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Greetings from Louisburgh, County Mayo in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Nov 13, Wednesday






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CROSSWORD SETTER: Mary Lou Guizzo
THEME: Metalheads … each of today’s themed answers starts with a metal:
17A. Ford Model T, colloquially TIN LIZZIE
21A. Speed demon LEADFOOT
36A. Mature male gorilla SILVERBACK
43A. One only in it for the money GOLD DIGGER
52A. Japanese cooking show IRON CHEF

61A. Certain rock music fan, and what 17-, 21-, 36-, 43- and 52-Across each has METALHEAD
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 08m 45s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Cocoon contents LARVA
Larva is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

16. Carne __: roasted Mexican dish ASADA
“Carne Asada” translates from Spanish as "roasted meat".

17. Ford Model T, colloquially TIN LIZZIE
The Ford Model T was the first really affordable car that was offered for sale, and it was produced from 1908 to 1927. It was the Model T that ushered in the era of assembly line production, which greatly cut down the cost of manufacture. The engine was designed to run on petrol, kerosene or even ethanol. Famously, the Model T was known colloquially as the “Tin Lizzie”.

19. Siesta taker DOZER
We use the word “siesta” to describe a short nap in the early afternoon, taking the word from the Spanish. In turn, the Spanish word is derived from the Latin “hora sexta” meaning “the sixth hour”. The idea is that the nap is taken at “the sixth hour” after dawn.

20. Eight-armed cephalopod SQUID
A cephalopod is a class of molluscs with arms or tentacles, a prominent head and a body with bilateral symmetry. Most cephalopods have the ability to squirt ink as a defensive mechanism. Examples of the class are the octopus, squid and cuttlefish. The name “cephalopod” comes from the Greek for “head-feet”.

26. TV producer Norman LEAR
Norman Lear wrote for and produced some great television shows, including "All in the Family", Sanford and Son" and "The Jeffersons". He also did some film work, including writing and producing the great 1967 movie "Divorce American Style".

27. Online "Yikes!" OMG!
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you might think of …

30. Chinese leader PREMIER
China has both a president and a premier. The president is the head of state, and is the person who appoints the premier. Xi Jinping is the current President of China, and Li Keqiang is the current Premier, with both having taken office in March 2013.

36. Mature male gorilla SILVERBACK
Adult male gorillas are commonly called “silverbacks”, a reference to the silver hair that runs down their backs. Gorillas live in groups called “troops”. Each troop usually has one silverback who runs the show, with several adult females and their offspring.

38. Purim observers JEWS
Purim is a festival commemorating the deliverance of the Jewish people from a plot to wipe them out by Haman the Agagite, as recorded in the Book of Esther. During the celebration of Purim, the Book of Esther is read aloud, once in the evening and once the following morning. By the way, Esther is the only book in the Old Testament that doesn't mention "God".

39. Essayist de Botton ALAIN
Alain de Botton is a British writer and philosopher (born in Switzerland) whose best known work is the novel “Essays in Love” that was published in 1993.

41. West Pointer CADET
West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy (USMA) didn't start until 1802.

42. Mideast strip GAZA
After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the boundaries of the strip of land on the Mediterranean around Gaza were fixed in the Israel-Egypt Armistice Agreement. The boundaries were specifically defined but were not to be recognized as an international border. From 1948, the Gaza Strip was occupied and administered by Egypt, until 1967 when Israel took over occupation following the Six-Day War. In 1993, Israel and the PLO signed the Oslo Accords which handed over administration to the Palestinian Authority, but with Israel retaining control of the Gaza Strip's airspace, some land borders and its territorial waters. The intent was to further this agreement, but discussions between the parties broke down. Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005.

45. Baton Rouge-to-Montgomery dir. ENE
Baton Rouge is the capital city of the state of Louisiana. The name “Baton Rouge” is French for “red stick or staff”. The exact reason why such a name was given to the city isn’t really clear.

Montgomery is the capital of Alabama, and is the state’s second biggest city (after Birmingham). Montgomery is a port city, located on the Alabama River. The city is actually named for an Irishman. Richard Montgomery was an Irish-born soldier who served in the British Army and later in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.

47. WWII venue ETO
General Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE) was in command of the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during WWII.

48. Latin god DEUS
“Deus” is the Latin word for “god”.

52. Japanese cooking show IRON CHEF
“Iron Chef” is a Japanese cooking show that has been aired since 1993. The original Japanese show was dubbed for airing in English-speaking countries and became a surprising hit around the world. There are now spin-off shows around the world including “Iron Chef America” and “Iron Chef UK”.

56. Schemer Charles PONZI
Charles Ponzi was born in Luigi, Italy in 1882 and arrived in the US in 1903, flat broke having gambled away all his money on the voyage to Boston. Ponzi devised a scheme to buy what were known as "international reply coupons" through friends in Italy, which he had sent to him in the US so that he could redeem them on this side of the Atlantic. As the value in the US was greater than that in Italy, he could make a handsome profit. This was in itself an "illegal" transaction, buying an asset in one market at a low price, then immediately selling it in another market at a higher price. But it's what he did next that became known as a Ponzi Scheme. He couldn't redeem his coupons quickly enough due to red tape so he approached other investors, initially friends, and had them give him cash so that he could buy more coupons in Italy. He promised the investors he would double their money, which they did initially. Many people wanted to get in on the scheme seeing that Ponzi was able to make the new investors a profit and double the money of the original investors. Eventually, somebody did the math and word started to get out that the investment was risky, so the number of new investors started to fall. Without sufficient new investors Ponzi couldn't double the money of his latest investors, and the whole scheme unraveled.

60. Gallivants ROVES
"Gallivant" is such a lovely word, and is probably a derivative of "gallant". To gallivant is to gad about, to flirt, wander in search of pleasure or amusement. My mother was always accusing me of gallivanting when I was a youth ...

61. Certain rock music fan, and what 17-, 21-, 36-, 43- and 52-Across each has METALHEAD
A “metalhead” is a fan of Heavy metal music. That wouldn’t be me …

64. Last Olds off the line ALERO
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

66. NBC skit show SNL
NBC first aired a form of "Saturday Night Live" (SNL) in 1975 under the title "NBC's Saturday Night". The show was actually created to give Johnny Carson some time off from "The Tonight Show". Back then "The Tonight Show" had a weekend episode, and Carson convinced NBC to pull the Saturday or Sunday recordings off the air and hold them for subsequent weeknights in which Carson needed a break. NBC turned to Lorne Michaels and asked him to put together a variety show to fill the vacant slot, and he came up with what we now call "Saturday Night Live".

67. Zac of "The Lorax" EFRON
Zac Efron is an actor from San Luis Obispo, California. Apparently Efron is a heartthrob to “tweenyboppers”. His big break was in the Disney hit movie “High School Musical”.

"The Lorax" is a children's book written by Dr. Seuss. It is an allegorical work questioning the problems created by industrialization, and in particular its impact on the environment. “The Lorax” was adapted into an animated film that was released in 2012, with Danny DeVito voicing the title character.

68. Glove material LATEX
Latex is a naturally occurring polymer made by some plants, that can also be made synthetically. About one in ten of the flowering plants in the world make the milky fluid called latex. It serves as a defense against insects and is exuded when a plant is injured or attacked by insects. Latex is collected commercially and is the source of natural rubber, which can be used to make things such as gloves, condoms and balloons.

Down
1. Boaters and bowlers HATS
A boater is a straw hat often associated with boating, hence the name.

I think a bowler hat is usually called a derby here in the US. The bowler was first produced in 1849 in London by hatmakers Thomas and William Bowler, hence the name. The alternative name of "derby" comes from the tradition of wearing bowler hats at the Derby horse race (a major race held annually in England).

2. Actor La Salle ERIQ
Eriq La Salle played Dr. Peter Benton on "ER", and is best known in film for his portrayal of Darryl in the 1998 comedy "Coming to America".

5. Axlike shaping tool ADZ
An adze (also adz) is similar to an axe, but different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool's shaft. An axe's blade is set in line with the shaft.

6. Tribal land, informally, with "the" REZ
“Rez” is a slang term that is short for “reservation”.

7. Colorado resort VAIL
The Vail Ski Resort in Colorado is the largest single-mountain ski resort in the whole country. The resort was opened in 1962, basically in the middle of nowhere. The name “Vail” comes from Vail Pass which runs by the mountain (now also called Vail Mountain). The town of Vail, Colorado was established four years later in 1966, and now has a population of about 5,000.

8. Out of the wind ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

10. Lady Liberty's land, familiarly US OF A
“Lady Liberty” is a familiar name given to the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor.

The Statue of Liberty was of course a gift from the people of France to the United States. It was designed by Frédéric Bartholdi and was dedicated in 1886. If you take a boat ride down the Seine in Paris you will probably see a one-third replica of Lady Liberty standing on a small island in the river, looking quite magnificent. The copy was given to the people of Paris by the city's American community in 1889.

11. Somerset Maugham novel, with "The" RAZOR’S EDGE
"The Razor's Edge" is a novel by W. Somerset Maugham that was first published in 1944. The book tells the story of a pilot who returns traumatized from his experiences in WWI. The most famous movie adaptation was released in 1946 starring Tyrone Power and Gene Tierney.

W. Somerset Maugham was a playwright and novelist from the UK. Maugham was actually born in France, but on British soil in the British embassy in Paris. He became very successful as an author and was the highest paid writer of the 1930s.

22. South Sudanese supermodel Wek ALEK
Alek Wek is a supermodel originally from Southern Sudan. In her native language, Wek’s name translates as “Black Spotted Cow”.

27. Missouri river OSAGE
Much of the Osage River in Missouri is now taken up by two large reservoirs created behind two dams that provide power for St. Louis and the surrounding area. The two reservoirs are the Truman Reservoir and the Lake of the Ozarks.

28. La Scala's city MILAN
The La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its name: "Teatro alla Scala" in Italian.

35. Jetson dog ASTRO
Astro is the pet dog on the animated television show “The Jetsons”.

“The Jetsons” is an animated show from Hanna-Barbera that had its first run in 1962-1963, and then was recreated in 1985-1987. When it was debuted in 1963 by ABC, "The Jetsons" was the network’s first ever color broadcast.

38. Spree JAG
The word "jag" is used to describe periods of unrestrained activity, particularly involving alcohol, and has been in use since the 1800s.

Our word “spree”, meaning “carefree outing”, might be an alteration of the French “esprit”, a term meaning “spirit, lively wit”.

44. It goes for a buck DOE
A male deer is usually called a “buck”, and a female a “doe”.

46. Second-most populous Arizona city TUCSON
Tucson is the second largest city in Arizona (after Phoenix). The founding father of the city was Hugh O’Conor, yet another Irishman, but one who was raised in Spain. O’Conor was a mercenary working for Spain when he authorized the construction of a military fort called Presidio San Augustín del Tucsón in 1775, which eventually grew into the city that we know today. The Spanish name “Tucsón” comes from the local name “Cuk Ṣon”, which translates as “(at the) base of the black (hill)”.

49. Warm Argentina month ENERO
In Spanish, a year (año) starts in January (enero) and ends in December (diciembre).

Argentina is the second largest country in South America (after Brazil), and geographically is the world’s largest Spanish-speaking nation. The name “Argentina” of course comes from the Latin “argentum”, the word for “silver”. It is thought that the name was given by the early Spanish and Portuguese conquerors who also named the Rio de la Plata (the “Silver River”). Those early explorers got hold of lots of silver objects that they found among the native population.

51. "Stupid me!" D’OH!
"The Simpsons" is one of the most successful programs produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Homer Simpson's catchphrase is "D'oh!", which is such a famous exclamation that it has been included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) since 2001.

52. "Dies __" IRAE
"Dies Irae" is Latin for "Day of Wrath". "Dies Irae"is the title of a famous melody in Gregorian Chant, one that is often used as part of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass.

53. Massage deeply ROLF
Rolfing is a trademarked massage technique, developed by Ida Pauline Rolf in the fifties.

54. Actor Jannings EMIL
Emil Jannings, an actor from Switzerland, was the first person to receive an Oscar. He was the star of the 1928 silent movie called "The Last Command".

55. Earthquake response gp. FEMA
Federal emergency management has been structured for over 200 years, but what we know today as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) was created in 1979 in an Executive Order issued by President Jimmy Carter.

58. Writer Grey ZANE
Zane Grey sure did hit on the right niche. He wrote romanticized western novels and stories that really lent themselves to the big screen in the days when westerns were very popular movies. Incredibly, 110 films were made based on his work.

62. Art on the reality show "Ink Master" TAT
"Ink Master" is a reality television show that has been airing on Spike since 2012. The show is a competition between tattoo artists. I don’t think I would like to tattooed as part of a competition. I don’t think I would like to be tattooed at all …

63. Single-malt datum AGE
Single malt Scotch is made with malted barley as the single grain ingredient. Single malt whiskey made in the US in some cases is made from malted rye, rather than malted barley.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Tucked-in part of a dress shirt HEM
4. Cocoon contents LARVA
9. Glaringly vivid LURID
14. "__ you kidding me?" ARE
15. Words after make or close A DEAL
16. Carne __: roasted Mexican dish ASADA
17. Ford Model T, colloquially TIN LIZZIE
19. Siesta taker DOZER
20. Eight-armed cephalopod SQUID
21. Speed demon LEADFOOT
23. Open-__ shoes TOED
26. TV producer Norman LEAR
27. Online "Yikes!" OMG!
30. Chinese leader PREMIER
33. Bus depot: Abbr. STA
36. Mature male gorilla SILVERBACK
38. Purim observers JEWS
39. Essayist de Botton ALAIN
40. Match for a pocket handkerchief TIE
41. West Pointer CADET
42. Mideast strip GAZA
43. One only in it for the money GOLD DIGGER
45. Baton Rouge-to-Montgomery dir. ENE
46. Twisting force TORSION
47. WWII venue ETO
48. Latin god DEUS
50. "__ a lift?" NEED
52. Japanese cooking show IRON CHEF
56. Schemer Charles PONZI
60. Gallivants ROVES
61. Certain rock music fan, and what 17-, 21-, 36-, 43- and 52-Across each has METALHEAD
64. Last Olds off the line ALERO
65. Mental picture IMAGE
66. NBC skit show SNL
67. Zac of "The Lorax" EFRON
68. Glove material LATEX
69. Game gadget, or the area where it's used TEE

Down
1. Boaters and bowlers HATS
2. Actor La Salle ERIQ
3. It may drop down or pop up MENU
4. Made vulnerable LAID OPEN
5. Axlike shaping tool ADZ
6. Tribal land, informally, with "the" REZ
7. Colorado resort VAIL
8. Out of the wind ALEE
9. Fire truck feature LADDER
10. Lady Liberty's land, familiarly US OF A
11. Somerset Maugham novel, with "The" RAZOR’S EDGE
12. Prefix with logical IDEO-
13. Pub missile DART
18. On fire LIT
22. South Sudanese supermodel Wek ALEK
24. Goof ERR
25. Short person? DEBTOR
27. Missouri river OSAGE
28. La Scala's city MILAN
29. Like eyes showing boredom GLAZED OVER
31. Drops in a slot MAILS
32. Stranded at 7-Down, perhaps ICED IN
34. Chirp TWEET
35. Jetson dog ASTRO
37. By way of VIA
38. Spree JAG
41. Multi-screen theater CINEPLEX
43. "Gee whiz" GOSH
44. It goes for a buck DOE
46. Second-most populous Arizona city TUCSON
49. Warm Argentina month ENERO
51. "Stupid me!" D’OH!
52. "Dies __" IRAE
53. Massage deeply ROLF
54. Actor Jannings EMIL
55. Earthquake response gp. FEMA
57. Cozy home NEST
58. Writer Grey ZANE
59. Inactive IDLE
62. Art on the reality show "Ink Master" TAT
63. Single-malt datum AGE


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10 comments:

Vidwan827 said...

Hey Bill, .... the puzzle was quite easy despite a few set backs. The long answers were especially easy, despite my unfamiliarity with Iron chef.

I couldn't remember the second largest city in Arizona ... Phoenix, Scottsdale, Mesa and what ?

"Carne Asada" sounds suspiciously like ..... ,'roasted Saddam'... To me, anyway.

A Jewish friend, once told me, that during the festival of Purim, the adult revelers are allowed, almost required, to indulge in copious amounts of alcohol, to properly appreciate the festivities. Indeed, some ancient, rabbinical statements have said that a man should have consumed enough alcohol (during the story telling part of the festival -), so he doesn't know the difference between, the words, 'Purim' and 'Haman'. ( the villain -). All in the spirit of fun, and a way of 'letting go', in olden times, when life was a drudgery, and very hard ....

I can empathize with Mr. Ponzi, on International Reply Coupons. ... In 1970, I had to write, from India, to the police dept. in Rochester, NY, requesting a letter, back, stating that I did not have a criminal record in that city. Except that, the process had a required fee of $20.... And due to foreign exchange controls, in India, (still exists -), I could not send any money, leave alone the required fees. So, I had to send $20 of international reply coupons, in quarter dollar increments.... ( I did get the requisite letter, and was allowed to immigrate -).

Because of the premium markup on US dollars, if I could have sold the coupons, for cash, in the US, I would have made a 60% profit, on my indian rupees, immediately. The process is not illegal, ...... . . it is called arbitrage, and the Wall Street traders use it a billion times a day .....

No comments on what Mr. Ponzi did next ..... that was definitely illegal.

Have a nice day, all.

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Vidwan.

I find it remarkable that Charles Ponzi created his scheme back in the early 1900s and that investors can get swindled out of vast sums of money in basically the same way a full century later. There ought to be a law ... oh, there is!

Vidwan827 said...

Bill, as Mark Twain, would have said, 'There is a sucker born every minute' .... Or did he say that.?

Scams are always in the works .... Probably a thousand going on right now. Remember the South sea Bubble, in England ? And of course Mr. Made-off, or Madoff.

Whenever there are people believing in things too good to be true ....

I wonder where the other bloggers are ?

Anonymous said...

It is worth noting that after defrauding so many people, Charles Ponzi was deported to Italy and subsequently moved to Brazil and died in poverty in a charity ward of a hospital in Buenos Aires in 1949. This kind of crime sometimes has Karma attached.

Boyd in MI said...

Anon, above, your point is well taken.

Nobody ever profited from crime very long. And they rarely enjoyed their ill gotten gains. Another man was Ivan Kreuger, the so called match king. He had a monopoly for match manufacture all over the world. Yet he was caught and he shot himself, with a pistol. ( 1880-1932).

Unmiraculously, but a miracle he shot himself through the exact center of his heart.

Ironically, his match companies are still in business today.

Boyd in MI said...

The name was Ivar , not Ivan.

Bill Butler said...

@Anonymous visitor,
Yes, Ponzi's ultimate fate is indeed worth noting. Karma is powerful concept.

@Boyd in MI
I hadn't heard of the "Match King" ... thank you! I suppose the fact that his match companies still survive is a good thing. Just because Kreuger was a crook is no reason for his employees to suffer.

Boyd in MI said...

The whole story Ivar Kreuger - Wikipedia

Hoyt said...

I had Phoenix, Flagstaff, Tempe, and what? haha..

Got it though.. that's days in a row !

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Hoyt.

You're on a roll :) Good luck tomorrow ...

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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