LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Oct 13, Thursday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Gerry Wildenberg
THEME: Desert Island Movies … today’s themed answers are the names of movies set on a desert island:

20A. 1954 Luis Buñuel film ROBINSON CRUSOE
35A. 1974 Lina Wertmüller film SWEPT AWAY
54A. 1963 Peter Brook film LORD OF THE FLIES

13D. With 44-Down, setting for 20-, 35- and 54-Across DESERT
44D. See 13-Down ISLAND

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 09m 28s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. One of two N.T. books COR
The seventh and eighth books of the New Testament are the First and Second Epistles to the Corinthians.

14. 24/7 Rollerball maker PENTEL
Pentel is Japanese company that is known for manufacture of pens and markers.

15. Address for a PFC APO
APO Army Post Office(APO)

Private First Class (PFC)

17. African adventure SAFARI
“Safari” is a Swahili word, meaning “journey” or “expedition”. The term ultimately derives from the Arabic word “safar” meaning “journey”, which is also a word that we used in English back in 19th century.

20. 1954 Luis Buñuel film ROBINSON CRUSOE
“Robinson Crusoe” is a 1954 big screen adaptation of the famed novel of the same name by Daniel Defoe. The film was directed by Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel and starred actor Dan O’Herlihy in the title role. The producers wanted to cast Orson Welles as Robinson Crusoe, but Buñuel rejected the choice, saying that Welles was too loud and fat!

22. Eur.’s ocean ATL
The Atlantic is the world’s second largest ocean, after the Pacific. The name Atlantic is a reference to the Greek god Atlas, and so the ocean might be called the “Sea of Atlas”. The ancient Greeks believed that the Atlantic was a giant river that encircled the world.

23. Diva quality EGO
“Diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean “goddess” or “fine lady”, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

24. Smallish cells AAS
AA batteries are relatively small.

25. “__ Love”: Natalie Cole hit OUR
Natalie Cole is of course the daughter of Nat King Cole. Natalie’s mother was Maria Cole, a singer with the Duke Ellington Orchestra. The most famous version of the hit song “Unforgettable” was released in 1951 by Nat King Cole. In 1991, Natalie Cole recorded a version that was mixed with an earlier 1961 version sung by her father, creating an “unforgettable” father-daughter duet that was made 26 years after Nat King Cole had passed away.

26. Lamarr of Hollywood HEDY
Hedy Lamarr was an American actress, originally from Vienna in modern-day Austria. Not only was Lamarr a successful Hollywood performer, during WWII she was the co-inventor of the frequency-hopping spread-spectrum method of transmitting radio signals that is still used to this day in wireless communication. Impressive …

28. Harrison colleague STARR
Ringo Starr’s real name is Richard Starkey. Before he joined the Beatles (replacing drummer Pete Best), Starkey played with the Raving Texans. It was with the Raving Texans that he adopted the name “Ringo Starr”, because he wore a lot of rings and he thought it sounded “cowboyish”. Back then his drum solos were billed as “Starr Time”.

George Harrison is often referred to as the “quiet Beatle”, although he did have a profound influence on the direction taken by the Fab Four. It was Harrison who first became an admirer of Indian culture and led the rest of the group into the Indian way of life. Harrison went as far as embracing the Hindu religion.

30. Sluglike “Star Wars” alien HUTT
Jabba the Hutt is the big blob of an alien that appears in the “Star Wars” movie “The Return of the Jedi”. Jabba’s claim to fame is that he enslaved Princess Leia and kitted her out in that celebrated metal bikini.

35. 1974 Lina Wertmüller film SWEPT AWAY
“Swept Away” is a 1974 movie from Italy that was directed by Lina Wertmüller. The film stars Giancarlo Giannini and Mariangela Melato as two castaways on a deserted island in the Mediterranean Sea. “Swept Away” was remade in 2002 with the same title and with Madonna as the female lead. Unlike the original, the 2002 version was panned by the critics.

38. Rat Pack leader SINATRA
The original Rat Pack from the fifties was a group of actors that centered on Humphrey Bogart, and included a young Frank Sinatra. Supposedly, Bogart’s wife, Lauren Bacall, christened them the Rat Pack after seeing them all return from one of their nights on the town in Las Vegas. The sixties Rat Pack was a reincarnation of the fifties version, with the core group of actors being Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin (Dino), Sammy Davis Jr., Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford.

44. Start for sphere IONO-
The ionosphere is that layer of the atmosphere that is ionized by solar radiation. One of the most important characteristics of the ionosphere is that it reflects radio waves and so is an important factor in the propagation of radio signals over long distance.

45. Moved, as a trireme OARED
Triremes were galleys used in the Mediterranean by a number of cultures, including the Ancient Greeks and Romans. The trireme was so called because there were three rows of oars on each side of the vessel. The term “trireme” comes from the Latin “tres remi” meaning “three-oar”. There was also a less ambitious version of the trireme that had only two banks of oars, and that was known as a bireme.

48. Aussie flock EMUS
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an “Emu War” in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the “invading force”. The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of “war”, the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

51. Portuguese royal REI
“Rei” is the Portuguese word for “king”.

53. PGA money winner, e.g. PRO
The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

54. 1963 Peter Brook film LORD OF THE FLIES
The 1963 film “Lord of the Flies” was directed by Peter Brook and is an excellent adaptation of the chilling novel of the same name by William Golding. It’s all about a group of English schoolboys who are stranded on a deserted island. We get to see the boys organize themselves for survival, and watch the darker side of the “survival of the fittest” principle emerge.

58. Unwanted import from the East? ASIAN FLU
The so called “Asian Flu” was a pandemic that originated in china in 1956, and lasted until 1958. The virus killed an estimated 2 million people worldwide, including almost 70,000 in the US. Years later, in 1997, the financial crisis that rocked many countries across Asia was given the same name, “Asian Flu”. The crisis started in Thailand when the Thai currency collapsed, and like a virus the panic spread across much of southeast Asia and Japan.

59. Words that may precede weeping? READ ‘EM
Read ‘em and weep.

61. Word with blue or bean NAVY
The navy bean is a white bean, and is the bean commonly found in the dish known as “baked beans”. It can also be called a haricot bean. The term “Navy Bean” is used because haricot beans were a staple for sailors in the 19th-century US Navy.

62. Neurologist’s test, briefly EEG
An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is “brain dead”.

63. Temper ANNEAL
One anneals glass or metal by exposing to a very specific temperature profile, resulting in a tougher or less brittle product.

65. Tokyo, long ago EDO
Edo is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today’s Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

Down
1. Festoons with certain tissue, for short TPS
TPing (toilet papering) is a prank involving the covering of some object or location with rolls and rolls of toilet paper. If you live in Texas or Minnesota that little “prank” is legal, but if you live here in California, TPing is classed as mischief or vandalism.

7. Hunter’s garb, for short CAMO
Our term “camouflage” evolved directly from a Parisian slang term “camoufler” meaning “to disguise”. The term was first used in WWI, although the British navy at that time preferred the expression “dazzle-painting”.

9. A.L. Rookie of the Year after Tommie Agee ROD CAREW
Rod Carew is a former Major League Baseball player from Panama. Actually. Carew is a “Zonian”, meaning that he was born in the Panama Canal Zone, a political entity that existed for decades from 1903.

Tommie Agee was a Major League Baseball player who played mainly with the Indians, White Sox and Mets. He was one of the “Amazin’ Mets”, and was famous for making two phenomenal catches in game three of the 1969 world series, potentially saving five runs.

10. Rights protection gp. ACLU
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has its roots in the First World War when it was founded to provide legal advice and support to conscientious objectors.

12. On the way EN ROUTE
“En route” is a French term that means “on the way”.

19. TV’s Oz and Gupta DRS
Mehmet Oz is a cardiothoracic surgeon, and a TV personality known simply as “Dr. Oz”. Oz appeared as a health expert for several seasons on “The Oprah Winfrey Show”. Now he has his own “The Dr. Oz Show” on radio and television that is backed by Winfrey’s Harpo Productions.

Sanjay Gupta is an American neurosurgeon, and is best known as the CNN’s chief medical correspondent. In 2009, Gupta was offered the post of Surgeon General in the Obama administration, but he declined.

21. Barstool topper SOT
Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning a fool. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

22. Yellowfin tuna AHI
Yellowfin tuna is usually marketed as “ahi”, its Hawaiian name. Yellowfin tuna is one big fish, often weighing over 300 pounds.

29. “When You Wish Upon __” A STAR
“When You Wish Upon A Star” is a hit song by Leigh Harline and Ned Washington that was written for the 1940 Disney movie “Pinocchio”. In the animated film, the song is sung by the Jiminy Cricket character, with the voice provided by singer Cliff Edwards. In some parts of the world, “When You Wish Upon A Star” has become a Christmas classic due the assumption that the “star” in the title is the Star of Bethlehem.

30. Big name in games HOYLE
Edmond Hoyle was a writer, most famous for documenting the rules and play of card games. In particular, Hoyle first wrote a book on the game of whist that was very popular. Such was the success of Hoyle’s treatises that we use the phrase “according to Hoyle” to mean “according to some respected authority”.

32. Bygone Delta rival TWA
Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan-Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the acronym TWA) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

Delta was the world’s largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta’s roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

34. “Illmatic” rapper NAS
Rapper Nas used to go by another stage name, Nasty Nas, and before that by his real name, Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones. Nas released his first album “Illmatic” in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001. Not my cup of tea, I would say …

36. Cajun crawfish dish ETOUFFEE
“Étouffée” is a Cajun and creole dish made with shellfish, the most famous version being Crawfish Étouffée. Étouffée is like a thick shellfish stew served over rice. The dish uses the cooking technique known as “smothering” in which the shellfish is cooked in a covered pan over a low heat with a small amount of liquid. “Étouffée” is the French word “stifled, smothered”.

43. That, in Tabasco ESO
Tabasco is one of Mexico’s 31 states, and is located in the very southeast of the country.

52. “The L Word” producer Chaiken ILENE
Ilene Chaiken was the executive producer for the Showtime drama series “The L Word”. The show deals with lesbian, bisexual and transgender people living in West Hollywood. The title refers to “the L word”: lesbian.

55. Woody Allen’s “Radio __” DAYS
Woody Allen’s 1987 movie “Radio Days” is somewhat autobiographical. On screen, Allen is the narrator of the piece, and tells how radio influenced his young life before the advent of television, during the so called Golden Age of Radio.

56. Science fiction prize HUGO
The Hugo Awards are presented annually for excellence in science fiction and fantasy writing. The awards are named for Hugo Gernsback who founded the sci-fi magazine “Amazing Stories”.

57. Collector’s suffix -IANA
The suffix “-iana” is a variant of “-ana”.

An ana (plural “anas”) is a collection, perhaps of literature, that represents the character of a particular place or a person. Ana can be used as a noun or as a suffix (e.g. Americana).

60. D.C. United’s org. MLS
D.C. United is a professional soccer team based in the nation’s capital. The team competes in Major League Soccer (MLS) and plays home games at the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Works by future doctors THESES
7. One of two N.T. books COR
10. Mellowed, perhaps AGED
14. 24/7 Rollerball maker PENTEL
15. Address for a PFC APO
16. Traffic controller CONE
17. African adventure SAFARI
18. Buttinskies MEDDLERS
20. 1954 Luis Buñuel film ROBINSON CRUSOE
22. Eur.’s ocean ATL
23. Diva quality EGO
24. Smallish cells AAS
25. “__ Love”: Natalie Cole hit OUR
26. Lamarr of Hollywood HEDY
28. Harrison colleague STARR
30. Sluglike “Star Wars” alien HUTT
31. Map corner item, maybe INSET
33. Cross-referencing words SEE NOTE
35. 1974 Lina Wertmüller film SWEPT AWAY
38. Rat Pack leader SINATRA
40. Pizza order SLICE
44. Start for sphere IONO-
45. Moved, as a trireme OARED
48. Aussie flock EMUS
49. Benchmark: Abbr. STD
50. “For shame!” TUT!
51. Portuguese royal REI
53. PGA money winner, e.g. PRO
54. 1963 Peter Brook film LORD OF THE FLIES
58. Unwanted import from the East? ASIAN FLU
59. Words that may precede weeping? READ ‘EM
61. Word with blue or bean NAVY
62. Neurologist’s test, briefly EEG
63. Temper ANNEAL
64. Covers the gray, say DYES
65. Tokyo, long ago EDO
66. They raise dough YEASTS

Down
1. Festoons with certain tissue, for short TPS
2. Give courage to HEARTEN
3. Swathes ENFOLDS
4. Attempt STAB
5. Spine-tingling EERIE
6. Baby carriers SLINGS
7. Hunter’s garb, for short CAMO
8. Clearing OPEN AREA
9. A.L. Rookie of the Year after Tommie Agee ROD CAREW
10. Rights protection gp. ACLU
11. Has a date GOES OUT
12. On the way EN ROUTE
13. With 44-Down, setting for 20-, 35- and 54-Across DESERT
19. TV’s Oz and Gupta DRS
21. Barstool topper SOT
22. Yellowfin tuna AHI
27. Like no-nonsense questions YES/NO
29. “When You Wish Upon __” A STAR
30. Big name in games HOYLE
32. Bygone Delta rival TWA
34. “Illmatic” rapper NAS
36. Cajun crawfish dish ETOUFFEE
37. Went on and on PRATTLED
38. In a manner of speaking SO TO SAY
39. Ready to go forward IN DRIVE
41. Blocks IMPEDES
42. Attack with profanity CURSE AT
43. That, in Tabasco ESO
44. See 13-Down ISLAND
46. Before, to a bard ERE
47. Offset, as costs DEFRAY
50. It may be gross TON
52. “The L Word” producer Chaiken ILENE
55. Woody Allen’s “Radio __” DAYS
56. Science fiction prize HUGO
57. Collector’s suffix -IANA
60. D.C. United’s org. MLS

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LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 13, Wednesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Chen
THEME: The Lone Ranger Says … the starts of today’s themed answers give us “HI-YO, SILVER”, the famous line uttered by the LONE RANGER:

16A. Home sound system HI-FI STEREO
23A. Memorable “Rocky” line YO, ADRIAN!
33A. Eloquent SILVER-TONGUED
55A. Hero whose catchphrase begins 16-, 23-, 33- and 47-Across LONE RANGER

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 06m 25s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Big name in big trucks MACK
Mack Trucks was founded by John Mack in the early 1900s, after he had spent some years working in companies that made carriages and electric motor cars. Along with his two brothers, Mack started their company to focus on building heavy-duty trucks and engines.

9. TV’s Dick Van __ DYKE
The marvelous iconic comedian, actor, singer and dancer Dick Van Dyke has been in the world of entertainment since the 1940s when he was a radio announcer with the US military. He really made a name for himself on television in his iconic sitcom “The Dick Van Dyke Show”. On the big screen, Van Dyke’s most famous roles were in “Bye Bye Birdie” (1963), “Mary Poppins” (1964) and “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” (1968).

13. When doubled, a Northwest city WALLA
The Walla Walla Valley is a wine-growing region in Washington that extends into the northeast of Oregon. The valley is named after the Walla Walla people who lived in the area. I have a few bottles of excellent wine from the region that I picked up there on a recent road trip with my wife.

16. Home sound system HI-FI STEREO
Hi-fi systems were introduced in the late forties, and is audio equipment designed to give a much higher quality reproduction of sound than cheaper systems available up to that point. “Hi-fi” of course stands for “high fidelity”.

20. Some Beethoven works TRIOS
Beethoven’s most famous piano trio is commonly referred to as the “Archduke Trio”, as it was dedicated to friend and student Archduke Rudolph of Austria.

22. “Veni, vidi, vici” man CAESAR
The oft-quoted statement “Veni, vidi, vici” (“I came, I saw, I conquered”) is believed by many to have been written by Julius Caesar. The words date back to 47 BC and refer to the short war between Rome and Pharnaces II of Pontus.

23. Memorable “Rocky” line YO, ADRIAN!
You might remember Rocky Balboa saying, “Yo, Adrian!” in the original Rocky movie. Adrian was Rocky’s wife played by the lovely Talia Shire, sister of director Francis Ford Coppola.

29. __ del Fuego TIERRA
Tierra del Fuego is an archipelago off the southern tip of South America and is the location of the famed Cape Horn. Tierra del Fuego was discovered by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan. He saw native fires on land as he passed by and originally called the location “Land of Smoke” This was later changed to “Land of Fire”, or “Tierra del Fuego” in Spanish.

32. Many millennia AEON
Aeon is a variant spelling of “eon”. In astronomical terms, an aeon is defined as one thousand million years.

40. Rapper who played Left Ear in “The Italian Job” MOS DEF
Mos Def is the stage name of actor and rapper Dante Terrell Smith-Bay. Mos Def is one of the few rap stars who is really making a name for himself in the world of movies. He received critical acclaim for roles in 2003’s “The Italian Job” , 2005’s “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy”, and a featured role in an episode of television’s “House”.

43. Software test version BETA
In the world of software development, the first tested issue of a new program is usually called the “alpha” version. Expected to have a lot of bugs that need to be fixed, the alpha release is usually distributed to a small number of testers. After reported bugs have been eliminated, the refined version is called a “beta” and is released to a wider audience, but with the program clearly labeled as “beta”. The users generally check functionality and report further bugs that are encountered. The beta version feeds into a release candidate, the version that is tested just prior to the software being sold into the market, bug-free. Yeah, right …

44. Agnus __ DEI
“Agnus Dei” is Latin for “Lamb of God”, a term used in Christian faiths for Jesus Christ, symbolizing His role as a sacrificial offering to atone for the sins of man.

51. Botanist’s study FLORA
The fauna is the animal life of a particular region, and the flora is that region’s plant life. The term “fauna” comes from the Roman goddess of earth and fertility who was called Fauna. Flora was the Roman goddess of plants, flowers and fertility.

52. Nostalgic souvenir MEMENTO
A “souvenir” is a memento, a token of remembrance. We imported the word from French, in which language it has the same meaning. The term comes from the Latin “subvenire” meaning “to come to mind”, or literally “to come up”.

53. River in a 1957 Best Picture title KWAI
The river referred to in the movie (and novel) “The Bridge on the River Kwai” is actually called the Khwae Yai River, and is in western Thailand. The original novel by Pierre Boulle was published in French in 1952, and the wonderful movie released in 1957. Both tell the story of construction of part of the Burma Railway and a bridge over the river, using prisoners of war as laborers. The film stars William Holden, Alec Guinness and Jack Hawkins.

55. Hero whose catchphrase begins 16-, 23-, 33- and 47-Across LONE RANGER
“The Lone Ranger” was both a radio and television show, dating back to its first radio performance in 1933 on a Detroit station. The line “Hi-yo, Silver! Away!” was a device used in the storyline to signal that a riding sequence was starting, so cue the music!

58. Q.E.D. part ERAT
QED is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. The QED acronym stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

60. Tiny arachnid MITE
Mites are tiny arthropods in the arachnid (spider) class. Mites are (annoyingly!) very successful creatures that have adapted to all sorts of habitats, and being so small, they generally pass unnoticed. Ick …

62. Puts the kibosh on ENDS
“Kibosh” is something that constrains or checks. “Kibosh” looks like a Yiddish word but it isn’t, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

Down
1. Fruity cocktail MAI TAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic’s restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum.

2. Butler in the Batcave ALFRED
Alfred Pennyworth was the faithful butler and valet to Bruce Wayne in the world of Batman.

Wayne Manor is where Bruce Wayne lives, the alter-ego of Batman. It is a huge manor that lies just outside Gotham City. Looking after the house is the Wayne family servant, Alfred. Beneath the grounds of the manor is an extensive cave system where Bruce Wayne put together his Batcave. Access is to the cave is via a staircase behind a hidden door. The door is opened by moving the hands of a non-functioning grandfather clock to 10:47, the time at which Wayne’s parents were murdered. It is the murder of his parents that sets Bruce off on his journey of crime fighting.

3. Awards for ads CLIOS
The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

4. “How Life Imitates Chess” author Garry KASPAROV
Garry Kasparov is a Russian chess grandmaster and former World Chess Champion. When he first became champion in 1985 he was 22 years old, making him the youngest ever undisputed World Chess Champion. Kasparov retired in 2005 in order to pursue a career in Russian politics.

5. Earl with a tea GREY
The Earl Grey blend of tea is supposedly named after Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey who was Prime Minister of the UK from 1830 to 1834. Earl Grey tea has a distinctive flavor that is largely due to the addition of oil from the rind of the bergamot orange.

6. Above, to Keats O’ER
7. Start of some Keats titles ODE TO
The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

9. H.G. Wells’ island physiologist DR MOREAU
“The Island of Doctor Moreau” is an 1896 novel penned by H. G. Wells. The book tells the story of a shipwrecked man who ends up on the island of Doctor Moreau. Moreau engages in vivisection and creates new beasts by combining different species.

12. Golf star Ernie ELS
Ernie Els is a South African golfer. Els a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. He has a child who suffers from autism and so Els has been very effective in raising money for charities that focus on the condition.

13. Off, in mobspeak WHACK
“Whack” and “off” are terms used by mobsters that mean “murder”.

21. Exiled Amin IDI
Idi Amin received most of his military training in the British armed forces, eventually achieving the highest rank possible for a Black African in the British Colonial Army in 1959, that of Warrant Officer. On his return to Uganda Amin joined his country’s military and quickly rose to the rank of Deputy Commander of the Army. During that time he was quite the athlete. He was a noted rugby player and swimmer, and for nine years held the Ugandan national light-heavyweight boxing title. By the early seventies, Amin was commander of all the armed forces of Uganda and in 1971 seized power in a military coup, displacing the country’s president Milton Obote. There followed seven years of brutal rule by Amin during which it is estimated that between 100,000 and 500,000 people were murdered. Amin was ousted from power in 1979 after a war with Tanzania, and fled to Libya where he stayed for a year. He then moved to Saudi Arabia, where he was financially supported by the Saudi Royal Family for the remainder of his life. Amin died in 2003.

23. Google-owned video site YOUTUBE
YouTube is a video-sharing website, launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion … less than two years after it was founded …

24. Yank since 2004 A-ROD
Poor old Alex Rodriguez earned more nicknames than just A-Rod. He has been called “the Cooler” by some players as there is a perception that teams go cold when he joins them and hot when he leaves. He has also been called “A-Fraud” by teammates because of another perception, that he is over-demanding. Rodriguez is now seems to be in a world of hurt for using illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

25. Bert Bobbsey’s sis NAN
The “Bobbsey Twins” series of children’s novels was first written by Edward Stratemeyer in 1904. Stratemeyer used the pseudonym Laura Lee Hope, as did subsequent authors who wrote 72 books in the series between 1904 and 1979. The title characters were two sets of fraternal twins, one called Bert and Nan (who were 12) and the other called Flossie and Freddie (who were 6).

28. Hot-sounding European capital BERN
Bern (or Berne) is the capital city of Switzerland. The official language of the city is German, but the language most spoken in Bern is a dialect known as Bernese German.

36. Infernal NETHER
I guess the idea is that the “infernal region” is the abode of Satan, the “nether region”, the lower region, Hell.

38. Physicians’ org. AMA
American Medical Association (AMA)

41. Id controller EGO
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

42. Chris of “Tommy Boy” FARLEY
Chris Farley was a comedian and actor who was noted as a member of Chicago’s “Second City Theatre” and a cast member of “Saturday Night Live”. Farley died in 1997 at the age of 33 due to a speedball (cocaine and heroin) overdose.

46. Stravinsky and Sikorsky IGORS
The classical composer Igor Stravinsky’s most famous works were completed relatively early in his career, when he was quite young. His three ballets “The Firebird”, “Petrushka” and “The Rite of Spring” were published in 1910-1913, when Stravinsky was in his early thirties.

Igor Sikorsky was a Russian pioneer in the world of aviation. He designed and indeed piloted the world’s first multi-engine, fixed-wing aircraft in 1913. He moved to the US in 1919 and set up his own aircraft manufacturing business. In the thirties he made the magnificent flying boats that were used by Pan Am in their Clipper era. Sikorsky also developed the world’s first mass-produced helicopter, in 1942.

48. Native New Zealander MAORI
The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. The Māori are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting sometime in the late 13th century. The word “māori” simply means “normal”, distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities.

53. Airline to Amsterdam KLM
The acronym KLM stands for “Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij”, which translates from Dutch as “Royal Aviation Company”. KLM is the flag carrier for the Netherlands, and is the oldest airline in the world still operating with its original name. It was founded in 1919. KLM merged with Air France in 2004.

54. Xbox 360 competitor WII
The Wii is the biggest-selling game console in the world.

Xbox is made by Microsoft (I’m sure the kids have one around here somewhere!) and introduced in 2001. The current version is known as Xbox 360.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Big name in big trucks MACK
5. Gunk GOOP
9. TV’s Dick Van __ DYKE
13. When doubled, a Northwest city WALLA
14. Give a makeover REDO
15. Line holder REEL
16. Home sound system HI-FI STEREO
18. Texts: Abbr. MSGS
19. Decline from disuse ATROPHY
20. Some Beethoven works TRIOS
22. “Veni, vidi, vici” man CAESAR
23. Memorable “Rocky” line YO, ADRIAN!
26. Little Leaguer, say KID
27. Automated intro? ROBO-
29. __ del Fuego TIERRA
30. Stay a step ahead of ONE-UP
32. Many millennia AEON
33. Eloquent SILVER-TONGUED
38. “__ baby!” ATTA
39. Zapped NUKED
40. Rapper who played Left Ear in “The Italian Job” MOS DEF
43. Software test version BETA
44. Agnus __ DEI
47. Reason to pile onto the team bus AWAY GAME
49. Promoting HYPING
51. Botanist’s study FLORA
52. Nostalgic souvenir MEMENTO
53. River in a 1957 Best Picture title KWAI
55. Hero whose catchphrase begins 16-, 23-, 33- and 47-Across LONE RANGER
57. Work on, as a popsicle LICK
58. Q.E.D. part ERAT
59. Levels TIERS
60. Tiny arachnid MITE
61. “Gadzooks!” YIPE!
62. Puts the kibosh on ENDS

Down
1. Fruity cocktail MAI TAI
2. Butler in the Batcave ALFRED
3. Awards for ads CLIOS
4. “How Life Imitates Chess” author Garry KASPAROV
5. Earl with a tea GREY
6. Above, to Keats O’ER
7. Start of some Keats titles ODE TO
8. Having little talent for POOR AT
9. H.G. Wells’ island physiologist DR MOREAU
10. “Darn tootin’!” YES, SIREE!
11. Small cask KEG
12. Golf star Ernie ELS
13. Off, in mobspeak WHACK
17. Royal seat THRONE
21. Exiled Amin IDI
23. Google-owned video site YOUTUBE
24. Yank since 2004 A-ROD
25. Bert Bobbsey’s sis NAN
28. Hot-sounding European capital BERN
31. Elbow POKE
33. Tuck away STOW
34. “I’ve got proof!” IT’S A FACT!
35. Elegantly feminine LADYLIKE
36. Infernal NETHER
37. Greeting from Down Under G’DAY, MATE
38. Physicians’ org. AMA
41. Id controller EGO
42. Chris of “Tommy Boy” FARLEY
44. Dented DINGED
45. Keys in ENTERS
46. Stravinsky and Sikorsky IGORS
48. Native New Zealander MAORI
50. Enclose, as pigs PEN IN
52. Parcel (out) METE
53. Airline to Amsterdam KLM
54. Xbox 360 competitor WII
56. Quick snooze NAP

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