LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Sep 13, Monday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: David W. Cromer
THEME: Crowded in Answers … each of today’s themed answers start with a synonym of the word CROWDED:

20A. Exhortation to the engine room FULL SPEED AHEAD
25A. Had some wallop PACKED A PUNCH
49A. Self-important sort STUFFED SHIRT
58A. Interviewer’s booby trap LOADED QUESTION

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 32s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Cpls.’ superiors SGTS
Sergeants (sgts.) are higher ranking than corporals (cpls.).

5. EMT’s skill CPR
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

8. “Cultured” gem PEARL
The strong iridescent material laid down by some mollusks on the inside of their shells is called “nacre”, and nacre is also the material that makes up pearls. The creature lays down nacre as a defensive mechanism, protecting the soft tissue of its body from the rough surface of the outer shell. Similarly, it uses nacre to encapsulate harmful debris or a parasite that penetrates the shell, and that’s how a pearl is formed. Cultured pearls are made by inserting a tissue graft from a donor oyster, around which nacre is laid down.

13. Spy novelist Ambler ERIC
Eric Ambler was a British author of spy novels, an author that I read voraciously for relaxation as I worked my way through college. One of his books was “The Light of Day”, which provided inspiration for the comic movie adaption called “The Pink Panther”. Ambler also wrote the screenplay for the excellent film “A Night to Remember” which told the story of the fateful maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic.

17. __ IRA ROTH
Roth Individual Retirement Accounts (Roth IRAs) were introduced in 1997 under a bill sponsored by Senator William Roth of Delaware.

18. SeaWorld attraction ORCA
The taxonomic name for the killer whale is Orcinus orca. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

SeaWorld was started in San Diego in 1964. The original plan was build an underwater restaurant with a marine life show. Eventually the founders dropped the idea of the eating establishment and just went with a theme park.

24. Down Under runner EMU
Emu eggs are very large, with a thick shell that is dark-green in color. One emu egg weighs about the same as a dozen chicken eggs.

33. Dreamer’s acronym REM
REM is an acronym standing for Rapid Eye Movement sleep. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one’s most vivid dreams.

44. Ford of the ’70s PINTO
The Pinto is a small car that was made by the Ford company from 1971 to 1980. The Pinto was of course named for the type of horse. Allegations were made in 1997 that the neck of the car’s fuel tank could easily break off in a collision leading to a deadly fire. However, the allegations were never really shown to be valid.

48. Cause of Cleopatra’s undoing ASP
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

Cleopatra was the last pharaoh to rule Egypt. After Cleopatra died, Egypt became a province in the Roman Empire.

53. Brother in a monastery FRA
The title “Fra” (brother) is used by Italian monks.

54. Phi Beta __ KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa was the first collegiate Greek fraternity in the US, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary. The initials Phi Beta Kappa stand for “philosophia biou kybernētēs”, which translates into “philosophy is the guide of life”. The symbol of the Phi Beta Kappa Society is a golden key.

64. Kind of jacket named for an Indian leader NEHRU
A Nehru jacket is very like a regular suit jacket, except that the collar buttons at the neck. It was originally created in the 1940s in India, and then marketed as the Nehru jacket in the west in the sixties. The name Nehru was lifted from Jawaharlal Nehru, the prime minister of India from 1947 to 1964.

69. Shine partner RISE
Rise and shine, greet the day!

71. Doris who sang “Que Sera, Sera” DAY
The actress and singer Doris Day was born Doris Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio. Day made more than 650 recordings as a singer with Columbia Records, and also appeared in 39 movies. Outside the world of entertainment, she has been an ardent supporter of animal rights. She now lives in Carmel-by-the-Sea in California, along with her many pets and stray animals that she has adopted over the years.

As Doris Day told us, “que sera sera” is Spanish for “whatever will be, will be”. Day performed the Oscar-winning song in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1956 version of the movie “The Man Who Knew Too Much”.

72. Burpee product SEED
The Burpees Seeds company was formed in 1876 by Washington Atlee Burpee (what a name!).

Down
1. Feudal workers SERFS
A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

2. Tile installer’s need GROUT
Grout is a thin mortar used to fill the joints between ceramic tiles. The name “grout” comes from the Old English word “gruta”, the word for a “coarse porridge” (due to the similarity in appearance of the two). Interestingly, the word “grits” comes from the same root. Grout … grits … makes sense …

3. Information on a book’s spine TITLE
In the US, the convention is to write the title on the spine of a book from top-to-bottom. In most of Europe, the convention is to write the title from bottom-to-top. We have a lot of books in the “library” in our house from both sides of the Atlantic, and so there is a lot of moving of the head from left to right as we glance along our bookshelves.

4. Carry with effort SCHLEP
Our word “schlep” means “to carry, drag”. As one might expect, “schlep” comes from Yiddish, with “shlepen” having the same meaning.

9. Southernmost Great Lake ERIE
Lake Erie is the fourth largest of the five Great Lakes (Lake Ontario is the smallest). The lake takes its name from the Erie tribe of Native Americans that used to live along its southern shore. Erie is the shallowest of the Great Lakes, something for which nearby residents must be quite grateful. Being relatively shallow, much of Erie freezes over part way through most winters putting an end to most of the lake effect snow that falls in the snow belt extending from the lake’s edge.

10. Indian tourist city AGRA
The Indian city of Agra is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

– The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
– Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
– Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal architecture.

11. Clarinetist’s need REED
The clarinet is a lovely-sounding instrument, isn’t it? The name comes from the Italian word “clarino” meaning “trumpet” with the “-et” suffix indicating “small”.

12. Drug “dropped” in the ’60s LSD
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

22. Dr.’s group AMA
American Medical Association (AMA)

27. Colorful Japanese carp KOI
Koi are also called Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

28. Some Kindle reading, briefly E-MAGS
I finally bought myself a Kindle Fire HD a couple of weeks ago. I’ve started reading e-books for the first time in my life. I’ve always been behind the times …

29. TV dial letters UHF
The radio spectrum is divided into bands based on frequency. “High band” is composed of relatively high frequency values, and “low band” is composed of frequencies that are relatively low. FM radio falls into the band called Very High Frequency, or VHF. Television signals use frequencies even higher than VHF, frequencies in the Ultra High Frequency band (UHF). AM radio uses lower frequencies that fall into the relatively low bands of Low, Medium and High Frequency (LF, MF, and HF).

30. Romance writer Roberts NORA
Nora Roberts is a very successful author who has written over 165 romance novels. Roberts writes under a number of pen names: J.D. Robb, Jill March and Sarah Hardesty.

32. Web address letters HTTP
“http” are the first letters in most Internet link addresses. “http” stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol.

39. Justice Dept. enforcers ATF
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is today part of the Department of Justice. The ATF has its roots in the Department of Treasury dating back to 1886 when it was known as the Bureau of Prohibition. “Explosives” was added to the ATF’s name when the bureau was moved under the Department of Justice as part of the reorganization called for in the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

42. Baba of folklore ALI
There is some controversy about the story “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” in that it has been suggested it was not part of the original collection of Arabic tales called “One Thousand and One Nights”. The suggestion is that the Ali Baba tale was added by one of its European translators.

52. Spuds TATERS
The word “spud” is used as a slang term for a potato and was first recorded in the mid-1800s, in New Zealand would you believe?

58. Popular jeans LEES
The Lee company famous for making jeans was formed in 1889, by one Henry David Lee in Salina, Kansas.

59. Units of resistance OHMS
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm’s Law.

62. __ Minor: constellation URSA
Ursa Minor sits right beside the constellation Draco (Latin for “dragon”). Ursa Minor used to be considered the wing of Draco, and so was once called “Dragon’s Wing”.

64. Second Amendment backer: Abbr. NRA
The Second Amendment of the US Constitution was adopted in 1791 as part of the Bill of Rights. The actual text of the amendment is:

A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

I hear that the wording and punctuation in the original text has led to some controversy over the years, some debate over the original intent …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Cpls.’ superiors SGTS
5. EMT’s skill CPR
8. “Cultured” gem PEARL
13. Spy novelist Ambler ERIC
14. Bread buy LOAF
16. Exhorts URGES
17. __ IRA ROTH
18. SeaWorld attraction ORCA
19. Fathered SIRED
20. Exhortation to the engine room FULL SPEED AHEAD
23. Prepare, as tea STEEP
24. Down Under runner EMU
25. Had some wallop PACKED A PUNCH
33. Dreamer’s acronym REM
36. House division ROOM
37. Loud cry SHOUT
38. Inventor’s starting point IDEA
40. Princess’s headgear TIARA
43. Worry FRET
44. Ford of the ’70s PINTO
46. Festive affair GALA
48. Cause of Cleopatra’s undoing ASP
49. Self-important sort STUFFED SHIRT
53. Brother in a monastery FRA
54. Phi Beta __ KAPPA
58. Interviewer’s booby trap LOADED QUESTION
64. Kind of jacket named for an Indian leader NEHRU
65. Ambiance AURA
66. Way to get out EXIT
67. Send payment REMIT
68. Give some lip to SASS
69. Shine partner RISE
70. Test for purity, as gold ASSAY
71. Doris who sang “Que Sera, Sera” DAY
72. Burpee product SEED

Down
1. Feudal workers SERFS
2. Tile installer’s need GROUT
3. Information on a book’s spine TITLE
4. Carry with effort SCHLEP
5. Hoofbeat CLOP
6. Minute skin opening PORE
7. Event at a track RACE
8. Exercises done in a prone position PUSH-UPS
9. Southernmost Great Lake ERIE
10. Indian tourist city AGRA
11. Clarinetist’s need REED
12. Drug “dropped” in the ’60s LSD
15. Lost luster FADED
21. Train in a ring SPAR
22. Dr.’s group AMA
26. Simple bed COT
27. Colorful Japanese carp KOI
28. Some Kindle reading, briefly E-MAGS
29. TV dial letters UHF
30. Romance writer Roberts NORA
31. Sticks by the pool table CUES
32. Web address letters HTTP
33. Tears RIPS
34. Work on a column, say EDIT
35. Restaurant host’s handout MENU
39. Justice Dept. enforcers ATF
41. Part of a cheerleader’s chant RAH
42. Baba of folklore ALI
45. Taxi’s “I’m not working now” sign OFF DUTY
47. Ships like Noah’s ARKS
50. Prior to, in poems ERE
51. Mamas’ mates DADAS
52. Spuds TATERS
55. Impish fairy PIXIE
56. Model’s asset POISE
57. Tossed a chip in the pot ANTED
58. Popular jeans LEES
59. Units of resistance OHMS
60. Soprano’s chance to shine ARIA
61. Campus area QUAD
62. __ Minor: constellation URSA
63. “No problem” EASY
64. Second Amendment backer: Abbr. NRA

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LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Sep 13, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Julian Lim
THEME: Particle Mechanics … today’s themed answers are common phrases, but have have an -ION removed from the end, and half have an -ION added to the end. The ION TRANSFERS take place symmetrically in the grid:

69A. Chemical reaction phenomenon, and what occurs in four symmetrical pairs of long answers in this puzzle ION TRANSFER
23A. Arsonist’s pursuit? BURNING QUEST (burning quest-ion)
30A. Amer. armed forces traitor? US MILITARY RAT (US military rat-ion)
57A. Commuters per hour, e. g.? RAILWAY STAT (railway stat-ion)
81A. Tryout for a CPA? IRS AUDITION (IRS audit+ion)
107A. Fighting unit in the barnyard wars? CHICKEN LEGION (chicken leg+ion)
122A. 17th-century anti-witch application? SALEM’S LOTION (Salem’s Lot+ion)
16D. Failure in treaty talks? PEACEKEEPING MISS (peacekeeping miss-ion)
39D. Behind-the-scenes romance? BACKSTAGE PASSION (backstage pass+ion)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 23s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

12. Thousandth of a meg ONE-K
In the world of computing, one kilobyte (“1k) is one thousandth of a megabyte (“a meg”).

16. Holy Communion receptacle PYX
In some Christian traditions, a pyx (alos “pix”) is a small round box that is used to carry the Eucharist. A pyx is usually used to carry a small number of hosts to someone who is unable to attend church in person, perhaps due to illness. The term “pyx” comes from the Greek “pyxis” meaning “box, receptacle”. The plural of “pyx” is “pyxides”.

25. TV spin-off set in Florida CSI: MIAMI
I quite enjoy the “CSI” franchise of television shows, except “CSI: Miami”. I find the character played by David Caruso to be extremely annoying. Apparently it was cancelled in 2012. No loss …

27. Legendary Dolphins coach SHULA
Don Shula is a former football player and coach. Shula appeared as head coach in a record six Super Bowls, including a run of three successive Super Bowls (1971-73, winning twice).

29. Math subj. with integrals CALC
Remember doing calculus at school, and all those derivatives and integrals? Well, you probably also remember that an integral calculates the area under a curve (for example).

37. Caps Lock neighbor TAB
Like most features on our computer keyboards, the tab key is a hangover from the days of typewriters. When using a typewriter, making entries into a table was very tedious as it involved lots of tapping on the spacebar and backspace key. So, a lever was added to typewriters that allowed the operator to “jump” across the page to positions that could be set by hand. Later this was simplified to a tab key, which could be depressed causing the carriage to jump to the next tab stop in much the same way that the modern tab key works on a computer.

40. Public pair ITEM
An unmarried couple known to be involved with each other might appear in the gossip columns. This appearance as “an item” in the papers, led to the use of “item” to refer to such a couple, but only since the very early seventies.

41. High seas quaff GROG
Edward Vernon was a naval officer with the nickname “Old Grog”. In 1740, Vernon ordered that the daily ration of rum for his sailors should be watered down, in order to reduce discipline problems caused by drunkenness. The diluted rum was sweetened with sugar, and lemon or lime added to help preserve it on long voyages. This recipe, found to reduce scurvy among sailors (because of the citrus) spread throughout the Royal Navy, and “grog” was born.

“Quaff” is both a verb and a noun. One quaffs (takes a hearty drink) of a quaff (a hearty drink).

43. Company with a stork in its logo VLASIC
Apparently Vlasic invented the glass-packed, shelf-stable pickle. The company adopted the stork mascot in the late sixties, with the stork originally carrying a baby. The mascot was a play on the perception that pregnant women have a higher than average appetite for pickles.

46. AWOL hunters MPS
Military Police officers (MPs) are concerned with personnel who go absent without leave (AWOL).

48. Activist Bonner who married Sakharov YELENA
Yelena Bonner became active in fighting for human rights in the former Soviet Union in the sixties, although she had been helping political prisoners since the forties. She married fellow activist Andrei Sakharov in 1972. She supported her husband while he was internally exiled to Gorky, until she was herself was sent to Gorky as an exile in 1984. Now in her eighties, she is still active, and was the first person to sign the online, anti-Putin manifesto called “Putin must go”.

50. AQI monitor EPA
The air quality index (AQI) is monitored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

51. Like he-men MACHO
A man described as “macho” shows pride in his masculinity. “Macho” is a Spanish word for “male animal”.

54. “The Office” network NBC
The excellent sitcom “The Office” is set in a branch of a paper company in Scranton, Pennsylvania. If you haven’t seen the original UK version starring Ricky Gervais, I do recommend you check it out. Having said that, the US cast took the show to a whole new level. Great television …

61. Moshing site PIT
Moshing (also “slam dancing”) is the pushing and shoving that takes place in the audience at a concert (usually a punk or heavy metal concert). The area directly in front of the stage is known as the mosh pit. When a performer does a “stage dive” it is into (or I suppose “onto”) the mosh pit. It doesn’t sound like fun to me. Injuries are common in the mosh pit, and deaths are not unknown.

64. Ample, in verse ENOW
“Enow” is an archaic form of the word “enough”.

65. Early Alaskan ESKIMO
Although still used in the US, the term “Eskimo” tends to be avoided in Canada and Greenland as there it is considered pejorative.

67. Part of IOC: Abbr. INTL
The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

74. Cabinet dept. formed under Carter ENER
The US Department of Energy (DOE) came into being largely as a result of the 1973 oil crisis. The DOE was founded in 1977 by the Carter administration. The DOE is responsible for regulating the production of nuclear power, and it is also responsible for the nation’s nuclear weapons.

77. Jazzy improvisation SCAT
Scat singing is a vocal improvisation found in the world of jazz. There aren’t any words as such in scat singing, just random nonsense syllables made up on the spot.

78. Whitman’s “__ the Body Electric” I SING
“I Sing the Body Electric” is a poem from Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” collection that was first published in 1855.

I SING the Body electric;
The armies of those I love engirth me, and I engirth them;
They will not let me off till I go with them, respond to them,
And discorrupt them, and charge them full with the charge of the Soul.

Waltman added the opening line to the poem after its original publication, in 1867. In fact, the term “electric” wasn’t very common back in 1855.

81. Tryout for a CPA? IRS AUDITION (IRS audit+ion)
Certified Public Accountant (CPA)

86. Mell Lazarus comic strip MOMMA
Mell Lazarus is known as the creator of two long-running comic strips. “Miss Peach” ran from 1957 to 2002, and “Momma” first appeared in 1970 and is still going strong. Lazarus started his career as an apprentice to famed cartoonist Al Capp.

89. Big heart ACE
The ace of hearts (or spade, clubs or diamonds) is a “big” heart in a deck of cards.

90. Hägar creator Browne DIK
“Hagar the Horrible” is a comic strip that was created by the late Dik Browne and is now drawn by his son, Chris Browne. “Hagar the Terrible” (not “Horrible”) was the nickname given to Dik by his sons.

92. “__ Irish Rose” ABIE’S
“Abie’s Irish Rose” was originally a Broadway play by Anne Nichols that opened in 1922 and ran for over five years, which back then was the longest run for any show in New York. The show then went on tour, and stayed on tour for an amazing 40 years.

100. “… bombs bursting __” IN AIR
And the rocket’s red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there
are lines from “The Star-Spangled Banner”.

The lyrics of “The Star-Spangled Banner” were written first as a poem by Francis Scott Key, inspired by the bombarding by the British of the American forces at Fort McHenry that he witnessed during the Battle of Baltimore in September 1814. The words were then set to the tune of a popular British drinking song penned by John Stafford Smith called “The Anacreontic Song”, with the Anacreontic Society being a men’s club in London.

102. Yemen’s capital SANA
Sana (also Sana’a) is the capital city of Yemen. Within the bounds of today’s metropolis is the old fortified city of Sana where people have lived for over 2,500 years. The Old City is now a World Heritage Site.

105. Cong. member SEN
A senator (sen.) is a member of Congress (Cong.).

106. Gas brand born in 1926 ESSO
The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company as it uses the initial letters of “Standard” and “Oil” (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US, but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

119. Plant animals? CHIA PETS
Chia is a flowering plant in the mint family, and the Chia Pet is an invention of a San Francisco company. Chia Pets are terracotta figurines to which are applied moistened chia seeds. The seeds sprout and the seedlings become the “fur” of the Chia Pet.

122. 17th-century anti-witch application? SALEM’S LOTION (Salem’s Lot+ion)
Salem is a seaport on the Massachusetts coast. It is noted as the location of the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, an event that the city commemorates during the run up to Halloween every year in October.

Stephen King’s “’Salem’s Lot” was published in 1975, his second novel. It belongs to the horror genre, so you won’t catch me reading it. The title refers to the Maine town of Jerusalem’s Lot, or ‘Salem’s Lot for short. There’s an interesting story about the actual publication of the first edition. The intended price of $8.95 was changed at the last minute to $7.95, but not all the price changes were made before release. A few copies “escaped” with the dust cover marked $8.95, and they are now worth a lot of money. Go check your bookshelves …

125. “The Tempest” sorcerer PROSPERO
William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” tells the story of Prospero, who was removed from the throne of Milan and banished to a deserted island along with his daughter Miranda. Prospero learns sorcery while cast away, and eventually conjures up a tempest that drives those who usurped his throne onto the island’s shores (in particular his own brother, Antonio). On the island, Prospero is eventually successful in revealing Antonio’s lowly nature.

126. White house? IGLOO
The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar: “igdlo”.

128. “You eediot!” speaker of cartoons REN
“The Ren and Stimpy Show” is an animated television show that ran on Nickelodeon from 1991 to 1996. The title characters are Marland “Ren” Höek, a scrawny Chihuahua, and Stimpson J. Cat, a rotund Manx cat. Not my cup of tea …

130. ’90s-’00s heartthrob band ‘N SYNC
‘N Sync was a boy band from Orlando, Florida that was formed in 1995. The name of the group came from a comment by the mother of band member Justin Timberlake, who said the boys voices sounded “in sync”. But, it’s also true that the letters of the name ‘N Sync are the last letters of the given names of the five band members:

– Justin Timberlake
– Chris Kirkpatrick
– Joey Fatone
– Lance “Lansten” Bass
– JC Chasez

131. Filibuster site SENATE
A filibuster is a procedure used in parliamentary circles whereby someone extends a debate in order to prevent a vote taking place. The use of the filibuster has led to most legislation needing a 60% vote in order to come the floor of the US Senate. At least that has been the case since 1975. The filibuster was an option in the US House as well until 1842, at which time a rule was introduced that limits the duration of a debate.

Down
1. “Dear __” ABBY
The advice column “Dear Abby” first appeared in 1956. Pauline Phillips was Abby back then, but now the column is written by Jeanne Phillips, her daughter. The full name of the “Abby” pen name is Abigail Van Buren, which Pauline Phillips came up with by combining “Abigail” from the biblical Book of Samuel, and “Van Buren” after the former US president.

2. Man without morals ROUE
“Roue” is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. “Roue” comes from the French word “rouer” meaning “to break on a wheel”. This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

3. Writable storage media, for short CD-RS
Compact Disc-Recordable (CD-R).

4. Veda devotee HINDU
The Vedas are a body of ancient Indian texts, the oldest Hindu scriptures. The word “véda” is Sanskrit, and means “knowledge, wisdom”.

5. Nobelist Wiesel et al. ELIES
Elie Wiesel is a holocaust survivor, best known for his book “Night” that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986.

7. Web help source FAQ
Most websites have a page listing answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). There is a link to this blog’s FAQs at the top right of every page.

8. Hosp. area ICU
Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

9. Desert trial N-TEST
Nuclear test (N-test)

10. Tyler of “The Talk” AISHA
Aisha Tyler is an actor and comedian who is currently a co-host on “The Talk” and is the new host of “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” She is doing a really good job on “Whose Line …”

12. Neil Sedaka hit OH! CAROL
“Oh! Carol” is a 1958 hit performed and co-written by Neil Sedaka. Sedaka used the name “Carol” in honor of Carole King, whom he had dated when he was in high school. Carole King’s husband, Gerry Coffin, wrote new lyrics using the same tune and released it as “Oh! Neil” later that same year. “Oh! Neil” wasn’t successful at all.

13. “If I Ruled the World” rapper NAS
Rapper Nas used to go by another stage name, Nasty Nas, and before that by his real name, Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones. Nas released his first album “Illmatic” in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001. Not my cup of tea, I would say …

15. __ Sutra KAMA
The Kama Sutra is renowned for its descriptions of positions that can be used for sexual intercourse, but the sutra includes many other texts that deal with various matters of a sexual nature including how to woo a woman, the conduct of a “chief wife”, the conduct of “other” wives, how to make money as a courtesan and much, much more, as if that isn’t enough …

17. Holiday veggie YAM
Although in the US we sometimes refer to sweet potatoes as “yams”, the yam is actually a completely different family of plants. True yams are more common in other parts of the the world than they are in this country, and are especially found in Africa.

18. First year of Claudius’ reign XLI
I find Claudius to be the most fascinating of all the Roman Emperors. Claudius had a lot going against him as he walked with a limp and was slightly deaf. He was put in office by the Praetorian Guard (the emperor’s bodyguards) after Caligula was assassinated. Claudius had very little experience and yet proved to be very forward-thinking and capable.

22. Jovovich of “Resident Evil” films MILLA
Milla Jovovich is a model and actress who was born in Kiev in the former Ukrainian SSR. Jovovich left the USSR when she was five years old came to Sacramento, California via London. She started getting modelling jobs from the age of nine, but always wanted to be an actress. Jovovich played the female lead in “Return to the Blue Lagoon” when she was 16 years old. Her big break in movies came with a starring role in “The Fifth Element” opposite Bruce Willis, playing Leeloo the alien who helps save the planet.

28. Deceptive-sounding instrument? LYRE
You play the lyre? You liar!

32. JFK Library architect IM PEI
The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library is a splendid structure located right beside the Boston campus of the University of Massachusetts. President Kennedy chose the location for his library just one week before he was assassinated. The library itself was designed by architect I. M. Pei.

35. Seventh fencing position SEPTIME
In competitive fencing, a parry is a maneuver that blocks and attack by an opponent. There are nine defined ways to execute a parry. The seventh of this is known as “septime”.

37. “True Blood” rating TV-MA
“True Blood” is a television drama made by HBO. The series is based on novels written by Charlaine Harris that describe human and vampires who co-exist in a small town in Louisiana. I don’t do vampires …

44. Con game decoys SHILLS
A shill is someone planted, perhaps in an audience, with the job of feigning enthusiasm.

45. Inner Hebrides isle IONA
Although the small island of Iona lies just off the west coast of Scotland, it was the site of a monastery built in the Middle Ages by a monk from Ireland names Colm Cille (also known as Columba). Colm Cille and his followers were sent into exile from the Irish mainland and settled in Iona, as at that time the island was part of an Irish kingdom. This monastery in Iona expanded its influence over the decades and founded other institutions all over Ireland and Great Britain. It is believed that the famous Book of Kells may have been written, or at least started, at the monastery on Iona. Iona is also the burial site for Macbeth, King of Scotland who was immortalized in Shakespeare’s fictional account of the king’s life.

47. NBC comedy staple SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (“SNL”)

49. Celts, e.g. NBAERS
The Boston Celtics NBA basketball team were founded just after WWII in 1946. The Celtics won eight league championships in a row from 1958 to 1966. That’s the longest consecutive championship winning streak of any professional sports team in North America.

52. Cornstarch brand ARGO
Argo brand cornstarch first hit the store shelves in 1892.

58. “Run” author Patchett ANN
Ann Patchett is an author who lives in Nashville, Tennessee. Patchett’s most famous work is probably her novel “Bel Canto”, published in 2001. In 2012, “Time” included her in the magazine’s list of 100 most influential people in the world.

59. Rocky greetings YOS
You might remember Rocky Balboa saying, “Yo, Adrian!” in the original Rocky movie. Adrian was Rocky’s wife played by the lovely Talia Shire, sister of director Francis Ford Coppola.

60. Personal ad abbr. SWF
Single white female (SWF)

66. “Star Wars” mentor Obi-Wan __ KENOBI
The Jedi are the “good guys” in the “Star Wars” series of movies. The most famous Jedi knights from the films are Obi-Wan Kenobi (played by Alec Guinness, and later Ewan McGregor) and Yoda (voiced by Frank Oz). Well, they’re my favorites anyway …

68. Recent rightists NEOCONS
By definition, a neoconservative supports the use of American power and military to bring democracy, liberty, equality and human rights to other countries.

70. Fed. hush-hush group NSA
The National Security Agency (NSA) was set up in 1952 by President Truman, a replacement for the Armed Forces Security Agency that had existed in the Department of Defense since 1949. The NSA has always been clouded in secrecy and even the 1952 letter from President Truman that established the agency was kept under wraps from the public for over a generation. I really like the organization’s nickname … “No Such Agency”.

71. Ft. Worth school TCU
Texas Christian University (TCU) is a private school in Fort Worth, Texas. TCU used to be called AddRan Male & Female, named after an AddRan Clark, the son of Addison Clark who died at the age of 3-years-old from diphtheria. Poor young AddRan was named after his father and his brother, Addison and Randolph.

73. One, in Oldenburg EINS
Oldenburg is a city in the northwest of Germany.

76. Down source EIDER
Eiders are large sea ducks. Their down feathers are used to fill pillows and quilts, giving the name to the quilt called an “eiderdown”.

79. Big name in theaters? IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

82. Tiny bit SKOSH
“Skosh” is a slang term meaning “a little bit”, originally military slang that came out of the Korean War. “Skosh” derives from the Japanese word “sukoshi” which translates as “few, little, some”.

83. B.O. purchases TIX
One can purchase tickets (tix) at the box office (B.O.)

The term “box office” may date back to Shakespearean times. In those days long past, patrons would deposit fees for seeing theater performances in boxes. The full boxes would be collected and placed in an office called, imaginatively enough, the “box office”.

84. Paragon IDEAL
A paragon is an model of excellence, a peerless example. Ultimately the term derives from the Greek “para-” meaning “on the side” and “akone” meaning “whetstone”. This derivation comes from the ancient practice of using a touchstone to test gold for its level of purity by drawing a line on the stone with the gold and comparing the resulting mark with samples of known purity.

85. Left on Spanish maps? OESTE
“Oeste” (west) is a “dirección” (direction), in Spanish.

95. “Rolling along” item in an Army song CAISSON
The “Caisson Song” was written in 1908 by three US Army officers stationed in the Philippines.

Over hill over dale we will hit the dusty trail
As the caissons go rolling along.
Up and down, in and out, Countermarch and right about,
And our caissons go rolling along.

A caisson is a two-wheeled cart used to carry artillery ammunition, and perhaps for this reason the song became popular with field artillery units. In the fifties, the Army decided to adopt the “Caisson Song” as its official song, but with new lyrics that had broader appeal beyond the artillery units. The new song is called “The Army Goes Rolling Along” or simply “The Army Song”.

First to fight for the right,
And to build the Nation’s might,
And The Army Goes Rolling Along
Proud of all we have done,
Fighting till the battle’s won,
And the Army Goes Rolling Along.

101. Tiny bits IOTAS
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

109. Poet Sachs NELLY
Nelly Sachs was a German poet who voiced the grief felt by the Jewish people after WWII. Sachs escaped on the last flight from Nazi Germany to Sweden in 1940. One week later, Sachs was scheduled to report to a concentration camp.

110. Carol opening O COME
The lovely hymn “Adeste Fideles” (translated from Latin as “O Come, All Ye Faithful”) was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time.

116. Baltic capital RIGA
Riga is the capital city of Latvia. The historical center of Riga is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, declared as such because of the city’s magnificent examples of Art Nouveau architecture.

The Baltic is a sea in northern Europe that is much less saline than the oceans. The lower amount of salt in the Baltic partially explains why almost half of the sea freezes during the winter. In fact, the Baltic has been known to completely freeze over several times over the past few centuries.

117. Lawsuit basis TORT
The word “tort” is a French word meaning “mischief, injury or wrong”. Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

118. Old-time knife SNEE
“Snick or snee” is the name given to cut and thrust while fighting with a knife. The phrase is rooted in a pair of Dutch words and it gave its name to a “snee”, a light sword-like knife.

119. Response to an arrest, initially CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

120. Charles V’s domain: Abbr. HRE
Charles V ruled the Holy Roman Empire (HRE) from 1519 until 1556. Charles also ruled the Spanish Empire as Charles I. Charles’ parents had colorful names: Philip the Handsome and Joanna the Mad …

124. Casual shoe MOC
“Moc” is short for “moccasin” shoe.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Like some windows ARCHED
7. All-nighter cause FINAL
12. Thousandth of a meg ONE-K
16. Holy Communion receptacle PYX
19. In person BODILY
20. When the plot thickens, often ACT II
21. Ate HAD A MEAL
23. Arsonist’s pursuit? BURNING QUEST (burning quest-ion)
25. TV spin-off set in Florida CSI: MIAMI
26. “Whatever you say, honey” YES, DEAR
27. Legendary Dolphins coach SHULA
29. Math subj. with integrals CALC
30. Amer. armed forces traitor? US MILITARY RAT (US military rat-ion)
34. For fear that LEST
37. Caps Lock neighbor TAB
40. Public pair ITEM
41. High seas quaff GROG
42. Actor, usually FAKER
43. Company with a stork in its logo VLASIC
46. AWOL hunters MPS
48. Activist Bonner who married Sakharov YELENA
50. AQI monitor EPA
51. Like he-men MACHO
52. Church closings AMENS
54. “The Office” network NBC
55. Truncation abbr. ETC
56. Invite across the threshold ASK IN
57. Commuters per hour, e. g.? RAILWAY STAT (railway stat-ion)
61. Moshing site PIT
62. Word on the street, maybe SLANG
64. Ample, in verse ENOW
65. Early Alaskan ESKIMO
67. Part of IOC: Abbr. INTL
69. Chemical reaction phenomenon, and what occurs in four symmetrical pairs of long answers in this puzzle ION TRANSFER
74. Cabinet dept. formed under Carter ENER
75. Dollhouse accessory TEA SET
77. Jazzy improvisation SCAT
78. Whitman’s “__ the Body Electric” I SING
80. Soak, in British dialect SOG
81. Tryout for a CPA? IRS AUDITION (IRS audit+ion)
86. Mell Lazarus comic strip MOMMA
89. Big heart ACE
90. Hägar creator Browne DIK
91. Shoreline changers TIDES
92. “__ Irish Rose” ABIE’S
93. Shear (off) LOP
94. Green wheels ECO-CAR
98. Cancels (out) XES
99. Isn’t fictional EXISTS
100. “… bombs bursting __” IN AIR
102. Yemen’s capital SANA
103. __ opportune moment AT AN
105. Cong. member SEN
106. Gas brand born in 1926 ESSO
107. Fighting unit in the barnyard wars? CHICKEN LEGION (chicken leg+ion)
112. Big draw STAR
114. Words students fear SEE ME
115. Some arm candy ESCORTS
119. Plant animals? CHIA PETS
122. 17th-century anti-witch application? SALEM’S LOTION (Salem’s Lot+ion)
125. “The Tempest” sorcerer PROSPERO
126. White house? IGLOO
127. Expatriate EMIGRE
128. “You eediot!” speaker of cartoons REN
129. Body suit? SKIN
130. ’90s-’00s heartthrob band ‘N SYNC
131. Filibuster site SENATE

Down
1. “Dear __” ABBY
2. Man without morals ROUE
3. Writable storage media, for short CD-RS
4. Veda devotee HINDU
5. Nobelist Wiesel et al. ELIES
6. Peppy DYNAMIC
7. Web help source FAQ
8. Hosp. area ICU
9. Desert trial N-TEST
10. Tyler of “The Talk” AISHA
11. Arrangement of church services LITURGY
12. Neil Sedaka hit OH! CAROL
13. “If I Ruled the World” rapper NAS
14. King’s order EDICT
15. __ Sutra KAMA
16. Failure in treaty talks? PEACEKEEPING MISS (peacekeeping miss-ion)
17. Holiday veggie YAM
18. First year of Claudius’ reign XLI
22. Jovovich of “Resident Evil” films MILLA
24. Sand in food, say GRIT
28. Deceptive-sounding instrument? LYRE
31. Logic proposition LEMMA
32. JFK Library architect IM PEI
33. Sales rep AGENT
35. Seventh fencing position SEPTIME
36. Field vehicle TRACTOR
37. “True Blood” rating TV-MA
38. “Sorry to say …” ALAS
39. Behind-the-scenes romance? BACKSTAGE PASSION (backstage pass+ion)
42. Judge’s concerns FACTS
44. Con game decoys SHILLS
45. Inner Hebrides isle IONA
47. NBC comedy staple SNL
49. Celts, e.g. NBAERS
52. Cornstarch brand ARGO
53. Fail to chill SWEAT IT
58. “Run” author Patchett ANN
59. Rocky greetings YOS
60. Personal ad abbr. SWF
63. Kind of acid used in fertilizers NITRIC
66. “Star Wars” mentor Obi-Wan __ KENOBI
67. “No way that’s true!” IT’S A LIE!
68. Recent rightists NEOCONS
70. Fed. hush-hush group NSA
71. Ft. Worth school TCU
72. “Sweet!” RAD!
73. One, in Oldenburg EINS
76. Down source EIDER
79. Big name in theaters? IMAX
82. Tiny bit SKOSH
83. B.O. purchases TIX
84. Paragon IDEAL
85. Left on Spanish maps? OESTE
87. Pass (out) METE
88. Professional gp. ASSN
95. “Rolling along” item in an Army song CAISSON
96. Clear conclusion? -ANCE
97. Collects lots of RAKES IN
99. Exiles, perhaps ENISLES
101. Tiny bits IOTAS
104. Quite a while AGES
107. Small stream CREEK
108. Browser’s reading, briefly E-MAGS
109. Poet Sachs NELLY
110. Carol opening O COME
111. Running an errand, say NOT IN
113. iPhone programs APPS
116. Baltic capital RIGA
117. Lawsuit basis TORT
118. Old-time knife SNEE
119. Response to an arrest, initially CPR
120. Charles V’s domain: Abbr. HRE
121. Prefix with -pod TRI-
123. Millions of lifetimes EON
124. Casual shoe MOC

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