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Greetings from Dundalk, County Louth in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland, and have extended my stay until October 24th. I am focused on getting the puzzle solved and at least a basic post up each day. It's proving to be difficult to do much more than that due to pressure of time, which I am sure you can understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 3 Nov 13, Sunday






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CROSSWORD SETTER: Arthur S. Verdesca
THEME: The Doctor Is In … the initials MD are found in the middle of today’s themed answers, linking two words:
23A. Perry Mason story, e.g. COURTROOM DRAMA
45A. Symbol of a bettor's certainty BOTTOM DOLLAR
54A. Post-hurricane assessment STORM DAMAGE
73A. Like some locomotives STEAM-DRIVEN
81A. Coen or Stone FILM DIRECTOR
103A. Made-to-order CUSTOM-DESIGNED
32D. Winners can be determined by one RANDOM DRAWING
36D. Coffee break treat CREAM DOUGHNUT

104D. Puzzle title people hidden in eight long answers MDS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 27s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … FEED (seed), RCAF (RCAs!!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Obama attorney general Holder ERIC
Eric Holder is the Attorney General of the United States, and is the first African American to hold the position. Holder was close to President Obama during the presidential campaign. Holder was the campaign's legal advisor and was also one of the three members on the Obama vice-presidential selection committee, which of course opted for Vice-President Joe Biden.

20. One missing roll call, perhaps AWOL
Absent without leave (AWOL)

22. Deadhead's idol GARCIA
Jerry Garcia was one of the founding members of the rock band, the Grateful Dead. Garcia struggled with cocaine and heroin addiction during most of his life, and died of a heart attack in 1995 in a California drug rehabilitation center.

A “deadhead” is a fan of the Grateful Dead (my wife, for example …).

23. Perry Mason story, e.g. COURTROOM DRAMA
I must have read all of the Perry Mason books when I was in college. I think they kept me sane when I was facing the pressure of exams. Author Erle Stanley Gardner was himself a lawyer, although he didn't get into the profession the easy way. Gardner went to law school, but got himself suspended after a month. So, he became a self-taught attorney and opened his own law office in Merced, California. Understandably, he gave up the law once his novels became successful.

30. Onetime Rus. state SSR
Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR)

39. Montana motto metal PLATA
"Oro y Plata" means "gold and silver", and is the state motto of Montana. The motto was written in Spanish, solely because "it had a nice ring to it".

41. Yemen's capital SANA’A
Sana (also Sana’a) is the capital city of Yemen. Within the bounds of today's metropolis is the old fortified city of Sana where people have lived for over 2,500 years. The Old City is now a World Heritage Site.

43. Stimpy's pal REN
“The Ren and Stimpy Show” is an animated television show that ran on Nickelodeon from 1991 to 1996. The title characters are Marland "Ren" Höek, a scrawny Chihuahua, and Stimpson J. Cat, a rotund Manx cat. Not my cup of tea ...

48. SFO listing ETD
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

San Francisco International Airport (SFO) serves as the main base of operations for Virgin America, and is also the maintenance hub for United Airlines. SFO was the site of a crash of an Asiana Airlines Boeing 777 that resulted in three fatalities. My wife and I had flown into SfO 24 hours earlier. That tends to be sobering ...

50. Jesus of baseball ALOU
Felipe Alou is a former professional baseball player and manager. Alou managed the Montreal Expos from 1992 to 2001, and the San Francisco Giants from 2003 to 2006. Alou was born and raised in the Dominican Republic and came to the US to play for the Giants in 1955. Felipe’s brothers Matty and Jesús followed him to the US, and into Major League baseball.

51. Durban dough RAND
The Rand is the currency of South Africa. Much of South Africa’s famed gold comes from mines around Johannesburg in the Witwatersrand (Afrikaans for “the ridge of white waters”). The Rand currency takes its name from this ridge.

Durban is the third largest city in South Africa, after Johannesburg and Cape Town. The city was founded by the British in 1824, and named for Sir Benjamin d'Urban, the governor of the Cape Colony at that time.

53. Fight stopper TKO
In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can't get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly "knocked out". A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter's safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

58. Disney king SIMBA
Simba is the main character in the Disney animated feature, "The Lion King". "Simba" is the Swahili word for "lion".

59. "Fearful" feature of Blake's Tyger SYMMETRY
William Blake was an English poet and artist, considered now have been a powerful force in his fields during the Romantic Age. One of Blake's more famous poems is “The Tyger”, which has the celebrated lines:
Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

61. Tasman and a Genesis shepherd ABELS
Tasmania is the large island lying off the southeast coast of Australia. The Dutch explorer Abel Tasman was the first European to sail past the island, in 1642. Tasman named his discovery Van Dieman's Land after the Governor of the Dutch East Indies, Anthony van Dieman. The name was officially changed to Tasmania, after the discoverer himself, in 1856. In Australia a more familiar name used is "Tassie".

The story of Cain and Abel not only appears in the Christian and Hebrew Bibles, it also features in the Qur'an. In the Muslim account the brothers are named Qabil and Habil.

62. Sneeze cause DANDER
Dander is the animal equivalent of dandruff in humans. Dander is composed of skin cells that have been shed from an animal, maybe a pet.

64. Tapestry behind which Polonius hid ARRAS
A famous arras is seen in Shakespeare's "Hamlet". In one pivotal scene, Polonius is hiding behind a tapestry listening to an argument between Hamlet and Gertrude. Hamlet hears Polonius, mistakes his identity and stabs wildly through the cloth, killing Polonius. The name "arras", used for such a tapestry, comes from the French town of Arras which was famous for the production of fine wall hangings.

66. "The Weaver of Raveloe" MARNER
"Silas Marner: The Weaver of Raveloe" is a novel written by George Eliot and first published in 1861. There's an excellent BBC TV version of the tale (shown on PBS) starring Ben Kingsley in the title role, with Patsy Kensit playing Eppie, the young orphaned child that Marner takes under his wing.

72. Oil well firefighter Red ADAIR
Red Adair was a famous fighter of fires in oil fields, and was a native of Houston, Texas. Adair’s exploits were the inspiration for a 1968 movie called “Hellfighters” starring John Wayne.

76. Shooting marbles TAWS
In the game of marbles, the "taw" is the shooting marble, the marble that one shoots at the "ducks".

80. Letters seen before Fridays TGI
"Thank God It's Friday" (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies.

81. Coen or Stone FILM DIRECTOR
I think it's great to see two brothers working together and being so successful. Joel and Ethan Coen are two movie producers and directors who both live in New York City. The Coen brothers do love the movie-making business and they even married industry "insiders". Ethan's wife is film editor Tricia Cooke, and Joel is married to one of my favorite actresses, the lovely Frances McDormand.

Oliver Stone came to prominence as a film director in the 1980s when he came out with a string of war films such as “Salvador”, “Platoon” and “Born on the Fourth of July”. Stone dropped out of Yale University in the sixties and spent six months in South Vietnam teaching English. A few years later he signed up with the US Army and requested combat duty in South Vietnam and completed a 15-month tour. His movie “Platoon” is a semi-autobiographical account of his experiences during the Vietnam War.

85. Where TV's "Charlie's Angels" was set IN LA
When the TV show “Charlie’s Angels” started airing in the mid-seventies it was a little unusual in that it featured three women playing private detectives, a role usually reserved for men. The name first chosen for the show was “The Alley Cats”, then “Harry’s Angels”, before finally settling on “Charlies Angels”.

86. A, for Mozart EIN
The composer Mozart’s full name was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The name “Wolfgang” translates literally as “wolf journey”. Amadeus translates as “Love God!”.

89. Dick Tracy creator Chester GOULD
Chester Gould was the cartoonist behind the famous comic strip “Dick Tracy”. Gould wrote and drew “Dick Tracy” for 46 years, from 1931 to 1977.

92. Cats in Cádiz GATOS
Cádiz is a port city in southwestern Spain, in the autonomous community of Andalusia. Cádiz is a remarkable city geographically in that it sits on a thin spit of land that juts out into the sea.

95. Rope on the briny TYE
In the nautical world, a tye can be either a chain or a rope and is used to hoist a spar up a mast.

96. Classic auto REO
The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom E. Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

97. Irish tenor Tynan RONAN
Ronan Tynan is a classical singer from Ireland who is best known as a member of the Irish Tenors. Tynan is also known as participant in the 1984 and 1988 Paralympics as he has had both his legs amputated below the knee.

98. Brazilian range __ do Mar SERRA
Serra do Mar is a long stretch of mountain ranges in the southeast of Brazil. The mountain chain runs parallel to the Atlantic, and “Serra do Mar” translates as “Sea’s Ridge”.

108. House minority leader PELOSI
Nancy Pelosi is a former Speaker of the House, the 60th person to hold that position. Ms. Pelosi represents a district not far from here, which covers most of San Francisco. She is the first Californian, the first Italian-American and the first woman to be Speaker of the House. As Speaker, she was also second in line, after the Vice President, to take over if President Obama could not finish his term. That made Nancy Pelosi the highest-ranking female politician in US history.

109. '40s film critic James AGEE
James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel "A Death in the Family" that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

110. Nihilistic art movement DADA
Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

“Nihil” is the Latin word for “nothing, and is a term we’ve absorbed into English. “Nihil” is also the root from which we get our term “nil”. Someone described as “nihilistic” is very skeptical and tends to believe in nothing.

112. Carl with Emmys REINER
The multi-talented Carl Reiner is from the Bronx, New York. Reiner was married to singer Estelle Roberts. You might remember Roberts from the film “When Harry Met Sally”directed by Carl’s son, Rob Reiner. Estelle was the woman in the deli who said the famous line “ I'll have what’s she’s having” on seeing how excited Meg Ryan apparently was with her sandwich.

114. Certain terrier's isle SKYE
The Skye terrier is a breed of dog that is actually under threat of extinction. A few years ago there were only 30 Skye terriers born in the breed's native land of the UK.

Down
2. Letter after pi RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter "p".

5. Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," e.g. FARCE
"The Importance of Being Earnest” is a marvelous farce from the pen of Irish dramatist Oscar Wilde. The play’s title is a pun on the name “Ernest”, as the main protagonist in the play leads a double life, and in one uses the name “Ernest”.

8. Disease-struck tree ELM
Dutch elm disease is a fungus devastating to all species of elm trees that is transmitted by the elm bark beetle. The disease is thought to have originated in Asia and is now rampant in Europe and North America. Even though there is a hybrid of elm known as the Dutch elm, the disease isn't named after the tree. Rather, the disease is called "Dutch" as it was identified in 1921 by a phytopathologist (plant pathologist) in the Netherlands.

12. Cyberjunk SPAM
Apparently the term "SPAM", used for unwanted email, is taken from a "Monty Python" sketch. In the sketch (which I've seen) the dialog is taken over by the word SPAM, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So "SPAM" is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a "Monty Python" sketch to describe an online phenomenon ...

14. Coleridge storyteller MARINER
"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is an epic poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge first published in 1798. The publication of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period of British literature.

16. Curling surface ICE
I think curling is a cool game (pun intended!). It's somewhat like bowls, but played on a sheet of ice. The sport was supposedly invented in medieval Scotland, and is called curling because of the action of the granite stone is it moves across the ice. A player can make the stone take a curved path ("curl") by causing it to slowly rotate as it slides.

25. Pipe cleaner DRANO
To clean out drains we might buy Crystal Drano which is sodium hydroxide (lye) mixed with sodium nitrate, sodium chloride (table salt) and aluminum. The contents of Drano work in concert to clear the clog. The lye reacts with any fats creating soap which may be enough to break up the clog. Also, the finely-divided aluminum reacts with sodium hydrovixide and water creating tremendous heat so that that mixture boils and churns, providing some mechanical effort to disrupt the clog. The sodium nitrate is present to absorb hydrogen that is created when the aluminium shards react with the lye, a necessary step to prevent the gas causing a fire or explosion. Having said all that, I find that boiling water poured down the drain almost always does the job ...

30. Jack and the missus of verse SPRATS
Jack Sprat was a nickname given in the 16th century to people of small stature. Jack featured in a proverb of the day:
Jack will eat not fat, and Jull doth love no leane. Yet betwixt them both they lick the dishes cleane.
Over time, this mutated into a nursery rhyme that is still recited in England:
Jack Sprat could eat no fat. His wife could eat no lean. And so between them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

31. Spring toy SLINKY
The marvelous Slinky toy was invented in the early forties by a naval engineer called Richard James. James was developing springs for the navy that could stabilize sensitive instruments in rough seas. One day he accidentally knocked one of his experimental coils off a shelf and watched it "step" onto a stack of books, then onto a table and from there onto the floor where it recoiled itself very neatly. The Slinky was born ...

34. "The Genius of Keyboard" jazzman TATUM
Art Tatum was a jazz pianist who overcame the disability of being nearly blind from birth. Many laud Tatum as the greatest jazz pianist of all time.

35. "Toad of Toad Hall" playwright MILNE
Mr. Toad is one of the main characters in the children's novel "The Wind in the Willows" by Kenneth Grahame. A. A. Milne (of "Winnie the Pooh" fame) wrote several plays based on "The Wind in the Willows", the first of which is "Toad of Toad Hall". And, Mr Toad's Wild Ride was (it's gone now!) one of the original rides at Disneyland when the park opened in 1955.

42. Loses strength FLAGS
Our verb “to flag” meaning “to tire” was originally used in the sense of something flapping about lazily in the wind. From this it came to mean “to go limp, droop”, and then “to tire”.

52. 20, in Toulouse VINGT
Toulouse is the fourth largest city in France, and is locate in the southwest of the country. These days, Toulouse is noted as home to the Airbus headquarters and is known as the center of the European aerospace industry.

55. "Beavis and Butt-head" spin-off DARIA
“Daria” is an animated television show on MTV. It is a spin-off from the hit series “Beavis and Butthead”.

56. Milhous : Nixon :: __ : Garfield ABRAM
James Abram Garfield, the 20th President, was of course assassinated in office. He was shot twice, and one bullet could not be found (it was lodged in his spine). Alexander Graham Bell developed a metal detector in an attempt to locate the bullet, but apparently he was unsuccessful because of interference from the metal bed frame on which the president lay. Garfield died two months after being shot.

President Richard Milhous Nixon used “Milhous” in his name in honor of his mother Hannah Milhous. Richard was born in a house in Yorba Linda, California. You can visit that house today as it is on the grounds of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library. It’s a really interesting way to spend a few hours if you ever get to Yorba Linda …

57. Lennon's "Everybody's Got Something to Hide Except __ My Monkey" ME AND
"Everybody's Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Monkey" is a track by the Beatles from the 1968 album “The Beatles”, which is better known as “The White Album”. The song was written by John Lennon, and Paul McCartney believes that “the Monkey” in the title was a reference to Lennon’s heroin habitual use of heroin at the time of composition.

58. Kitchen wrap SARAN
What's known as plastic wrap in America, we call cling-film in Ireland. Plastic wrap was one of those unintended inventions, a byproduct of a development program to create a hard plastic cover for cars.

65. McGarrett's outfit, familiarly FIVE-O
Five-o has become urban slang for a police officer, or the police force in general. The term of course is rooted in the 1970s TV Show "Hawaii Five-O". Hawaii Five-O was a totally fictional police force created for the television show. The name recognizes that Hawaii was the 50th state to join the union. Steve McGarrett in the original show was played by Jack Lord, and “Danno” Williams was played by James MacArthur.

66. Hot Wheels maker MATTEL
The Hot Wheels brand of toy car was introduced by Mattel in 1968.

67. Slow work ADAGIO
An adagio is a piece of music with a slow tempo. The "adagio" marking on the score is an instruction to play the piece slowly and in a stately manner. The word adagio is Latin for "at ease".

71. Online financial site E*TRADE
E*Trade is mainly an online discount brokerage. It was founded in 1982 in Palo Alto, California, and I used to drive by its headquarters almost every day. The company is now run out of New York City. E*Trade produces those famous Super Bowl ads with the talking babies staring into a webcam.

73. Pope in Attila's time ST LEO
The first pope named Leo is now known as Pope Saint Leo the Great. Leo I is famous for meeting with the feared Attila the Hun and persuading him to turn back his invading force that was threatening to overrun Western Europe.

79. AFL partner CIO
The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was founded in 1886, making it one of the first federations of unions in the country. Over time the AFL became dominated by craft unions, unions representing skilled workers of particular disciplines. In the early thirties, John L. Lewis led a movement within the AFL to organize workers by industry, believing this would be more effective for the members. But the craft unions refused to budge, so Lewis set up a rival federation of unions in 1932 called the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). The two federations became bitter rivals for over two decades until finally merging in 1955 to form the AFL-CIO.

82. Song title words before "for Miles" I CAN SEE
"I Can See for Miles" is the biggest selling single for the Who in the United States, although I doubt it is the track that is heard most often. Three songs from the Who are used as theme music for the three very successful CSI television series.

The Who's hit "Who Are You" is used as the theme song for the TV show "CSI". Old hits from the Who are also used as theme songs for the CSI spin-off shows, "CSI: New York" (theme: "Baba O'Riley") and "CSI: Miami" (theme: "Won't Get Fooled Again"). The Who played all three "CSI" songs during the halftime show at the 2010 Super Bowl.

89. Spice Girl Halliwell GERI
Geri Halliwell was called Ginger Spice because of her red hair when she was with the Spice Girls. Halliwell was quite a bit older than the rest of the group and so sometimes she was less charitably referred to as "Old Spice".

91. Small-screen Bean ORSON
Orson Bean is an actor, perhaps best known for his appearances on television game shows in the sixties, seventies and eighties. His most famous game show role was that of a panelist on "To Tell the Truth". Interestingly, Bean (real name Dallas Burrows) is a first cousin, twice removed, of President Calvin Coolidge.

93. Run-down SEEDY
We use the word “seedy” to mean “shabby”. The usage probably arose from the appearance of a flowering plant that has gone to seed.

94. Bears, to Ovid URSAE
“Ursae” is Latin for “bears”.

The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil.

97. North Amer. WWII fliers RCAF
The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) is also known as the Aviation royale canadienne (ARC). The RCAF is a partner with the USAF in providing protection to the whole of the North American airspace in the arrangement known as NORAD (North American Aerospace Defence Command).

98. The Missouri R. runs through it S DAK
The Missouri is the longest river in North America. The source of the Missouri is made up of three streams flowing down from the Rocky Mountains in Montana and Wyoming. The official start the river is in Missouri Headwaters State Park near Three Forks, Montana. The Missouri empties into the Mississippi on the border between the states of Missouri and Illinois near St. Louis. The official length of the Missouri is 2,341 miles.

100. ER procedure CPR
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

101. Dixie general LEE
Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in the war in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited Lee to take command of the whole Union Army but he declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

“Dixie” is a nickname sometimes used for the American South, and often specifically for the original 11 states that seceded from the Union just prior to the Civil War. It’s apparently not certain how the name “Dixie” came about. One theory is that it comes from the term “dixie” which was used for currency issued by banks in Louisiana. The 10-dollar bills had the word “dix” on the reverse side, the French for “ten”. From the banknote, the French speaking area around New Orleans came to be known as Dixieland, and from there “Dixie” came to apply to the South in general.

102. Poetic fighter ALI
Muhammad Ali first used his famous catchphrase “float like a butterfly and sting like a bee” before his world title fight against Sonny Liston in 1964. Back then Ali still went by his birth name of Cassius Clay.

104. Puzzle title people hidden in eight long answers MDS
Doctor of Medicine (MD)

105. Bird's org. NBA
Larry Bird played basketball for the Boston Celtics from 1978 to 1992. Bird has a lot of very loyal fans, and some might even be described as fanatical. In 2005 an Oklahoma City man was convicted of a crime involving a shooting. On being sentenced to 30 years imprisonment, the guilty man requested that the sentence be changed to 33 years so that it matched the number on Larry Bird's jersey. The judge obliged ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Obama attorney general Holder ERIC
5. Rattle FAZE
9. Bros BUDS
13. Online letters EMAILS
19. Commandment opener THOU
20. One missing roll call, perhaps AWOL
21. Per person A POP
22. Deadhead's idol GARCIA
23. Perry Mason story, e.g. COURTROOM DRAMA
26. Insatiable GREEDY
27. Some deer BUCKS
28. Shorten, as a skirt REHEM
29. Bad acting SIN
30. Onetime Rus. state SSR
33. Busy buzzer BEE
34. Strains TAXES
35. Restraint usually seen in pairs MANACLE
39. Montana motto metal PLATA
41. Yemen's capital SANA’A
42. Do clerical work FILE
43. Stimpy's pal REN
44. Zest source RIND
45. Symbol of a bettor's certainty BOTTOM DOLLAR
48. SFO listing ETD
49. Everyday connectors ANDS
50. Jesus of baseball ALOU
51. Durban dough RAND
52. Bloom holder VASE
53. Fight stopper TKO
54. Post-hurricane assessment STORM DAMAGE
58. Disney king SIMBA
59. "Fearful" feature of Blake's Tyger SYMMETRY
61. Tasman and a Genesis shepherd ABELS
62. Sneeze cause DANDER
63. Took the plunge DIVED
64. Tapestry behind which Polonius hid ARRAS
65. Abstain from FORGO
66. "The Weaver of Raveloe" MARNER
68. Unit or sect suffix -ARIAN
69. Surgical tie LIGATURE
72. Oil well firefighter Red ADAIR
73. Like some locomotives STEAM-DRIVEN
75. Catch GET
76. Shooting marbles TAWS
77. Stub __ A TOE
78. Voyaging, say ASEA
79. Scorch CHAR
80. Letters seen before Fridays TGI
81. Coen or Stone FILM DIRECTOR
85. Where TV's "Charlie's Angels" was set IN LA
86. A, for Mozart EIN
87. Riles up IRES
88. Gets ready to shoot COCKS
89. Dick Tracy creator Chester GOULD
90. Access, in a way LOG ONTO
92. Cats in Cádiz GATOS
93. Seek redress SUE
95. Rope on the briny TYE
96. Classic auto REO
97. Irish tenor Tynan RONAN
98. Brazilian range __ do Mar SERRA
100. Minor league baseball level CLASS A
103. Made-to-order CUSTOM-DESIGNED
108. House minority leader PELOSI
109. '40s film critic James AGEE
110. Nihilistic art movement DADA
111. Follow OBEY
112. Carl with Emmys REINER
113. Supply in a farm country store FEED
114. Certain terrier's isle SKYE
115. Big wind GALE

Down
1. And so on: Abbr. ETC
2. Letter after pi RHO
3. Signed promise IOU
4. Restrain CURB
5. Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest," e.g. FARCE
6. Stirred AWOKE
7. Madhouses ZOOS
8. Disease-struck tree ELM
9. Legal hurdle BAR EXAM
10. Toward the front UP AHEAD
11. Stadium protectors DOMES
12. Cyberjunk SPAM
13. Deli sandwich EGG SALAD
14. Coleridge storyteller MARINER
15. __ football ARENA
16. Curling surface ICE
17. Eye protector LID
18. Utter SAY
24. Big wind TUBA
25. Pipe cleaner DRANO
30. Jack and the missus of verse SPRATS
31. Spring toy SLINKY
32. Winners can be determined by one RANDOM DRAWING
34. "The Genius of Keyboard" jazzman TATUM
35. "Toad of Toad Hall" playwright MILNE
36. Coffee break treat CREAM DOUGHNUT
37. Doesn't disturb LETS BE
38. Make cherished ENDEAR
40. NFL six-pointers TDS
41. It may be long STORY
42. Loses strength FLAGS
45. Baker's preparation BATTER
46. Prayer opener O LORD
47. Scary tests ORALS
52. 20, in Toulouse VINGT
54. Lop off SEVER
55. "Beavis and Butt-head" spin-off DARIA
56. Milhous : Nixon :: __ : Garfield ABRAM
57. Lennon's "Everybody's Got Something to Hide Except __ My Monkey" ME AND
58. Kitchen wrap SARAN
60. Revealing garb MINIS
62. Mark for future reference DOG-EAR
64. Thin as __ A REED
65. McGarrett's outfit, familiarly FIVE-O
66. Hot Wheels maker MATTEL
67. Slow work ADAGIO
68. Basic building material ATOMS
69. Leans LISTS
70. "No kidding" REALLY
71. Online financial site E*TRADE
73. Pope in Attila's time ST LEO
74. Book displays RACKS
77. Like a dogfight missile AIR-TO-AIR
79. AFL partner CIO
81. Tactful handling FINESSE
82. Song title words before "for Miles" I CAN SEE
83. Took turns in succession ROTATED
84. Budget, in brand names ECONO-
89. Spice Girl Halliwell GERI
91. Small-screen Bean ORSON
92. Overcharge GOUGE
93. Run-down SEEDY
94. Bears, to Ovid URSAE
97. North Amer. WWII fliers RCAF
98. The Missouri R. runs through it S DAK
99. All excited AGOG
100. ER procedure CPR
101. Dixie general LEE
102. Poetic fighter ALI
104. Puzzle title people hidden in eight long answers MDS
105. Bird's org. NBA
106. Slippery one EEL
107. Salon stock DYE


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9 comments:

Addict said...

I see I wasn't only one to put seed instead of feed. Seedy already being in the grid should have been a tip off.

Bill, I noticed you got TAW right this time :)

Addict said...

Oh, And I went to a Grateful Dead concert once... I think.

Pookie said...

Hi Bill, Done in again by a few letters.
No idea of spin-off to Beavis and don't really care.
Arras unknown.
Pretty easy except for a few obscure things(to me, anyway)
Vidwan:

HAPPY DIWALI

Bill Butler said...

@Addict
Well, you and I are in the same grumpy boat again, making the same mistakes. I failed to notice the SEEDY/SEED pairing, until you mentioned it. I felt like a right Charlie putting down RCAS instead of RCAF though.

Wouldn't have tken you for a Deadhead, Addict. I brought my wife to a Rolling Stones vs Beatle trubute band "shootout" this weekend. Being a Deadhead, she wanted to cheer for the Stones, the bad boys. She had to relent and admit that the Beatles just lifted the roof off the theater :)

Pookie
I can't stand those "adult" cartoon shows like "The Simpsons", "Family Guy" and "Beavis and Butthead" (the worst of them all).

Thanks for the reminder about the Festival of Lights, Pookie (and for the informative vid). To Vidwan, and to everyone else who celbrates the festival ... Happy Diwali!

Addict said...

Heh! Heh! Bill, In no way,
shape or form am I a Dead Head. I was once asked if I wanted to go to a concert for free. I had the van to carry everyone!
And I agree with you about those Cartoon shows. Can't stand to watch any of them but I think "The Simpsons" doesn't quite fall into that category of "Raunchy" or "Bathroom humor" I allowed my kids to watch it back then.

Hoyt said...

I too fell for the SEED/FEED trick.
I was doing the puzzle online and couldn't figure out what I had done wrong. It lets you know when you're done, I thought the thing was broken.
You guys forgot to mention "Southpark".

Bill Butler said...

@Addict
I think we must be twins. You've no idea how many times I've "just been the driver". And you are probably right about "The Simpsons". I don't care for the show but do recognize that some very qualified critics really respect it.

@Hoyt
It's reassuring to hear that a few of us had problems with the SEED/FEED choice. I felt a bit foolish having opted for RCAS. And thanks for reminding us about "South Park". Another show that I choose to avoid.

Addict said...

Hoyt, I think there was just way too many to mention, but Southpark is right up there.

Bill, As for being twins... Can't be, I have hair!

( Aww Crap... Banned Again? )

Bill Butler said...

Addict,

You can use the time in the sin bin to rush your flowing locks :)

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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