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LA Times Crossword Answers 1 Apr 13, Monday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Patti Varol
THEME: Some People Today … each of today’s themed answers ends with a word that means “fool”, apt since today is April Fools Day:
60A. Cry heard today, and a hint to the ends of the answers to starred clues APRIL FOOL

16A. *Evangelist honored with a basilica in Venice SAINT MARK
10D. *Trapshooter's target CLAY PIGEON
24D. *Tapped maple fluid TREE SAP
29D. *Lightweight, crinkled material used for suits SEERSUCKER
COMPLETION TIME: 06m 43s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
13. __ vera lotion ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

16. *Evangelist honored with a basilica in Venice SAINT MARK
St. Mark’s Basilica is the Roman Catholic cathedral in the the city of Venice, Italy. In front of the basilica is the Piazza San Marco, the city's main public square. St. Mark’s Square is a remarkable urban space in Europe as the sound of the human voice dominates, rather than the sound of traffic. That is indeed remarkable ...

18. Resell at a big profit SCALP
Scalping of tickets, selling them above retail price for an excessive profit, originated in the mid-1800s with scalpers making money off theater tickets. There was also quite a bit of money made by people scalping railway tickets. Railroads gave discounts on tickets for longer journeys, so someone trying to get from San Francisco to Chicago say, might buy a ticket to New York. Once in Chicago the passenger would scalp the remainder of his/her ticket to someone wanting to get to New York, and make his or her invested money back with a bonus.

22. Huck Finn's ride RAFT
"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain was first published in 1884, not here in the US but rather in England. The original launch planned for the US had to be delayed until the following year because some rascal had defaced the plate for one of the illustrations, making an obscene joke. Once the problem was spotted a new plate had to be made, and 30,000 copies already printed had to be reworked to cover up the obscenity.

25. Astrological edges CUSPS
The word "cusp" comes from the Latin "cuspis" meaning "spear, point". In the world of astrology, a cusp is an imaginary line separating two signs of the zodiac. For example, some whose birthday is between April 16 and April 26 is said to have been born "on the cusp" between the signs Aries and Taurus.

27. Pyromaniac's crime ARSON
“Pyro-” is the combining form of the Greek word for "fire". A pyromaniac (a "pyro") is someone with an abnormal desire to start fires, or with a general obsession with fire.

33. Figs. well above 100 in Mensa IQS
The first usable intelligence test was invented by a French psychologist named Alfred Binet. Binet collaborated with Théodore Simon and together they produced the Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale that is still in use today for IQ tests.

If you ever had to learn Latin, as did I, "mensa" was probably taught to you in Lesson One as it's the word commonly used as an example of a first declension noun. Mensa means "table". The Mensa organization for folks with high IQs was set up in Oxford, England back in 1946. To become a member, one is required to have an IQ that is in the top 2% of the population.

36. BBC nickname, with "the" BEEB
The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is also known as "the Beeb", a name given to the network by the great Peter Sellers on the classic British radio comedy called "The Goon Show". The BBC was founded in 1922, and was the world’s first national broadcasting organization.

37. Juan's water AGUA
In Spanish, there is plenty of water (agua) in a river (río).

40. "Hud" Best Actress Patricia NEAL
Patricia Neal won her Best Actress Oscar relatively late in her career, for playing the middle-aged housekeeper in 1963’s “Hud”. A few years later she was offered the role of Mrs. Robinson in “The Graduate” but turned it down. Famously, Neal had an affair with Gary Cooper who was married at the time. She became pregnant with his child but he persuaded her to have an abortion. Not long afterwards Neal married British writer Roald Dahl (of “Willy Wonka” fame) and the couple had five children together before divorcing in 1983.

The modern-day, western movie called "Hud" was released in 1963 and has become a classic. "Hud" stars Paul Newman (in the title role) and Patricia Neal and is an adaptation of a novel by Larry McMurtry called "Horseman, Pass By". Patricia Neal's role in the film was relatively small, yet her performance was enough to earn her an Academy Award for Best Actress.

44. ICU personnel RNS
Registered nurses (RNs) might be found in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

45. Campaign sticker, e.g. DECAL
A decal is a decorative sticker, short for “decalcomania”. The term is derived from the French “décalquer”, the practice of tracing a pattern from paper onto glass or perhaps porcelain.

49. Folk icon Seeger PETE
The American folk singer Pete Seeger wrote and co-wrote a lot of classic songs. The list includes “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?”, “If I had a Hammer”, and “Turn, Turn, Turn!”

58. Bracelet site ANKLE
To the best of my knowledge a bracelet goes on the arm or wrist. The equivalent for the ankle is an anklet. Oh, I guess that might also be called an "ankle bracelet” ...

60. Cry heard today, and a hint to the ends of the answers to starred clues APRIL FOOL
April Fool's Day is celebrated on April 1st in the western world. In the US (and Ireland) one can make practical jokes all day long if one wants, but in the UK there is a noon deadline. Anyone pranking after midday is called an "April Fool".

66. Mayo holders JARS
Mayonnaise originated in the town of Mahon in Menorca, a Mediterranean island belonging to Spain. The Spanish called the sauce “salsa mahonesa” after the town, and this morphed into the French word “mayonnaise” that we use in English today.

67. Beaver-built barriers DAMS
Beavers build dams so that they can live in and around the slower and deeper water that builds up above the dam. This deeper water provides more protection for the beavers from predators such as bears. Beavers are nocturnal animals and do all their construction work at night.

Down
1. Soak up the sun BASK
Our word "bask" has a gruesome etymology. It comes from the Old English "basken" meaning "to wallow in blood". Then William Shakespeare used the word "bask" in his play "As You Like It" (about 1600) in reference to sunshine, and we've been basking in warmth ever since.

3. Superman's Lane LOIS
Lois Lane has been the love interest of Superman/Clark Kent since the comic series was first published in 1938. Lois and Clark both work for the big newspaper in the city of Metropolis called "The Daily Planet". The couple finally got hitched in the comics (and on television's "Lois and Clark") in 1996. But never mind all that ... one has to wonder how good the crossword is in "The Daily Planet" ...

5. __ Bay Rays TAMPA
The Tampa Bay Rays is a relatively "young" franchise, being formed in 1998. The initial name of the franchise was the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. and while known as the Devil Rays the team finished last in the league in almost every year. The name was changed to the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008, and I am told the Rays started into a streak of winning seasons soon after.

6. Composer Gershwin IRA
I don’t think Ira Gershwin is usually regarded as a composer. Certainly, he was one of the greatest lyricists in American history, and one who worked the best of composers, including his brother George.

8. Sushi bar cupful SAKE
We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as "sake". We've gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. "Sake" is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as “rice wine”. It is indeed made from rice, but it is a brewed rather than fermented and so is more like a beer than a wine.

Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If you want raw fish by itself, then you have to order "sashimi".

9. Machu Picchu builders INCAS
Machu Picchu is known as "The Lost City of the Incas", and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means "old peak".

10. *Trapshooter's target CLAY PIGEON
There are three types of competitive shotgun target shooting sports:
- Skeet shooting
- Trap shooting
- Sporting clays

12. Longtime auto racing sponsor STP
STP motor oil takes its name from "Scientifically Treated Petroleum".

21. Reef explorer's gear SCUBA
The SCUBA tank was of course invented by the underwater adventurer Jacques Cousteau.

Jacques-Yves Cousteau started off his career in the French Navy, aiming for a working life in aviation. Because of a car accident, Cousteau had to abandon his first career choice and instead went to sea. Famously, he invented the Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus (SCUBA), also called the aqualung.

27. Ann __, Michigan ARBOR
Ann Arbor, Michigan was founded in 1824 by John Allen and Elisha Rumsey. Supposedly, Allen and Rumsey originally used the name “Annsarbour” in recognition of stands of bur oak that were on the land they had purchased and in recognition of their wives, both of whom were called “Ann” (i.e. Anns' Arbor)

28. "Seinfeld" episodes, now RERUNS
The character called Elaine Benes, unlike Jerry, Kramer and George, did not appear in the pilot episode of "Seinfeld". NBC executives specified the addition of a female lead when they picked up the show citing that the situation was too "male-centric".

29. *Lightweight, crinkled material used for suits SEERSUCKER
Seersucker is a type of fabric, often made of alternating rough and smooth stripes. The name “seersucker” comes from the Persian “shir o shekar” meaning “milk and sugar”. I guess the idea is that the “milky” stripes are smooth and the “sugary” stripes are rough or granular.

37. Year, on monuments ANNO
Anno (plural “anni”) is the Latin for "year".

45. Passé DATED
“Passé” is a French word, meaning "past, faded".

52. Scotland __ YARD
London’s Metropolitan Police Service was originally headquartered at 4 Whitehall Place, and the rear entrance to the building was in a street called Great Scotland Yard. As the public entrance to the headquarters became that rear entrance, the headquarters and the force itself became known as “Scotland Yard”. The current headquarters is nowhere near that first building, and hasn’t been so since 1890, and the new facility is called New Scotland Yard.

55. Actor's cameo, e.g. ROLE
Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to playing himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning, it's easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

57. One-armed bandit SLOT
Slot machines earned the nickname "one-armed bandits" simply because they had "one arm", the handle pulled to operate the machine, and they robbed you of all your money!

59. Org. that created American Hunter magazine NRA
The National Rifle Association (NRA) issues a number of periodical publications, including:
- “American Rifleman”
- “American Hunter”
- “Shooting Illustrated”
- “America’s 1st Freedom”
- “Shooting Sports USA”

62. Chrysler truck that sounds hard-hitting RAM
Chrysler put ram hood ornaments on all of its Dodge branded vehicles starting in 1933. When the first line of Dodge trucks and vans were introduced in 1981, they were named “Ram” in honor of that hood ornament.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Bouncing toy BALL
5. What waiters wait for TIPS
9. Finishes making, as a black-and-white cookie ICES
13. __ vera lotion ALOE
14. Length times width AREA
15. Arm of a sea INLET
16. *Evangelist honored with a basilica in Venice SAINT MARK
18. Resell at a big profit SCALP
19. Flatter the boss for personal gain KISS UP
20. English class assignment ESSAY
22. Huck Finn's ride RAFT
25. Astrological edges CUSPS
27. Pyromaniac's crime ARSON
31. Lock horns (with) ARGUE
33. Figs. well above 100 in Mensa IQS
35. Marsh grasses REEDS
36. BBC nickname, with "the" BEEB
37. Juan's water AGUA
38. Spawned BRED
39. Ice show site ARENA
40. "Hud" Best Actress Patricia NEAL
41. Yours and mine OURS
42. Dean's __ LIST
43. Inelegant laugh SNORT
44. ICU personnel RNS
45. Campaign sticker, e.g. DECAL
46. Cold hard cash MONEY
47. Cubes in a bowl SUGAR
49. Folk icon Seeger PETE
51. Spiteful, as gossip CATTY
53. Antitheft noisemakers ALARMS
58. Bracelet site ANKLE
60. Cry heard today, and a hint to the ends of the answers to starred clues APRIL FOOL
63. Deep trepidation DREAD
64. Not hypothetical REAL
65. "Not only that ..." ALSO
66. Mayo holders JARS
67. Beaver-built barriers DAMS
68. Conserve energy REST

Down
1. Soak up the sun BASK
2. Jai __ ALAI
3. Superman's Lane LOIS
4. Binoculars part LENS
5. __ Bay Rays TAMPA
6. Composer Gershwin IRA
7. Pay-__-view PER
8. Sushi bar cupful SAKE
9. Machu Picchu builders INCAS
10. *Trapshooter's target CLAY PIGEON
11. Snakelike swimmer EEL
12. Longtime auto racing sponsor STP
15. Newsletter edition ISSUE
17. Spins in board games, say TURNS
21. Reef explorer's gear SCUBA
23. Seamstress's purchase FABRIC
24. *Tapped maple fluid TREE SAP
26. Unhip type SQUARE
27. Ann __, Michigan ARBOR
28. "Seinfeld" episodes, now RERUNS
29. *Lightweight, crinkled material used for suits SEERSUCKER
30. Betting info ODDS
32. Soft-hearted GENTLE
34. Thirst-inducing, like potato chips SALTY
37. Year, on monuments ANNO
39. Vigilant ALERT
43. Aroma SMELL
45. Passé DATED
48. Grand parties GALAS
50. Coin toss choice TAILS
52. Scotland __ YARD
54. Quite a distance AFAR
55. Actor's cameo, e.g. ROLE
56. Forest-floor plant MOSS
57. One-armed bandit SLOT
58. Descriptive wd. ADJ
59. Org. that created American Hunter magazine NRA
61. Potpie veggie PEA
62. Chrysler truck that sounds hard-hitting RAM


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LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Mar 13, Sunday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrew J. Ries
THEME: Support Group … each of the themed answer is made up of two words, one ending with A and the other starting with A, giving us an AA meeting:
69A. Event where the number 12 is important, and a feature of 12 two-word answers in this puzzle AA MEETING

23A. Tibetan breed LHASA APSO
24A. Cinematographer's concern CAMERA ANGLE
30A. First Bond girl URSULA ANDRESS
45A. Orange County seat SANTA ANA
47A. Max Ernst, for one DADA ARTIST
55A. Crimson Tide's home TUSCALOOSA ALABAMA
80A. "The Voice" coach CHRISTINA AGUILERA
87A. Interactive website plug-in JAVA APPLET
91A. Unusual thing RARA AVIS
106A. Its largest hub is in Atlanta DELTA AIRLINES
113A. First Japanese car to be produced in the U.S. HONDA ACCORD
116A. Mozart highlight OPERA ARIA
COMPLETION TIME: 33m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
15. Epps of "House" OMAR
Omar Epps is the actor who played Eric Foreman on the excellent television series "House". Prior to playing Dr. Foreman, Epps had a recurring role playing Dr. Dennis Grant on "ER". And, in another link to the world of medicine, Epps was born in Savannah, Georgia to single mom, Dr. Bonnie Epps.

23. Tibetan breed LHASA APSO
The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after Lhasa (the capital city) and apso (a Tibetan word meaning "bearded"). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

26. Patriotic org. DAR
In order to be a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR), an applicant has to prove that she is a descendant of someone closely associated with, and supportive of, the American Revolution.

30. First Bond girl URSULA ANDRESS
The actor Ursula Andress was quite the sex symbol in the sixties, famously playing Honey Ryder in the first James Bond movie “Dr. No”. Andress was born in Switzerland and is fluent in English, French, Italian, German and her native Swiss-German.

39. Rocker Young NEIL
Neil Young is a singer and songwriter from Toronto, Ontario. Young is known for his solo work, as well as his earlier recordings with Buffalo Springfield and as the fourth member of Crosby, Stills & Nash. Young is also a successful movie director, although he uses the pseudonym “Bernard Shakey” for his movie work. Included in his filmography are “Human Highway” and “Greendale”.

40. Real estate listing abbr. RMS
Rooms (rms.)

41. Palm tree nut ARECA
The betel nut is something that is chewed, especially in parts of Asia. “Betel nut” is a bit of misnomer, as the nut in question is actually an Areca nut from the Areca palm. For chewing, the Areca nut is wrapped in betel leaves and the whole thing is called a “betel nut”.

43. Cuban of the Dallas Mavericks, e.g. OWNER
Mark Cuban is a successful American businessman, and is the owner of the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks. If you’ve seen the reality TV show “Shark Tank”, you’ll known Cuban as one of the investors putting up their money i.e. one of the “sharks”. If you’re a “Dancing with the Stars” fan, you might recall Cuban as a contestant on the 5th series of that show, partnered with Kym Johnson.

45. Orange County seat SANTA ANA
Santa Ana is the county seat of Orange County, California and takes its name from the Santa Ana River that runs through the city. The Santa Ana winds are the very dry air currents that sweep offshore late in the year in Southern California. Because these air currents are so dry, they are noted for their influence over forest fires in the area, especially in the heat of the fall. The winds arise from a buildup of air pressure in the Great Basin that lies between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Under the right conditions, that air spills over the peaks of the Sierra Nevada and basically "falls" down the side of the Sierra range, heading for the ocean. As the air falls it becomes drier and heats up so that relative humidity can fall to below 10% by the time it hits the coast.

47. Max Ernst, for one DADA ARTIST
Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

Max Ernst was a painter and sculptor, a pioneer in the Dada movement and Surrealism. Ernst was born near Cologne in Germany in 1891 and he was called up to fight in WWI, as were most young German men at that time. In his autobiography he writes "Max Ernst died the 1st of August, 1914" a statement about his experiences in the war. In reality, Ernst died in 1976 having lived to the ripe old age of 85.

54. Literally, “the tar” LA BREA
The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. "La Brea" is Spanish for "the tar". At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It's well worth a visit if you are in town …

55. Crimson Tide's home TUSCALOOSA ALABAMA
The city of Tuscaloosa, Alabama was named in honor of Chief Tuskaloosa, head of a Muskogean-speaking tribe. The city was the capital of Alabama from 1826 to 1846.

The athletic teams of the University of Alabama (“Bama”) are nicknamed the Crimson Tide, a reference to the team colors: crimson and white.

61. Mao's successor HUA
Hua Guofeng was man whom Mao Zedong designated as his successor as paramount leader of the People’s Republic of China and the Communist Party of China. Hua came to power in 1976 and within a few month’s brought Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution to an end. However, Hua was deemed to be moving too slowly with his reforms, and so he was forced into early retirement after just a few years in power and Deng Xiaoping took control.

64. Jobs offering of 2007 IPHONE
Steve Jobs certainly was a business icon in Silicon Valley. I don't think it is too surprising to learn that the brilliant Jobs didn't even finish his college education, dropping out of Reed College in Oregon after only one semester. Steve Jobs co-founded Apple in 1976, but in 1985 he was basically fired from his own company during the computer sales slump of the mid-eighties. Jobs then founded NeXT Computer, a company focused on supplying workstations to the higher education and business markets. Apple purchased NeXT in 1996, and that's how Jobs found himself back with his original company.

65. Former Bears coach DITKA
Mike Ditka is a retired NFL player, and retired coach of Chicago Bears and New Orleans Saints. Ditka and Tom Flores are the only people to have won Super Bowls as a player, an assistant coach, and as a head coach.

66. Full or half holds NELSONS
The full nelson and half nelson are wrestling holds in which one wrestler secures an opponent by encircling the opponent's arms under the armpits and around the neck. Some say the hold is named after Admiral Nelson, who was renowned for using encircling tactics in battle.

69. Event where the number 12 is important, and a feature of 12 two-word answers in this puzzle AA MEETING
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935, by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. As the organization grew, the guiding principles established by the founders were formatted into a 12-step program that was in place by the forties.

73. Texas Hold ’em variety NO-LIMIT
The official birthplace of the incredibly popular poker game of Texas Hold 'Em is Robstown, Texas where the game dates back to the early 1900s. The game was introduced into Las Vegas in 1967 by a group of Texan enthusiasts including Doyle Brunson, a champion often seen playing on TV today. Doyle Brunson published a poker strategy guide in 1978, and this really helped increase the popularity of the game. But it was the inclusion of Texas Hold 'Em in the television line-up that really gave the game its explosive surge in popularity, with the size of the prize money just skyrocketing.

79. Leveling initials TNT
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

80. "The Voice" coach CHRISTINA AGUILERA
Christina Aguilera is a singer who got her start on television’s “Star Search”. From there she took a role on Disney’s “The Mickey Mouse Club”.

“The Voice” is yet another reality television show. “The Voice” is a singing competition in which the judges hear the contestants without seeing them in the first round. The judges then take on chosen contestants as coaches for the remaining rounds. “The Voice” is a highly successful worldwide franchise that originated in the Netherlands.

85. Evelyn Waugh, but not George Eliot MAN
Evelyn Waugh was an English author, most famous for his fabulous 1945 novel “Brideshead Revisited”. Evelyn Waugh met and fell in love with Evelyn Gardner in 1927. Known to friends as “He-Evelyn” and “She-Evelyn”, the couple were married in 1929 (but divorced one year later).

George Eliot was the pen name of English novelist Mary Anne Evans. As one might think, Evans chose a male pen name in order that her work might be best appreciated in the Victorian era. Eliot wrote seven novels including “Adam Bede” (1859), “The Mill on the Floss” (1860), “Silas Marner” (1861) and “Middlemarch” (1871-72).

86. Pujols blasts: Abbr. HRS
Home runs (HRs)

Albert Pujols is a professional baseball player with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Pujols is a native of the Dominican Republic, and moved to the US in 1996.

87. Interactive website plug-in JAVA APPLET
Java is a programming language developed by Sun Microsystems. Java was originally designed for interactive television, but didn’t fit the needs at the time. Back then it was called Oak, named after an oak tree that stood outside the designer’s office. Later it was called Green and finally named Java, which was simply picked out of a list of random words.

91. Unusual thing RARA AVIS
A “rara avis” is anything that is very rare, and is Latin for "rare bird".

100. __-de-France ILE
Île-de-France (literally "Island of France") isn't an island at all. It is the name given to the most populous of France's 26 administrative regions. Île-de-France is roughly equivalent to the Paris metropolitan area.

101. Wolfe who tracks crooks NERO
Nero Wolfe is a fictional detective and the hero of many stories published by author Rex Stout. There are 33 Nero Wolfe novels for us to read, and 39 short stories. There are also movie adaptations of two of the novels: " Meet Nero Wolfe" (1936) which features a young Rita Hayworth, and "The League of Frightened Men" (1937). One of Wolfe's endearing traits is his love of good food and beer, so he is a pretty rotund character.

102. "Licensed to __": Beastie Boys album ILL
Beastie Boys are a hip hop band from New York that formed back in 1981.

103. Sea-Tac posting ARR
Sea-Tac Airport is more fully known as Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. Sea-Tac is the main hub for Alaska Airlines.

106. Its largest hub is in Atlanta DELTA AIRLINES
Today, Delta is the world's largest airline (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta's roots go back to 1924 before the company's planes started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting enterprise based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

112. Ambulance VIP EMT
Emergency medical technician (EMT)

113. First Japanese car to be produced in the U.S. HONDA ACCORD
Honda started manufacturing its Accord model in Marysville, Ohio in 1982, making the Accord the first Japanese car to be produced in the US. The Accord was the best-selling Japanese car in America from 1982 to 1997, and 1989 was the first import to become the best-selling car in the US.

122. Ancient Andean INCA
Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro discovered the Incas in 1526, marking the beginning of the end for an ancient civilization that was to be ravaged by brutal Spanish colonists and by imported smallpox. The last leader of the Inca was Atahualpa. Pizarro staged a mock trial and then condemned Atahualpa to execution by burning. A Spanish friar intervened on behalf of the condemned man, as Atahualpa believed that if he was burned his soul would not move on to the afterlife. Pizarro, was kind enough to have Atahualpa garroted instead.

Down
1. "The Simpsons" real estate agent Gunderson GIL
The character Gil Gunderson is a real estate agent on the Fox animated show “The Simpsons”. Gunderson is also known as “Ol’ Gil” and is voice by Dan Castellaneta.

2. Hamburger beef? ACH
The German exclamation "ach!" is usually translated into English as "oh!"

Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany (after Berlin), and the third largest port in Europe (after Rotterdam and Antwerp).

6. Men's tennis org. ATP
The Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) is an organization that looks after the interests of male tennis professionals. The equivalent organization for women is the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA).

7. Thing in court RES
"Res" is the Latin for "thing". "Res" is used in a lot of phrases in the law.

9. Lambeau Field pro PACKER
When Curly Lambeau founded his small-town football team in Green Bay in 1919, he was working for the Indian Packing Company. Lambeau went to his employers looking for sponsorship and was given $250 provided that the team was named for the company. And so, the team  was originally referred to as the Green Bay Indians, but by the time they took to the field for their first game it had changed to the Packers and Lambeau was $250 richer.

13. "Darn it!" NERTS
“Nerts” is a slang term, a corruption of "nuts!" and has the same meaning.

14. State with a panhandle IDAHO
Idaho has the nickname the Gem State, mainly because almost every known type of gemstone has been found there. Idaho is also sometimes called the Potato State as potatoes are such a popular crop in the state.

16. Oscar winner Anna MAGNANI
Anna Magnani was an Italian actress who won an Academy Award for Best Actress portraying a Sicilian widow in the 1955 film adaptation of the Tennessee Williams play “The Rose Tattoo”. Williams actually wrote the play for Magnani, but she declined to perform in it as she believed her English to be too imperfect. When the play was adapted for the big screen, Magnani felt that she had mastered the language sufficiently and so took the lead role.

20. Bush advisor Rove KARL
Whatever your politics, you have to give Karl Rove credit for engineering both presidential election victories for President George W. Bush. Rove is a Christmas baby, born on December 25, 1950.

25. Like koalas ARBOREAL
The koala really does look like a little bear, but it's not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope.

31. "Bloom" star Stephen REA
Stephen Rea is an Irish actor, whose most famous role was that of the "retired" IRA man in the brilliant 1992 film "The Crying Game". He also starred in the chilling movie "Stuck", a 2007 film that is based on a true story about a woman who commits a hit and run on a homeless man. The woman leaves the scene of the crime with the victim still "stuck" in her windshield. The woman leaves the man to die in her garage. Chilling, eh? But as I said, a true story ...

“Bloom” is a film made in Ireland based on the James Joyce novel “Ulysses”. All of the action, in both the novel and film, takes place on 16 June 1904, a day now celebrated annually in Dublin as “Bloomsday”. In the movie, the title character of Leopold Bloom is played by Stephen Rea.

33. OB/GYN test AMNIO
Amniocentesis is the prenatal test which involves the removal of a small amount of the amniotic fluid surrounding the fetus using a hypodermic needle. The fluid naturally contains some fetal cells, the DNA of which can then be tested to determine the sex of the child and to check for the presence of genetic abnormalities.

34. Org. in the film "Sneakers" NSA
The National Security Agency (NSA) was set up in 1952 by President Truman, a replacement for the Armed Forces Security Agency that had existed in the Department of Defense since 1949. The NSA has always been clouded in secrecy and even the 1952 letter from President Truman that established the agency was kept under wraps from the public for over a generation. I really like the organization’s nickname ... "No Such Agency".

“Sneakers” is a very entertaining 1992 film starring Robert Redford as the head of a team of security specialists that is used by the NSA for an undercover operation. Also in the cast are Dan Aykroyd, Ben Kingsley, River Phoenix and Sidney Poitier.

35. Italy's La __ SCALA
The La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its name, "Teatro alla Scala" in Italian.

38. Morsel ORT
Orts are small scraps of food left after a meal. “Ort” comes from Middle English, and originally described scraps left by animals.

44. 6-Down counterpart founded by Billie Jean King WTA
The former World No. 1 tennis player Billie Jean King founded the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) and won the first ever WTA Tour Championship. King also won the famous “Battle of the Sexes” tennis match played in 1973 against Bobby Riggs.

46. Ireland's __ Islands ARAN
The Aran Islands are a group of three islands located at the mouth of Galway Bay in the west of Ireland. They are beautiful and desolate places, and one of the few places in Ireland where the main language spoken is Irish, as opposed to English. If you've seen the television comedy "Father Ted", you'll be familiar with the landscape, as many of the external shots are from Inishmore, one of the Aran Islands.

49. Soldat’s weapon ARME
In French, a soldier (soldat) uses a weapon (arme).

52. One of Edison's 1,000-plus PATENT
Thomas Alva Edison was nicknamed "The Wizard of Menlo Park" by a newspaper reporter, a name that stuck. He was indeed a wizard, in the sense that he was such a prolific inventor. The Menlo Park part of the moniker recognizes the location of his first research lab, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

56. B.J. or Justin of baseball UPTON
Justin and B.J. Upton are two brothers playing Major League Baseball. Justin plays for the Arizona Diamondbacks, and B. J. plays for the Tampa Bay Rays.

58. Mozart's "__ fan tutte" COSI
Mozart's comic opera "Così fan tutte" is also known in English as "The School for Lovers". The literal translation of the opera's title is "Thus do all (women)", or "Women are like that".

59. Seraglio room ODA
"Oda" is the Turkish word for "room", and is the name used for a room within a harem in the days of the Ottoman Empire. We use the derivative word "odalisque" for "a concubine" or "a chamber girl".

“Seraglio” was the name given to the living quarters use by wives and concubines in some Ottoman households. It might also be referred to as a harem.

60. J.Lo, for one LATINA
J.Lo is the nickname of singer and actress Jennifer Lopez. "J.Lo" is also the title of her second studio album, released in 2001.

61. Mezzo Marilyn HORNE
Marilyn Horne is a mezzo-soprano opera singer from Bradford, Pennsylvania. Her first major engagement was to dub the female lead voice in the 1954 film “Carmen Jones”.

62. Racing great Bobby UNSER
The Unser family seems to have racing cars in its blood. Al Unser, Sr. won the Indy 500 on four occasions. Al’s brother Jerry was the first of the Unsers to compete at Indianapolis. Al’s other brother Bobby, won the Indy three times. Al’s son, Al Junior, won the Indy twice. Al Junior’s son is also a racing driver who competes at the Indy Speedway.

63. Stars at the Forum? ASTRA
"Astra" is the Latin for "stars" as in "Ad Astra", the motto of my alma mater, University College Dublin in Ireland.

The Roman forum was the public space in the middle of a city, taking it's name from the Latin word "forum" meaning "marketplace, town square".

69. Aweigh ATRIP
When an anchor is “aweigh” or “atrip”, it is just clear of the bottom, having just been lifted.

70. US Open champ between John and Mats IVAN
Ivan Lendl is a former professional tennis player from Czechoslovakia. Lendl appeared in eight consecutive US Open finals in the eighties, a record that stands to this day.

71. Grant-providing gp. NEA
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an agency funded by the federal government that offers support and financing for artistic projects. The NEA was created by an Act of Congress in 1965. Between 1965 and 2008, the NEA awarded over $4 billion to the arts, with Congress authorizing around $170 million annually through the eighties and much of the nineties. That funding was cut to less than $100 million in the late nineties due to pressure from conservatives concerned about the use of funds, but it is now back over the $150 million mark. I wonder how long that will last though ...

74. '60s defense secretary MCNAMARA
Robert McNamara was the Secretary of Defense in both the Kennedy and the Johnson administrations. McNamara served as Secretary of Defense longer than any other individual, taking office in 1961 and leaving in 1968. McNamara also played a crucial role in escalating US involvement in the Vietnam War, a role not appreciated by everyone. In 1972, a passenger on the ferry to Martha’s Vineyard recognized him and tried to physically throw him overboard, afterwards citing a need to confront McNamara on Vietnam.

75. Chain with stacks IHOP
The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn't do too well in marketing tests ...

78. Crossword-solving Simpson LISA
Lisa Simpson is Bart's brainy younger sister on TV's "The Simpsons". Lisa is voiced by actress Yeardley Smith.

81. At a Lakers home game, e.g. IN LA
The Los Angeles Lakers basketball team started out in 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team chose the Lakers name in honor of the nickname of Minnesota, “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. The Lakers moved to Los Angeles in 1960.

83. '90s U.N. secretary-general Boutros-__ GHALI
Boutros Boutros-Ghali is an Egyptian diplomat, the sixth Secretary-General of the United Nations. Boutros-Ghali was nominated for a second term as Secretary-General in 1996, but the US used its right of veto to block the appointment. According to senior delegates, the US wasn't too happy with his handling of the international crisis in Bosnia.

84. River past Berne AAR
The Aar (also called the "Aare" in German) is the longest river entirely in Switzerland. A famous spot along the Aar is the Reichenbach Falls in the center of the country, actually a series of waterfalls near the city of Meiringen. These falls are renowned in the world of literature as it was here that Sherlock Holmes fell to his supposed doom with his nemesis Professor Moriarty (in "The Adventure of the Final Problem").

Bern (or Berne) is the capital city of Switzerland. The official language of the city is German, but the language most spoken in Bern is a dialect known as Bernese German.

87. Start of a rhyming Basque game JAI
Even though jai alai is often said to be the fastest sport in the world because of the speed of the ball, in fact golf balls usually get going at a greater clip.

89. Element's combining power VALENCE
An atom’s valence is the number of electrons that it loses, adds or shares when bonding with other atoms.

90. 2011 Liam Neeson film involving a wolf pack THE GREY
“The Grey” is a 2012 thriller movie starring Liam Neeson. The film is based on a short story called “Ghost Walker” written by Ian MAcKenzie Jeffers and is about some oil-men stranded in Alaska after a plane crash. A pack of wolves moves in, and mayhem ensues …

Irish actor Liam Neeson got his big break when he played Oskar Schindler in the Spielberg epic "Schindler's List". Neeson was in the news a few years ago when he lost his wife, actress Natasha Richardson, in a tragic skiing accident in 2009.

91. Fjord-like inlet RIA
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

92. Pink Floyd album including "Dogs" and "Sheep" ANIMALS
Pink Floyd were an English rock band founded in 1965. The band's most famous albums were probably “The Dark Side of the Moon” and “The Wall”.

95. Tapped-out letters SOS
The combination of three dots - three dashes - three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots - pause - three dashes - pause - three dots), although in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so SOS is in effect only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases "Save Our Souls" and "Save Our Ship" are also mnemonics, introduced after the "SOS" signal was adopted.

99. Boozer's affliction DTS
The episodes of delirium that can accompany withdrawal from alcohol are called Delirium Tremens (the DTs). The literal translation of this Latin phrase is "trembling madness".

104. Stampede rope RIATA
"Riata" is another name for a lariat or a lasso. "Riata" comes from "reata", the Spanish word for lasso.

110. Pop singer Lambert ADAM
Adam Lambert is one of the "successes" to come out of the "American Idol" machine.

115. Native Nebraskan OTO
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

118. Scratch (out) EKE
To "eke out" means to "make something go further or last longer". For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses. I always have a problem with the commonly cited definition of “eke out” as “barely get by”. Close but no cigar, I say ...

119. Sleep lab acronym REM
REM is an acronym standing for Rapid Eye Movement sleep. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one's most vivid dreams.

120. TV chef Garten INA
Ina Garten is an author as well as the host of the cooking show on the Food Network called “Barefoot Contessa”. Garten has no formal training as a chef, and indeed used to work as a nuclear policy analyst at the White House!

121. Cause of Cleo's demise ASP
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Festive occasion GALA
5. Stinging remark BARB
9. Italian for "small rolls" PANINI
15. Epps of "House" OMAR
19. One working on figures? ICE SKATER
21. Knocked the socks off AMAZED
22. Goody-goody's "headwear" HALO
23. Tibetan breed LHASA APSO
24. Cinematographer's concern CAMERA ANGLE
26. Patriotic org. DAR
27. Starts the haggling at ASKS
29. Powerful perch THRONE
30. First Bond girl URSULA ANDRESS
36. Let the tears go SOB
37. In the past AGO
39. Rocker Young NEIL
40. Real estate listing abbr. RMS
41. Palm tree nut ARECA
43. Cuban of the Dallas Mavericks, e.g. OWNER
45. Orange County seat SANTA ANA
47. Max Ernst, for one DADA ARTIST
50. Bases-loaded walk stat RBI
51. Well-stated APT
54. Literally, “the tar” LA BREA
55. Crimson Tide's home TUSCALOOSA ALABAMA
61. Mao's successor HUA
64. Jobs offering of 2007 IPHONE
65. Former Bears coach DITKA
66. Full or half holds NELSONS
68. Train-stopping spots: Abbr. STAS
69. Event where the number 12 is important, and a feature of 12 two-word answers in this puzzle AA MEETING
72. Once, archaically ERST
73. Texas Hold ’em variety NO-LIMIT
76. Believing in the green-cheese moon, say NAIVE
77. Smoothing tool PLANER
79. Leveling initials TNT
80. "The Voice" coach CHRISTINA AGUILERA
84. Rub with oil ANOINT
85. Evelyn Waugh, but not George Eliot MAN
86. Pujols blasts: Abbr. HRS
87. Interactive website plug-in JAVA APPLET
91. Unusual thing RARA AVIS
96. Scare ALARM
97. Reacted to a massage AAHED
100. __-de-France ILE
101. Wolfe who tracks crooks NERO
102. "Licensed to __": Beastie Boys album ILL
103. Sea-Tac posting ARR
106. Its largest hub is in Atlanta DELTA AIRLINES
109. Turtledove DEARIE
111. Hair disheveler GUST
112. Ambulance VIP EMT
113. First Japanese car to be produced in the U.S. HONDA ACCORD
116. Mozart highlight OPERA ARIA
122. Ancient Andean INCA
123. Just as prescribed TO A TEE
124. Save a date, say MAKE PLANS
125. Consider DEEM
126. Bugs ANNOYS
127. Flower stalk STEM
128. Wrist-directed reprimand SLAP

Down
1. "The Simpsons" real estate agent Gunderson GIL
2. Hamburger beef? ACH
3. Shows the way (to) LEADS IN
4. Military attack ASSAULT
5. Ovine bleat BAA
6. Men's tennis org. ATP
7. Thing in court RES
8. Like some shoulders BROAD
9. Lambeau Field pro PACKER
10. Saved up AMASSED
11. Site of '60s action NAM
12. Modern ending? -IZE
13. "Darn it!" NERTS
14. State with a panhandle IDAHO
15. [Gasp!] OH NO!
16. Oscar winner Anna MAGNANI
17. Asserts sans proof ALLEGES
18. Fish eggs ROE
20. Bush advisor Rove KARL
25. Like koalas ARBOREAL
28. Mexican Mrs. SRA
30. Young __ ‘UNS
31. "Bloom" star Stephen REA
32. Ideal for growing ARABLE
33. OB/GYN test AMNIO
34. Org. in the film "Sneakers" NSA
35. Italy's La __ SCALA
38. Morsel ORT
42. Very little A DAB
44. 6-Down counterpart founded by Billie Jean King WTA
46. Ireland's __ Islands ARAN
48. Go out with __ A BANG
49. Soldat’s weapon ARME
51. "__ sure you're aware …" AS I’M
52. One of Edison's 1,000-plus PATENT
53. Put in the crosshairs TAKE AIM
55. Quaint "Not so" ‘TISN’T
56. B.J. or Justin of baseball UPTON
57. Commandment verb SHALT
58. Mozart's "__ fan tutte" COSI
59. Seraglio room ODA
60. J.Lo, for one LATINA
61. Mezzo Marilyn HORNE
62. Racing great Bobby UNSER
63. Stars at the Forum? ASTRA
67. Official emblem SEAL
69. Aweigh ATRIP
70. US Open champ between John and Mats IVAN
71. Grant-providing gp. NEA
74. '60s defense secretary MCNAMARA
75. Chain with stacks IHOP
77. Coddled kitty, e.g. PURRER
78. Crossword-solving Simpson LISA
81. At a Lakers home game, e.g. IN LA
82. Place STEAD
83. '90s U.N. secretary-general Boutros-__ GHALI
84. River past Berne AAR
87. Start of a rhyming Basque game JAI
88. Finished ALL DONE
89. Element's combining power VALENCE
90. 2011 Liam Neeson film involving a wolf pack THE GREY
91. Fjord-like inlet RIA
92. Pink Floyd album including "Dogs" and "Sheep" ANIMALS
93. Abdominal VENTRAL
94. Mad-as-all-get-out state IRE
95. Tapped-out letters SOS
98. Gets away from ELUDES
99. Boozer's affliction DTS
104. Stampede rope RIATA
105. Casing outing, briefly RECON
107. Physics bits ATOMS
108. Spring LEAP
110. Pop singer Lambert ADAM
113. Kept under wraps HID
114. Crushable container CAN
115. Native Nebraskan OTO
117. Search, with "down" PAT
118. Scratch (out) EKE
119. Sleep lab acronym REM
120. TV chef Garten INA
121. Cause of Cleo's demise ASP


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LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Mar 13, Saturday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Barry C. Silk
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 14m 30s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Its goal is to include "all words in all languages" WIKTIONARY
Wiktionary is a sister project to Wikipedia. Wiktionary even includes a section called Wikisaurus.

11. Walker of the 1960s 76ers CHET
Chet Walker is a former basketball player who played with the Syracuse Nationals (which team became the Philadelphia 76ers) and the Chicago Bulls.

16. Bar mitzvah staple HORA
The hora (also "horah") is a circle dance that originated in the Balkans. The hora was brought to Israel by Romanian settlers, and is often performed to traditional Israeli folk songs. The dance is a regular sight at Jewish weddings and at bar and bat mitzvahs. At such events, it is common for the honorees to be raised on chairs during the dance.

18. Without restraint AMOK
The phrase "to run amok" (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for "attacking furiously", "amuk". The word "amok" was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were "frenzied". Given Malaya's troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy ...

19. The Panthers of the Big East PITT
The University of Pittsburgh chose its nickname for its sporting teams in 1909, and claims that it was the first team in the country to adopt the name "Panthers".

20. Bond first bought by FDR in 1941 SERIES E
Series E Savings Bonds were introduced in 1941, just before the start of WWII, as ‘defense bonds”. After the attack on Pearl Harbor they became known as “war bonds”.

22. Heavenly approach? STAIRWAY
Led Zeppelin was an English rock band that got together in 1968. The band's most famous release has to be the classic "Stairway to Heaven". Led Zeppelin broke up right after drummer John Bonham was found dead in 1988.

27. Open living rooms LANAIS
Named after the Hawaiian island, a lanai is a type of veranda.

28. Schools overseas ECOLES
French for school is “école”.

30. Spartan toiler HELOT
The helots were a population of poorly-treated slaves who served the citizens of Sparta.

31. Ambergris source SPERM WHALE
The massive sperm whale takes its name from “spermaceti”, a waxy liquid that is found in its digestive system. The liquid was originally mistaken for the whale’s sperm, hence the name.

37. Birds with colorful mates PEAHENS
The female peafowl, the peahen, has very dull plumage compared to the extravagant display on the tail of the peacock. The young of a peacock and peahen is known as a peachick (there's a surprise!).

40. Tim of "WKRP in Cincinnati" REID
Tim Reid played the character Venus Flytrap on the sitcom “WKRP in Cincinnati”, one of the disc jockeys at the station.

The sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati" was produced by MTM, the production company established by Mary Tyler Moore and her husband for the "The Mary Tyler Moore Show". "WKRP" was a successful enough show when it originally aired, but then became a blockbuster in syndication. It became MTM's most-watched program, even outstripping the original "The Mary Tyler Moore Show".

42. Relatives of penny dreadfuls DIME NOVELS
The genre of literature called “dime novels” originated with books from the 1860s called the “Beadle’s Dime Novel” series. Some of those books cost a dime, but many went for 15 cents.

“Penny dreadfuls” originally were cheap works of fiction published in the 1800s in Britain. The books’ price-points were originally a penny, which compared to the shilling that was charged for more mainstream works. Just like America’s dime novels, “penny dreadful” came to be a generic term for trash literature.

44. Dramatist Chekhov ANTON
Anton Chekhov was a Russian writer of short stories and a playwright, as well as a physician. Chekhov wrote four classic plays that are often performed all around the world, namely “The Seagull”, “Uncle Vanya”, “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard”. While Chekhov was advancing his writing career, he continued to practice medicine. He is quoted as saying “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”

47. Ancient Mexican TOLTEC
The Aztec's viewed the Toltec people as their cultural ancestors. In the "Aztec" language, the term "Toltec" came to mean "artisan".

49. Fertile Crescent area NEAR EAST
The Fertile Crescent is a large swath of land in the Near East that includes the Nile Valley in the west and the land around the Tigris and Euphrates in the east.

53. Musical name that means "Love God" AMADEUS
The composer Mozart’s full name was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The name “Wolfgang” translates literally as “wolf journey”. Amadeus translates as “Love God!”.

56. Actress Rowlands GENA
Gena Rowlands is an actress best known for the films made with her husband, actor and director John Cassavetes. More recently, Rowlands played a lead role opposite James Garner in the weepy, weepy 2004 film “The Notebook”. “The Notebook” was directed by her son, Nick Cassavetes.

57. Instigator of '70s-'80s wars BURGER KING
The “Burger Wars” consisted of a series of comparative advertising campaigns engaged in by McDonalds, Burger King, Wendy’s and other fast food chains in the 1970s and 1980s. One of the more famous slogans to come out of the Burger Wars was “Where’s the beef?”, a question raised by Wendy’s.

62. Hydrocarbon endings -ENES
An alkene is an organic compound made up of carbon and hydrogen atoms. It differs from an alkane in that it has at least one C=C double bond. The simplest alkene is the gas ethylene, a major raw material used in the manufacture of plastics (like polyethylene).

63. Sign of a bad waiter IMPATIENCE
Someone impatient just won’t wait.

64. British side MASH
I guess “mash” is a term mainly used in Britain for mashed potatoes. I didn’t know that we didn’t used the same term over here in North America …

Down
1. They may be found in board examinations WARPS
Examination of a wooden board might reveal warps.

3. Kinte in "Roots" KUNTA
Not only did Alex Haley author the magnificent novel "Roots", but he was also the collaborator with Malcolm X on "The Autobiography of Malcolm X". His 1976 novel "Roots" is based on Haley's own family history, and he claimed to be a direct descendant of the real life Kunta Kinte, the slave who was kidnapped in the The Gambia in 1767. If you remember the fabulous television adaptation of "Roots", you might recall that Kunta Kinte was played by LeVar Burton, who later went on to play another famous role, Geordi La Forge on "Star Trek: the Next Generation".

5. E-file org. IRS
E-file: that's what I do with my tax returns each year. I saved myself a fortune by saying a polite "goodbye" to my tax accountant 5-6 years ago and trusting Turbotax instead.

6. Nasdaq predecessor OTC
The computerized stock trading system known as the NASDAQ was created in 1971 by the National Association of Securities Dealers. NASDAQ stands for National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations. NASDAQ was the successor to the over-the-counter (OTC) trading system that was common at the time. OTC trading is done directly between two parties without being facilitated by an exchange.

7. PBS benefactor NEA
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an agency funded by the federal government that offers support and financing for artistic projects. The NEA was created by an Act of Congress in 1965. Between 1965 and 2008, the NEA awarded over $4 billion to the arts, with Congress authorizing around $170 million annually through the eighties and much of the nineties. That funding was cut to less than $100 million in the late nineties due to pressure from conservatives concerned about the use of funds, but it is now back over the $150 million mark. I wonder how long that will last though ...

The Public Broadcasting System (PBS) was founded in 1970, and is my favorite of the broadcast networks. I love PBS's drama and science shows in particular, and always watch the election results coming in with the NewsHour team. PBS’s Big Bird from “Sesame Street” made a bit of a splash in the last election cycle …

8. LAX datum ARR
Los Angeles International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and the busiest here on the West Coast of the US. The airport was opened in 1930 as Mines Field and was renamed to Los Angeles Airport in 1941. On the airport property is the iconic white structure that resembles a flying saucer. This is called the Theme Building and I believe it is mainly used as a restaurant and observation deck for the public. The airport used to be identified by the letters “LA”, but when the aviation industry went to a three-letter standard for airport identification, this was changed to “LAX”. Apparently the “X” has no significant meaning.

9. They usually involve turns: Abbr. RTES
Route (rte.).

12. Film in which Marv says, "He's only a kid, Harry. We can take him." HOME ALONE
“Home Alone” is a 1990 film starring Macaulay Culkin that has become a Christmas classic. Culkin was nominated for a Best Actor Golden Globe for his performance, the youngest actor ever to be so honored.

23. Ottawa-based enforcement gp. RCMP
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the Mounties; RCMP) is an unusual police force in that it provides all policing for the whole country. The RCMP works on the national level, and right down to the municipal level. The force's distinctive uniform of red serge tunic, blue pants with a yellow stripe, stetson hat etc. is known internally as "Review Order". The red uniform dates back to the days of the North-West Mounted Police, which was one of the existing forces that were merged in 1920 to form the RCMP.

25. Ron Reagan's first secretary of state AL HAIG
Alexander Haig was Secretary of State under President Reagan, and White House Chief of Staff under Presidents Nixon and Ford.

34. Octa- plus one ENNEA-
Ennead is the Greek word for "the nine".

38. Liszt's "Harmonies du __" SOIR
Franz Liszt was a Hungarian composer and a fabulous pianist. Particularly towards the end of his life, Liszt gained a tremendous reputation as a teacher. While he was in his sixties, his teaching jobs caused him to commute regularly between the cities of Rome, Weimar and Budapest. It is quite remarkable that a man of such advanced age, and in the 1870s, could do so much annual travel. It is estimated that Liszt journeyed at least 4,000 miles every year!

41. A, to Morse DOT DASH
Samuel Morse was a very accomplished and reputable painter (he was engaged to paint a portrait of President John Adams, for example). In 1825 Morse was in Washington working on a commissioned painting when he received a one-line letter by horse messenger telling him that his wife was ill. He left immediately for his home in New Haven, Connecticut but by the time that Morse arrived his wife had already died and had been buried. This single event spurred him to move from painting to the development of a rapid means of long distance communication, leading to the single-wire telegraph and Morse code.

50. Dress with a flare A-LINE
An A-line skirt is one that fits snugly at the hips and flares toward the hem.

52. Clemson player TIGER
Clemson University was founded in 1889. The school takes its name from the town in which it is located: Clemson, South Carolina. The athletic teams of Clemson University have been called the Tigers since 1896 when a new football coach, Walter Riggs, arrived from Auburn University. Riggs was an admirer of the Princeton Tigers, so he gave his new school the tiger mascot.

54. Sport for heavyweights SUMO
Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in Japan, the country of its origin. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of the organization's aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

58. Dash letters RPM
Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a "board" placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from "dashing" against the passengers in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hoofs of the horses. Quite interesting ...

59. Pinup highlight GAM
The American slang term "gams" is used for a woman's legs, but the term goes back to the 18th century "gamb" meaning the leg of an animal on a coat of arms.

60. Frat vowel ETA
Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character "H".

61. Film dog's first name? RIN
The original Rin Tin Tin was an actual dog, a puppy discovered by a GI in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI. The soldier named the pup Rin Tin Tin, the same name as a puppet given to American soldiers for luck. On returning to the US, "Rinty" was trained by his owner and was spotted doing tricks by a film producer. Rinty featured in some films, eventually getting his first starring role in 1923 in the silent movie "Where the North Begins". Legend has it that this first Rin Tin Tin died in the arms of actress Jean Harlow. Not a bad way to go ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Its goal is to include "all words in all languages" WIKTIONARY
11. Walker of the 1960s 76ers CHET
15. Approaching the hour A QUARTER TO
16. Bar mitzvah staple HORA
17. Retreats RUNS SCARED
18. Without restraint AMOK
19. The Panthers of the Big East PITT
20. Bond first bought by FDR in 1941 SERIES E
22. Heavenly approach? STAIRWAY
27. Open living rooms LANAIS
28. Schools overseas ECOLES
30. Spartan toiler HELOT
31. Ambergris source SPERM WHALE
35. Wiped out, with "in" DONE
36. Texting nicety THX
37. Birds with colorful mates PEAHENS
39. Little break NAP
40. Tim of "WKRP in Cincinnati" REID
42. Relatives of penny dreadfuls DIME NOVELS
44. Dramatist Chekhov ANTON
46. Caved GAVE IN
47. Ancient Mexican TOLTEC
49. Fertile Crescent area NEAR EAST
53. Musical name that means "Love God" AMADEUS
55. Mid-second-century date CLII
56. Actress Rowlands GENA
57. Instigator of '70s-'80s wars BURGER KING
62. Hydrocarbon endings -ENES
63. Sign of a bad waiter IMPATIENCE
64. British side MASH
65. Take over COMMANDEER

Down
1. They may be found in board examinations WARPS
2. Resigning words I QUIT
3. Kinte in "Roots" KUNTA
4. More palatable TASTIER
5. E-file org. IRS
6. Nasdaq predecessor OTC
7. PBS benefactor NEA
8. LAX datum ARR
9. They usually involve turns: Abbr. RTES
10. Singing cowboy's refrain YODEL
11. Bound, in a way CHAINED
12. Film in which Marv says, "He's only a kid, Harry. We can take him." HOME ALONE
13. Caused by weathering EROSIONAL
14. Act TAKE STEPS
21. Fan sound RAH
23. Ottawa-based enforcement gp. RCMP
24. Amazed WOWED
25. Ron Reagan's first secretary of state AL HAIG
26. Cat's assent YEAH, MAN
29. Record holder SLEEVE
31. Gambit STRATAGEM
32. Events PHENOMENA
33. Turnoffs EXIT LANES
34. Octa- plus one ENNEA-
38. Liszt's "Harmonies du __" SOIR
41. A, to Morse DOT DASH
43. Unlike crews V-NECKED
45. Formerly NEE
48. __ yard CUBIC
50. Dress with a flare A-LINE
51. Subsequently SINCE
52. Clemson player TIGER
54. Sport for heavyweights SUMO
58. Dash letters RPM
59. Pinup highlight GAM
60. Frat vowel ETA
61. Film dog's first name? RIN


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LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Mar 13, Friday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Jack McInturff
THEME: Hoops for Troops … today’s themed answers are well known phrases with a TR combo swapped for an H, which is how you also arrive at HOOP from TROOP:
16A. Hide cyberspace crimes? COVER ONE’S HACKS (from “cover one’s tracks”)
27A. Amsterdam cops? DUTCH HEAT (from “Dutch treat”)
35A. Objects of poolside ogling? SWIMMING HUNKS (from “swimming trunks”)
47A. Hayseed that doesn't tip? CHEAP HICK (from “cheap trick”)
57A. NBA military appreciation initiative, and a hint to this puzzle's theme HOOPS FOR TROOPS
COMPLETION TIME: 17m 07s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Beginning to bat? ACRO-
Our prefix "acro-" comes from the Greek "akros" meaning "at the top". Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

5. Styptic stuff ALUM
Alum is common name for the chemical potassium aluminium sulfate. Styptic pencils can contain alum as the active ingredient that stems bleeding from a small cut. The alum acts as an astringent, a compound that shrinks some body tissues.

13. Cleaver kid BEAV
Ward Cleaver and his wife June were the parents of Wally Cleaver and his younger brother "The Beaver", for whom the fifties sitcom "Leave It to Beaver" was named. Ward Cleaver was played by Hugh Beaumont.

14. Collaborative website WIKI
A wiki is a website in which users are allowed to create and edit content themselves. The term “wiki” comes from the name of the first such site, introduced in 1994 and called WikiWikiWeb. “Wiki” is a Hawaiian word for “quick”, and is used because comprehensive content is created very quickly a there are so many collaborators contributing to the site.

15. Actress Anderson LONI
Loni Anderson's most remembered role was Jennifer Marlowe on the sitcom "WKRP in Cincinnati". Anderson has been married four times, most famously to actor Burt Reynolds from 1988 to 1993.

19. Macbeth or Hamlet ROLE
There is a superstition in the theatrical world that uttering the name “Macbeth” in a theater will bring disaster of some sort. To avoid this, the euphemism “the Scottish Play” is used instead.

“Hamlet” is William Shakespeare’s longest play, and was also one of most popular of the playwright's works during his lifetime.

22. "Where __": 1996 Beck hit IT’S AT
Beck is the stage name of Bek David Campbell, an American alternative rock musician.

25. Mr. __: Dr Pepper rival PIBB
The soft drink on the market today called Pibb Xtra used to be known as Mr Pibb, and before that was called Peppo. Peppo was introduced in 1972 as a direct competitor to Dr Pepper.

30. "Barnaby Jones" star EBSEN
The actor Buddy Ebsen is best known for playing Jed Clampett in television’s “The Beverly Hillbillies”. Ebsen had been cast in the role of the Tin Man in the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”, but he developed an allergy to the aluminium dust that was used in the makeup. He ended up in hospital and had to walk away from the part. Ebsen blamed “The Wizard of Oz” on persistent problems that he had with his lungs in subsequent years. But Ebsen lived 16 years longer that any of the other major cast members of the film, so maybe he got the last laugh!

Barnaby Jones is a character on the detective show from the seventies called “Canon”. The Jones character was played by Buddy Ebsen. Ebsen then starred in the title role of the spinoff show called “Barnaby Jones”.

32. Editor's mark STET
"Stet" is the Latin word meaning "let it stand". In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word "stet" and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

33. Strong-legged bird EMU
The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an "Emu War" in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the "invading force". The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of "war", the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

34. Pendleton Act pres. CAA
Chester Arthur was the 21st President of the US, and came to power after the assassination of James Garfield in 1881. President Arthur was known to be socially adept, and was very conscious of his role in society. He was always immaculately attired, apparently even changing his pants several times in a day. He was called "Chet" by family and friends, and sometimes answered to his middle name, Alan. However, he insisted that Alan be pronounced with the stress on the second syllable, Al-an.

40. Writer Marilyn __ Savant VOS
Marilyn vos Savant is a writer from St. Louis, Missouri. vos Savant first came into the limelight not for her writing, but for her IQ. She was listed in the “Guinness Book of World Records” in 1985 as having the highest IQ for a female, with a score of 190.

41. Chambéry shout CRI
“Cri” is the French for “shout”.

Chambéry is a city in southeastern France. The most landmark in town is the “Elephants Fountain”, an elaborate structure built in 1838 that includes four elephants squirting water from their trunks.

44. Parting word ADIEU
"Adieu" is the French for "goodbye" or "farewell", from "à Dieu" meaning "to God".

47. Hayseed that doesn't tip? CHEAP HICK (from “cheap trick”)
"Hayseed" is a slang term for a country bumpkin, a yokel. Not very flattering terms, I’d say ...

49. Push for payment DUN
"To dun" is to insist on payment of a debt.

52. Málaga-to-Cádiz dirección OESTE
“Oeste” (west) is a “dirección” (direction), in Spanish.

The city of Malaga is on the Costa del Sol in the South of Spain, as are the famous European tourist destinations of Torremolinos and Marbella. The Costa del Sol was made up of sleepy little fishing villages until the 1980s when the European sunseekers descended on the region. I wouldn't recommend it for a holiday quite frankly ...

Cádiz is a port city in southwestern Spain, in the autonomous community of Andalusia. Cádiz is a remarkable city geographically, in that it sits on a thin spit of land that juts out into the sea.

53. Like the L.A. Times Building ART DECO
The headquarters of the “Los Angeles Times” newspaper is located in an art deco building that was opened in 1935.

57. NBA military appreciation initiative, and a hint to this puzzle's theme HOOPS FOR TROOPS
“Hoops for Troops” is an NBA-led initiative focused on honoring serving and retired military personnel, especially around Veterans Day weekend.

62. Broadway governess ANNA
“The King and I” is a Rodgers and Hammerstein musical based on a book by Margaret Landon called “Anna and the King of Siam” first published in 1944. Landon’s book is based on a true story, told in the memoirs of Anna Leonowens. Leonowens was the governess of the children of King Mongkut of Siam in the 1860s, and she also taught the king’s wives.

63. The Supremes or Cream TRIO
The Supremes were the most successful vocal group in US history, based on number one hits. The group started out in 1959 as a four-member lineup called the Primettes. The name was changed to the Supremes in 1961. One member dropped out in 1962, leaving the Supremes as a trio. Lead singer Diana Ross began to garner much of the attention, which eventually led to a further name change, to Diana Ross & the Supremes.

Cream were a "supergroup" from Britain, meaning the band was comprised of musicians from other successful groups. Band members included Eric Clapton and Ginger Baker.

65. Honey drink MEAD
Mead is a lovely drink, made from fermented honey and water.

Down
1. "Shark Tank" airer ABC
“Shark Tank” is a reality television show that features aspiring entrepreneurs making pitches to potential investors (the “sharks”) as they try to grow their businesses. The show is a Mark Burnett production and is based in a British series called “Dragons’ Den”.

3. __4: Toyota SUV RAV
The Toyota RAV4 is Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV or "ute" for short). The RAV4 name stands for Recreational Active Vehicle with 4-wheel drive. Inventive, huh? The Chevy TrailBlazer was also an SUV, but production was stopped in 2008, caught up in the financial woes of GM a couple of years ago.

5. MP's concern AWOL
The Military Police (MPs) are concerned with personnel who go AWOL (Absent WithOut Leave).

7. Ho's instrument UKE
The ukulele originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

Don Ho apparently had a pretty liberal arrangement with his wife. When Ho was touring with his two backing singers, Pattie Swallie and Elizabeth Gevara, all three of them shared a room together. He had two children with each of his roommates, giving a total of ten kids including the six he had with his wife. The arrangement was quite open, it seems, with all ten kids visiting each other regularly. To each his own …

9. Mardi Gras torch FLAMBEAU
A flambeau is a burning torch, like one carried in a ritual procession. “Flambeau” is the French word for “torch”.

10. Focal points LOCI
“Locus” is Latin for “place”.

12. Offer to one who's been recently blessed? TISSUE
“Bless you! Do you have a cold? Here’s a tissue.”

17. "Goodbye, Columbus" author ROTH
Author Philip Roth's two most famous works are probably his 1959 novella "Goodbye, Columbus" for which he won a National Book Award, and his extremely controversial 1969 novel "Portnoy's Complaint". The latter title was banned in some libraries in the US, and was listed as a "prohibited import" in Australia. The controversy surrounded Roth's treatment of the sexuality of the main character, a young Jewish bachelor undergoing psychoanalysis for his "complaint".

18. Fireside shelf HOB
A “hob” is the cooking surface on a stove, and is a term that originally applied to a shelf at the back or side of a fireplace that was used for keeping food warm.

29. Brit. recording heavyweight EMI
EMI is a British music company, with the acronym originally standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

34. Hairy "pet" CHIA
Chia is a flowering plant in the mint family, and the Chia Pet is an invention of a San Francisco company. Chia Pets are terracotta figurines to which are applied moistened chia seeds. The seeds sprout and the seedlings become the "fur" of the Chia Pet.

36. Clicking site MOUSEPAD
Macintosh (also “Mac”) is a line of computers from Apple Inc. The first Mac was introduced in 1984, and I remember someone showing me one at work in those early days of personal computing. There was a piece of white plastic connected to the main computer by a cord, and I was amazed when the guy showed me that it controlled where the cursor was on the screen. My colleague told me that the lump of plastic was called "a mouse" ...

37. Ph.D. seeker's exam GRE
Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

38. Brooklyn Nets forward Humphries KRIS
Kris Humphries is a basketball player with the Brooklyn Nets. Humphries was married for a short time to TV personality Kim Kardashian in 2011/2012.

43. Barely earn, with "out" EKE
To "eke out" means to "make something go further or last longer". For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses. I always have a problem with the commonly cited definition of “eke out” as “barely get by”. Close but no cigar, I say ...

44. Oklahoma city ADA
Back in 1889, Jeff Reed was hired to carry the mail between the two communities of Stonewall and Center in what was then called the Indian Territory. Reed had moved to the area from Texas and he bought some land in between the two limits of his mail route and built himself a log cabin. Pretty soon other settlers built homes nearby and in 1891 the settlement got its own post office. As postman, Reed got to name the new post office and he called it Ada, after his oldest daughter. Ada is now a county seat and has over 17,000 residents. One of the sons of the city of Ada was the televangelist Oral Roberts.

45. Duke's home DURHAM
Duke University was founded in 1838 as Brown’s Schoolhouse. The school was renamed to Trinity College in 1859, and to this day the town where the college was located back then is known as Trinity, in honor of the school. The school was moved in 1892 to Durham, North Carolina in part due to generous donations from the wealthy tobacco industrialist Washington Duke. Duke’s donation required that the school open its doors to women, placing them on an equal footing with men. Trinity’s name was changed to Duke in 1924 in recognition of the generosity of the Duke family.

47. Seals's partner CROFTS
Seals and Crofts was a soft rock duo made up of Jim Seals and Dash Crofts, two musicians from Texas. Seals and Crofts were most active in the 1970s.

54. Spanish address DONA
In Spain, a title of respect for men is “Don”. The equivalent female title is “Dona”.

55. Creamy spread BRIE
Brie is a soft cheese, named after the French province of Brie where it originated.

56. Early Nebraskans OTOS
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

60. Class-conscious org.? PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Beginning to bat? ACRO-
5. Styptic stuff ALUM
9. Leapfrog FLIT
13. Cleaver kid BEAV
14. Collaborative website WIKI
15. Actress Anderson LONI
16. Hide cyberspace crimes? COVER ONE’S HACKS (from “cover one’s tracks”)
19. Macbeth or Hamlet ROLE
20. Most cozy HOMIEST
22. "Where __": 1996 Beck hit IT’S AT
25. Mr. __: Dr Pepper rival PIBB
26. Bemoan RUE
27. Amsterdam cops? DUTCH HEAT (from “Dutch treat”)
30. "Barnaby Jones" star EBSEN
32. Editor's mark STET
33. Strong-legged bird EMU
34. Pendleton Act pres. CAA
35. Objects of poolside ogling? SWIMMING HUNKS (from “swimming trunks”)
40. Writer Marilyn __ Savant VOS
41. Chambéry shout CRI
42. Olive, for one TREE
44. Parting word ADIEU
47. Hayseed that doesn't tip? CHEAP HICK (from “cheap trick”)
49. Push for payment DUN
50. Peppy SPRY
52. Málaga-to-Cádiz dirección OESTE
53. Like the L.A. Times Building ART DECO
55. Nitwit BOOB
57. NBA military appreciation initiative, and a hint to this puzzle's theme HOOPS FOR TROOPS
62. Broadway governess ANNA
63. The Supremes or Cream TRIO
64. Remote button MUTE
65. Honey drink MEAD
66. Realizes SEES
67. Victim of spoilage? BRAT

Down
1. "Shark Tank" airer ABC
2. Corp. leader CEO
3. __4: Toyota SUV RAV
4. Like some imaginations OVERACTIVE
5. MP's concern AWOL
6. Pickup initiator LINE
7. Ho's instrument UKE
8. Cause of a big slice MISHIT
9. Mardi Gras torch FLAMBEAU
10. Focal points LOCI
11. Cartoonists, at times INKERS
12. Offer to one who's been recently blessed? TISSUE
17. "Goodbye, Columbus" author ROTH
18. Fireside shelf HOB
21. Common base TEN
22. Points a finger at IDS
23. Sounds of disdain TUTS
24. Difficult spot STEW
25. Potbellied PAUNCHY
28. Clothes lines HEMS
29. Brit. recording heavyweight EMI
31. Peace rally slogan BAN THE BOMB
34. Hairy "pet" CHIA
36. Clicking site MOUSEPAD
37. Ph.D. seeker's exam GRE
38. Brooklyn Nets forward Humphries KRIS
39. Dissenting group SECT
43. Barely earn, with "out" EKE
44. Oklahoma city ADA
45. Duke's home DURHAM
46. Chant INTONE
47. Seals's partner CROFTS
48. In need POOR
51. Mac alternatives PCS
54. Spanish address DONA
55. Creamy spread BRIE
56. Early Nebraskans OTOS
58. Pay dirt ORE
59. Word of sharing OUR
60. Class-conscious org.? PTA
61. Prepared SET


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LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Mar 13, Thusday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Hyson & Victor Barocas
THEME: Float with This … each of today’s themed answers are things associated with a FLOAT:
20A. New Year's Day staple, familiarly ROSE BOWL PARADE
32A. Place to learn to crawl? SWIM CLASS
43A. It has a handle and flies TACKLE BOX
56A. Place to split a split ICE CREAM PARLOR

68A. What one might see in a 20-, 32-, 43- or 56-Across FLOAT
COMPLETION TIME: 14m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
6. 1979 exile SHAH
The last Shah of Iran was Mohammed-Reza Shah Pahlavi, as he was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

10. "Collective unconscious" coiner JUNG
Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist. Jung was very much associated with the analysis of dreams.

15. Big Island port HILO
Hilo is the largest settlement on the big island of Hawai’i, with a population of over 43,000 (that’s not very many!). I love the Big Island …

17. President who appointed Sotomayor to the Supreme Court OBAMA
In a 2001 speech addressing the need for stronger representation of the Hispanic community in the judiciary, Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor made the remark:
I would hope that a wise Latina woman, with the richness of her experiences, would more often than not reach a better conclusion than a white male who hasn't lived that life.
That line raised a few eyebrows, and was a topic of some discussion during her confirmation hearing. Discuss ...

19. Beatles movie HELP!
“Help!” is a 1965 movie, the second film released by the Beatles. Personally, I prefered teh Beatles' first movie, “A Hard Day’s Night” …

20. New Year's Day staple, familiarly ROSE BOWL PARADE
The Rose Bowl is the oldest of all the bowl games and so has the nickname “The Granddaddy of the Them All”. The first Rose Bowl game was played in 1902.

24. Bias-__ tire PLY
A bias-ply tire is also known as a “cross ply”.

25. Mil. roadside hazard IED
Sadly, having spent much of my life in the border areas between southern and Northern Ireland, I am all too familiar with the devastating effects of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). No matter what one's politics, one has to admire the bravery of soldiers who spend their careers defusing (or attempting to defuse) such devices in order to save the lives and property of others. Of course these days, IEDs are very much in the news in Iraq and Afghanistan.

26. Highest of MLB's "minors" AAA
A, AA and AAA are minor leagues in baseball.

29. Animation unit CEL
In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the "cel" its name.

37. "Harold and Maude" director Hal ASHBY
Hal Ashby was a movie director from Ogden, Utah. Ashby’s most famous films are from the seventies: “Harold and Maude” and “Shampoo”.

"Harold and Maude" is a somewhat dark comedy film released in 1971. I found the storyline to be quite bizarre when I saw it many years ago, with a death-obsessed young man taken to driving a hearse as his private vehicle. The young man makes friends with a 79-year-old woman who, like him, is in the habit of attending the funerals of people she never knew. It's not my cup of tea, quite frankly ...

39. Aptly named 22-Down LE CAR
French automaker Renault made the "mini-like" Renault 5 and sold it as the Renault "Le Car" in North America. My Dad had a Renault 5 back in Ireland ...

40. Band since 1980 that disbanded in 2011 REM
R.E.M. was a rock band from Athens, Georgia formed in 1980. The name “R.E.M.” was chosen randomly from a dictionary, apparently.

42. "The Wizard of Oz" device IRONY
The movie “The Wizard of Oz” is full of irony. The Scarecrow wants to be intelligent and discovers he is already very smart. The Tin Man wants to be able to love and finds out that he already has a heart. The Lion thinks he is a coward but turns out to be fearless. And the big reveal is that the Wizard of Oz, who is positioned as all-powerful, is actually just a bumbling and eccentric old man.

45. Comaneci score TEN
Nadia Comaneci won three golds in the 1976 Summer Olympics and was the first gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of a ten in the gymnastics competition. Comaneci published a book called "Letters to a Young Gymnast" in 2003, and now lives in the United States.

46. "Now I __ me ..." LAY
One of the prayers that I was taught as a child goes:
Now I lay me down to sleep,
I pray the Lord my soul to keep,
If I shall die before I wake,
I pray the Lord my soul to take.

49. 90210, e.g. ZIP
ZIP codes were introduced in 1963. The acronym ZIP stands for Zone Improvement Plan, a name indicating that mail travels more efficiently when the codes are included in the postal address.

61. Ricelike pasta ORZO
Orzo is pasta that has been formed into granular shapes, much like barley. And indeed, "orzo" is the Italian word for "barley".

65. Lena and others OLINS
The lovely Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, clearly someone who had acting in her blood. Her mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin's breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" released in 1988. Way back in 1974, the lovely Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland.

66. Surfers' guides FAQS
Most websites have a page listing answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). There is a link to the LAXCrossword's blog’s FAQs at the top right of every page.

67. __ qua non SINE
"Sine qua non" is a Latin phrase that we use to mean "the essential element or condition". The literal translation is "without which not". One might say, for example, "a challenging crossword is the sine qua non of a good newspaper". Well, crossword fans might say that anyway ...

Down
2. NOLA sandwich PO’ BOY
A po' boy is a submarine sandwich from Louisiana. There are a lot of theories about where the name came from, and none sound too convincing to me. A po' boy differs from a regular submarine sandwich in that it uses Louisiana French bread, which is soft in the middle and crusty on the outside.

7. Like links golf courses HILLY
The oldest type of golf course is a links course. The name “links” comes from the Old English word “hlinc” meaning “rising ground”. "Hlinc" was used to describe areas with coastal sand dunes or open parkland. As a result, we use the term “links course” to mean a golf course that is located at or on the coast, often amid sand dunes. The British Open is always played on a links course.

8. Crooked ALOP
I had to go to one of my two huge volumes of the OED to find the definition of "alop". It means "lop-sided". A lovely word, I think, but it's amazing that it seems to have avoided the Internet!

9. Bloviator's talk HOT AIR
“To bloviate” is such a descriptive term, meaning to discourse pompously. “Bloviate” is mock-Latin and derived from “blow”.

10. Muslim holy war JIHAD
In the Islamic tradition “jihad” is a duty, either an inner spiritual struggle to fulfill religious obligations or an outward physical struggle to defend the faith. Someone engaged in jihad is called a “mujahid” with the plural being “mujahideen”.

12. "Aida" backdrop NILE
"Aida" is the famous opera by Giuseppe Verdi, actually based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette, who also designed the costumes and stages for the opening performance. The opera was first performed in 1871 in an opera house in Cairo. In the storyline, Aida is an Ethiopian princess brought into Egypt as a slave. Radames is an Egyptian commander who falls in love with her, and then of course complications arise!

13. Macroeconomics fig. GNP
A country’s Gross National Product (GNP) is the value of all services and products produced by its residents in a particular year. GNP includes all production wherever it is in the world, as long as the business is owned by residents of the country concerned. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is different, and is the value of all services and goods produced within the borders of the country for that year.

21. Gem for a Scorpio, perhaps OPAL
Here is the "official" list of birthstones by month, that we tend to use today:
January: Garnet
February: Amethyst
March: Bloodstone or Aquamarine
April: Diamond
May: Emerald
June: Pearl or Moonstone
July: Ruby
August: Sardonyx or Peridot
September: Sapphire or Lapis Lazuli
October: Opal or Pink Tourmaline
November: Topaz or Citrine
December: Turquoise or Zircon (also now, Tanzanite)

22. 39-Across automaker RENAULT
Renault is a French automaker that was founded in 1899 by Louis Renault and his brothers. I’ve seen relatively few Renault cars here in North America, but have driven them many times in Europe, which is the company’s core market.

28. "Semper Fi" org. USMC
"Semper Fidelis" is the motto of the United States Marine Corps. The phrase is Latin and means "Always Faithful". The US Marine Corps isn't the only military unit using "Semper Fidelis" as a motto . It's also used by the Portuguese Marine Corps, the Republic of China Marine Corps and the Swiss Grenadiers.

29. Carp family fish CHUB
There is a whole family of fish called "chubs" including European chubs, lake chubs, hornyhead chub, creek chubs, and a host of others.

30. Spanish Civil War battle site EBRO
The Ebro is the longest river in Spain. The river was known by the Romans as the Iber, and it is the "Iber" river that gives the "Iberian" Peninsula its name.

31. Snowshoe hare hunter LYNX
A lynx is a wild cat, of which there are four species. These are:
- The Eurasian Lynx: the biggest of the four species.
- The Canada Lynx: well-adapted to life in cold environments.
- The Iberian Lynx: a native of the Iberian Peninsula in Southern Europe, and the most endangered cat species in the world.
- The Bobcat: our North American wildcat, the smallest of the four species.

36. "Wide Sargasso __": Jean Rhys novel SEA
"Wide Sargasso Sea" was written by Jean Rhys and first published in 1966. It's a clever work, written as a sort of prequel to Charlotte Bronte's famous "Jane Eyre", which dates back to 1847.

The Sargasso Sea is an area within the Atlantic Ocean that is famous as the home to many species of Sargassum, the algae floating on the surface that gives the area its name. The Sargasso Sea is also where both European and American species of eel lay their eggs and hatch their young. The young eels (or "elvers") then head east or west, depending on the species.

50. Certain strip native GAZAN
After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the boundaries of the strip of land on the Mediterranean around Gaza were fixed in the Israel-Egypt Armistice Agreement. The boundaries were specifically defined but were not to be recognized as an international border. From 1948, the Gaza Strip was occupied and administered by Egypt, until 1967 when Israel took over occupation following the Six-Day War. In 1993, Israel and the PLO signed the Oslo Accords which handed over administration to the Palestinian Authority, but with Israel retaining control of the Gaza Strip's airspace, some land borders and its territorial waters. The intent was to further this agreement, but discussions between the parties broke down. Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005.

53. California town whose name means "the river" EL RIO
El Rio is a town in Ventura County, California. The town was founded as New Jerusalem in 1975, then became Jerusalem, Elrio and finally El Rio in 1905.

54. Doone who turned out to be Lady Dugal's daughter LORNA
The novel “Lorna Doone” was written by Richard Doddridge Blackmore. R. D. Blackmore was an English novelist, very celebrated and in demand in his day (the late 1800s). His romantic story "Lorna Doone" was by no means a personal favorite of his, and yet it is the only one of his works still in print.

55. Secret rendezvous TRYST
In its most general sense, a tryst is a meeting at an agreed time and place. More usually we consider a tryst to be a prearranged meeting between lovers. The term comes from the Old French “triste”, a waiting place designated when hunting.

56. Furniture store that also sells Swedish meatballs IKEA
Did you know that IKEA was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943 when he was just 17-years-old??!! IKEA is an acronym that stands for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don't forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

57. Quatre et un CINQ
In French, four and one (quatre et un) is five (five).

58. "... __ saw Elba" ERE I
The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:
- Able was I ere I saw Elba
- A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
- Madam, I'm Adam
One of my favorite words is "Aibohphobia", although it doesn't appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. "Aibohphobia" is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix "-phobia".

60. No. at the beach SPF
In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun ...

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Short glasses? SPECS
6. 1979 exile SHAH
10. "Collective unconscious" coiner JUNG
14. Necklace material CORAL
15. Big Island port HILO
16. "Beauty __ the eye ..." IS IN
17. President who appointed Sotomayor to the Supreme Court OBAMA
18. Loads A LOT
19. Beatles movie HELP!
20. New Year's Day staple, familiarly ROSE BOWL PARADE
23. One making sidelong glances EYER
24. Bias-__ tire PLY
25. Mil. roadside hazard IED
26. Highest of MLB's "minors" AAA
28. Ode relic URN
29. Animation unit CEL
32. Place to learn to crawl? SWIM CLASS
37. "Harold and Maude" director Hal ASHBY
39. Aptly named 22-Down LE CAR
40. Band since 1980 that disbanded in 2011 REM
41. Freeway no-no U-TURN
42. "The Wizard of Oz" device IRONY
43. It has a handle and flies TACKLE BOX
45. Comaneci score TEN
46. "Now I __ me ..." LAY
48. Getting-in approx. ETA
49. 90210, e.g. ZIP
50. Stylist's supply GEL
52. Run in the heat? MELT
56. Place to split a split ICE CREAM PARLOR
60. Goes downhill fast SKIS
61. Ricelike pasta ORZO
62. Worthless SORRY
63. Confined, with "up" PENT
64. "Terrif!" NEAT
65. Lena and others OLINS
66. Surfers' guides FAQS
67. __ qua non SINE
68. What one might see in a 20-, 32-, 43- or 56-Across FLOAT

Down
1. Make a point SCORE
2. NOLA sandwich PO’ BOY
3. Wipe clean ERASE
4. One concerned with composition and angles CAMERAMAN
5. Hunk SLAB
6. Wrapped accessory SHAWL
7. Like links golf courses HILLY
8. Crooked ALOP
9. Bloviator's talk HOT AIR
10. Muslim holy war JIHAD
11. Exploited USED
12. "Aida" backdrop NILE
13. Macroeconomics fig. GNP
21. Gem for a Scorpio, perhaps OPAL
22. 39-Across automaker RENAULT
27. Fake nail material ACRYLIC
28. "Semper Fi" org. USMC
29. Carp family fish CHUB
30. Spanish Civil War battle site EBRO
31. Snowshoe hare hunter LYNX
32. Narrow cut SLIT
33. Are in the past? WERE
34. Emblem ICON
35. Pretentiously showy ARTY
36. "Wide Sargasso __": Jean Rhys novel SEA
38. Overpower STEAMROLL
44. Plant in an underwater forest KELP
47. Golf green borders APRONS
49. Citrus peels ZESTS
50. Certain strip native GAZAN
51. Overact EMOTE
53. California town whose name means "the river" EL RIO
54. Doone who turned out to be Lady Dugal's daughter LORNA
55. Secret rendezvous TRYST
56. Furniture store that also sells Swedish meatballs IKEA
57. Quatre et un CINQ
58. "... __ saw Elba" ERE I
59. Starting from AS OF
60. No. at the beach SPF


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost everyday as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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