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Greetings from Dundalk, County Louth in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 8 Sep 13, Sunday






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CROSSWORD SETTER: Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
THEME: What Was In Is Now Out … today’s themed answers are common phrases with the letters IN changed to OUT:
23A. Patiently do tough tile work? GROUT AND BEAR IT (from “grin and bear it”)
44A. Displeasure over a split? BOWLING POUT (from “bowling pin”)
65A. Big toe, often? GOUT JOINT (from “gin joint”)
87A. Fight over a washing machine? LAUNDRY BOUT (from “laundry bin”)
107A. Campaign oratory? POLITICAL SPOUT (from “political spin”)
16D. Belligerent headliner? SHOUTING STAR (from “shining star”)
58D. What Army recruiters do? TOUT SOLDIERS (from “tin soldiers”)
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 51s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Brinker on skates HANS
"Hans Brinker, or The Silver Skates" is a children's novel written by American author Mary Mapes Dodge, first published in 1865. The novel is famous for introducing a story, told with within the novel's own storyline, the tale of the little Dutch boy who put his finger in the leaking dike. I always thought the tale of the boy and the dike was a Dutch legend but no, it was the literary invention of Mary Mapes Dodge ...

13. Popular small plane CESSNA
The Cessna Aircraft manufacturing company was founded in 1911 by Clyde Cessna, a farmer from Kansas. Cessna is headquartered in Wichita and today has over 8,000 employees.

21. Gamboling spot LEA
“Gambol” is a such a lovely word, meaning "to frolic. leap about". Sheep or other animals might gambol in a meadow or lea.

23. Patiently do tough tile work? GROUT AND BEAR IT (from “grin and bear it”)
Grout is a thin mortar used to fill the joints between ceramic tiles. The name "grout" comes from the Old English word "gruta", the word for a "coarse porridge" (due to the similarity in appearance of the two). Interestingly, the word "grits" comes from the same root. Grout ... grits ... makes sense ...

28. Latte option MOCHA
Mocha is a port city in Yemen on the Red Sea and was once the principal port for the capital city of Sana’a. Mocha was the major marketplace in the world for coffee until the 1600s, and gave its name to the Mocha coffee bean.

The term “latte” is an abbreviation of the Italian "caffelatte" meaning "coffee (and) milk". Note that in the correct spelling of "latte", the Italian word for milk, there is no accent over the "e". An accent is often added by mistake when we use the word in English, perhaps meaning to suggest that the word is French.

30. One before dix NEUF
In French, nine (neuf) comes before ten (dix).

32. Lofty capital LHASA
Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet, and the name "Lhasa" translates as "place of the gods". However, Lhasa used to be called Rasa, a name that translates into the less auspicious "goat's place". Lhasa was also once called the “Forbidden City” due to its inaccessible location high in the Himalayas and a traditional hostility exhibited by residents to outsiders. The “forbidden” nature of the city has been reinforced since the Chinese took over Tibet in the early 1950s as it has been difficult for foreigners to get permission to visit Lhasa.

34. France's westernmost city BREST
Brest is a port city in northwest France, and is the second largest military port in the country. Brest was an important base for German U-boats during WWII when France was occupied by the Nazis.

39. 1984 Vardon Trophy winner Calvin PEETE
Calvin Peete was the most successful African American golfer on the PGA tour before Tiger Woods hit the circuit. Peete played on the Ryder Cup teams of 1983 and 1985.

44. Displeasure over a split? BOWLING POUT (from “bowling pin”)
Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

47. Player in 24 All-Star games MAYS
Willie Mays' nickname was the "Say Hey Kid", although his friends and teammates were more likely to refer to him as "Buck". When Mays was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, he was asked who was the best player he'd seen in the game. He replied, "I don't mean to be bashful, but I was."

48. Spanish folk hero EL CID
Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar was known as El Cid Campeador, which translates as "The Champion" or perhaps "The Lord, Master of Military Arts". El Cid was a soldier who fought under the rule of King Alfonso VI of Spain (among others). However, he was sent into exile by the King in 1080, after acting beyond his authorization in battle. El Cid then offered his services to his former foes, the Moorish kings, After a number of years building a reputation with the Moors, he was recalled from exile by Alfonso. By this time El Cid was very much his own man. Nominally under the orders of Alfonso, he led a combined army of Spanish and Moorish troops and took the city of Valencia on the Mediterranean coast, making it is headquarters and home. He died there, quite peacefully in 1099.

50. Stats often in APBs HGTS
Heights (hgts.)

An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

51. Copywriters' awards CLIOS
The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

52. __ Tin Tin RIN
The original Rin Tin Tin was an actual dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, "Rinty" was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie "Where the North Begins". Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go ...

62. Flat figure RENTER
"Flat" is a word more commonly used in the British Isles than here. A flat is basically an apartment or condominium. The word "flat" is Scottish in origin, in which language it meant a "floor in a house".

64. Rice-__ A-RONI
Rice-a-Roni was introduced in 1958 by the Golden Grain Macaroni Company of San Francisco. The company was run by an Italian immigrant and his four sons. The wife of one of the sons served a pilaf dish at a family diner that was a big hit, so her brother-in-law created a commercial version by blending dry chicken soup mix with rice and macaroni. Sounds like "a San Francisco treat" to me ...

65. Big toe, often? GOUT JOINT (from “gin joint”)
Gout is caused by an elevation of the levels of uric acid in the blood. As a result of the high concentrations, the uric acid can crystallize out in tissue causing extreme discomfort. What we tend to call gout occurs when the crystals are deposited in the big toe.

74. Blasts from the past A-TESTS
There are two classes of nuclear weapons, both of which get the energy for the explosion from nuclear reactions. The first nuclear bombs developed, called atomic bombs (A-bombs), use fission reactions. In an atomic bomb, uranium nuclei are split into smaller nuclei with the release of an awful lot of energy in the process. The second class of nuclear weapons are fusion bombs. Fusion devices are also called thermonuclear weapons or hydrogen bombs (H-bombs). In a fusion reaction, the nuclei of hydrogen isotopes are fused together to form bigger nuclei, with the release of even greater amounts of energy than a fission reaction.

76. 7, on old phones PRS
In days gone by, telephone keypads had three letters written below each of the numbers 2 through 9. These eight numerical keys only allowed for 24 letters, so two letters had to be omitted, namely Q and Z. So, the 7-key has the letters PRS and 9-key the letters WXY.

78. MIT part: Abbr. INST
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) moved into its magnificent mile-long campus on the Cambridge side of the Charles River in 1906. The campus was built largely with funds donated by George Eastman, the founder of the Eastman Kodak Company.

79. Rake ROUE
"Roue" is a lovely word, I think, describing a less than lovely man. A roue could otherwise be described as a cad, someone of loose morals. "Roue" comes from the French word "rouer" meaning "to break on a wheel". This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

A "rake" (short for “rakehell”) is defined as a man who is habituated to immoral conduct (isn’t it always the man??!!). The rake is a character who turns up frequently in novels and films, only interested in wine, women and song and not accepting the responsibilities of life. Good examples would be Wickham in Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Daniel Cleaver (the Hugh Grant part) in the movie "Bridget Jones’s Diary". "Rake" comes from the Old Norse "reikall", meaning "vagrant or a wanderer".

81. WWII marine attacker E-BOAT
In WWII, the German Navy's Motor Torpedo Boats were similar to American PT boats and were called S-boots, short for Schnellboot ("fast craft"). The Allied forces referred to them as E-boats, with the "E" possibly standing for "enemy" or "Eilboot" ("hurry boat").

82. Disney chairman during the Lucasfilm acquisition IGER
Robert Iger is currently the president and CEO of the Walt Disney Company, and is the successor to Michael Eisner. Iger worked for ABC when it was taken over by Disney in 1996, and in 1999 he was named president of Walt Disney International. Iger is doing okay for himself. He earned more than $29 million in 2009.

86. Prefix with meter ODO-
An odometer measures distance traveled. The word derives from the Greek "hodos" meaning "path" and "metron" meaning "measure".

90. Memory Muse MNEME
In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses seems to be debated a lot, but the most popular view is that there are nine:
Calliope (epic poetry)
Clio (history)
Erato (lyric poetry)
Euterpe (music)
Melpomene (tragedy)
Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
Terpsichore (dance)
Thalia (comedy)
Urania (astronomy)
Before the "adoption" of the nine muses of Greek mythology, there were originally three muses, the three Boeotian Muses. These were:
Mneme (memory)
Melete (meditation)
Aoede (song)

96. 1 for H and 2 for He, e.g. AT NOS
The atomic number of an element is also called the proton number, and is the number of protons found in the nucleus of each atom of the element.

97. Since, in a nostalgic song SYNE
The song "Auld Lang Syne" is a staple at New Year's Eve, the words of which were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

98. Prefix with Japanese SINO-
The prefix "Sino-" is used to refer to things Chinese. It comes from the Latin word Sinae, meaning ... Chinese ...

110. "The Naked Ape" author Desmond MORRIS
Desmond Morris is an English zoologist, and someone I remember from my childhood in the late fifties as the presenter of a weekly animal life program(me) back in the UK called “Zoo Time”. Morris’s most famous publication is “The Naked Ape”, which takes a look at the human species and explores the many behaviors that resemble that of lower primates and mammals.

111. Syst. for talking without speaking ASL
It's really quite unfortunate that American Sign Language (ASL) and British Sign Language (BSL) are very different, and someone who has learned to sign in one cannot understand someone signing in the other.

115. __ Moines DES
The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French "Riviere des Moines" meaning "River of the Monks". It looks like there isn't any "monkish" connection to the city's name per se. "Des Moines" was just the name given by French traders who corrupted "Moingona", the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

Down
2. Magical opening ABRA-
The incantation "abracadabra" has a long history. It was used as far back as the 2nd century AD in Ancient Rome when the word was prescribed by a physician to be worn on an amulet to help his emperor recover from disease. "Abracadabra" is Aramaic, and roughly translates as "I will create as I speak".

3. Light gas NEON
The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

7. Boarding hr. determinants ETDS
Expected time of departure (ETD)

8. Point of writing? NIB
"Nib" is a Scottish variant of the Old English word "neb", with both meaning the beak of a bird. This usage of "nib" as a beak dates back to the 14th century, with "nib" meaning the tip of a pen or quill coming a little later, in the early 1600s.

9. Bastille Day saison ETE
One might spend the season (saison) of summer (ete) in France, in French.

The Bastille is a former fortress in Paris that was used as a prison by the kings of France. On 14 July 1789 an angry mob stormed the Bastille during the French Revolution. The mob was actually after the stores of gunpowder in the fortress, and while inside the building freed seven prisoners and killed the Bastille’s governor. The storming of the Bastille became a symbol of the French Revolution and has been celebrated in France on every July 14th since 1790: Bastille Day.

10. 1953 A.L. MVP AL ROSEN
Al Rosen is a former Major League baseball player who played his whole career with the Cleveland Indians. As one of the best all-time players of the game with a Jewish heritage, his fans gave him the nickname "the Hebrew Hammer".

11. Nikon competitor LEICA
Leica is a German optics company, famous for production of lenses and cameras. The 1913 Leica was the first practical camera that could use 35mm film, a size chosen because it was already the standard for film used in motion pictures.

Nikon was founded in 1917, a merger of three companies making various optical devices. After the merger, the company's main output was lenses (including the first lenses for Canon cameras, before Canon made its own). During the war, Nikon sales grew rapidly as the company focused on (pun unintended!) equipment for the military including periscopes and bomb sights.

13. Largest OH airport CLE
Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is the largest airport in the state of Ohio. Cleveland Hopkins was the first municipally owned airport in the country when it was founded in 1925. In 1930, it became the location of the country’s first air traffic control tower and the first airfield lighting system.

15. Type-A concern STRESS
The Type A and Type B personality theory originated in the fifties. Back then, individuals were labelled as Type A in order to emphasize a perceived increased risk of heart disease. Type A personality types are so called "stress junkies", whereas Type B types are relaxed and laid back. But there doesn't seem to be much scientific evidence to support the linkage between the Type A personality and heart problems.

17. Spongy toy brand NERF
Nerf is the name given to the soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for "safe" play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. "NERF" is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

18. MGM motto word ARS
It seems that the phrase "art for art's sake" has its origins in France in the nineteenth century, where the slogan is expressed as "l'art pour l'art". The Latin version "Ars gratia artis" came much later, in 1924 when MGM's publicist chose it for the studio's logo, sitting under Leo the lion. Who'd a thunk it?

24. Letter-shaped track T-SLOT
A T-slot is a type of cut in wood, but I think most often these days in some metal like aluminium. When viewed end on, the profile of the slot is a T-shape. In the case of weather strip, the rubber strip itself is often inserted into an aluminium support bar, by feeding the shaped strip into the t-slot from one end.

25. Italian who pulled a lot of strings AMATI
The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, they were succeeded by Girolamo's son, Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

32. Partner of Martin LEWIS
“Jerry Lewis” is the stage name of comedian and actor Joseph Levitch from Newark, New Jersey.Lewis gained fame when he teamed up with straight man Dean Martin in the 1940s. The duo broke up in 1961, largely because Lewis was always in the limelight and Martin’s role became less important in the eyes of the public. The relationship between the two was strained for many years until there was a reconciliation in the late eighties following the death of Martin’s son.

36. Developer of the one-named "Jeopardy!" contestant Watson IBM
Watson is a program still in development at IBM. Watson is designed to answer questions that are posed in natural language, so that it should be able to interpret questions just as you and I would, no matter how the question is phrased. The program is named after the founder of IBM, Thomas J. Watson. Today's Watson competed in a few memorable episodes of "Jeopardy!" in 2011 taking out two of the best players of the quiz show. That made for fun television ...

37. Poetry Out Loud contest co-creator: Abbr. NEA
Poetry Out Loud is an annual recitation contest that was founded in 2006 by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the Poetry Foundation.

39. Pennsylvania's resort area, with "the" POCONOS
The Pocono Mountains in northeastern Pennsylvania are home to many popular vacation resorts.

40. EMT's training CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

Emergency medical technician (EMT)

42. Baseball VIPs GMS
General Manager (GM)

44. Flashy accessories BLING
Bling-bling is the name given to all the shiny stuff sported by rap stars in particular i.e. the jewelry, watches, metallic cell phones, even gold caps on the teeth. The term comes from the supposed “bling” sound caused by light striking a shiny metal surface.

45. Surprises in bottles GENII
The "genie" in the bottle takes his or her name from "djinn". "Djinns" were various spirits considered lesser than angels, with people exhibiting unsavory characteristics said to be possessed by djinn. When the book "The Thousand and One Nights" was translated into French, the word "djinn" was transformed into the existing word "génie", because of the similarity in sound and the related spiritual meaning. This "génie" from the Arabian tale became confused with the Latin-derived "genius", a guardian spirit thought to be assigned to each person at birth. Purely as a result of that mistranslation the word genie has come to mean the "djinn" that pops out of the bottle. A little hard to follow, I know, but still quite interesting …

48. Manning of the NFL ELI
Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning is quarterback for the Denver Broncos. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, and Archie was also a successful NFL quarterback.

50. Vishnu worshiper HINDU
In the Hindu tradition, the god known as Vishnu has seven different avatars i.e. incarnations or manifestations. Rama is the seventh of these avatars.

56. Rand McNally offering MAP
Rand McNally is a company long associated with the city of Chicago. Its roots go back to 1856 when William Rand opened a printing shop in the city. Two years later he hired an Irish immigrant called Andrew McNally and the pair turned to printing tickets and timetables for the railroad industry. They diversified into "railroad guides" in 1870, a precursor of what was to be their big success, the road atlas. When automobile travel started to become significant, Rand and McNally turned their attention to roads and they published their first road map, of New York City in 1904. Rand and McNally really popularized the use of highway numbers, and indeed erected many roadside highway signs themselves, long before the state and federal authorities adopted the idea.

57. Magic home ORLANDO
The Orlando Magic were formed in 1989 as an NBA expansion team. A local paper was asked to run a competition to suggest names for the new team and the community came up with its four top picks of "Heat", "Tropics", "Juice" and "Magic". A committee then opted for "Orlando Magic". A good choice I think ...

60. Feather: Pref. PTER-
The prefixes pter- and ptero- mean "pertaining to a wing, or a feather", coming from the Greek word "pteron" (feather). Examples of use would be in the words "pterosaur" and "pterodactyl".

63. IV monitors RNS
A registered nurse (RN) might set up an intravenous (IV) drip.

75. They're often pickled SOUSES
The word "souse" dates back to the 14th century and means "to pickle, steep in vinegar". In the early 1600s the usage was applied to someone "pickled" in booze, a drunkard.

77. Black colors, in poetry EBONS
Ebony is another word for the color black (often shortened to "ebon" in poetry). Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned ...

78. Winter Games gp. IOC
The International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

80. A, in Arles UNE
A few years ago I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city's design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and where he painted his famous "Cafe Terrace at Night", as well as "Bedroom in Arles".

81. Spain's longest river EBRO
The Ebro is the longest river in Spain. The river was known by the Romans as the Iber, and it is the "Iber" river that gives the "Iberian" Peninsula its name.

82. 190-member enforcement group INTERPOL
The International Criminal Police Organization is better known as Interpol. The group was formed in 1923 to facilitate international police cooperation. Today the police forces of 190 countries around the world are members of Interpol. The first headquarters of Interpol were in Vienna, and were moved to Berlin during WWII by the Nazi regime. After the war the headquarters were moved again, to just outside Paris, and finally to Lyon in 1989.

83. Home of BMW GER
BMW stands for Bayerische Motoren Werke, which translates into Bavarian Motor Works. BMW was making aircraft engines during WWI, but had to cease that activity according to the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. The company started making motorcycles, and then moved into automobile production starting in 1928. BMW moved back into aircraft engine manufacturing during the build-up of the Luftwaffe prior to WWII.

84. Dingo prey EMU
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an "Emu War" in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the "invading force". The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of "war", the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

The dingo is a wild dog of Australia. The dingo is thought to have originated from domesticated dogs that were brought to Australia with humans that settled the land centuries ago.

85. Hi-__ monitor RES
In the digital world, resolution of a display, television, image etc. is defined by the number of pixels that can be displayed in a standard area (say a square inch). The emphasis today is on producing larger area displays/televisions, i.e increasing the number of pixels simply by increasing the size of the screen. In the past couple of decades the emphasis was on adding more pixels within the same screen size to increase resolution. This would just be wasted effort these days as further increases in resolution cannot be perceived by the eye. Now that TVs are capable of displaying such high resolutions, broadcasters are responding by producing a video signal of higher resolution that they call high-definition television, HDTV.

87. Shaving cream additive LANOLIN
Lanolin is a greasy substance secreted from the skin of woolly animals. It usually extracted from wool sheared from sheep for use in textiles. Medical grade lanolin is used to soothe skin in ointments. It is a relatively hypoallergenic and has antibacterial properties.

89. One-named New Ager YANNI
Yanni is a remarkable Greek musician, very successful in the world of New Age music. What I find so remarkable is that he is a self-taught musician.

92. Whom the angels name in "The Raven" LENORE
"The Raven" is a narrative poem by Edgar Allen Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student's bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven's shadow and shall be lifted "nevermore" …

94. Competed in the Tour de France CYCLED
Back in the late 1800s, long-distance cycle races were used as promotional events, traditionally to help boost sales of newspapers. These races usually took place around tracks, but in 1902 the backers of the struggling sports publication "L'Auto" decided to stage a race that would take the competitors all around France. That first Tour de France took place in 1903, starting in Paris and passing through Lyon, Marseilles, Bordeaux, Nantes and then back to Paris.

98. Signs of fullness, briefly SROS
Standing Room Only (SRO)

100. Popular tablet IPAD
The very exciting iPad isn't Apple's first foray into the world of tablet computing. Apple created great buzz by introducing the Newton MessagePad way back in 1993. This innovative machine was fraught with problems and really died a very slow death, finally being withdrawn from the market in 1998.

101. MBA subject ECON
The world's first Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree was offered by Harvard’s Graduate School of Business Administration, in 1908.

102. Pacific salmon COHO
The Coho salmon is silver along the side of its body, but only during the phase of its life while it is in the ocean. When spawning and heading up into a freshwater river, the Coho has bright red sides.

103. Roman moon deity LUNA
“Luna” is the Latin word for “moon”, and is the name given to the Roman moon goddess. The Greek equivalent of Luna was Selene. Luna had a temple on the Aventine Hill in Rome but it was destroyed during the Great Fire that raged during the reign of Nero.

104. Prince William's alma mater ETON
The literal translation for the Latin term "alma mater" is "nourishing mother". “Alma mater” was used in Ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one's alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one's last place of education.

105. Nashville awards gp. CMA
Country Music Association (CMA)

106. Winter setting at Mt. Snow EST
Mount Snow is a ski area on the mountain of the same name in Vermont, part of the state’s Green Mountains.

108. Whirling toon TAZ
The “Looney Tunes” character known as the Tasmanian Devil, or “Taz”, first appeared on screens in 1964 but gained real popularity in the 1990s.

109. Response on the stand I DO
Do you solemnly swear or affirm that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Brinker on skates HANS
5. Public display SCENE
10. High mountain ALP
13. Popular small plane CESSNA
19. "Yeah, right" I BET
20. Absorb the hit, financially EAT IT
21. Gamboling spot LEA
22. Tizzy LATHER
23. Patiently do tough tile work? GROUT AND BEAR IT (from “grin and bear it”)
26. One thing editors look for ERRORS
27. Woodcutters' tools HANDSAWS
28. Latte option MOCHA
30. One before dix NEUF
31. "Would __ to you?" I LIE
32. Lofty capital LHASA
34. France's westernmost city BREST
36. Like most plumbing INDOOR
39. 1984 Vardon Trophy winner Calvin PEETE
40. Where streets meet CROSSING
43. Corker BEAUT
44. Displeasure over a split? BOWLING POUT (from “bowling pin”)
46. Jacques ou Pierre NOM
47. Player in 24 All-Star games MAYS
48. Spanish folk hero EL CID
49. Significant times ERAS
50. Stats often in APBs HGTS
51. Copywriters' awards CLIOS
52. __ Tin Tin RIN
54. "Yummy!" DELISH!
56. Traveler's stop MOTOR INN
60. Cookout site PATIO
62. Flat figure RENTER
64. Rice-__ A-RONI
65. Big toe, often? GOUT JOINT (from “gin joint”)
68. "I don't give __!" A DARN
69. Good things PLUSES
71. Spread generously SMEAR
72. Puzzle solver's smudges ERASURES
74. Blasts from the past A-TESTS
76. 7, on old phones PRS
77. Not slouching ERECT
78. MIT part: Abbr. INST
79. Rake ROUE
81. WWII marine attacker E-BOAT
82. Disney chairman during the Lucasfilm acquisition IGER
86. Prefix with meter ODO-
87. Fight over a washing machine? LAUNDRY BOUT (from “laundry bin”)
90. Memory Muse MNEME
91. Cave COLLAPSE
93. Pulls in EARNS
94. Oranges and lemons CITRUS
95. Thick DENSE
96. 1 for H and 2 for He, e.g. AT NOS
97. Since, in a nostalgic song SYNE
98. Prefix with Japanese SINO-
99. Request to pull over, maybe SIREN
101. Gather around ENCIRCLE
105. New Orleans cuisine CREOLE
107. Campaign oratory? POLITICAL SPOUT (from “political spin”)
110. "The Naked Ape" author Desmond MORRIS
111. Syst. for talking without speaking ASL
112. More than like ADORE
113. "This can't be happening!" OH NO!
114. Approval ASSENT
115. __ Moines DES
116. Daydreaming, with "out" ZONED
117. Many a student's need LOAN

Down
1. Weather forecast number HIGH
2. Magical opening ABRA-
3. Light gas NEON
4. Hitting the books STUDIOUS
5. Oceanfront invigorator SEA AIR
6. "Pretty please?" CAN WE?
7. Boarding hr. determinants ETDS
8. Point of writing? NIB
9. Bastille Day saison ETE
10. 1953 A.L. MVP AL ROSEN
11. Nikon competitor LEICA
12. Garden feature PATH
13. Largest OH airport CLE
14. Fervent EARNEST
15. Type-A concern STRESS
16. Belligerent headliner? SHOUTING STAR (from “shining star”)
17. Spongy toy brand NERF
18. MGM motto word ARS
24. Letter-shaped track T-SLOT
25. Italian who pulled a lot of strings AMATI
29. Out of the country ABROAD
32. Partner of Martin LEWIS
33. Didn't come unglued HELD
35. Snore, maybe ROUSER
36. Developer of the one-named "Jeopardy!" contestant Watson IBM
37. Poetry Out Loud contest co-creator: Abbr. NEA
38. 86,400 seconds DAY
39. Pennsylvania's resort area, with "the" POCONOS
40. EMT's training CPR
41. "Let's talk outside" NOT HERE
42. Baseball VIPs GMS
44. Flashy accessories BLING
45. Surprises in bottles GENII
48. Manning of the NFL ELI
50. Vishnu worshiper HINDU
51. Tears up CRIES
52. Indian nobles RAJAS
53. Use __ lose ... IT OR
55. Bare minimum LEAST
56. Rand McNally offering MAP
57. Magic home ORLANDO
58. What Army recruiters do? TOUT SOLDIERS (from “tin soldiers”)
59. Beginning ONSET
60. Feather: Pref. PTER-
61. Heavy ONEROUS
63. IV monitors RNS
66. Called a strike, say UMPED
67. Reward for sitting, maybe TREAT
70. Subway hangers STRAPS
73. Play part ACT
75. They're often pickled SOUSES
77. Black colors, in poetry EBONS
78. Winter Games gp. IOC
80. A, in Arles UNE
81. Spain's longest river EBRO
82. 190-member enforcement group INTERPOL
83. Home of BMW GER
84. Dingo prey EMU
85. Hi-__ monitor RES
87. Shaving cream additive LANOLIN
88. Passes along, as a good joke RETELLS
89. One-named New Ager YANNI
90. Skimpy skirts MINIS
92. Whom the angels name in "The Raven" LENORE
94. Competed in the Tour de France CYCLED
96. Came up AROSE
97. Bag SNARE
98. Signs of fullness, briefly SROS
100. Popular tablet IPAD
101. MBA subject ECON
102. Pacific salmon COHO
103. Roman moon deity LUNA
104. Prince William's alma mater ETON
105. Nashville awards gp. CMA
106. Winter setting at Mt. Snow EST
108. Whirling toon TAZ
109. Response on the stand I DO


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9 comments:

Addict said...

Bill,
You posted the wrong grid
today ( last night )
Thats the NY times puzzle

Bill Butler said...

Thanks, Addict.

I was out late last night and posted at 3am! Not a good idea.

All fixed now. Thanks for the help, as always.

Anonymous said...

Not the same puzzle that was in my LA Times??

Addict said...

Anon @ 3:09,
This is one of life's mysteries.
The LA Times publishes Merl Reagle's
Xword on Sundays. The LA Times puzzle
that most do can be found here online
Mensa

Hope this helps

Addict

HeartRx said...

Bill, thanks for this write-up of my puzz. I find it interesting that you picked the same clues/answers that I would have highlighted in the grid! I loved your explanations, and read your blog every day...

Marti DuGuay-Carpenter

Vidwan827 said...

Bill, wonderful blog, as usual. Don't do the puzzle - had to work, on a Sunday, for a change ....

Learnt a lot - your blog is more fun than reading P.G. Wodehouse. ( that's a compliment ...)

My wife who likes coffee, once a day, loved your story about the fake accent of the latte'. !!!

Once upon a time, a tiny little dog, made its way, through all the restrictions and prohibitions got the requisite permission, and went into the inner sanctum of the Forbidden Palace in Lhasa.

He went all the way, up the infinite number of steps .... And was then rewarded with the title of Lhasa Apso. Lol.

GOUT and Kidney stones .... Having suffered from them both, - but thankfully, at different occasions, may I correct a small misconception. Although the metabolic problem , which causes both of them, is the same - Gout is caused by crystallization of Uric Acid crystals, from a supersaturated solution in the blood. Because the kidneys didn't filter the Uric Acid fast enough, to excrete it in the urine. Uric acid crystals are monoclinic, needle shaped, and sharp , and also being a corrosive acid attack the calcium in the joints, and erode them. Result - lots of unbearable pain and suffering.

Kidney stones are Calcium formates, oxalates, and citrates, that precipitate out of the urine, AFTER they have been filtered from the blood, by the kidneys, but the solution is too concentrated, so some of the dissolved salts are precipitated - and cannot be easily dissolved again.

Both are very painful. My urologist told me that he believes that kidney stones are more painful than a normal delivery of a baby, to the mother.

My wife, who is also a medical doctor, "harrumphed" at this remark, and sharply noted that this seems to be a typical chauvinistic and sexist remark by a male urologist - who has never suffed through a delivery himself .....

Hope to see you on Monday.

Addict said...

Marti, How nice of you stop by.
Loved your puzzle today. A little trickier than a normal Sunday.
Some great cluing.

Addict

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Marti.

I'm delighted that you stopped by, and even more delighted to hear that you are a regular visitor. I am honored :)

Thanks for providing us with a very tight puzzle, with a nice theme. I enjoyed writing it up after solving, and that's why I write this blog!

I look forward to your next offering, Marti.

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Vidwan.

Sorry to hear you had to work on a Sunday. It's a bad day when something stands in the way of solving your crossword.

Thanks for clearing up my misconception about gout and kidney stones. I've deleted the reference I made above.

And i do love your wife's comment about that male urologist :)

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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