a sop to eat, then he would let you pass and escape from Hades.

37. Commercial sign NEON
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

49. Fanfare ECLAT
“Éclat” can mean a brilliant show of success, or the applause or accolade that one receives. The word derives from the French “éclater” meaning “to splinter, burst out”.

50. Van Gogh’s “Starry Night Over the __” RHONE
“Starry Night Over the Rhone” is one of Vincent Van Gogh’s series of paintings he created depicting scenes at night in the South of France. The painting is actually a view from the quay on the east side of the Rhone river as it flows through the city of Arles.

51. Nighttime disorder APNEA
Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

54. Frankincense or myrrh RESIN
Frankincense and myrrh are both tree resins, exuded when certain species of tree are damaged. The harvested resins are used to make essentials oils for perfumes, and are also burned to give off a pleasant fragrance.

57. Lights-out signal TAPS
“Taps” is played nightly by the US military, indicating “lights out”. It’s also known as “Butterfield’s Lullaby” as it is a variation of an older bugle call named the “Scott Tattoo”, arranged during the Civil War by the Union Army’s Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield. The tune is called “taps”, from the notion of drum taps, as it was originally played on a drum, and only later on a bugle.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Use an updraft, say SOAR
5. Pacific veranda LANAI
10. Shoe site HOOF
14. “__ la Douce” IRMA
15. Mission attacked by Santa Anna ALAMO
16. “Betsy’s Wedding” director ALDA
17. Alfred E. Neuman expression GRIN
18. “I can’t believe …” IT’S A WONDER …
20. See 56-Across HIDDEN HAZARD
22. Winner of a record 82 PGA tournaments SNEAD
23. Cheer from Charo OLE!
24. Bring down ABASE
28. Top LID
30. Book between Micah and Habakkuk NAHUM
31. See 56-Across BALL-TOSSING GAME
38. Id checker EGO
39. Get up ROUSE
40. Comparative suffix -IER
41. See 56-Across GOOD TYPE TO MARRY
46. Mail at a castle ARMOR
47. SSA IDs, e.g. NOS
48. Discrimination TASTE
49. Gay Nineties, e.g. ERA
52. Catherine of “A Mighty Wind” O’HARA
56. Some slogans, and what 20-, 31- and 41-Across are? CATCHPHRASES
59. Response to an awkwardly timed call I’M NOT ALONE
62. Whiff MISS
63. Bed or bar attachment ROOM
64. Discussion group PANEL
65. Actress McClurg EDIE
66. “__ these days …” KIDS
67. Signal to a runner STEAL
68. Negative impression? DENT

Down
1. Chorus from adoring fans SIGHS
2. Hatch of Utah ORRIN
3. Nitrogen compound AMIDE
4. Unger player RANDALL
5. “This skull hath __ in the earth …”: Hamlet LAIN
6. E’en if ALTHO
7. __ passage NASAL
8. Knock the socks off AMAZE
9. Eastern segment of the Louisiana Purchase IOWA
10. Purse HANDBAG
11. Unoriginal OLD
12. Tribute in verse ODE
13. Word with flung or reaching FAR
19. Sumatran ape ORANG
21. Put in a word or two? EDIT
25. Win by __ A HAIR
26. Ancient Mesopotamian kingdom SUMER
27. Buffing board EMERY
29. Flat-bottomed boat DORY
31. Brought forth BEGAT
32. Ancient gathering place AGORA
33. Towers (over) LOOMS
34. Conciliatory offering SOP
35. Advice after an injury, perhaps SUE
36. Real end? -IST
37. Commercial sign NEON
42. Targets of many searches DOT-COMS
43. Unexpected pleasure TREAT
44. Marshy wasteland MOOR
45. Red in the face ASHAMED
49. Fanfare ECLAT
50. Van Gogh’s “Starry Night Over the __” RHONE
51. Nighttime disorder APNEA
53. Dramatic device ASIDE
54. Frankincense or myrrh RESIN
55. Black-ink entry ASSET
57. Lights-out signal TAPS
58. Inferno HELL
59. Rub the wrong way IRK
60. Word of feigned innocence MOI?
61. Subtle assent NOD

Return to top of page