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LA Times Crossword Answers 1 Aug 13, Thursday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Wechsler
THEME: Choices … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase that is also a choice:
15A. Choice words for gamblers PUT UP OR SHUT UP
33A. Choice words for super-patriots LOVE IT OR LEAVE IT
55A. Choice words for anglers FISH OR CUT BAIT
23A. Choice words for those out of options DO OR DIE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 29s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … TILAPIA (Tolapia), HIT (hot!!)

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
9. EMS destination HOSP
Emergency Medical Services (EMS) usually head for the hospital (hosp.).

19. Often-farmed fish TILAPIA
The name “tilapia” is used for almost a hundred species of related fish, most of which are found in freshwater. Tilapia are found in many fish farms as they grow very quickly and are popular in restaurants.

23. "Spring ahead" abbr. DST
On the other side of the Atlantic, Daylight Saving Time (DST) is known as "summer time". The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring and backwards in the fall so that afternoons have more daylight.

24. Ones falling in alleys PINS
Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

28. Network offering home improvement advice DIY
The DIY Network is a television channel that focuses on DIY (do-it-yourself) projects. You can learn about anything from rebuilding an engine to scrapbooking on the DIY channel.

29. "__ they've canceled my blood type": Bob Hope I’M SO OLD
I remember my first non-business visit to Los Angeles. I was a typical tourist and bought a map showing the homes of the stars and drove around Beverly Hills absorbing all the glitz. At one point I drove past a Rolls Royce that was stopped in oncoming traffic, waiting to make a left turn. The window was down, and the driver was puffing away on a big cigar. It was none other than Bob Hope. Seeing him there right beside me, that was a big thrill ...

32. Honey in Dijon? AMIE
A male friend in France is "un ami", and a female friend is "une amie".

Dijon is a city in eastern France, in the Burgundy region. Dijon is famous for its mustard, a particularly strong variation of the condiment. The European Union doesn't protect the name "Dijon" so anyone can use it on a label. That seems fair enough to me given that 90% of the mustard made in and around Dijon is produced using mustard seed imported from Canada!

37. Geraint's wife ENID
"Idylls of the King" is a cycle of twelve poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that retells the tale of King Arthur. One of the "idylls" is the story of Geraint and Enid. Tennyson’s Enid gave her name to the city of Enid, Oklahoma.

38. Trattoria preference AL DENTE
The Italian expression "al dente" literally means "to the tooth" or "to the bite" and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender yet still crisp.

A trattoria is an Italian restaurant. In Italian, a “trattore” is the keeper of an eating house.

40. Geraint's title SIR
Geraint was one of King Arthur's knights.

49. Warrior in "Rashomon" SAMURAI
“Rashomon” is a period drama film directed by Akira Kurosawa that was released in 1950. “Rashomon” was the movie that first introduced Kurosawa to western audiences. The film’s title refers to the huge gate to the city of Kyoto.

59. Galápagos denizen TORTOISE
The external shell of a tortoise is actually fused to the creature’s ribcage. Tortoises often have long lives. The oldest recorded age for a tortoise is 188 years.

The Galápagos Islands lie over 500 miles west of Ecuador. The Galápagos owe their celebrity to the voyage of HMS Beagle which landed there in 1835, with Charles Darwin on board. It was Darwin’s study of various species on the islands that inspired him to postulate his Theory of Evolution.

Down
1. NASA space observatory named for a Renaissance astronomer KEPLER
Kepler is a NASA space observatory that was launched in 2009. Kepler’s mission is to identify Earth-like planets that are orbiting stars other than our Sun. Based on the mission’s results to date, scientists suggest that there at least 17 billion Earth-sized exoplanets in the Milky Way.

Johannes Kepler was a German astronomer and mathematician, famous for developing Kepler’s laws of planetary motion. Kepler’s laws are threefold, and describe the motion of the planets around the Sun.

2. Galápagos denizen IGUANA
An iguana is a lizard, and as such is cold-blooded. There are times when pet iguanas need heat from an IR lamp to maintain body temperature.

3. Pointillist's unit DOT
Pointillism is a style of painting that grew out of Impressionism. The pointillist technique calls for the artist to use small, distinct dots of bold color to build up the image. Pointillism was developed in the late 1800s by the great French painter, Georges Seurat. You can go see his magnificent work “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte” at The Art Institute of Chicago the next time you’re in town.

5. Spanish morsel TAPA
"Tapa" is the Spanish for "lid", and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one's glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

7. Douglas __ FIR
Various species of Douglas fir are native to North and Central America, and to Asia. The tree gets its name from the Scottish botanist David Douglas, who introduced the species into Europe.

9. Schlep HAUL
Our word “schlep” means “to carry, drag”. As one might expect, “schlep” comes from Yiddish, with “shlepen” having the same meaning.

12. Charlemagne's father PEPIN III
Pepin the Short (aka Pepin the Younger, Pepin III) was Duke of the Franks from 751 to 768. Pepin expanded the Frankish Empire and then law dictated that he had to leave the Empire divided between his two sons, Carloman I and Charlemagne. Carloman I was given lands that were centered around Paris, and Charlemagne was given lands that completely surrounded his brothers territory. So it fell to Charlemagne to defend and extend the borders of the empire. It is because of this division of power that it's Charlemagne who we read about today, not Carloman I. It was Emperor Charlemagne who in effect founded the Holy Roman Empire.

17. Calculus prereq. ALG
Algebra (alg.)

The Latin word “calculus” was originally used for a reckoning or an account, and originally applied to a pebble that was used to maintain a count. The Latin word came from the Greek for a pebble, “khalix”.

26. U.K. record label EMI
EMI is a British music company, with the acronym originally standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

35. Carrot nutrient VITAMIN A
Vitamin A is actually a group of chemicals, including retinol, retinal and beta-carotene.

36. QB's statistic ATT
Attempts (ATT)

44. Elec. units KWS
Kilowatts (KWs)

47. Way of the East TAO
The Chinese character "tao" translates as "path", but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

50. Sigma preceders RHOS
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter "p".

Sigma is the eighteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, and is the one used for an “ess” sound, equivalent to our letter S. There are three letters S in the name “Odysseus”, or three sigmas, as Homer would say.

51. Hamilton foe BURR
Aaron Burr was the third vice-president of the US, serving under Thomas Jefferson. In the final year of his term in office, Burr fought an illegal duel and killed his political rival Alexander Hamilton. Burr wasn't brought to justice, but he did pay the price politically. Thomas Jefferson dropped him from his ticket in the election held the following year.

The US ten-dollar bill features the image of Alexander Hamilton, the first US Secretary of the Treasury. As such, ten-dollar bills are sometimes called “Hamiltons”. By the way, the $10 bill is the only US currency in circulation in which the portrait faces to the left.

52. She rode on Butch's handlebars ETTA
In a marvelous scene in 1969’s “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid”, Butch (Paul Newman) takes Etta (Katherine Ross) for a ride on his bicycle, while “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head” plays in the background.

When the great movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” was in development, Paul Newman was always the first choice to play one of the leads, although the initial casting had him in the role of Sundance. Steve McQueen actually accepted the co-starring role, but left over a dispute about the billing (the film was entitled “The Sundance Kid and Butch Cassidy” at that point). The role of Sundance was then offered to Jack Lemmon, but he turned it down. Warren Beatty and Marlon Brando were considered next, before opting for the relatively unknown Robert Redford. What a great choice ...

53. Dark, poetically EBON
Ebony is another word for the color black (often shortened to "ebon" in poetry). Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned ...


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Easy job KID STUFF
9. EMS destination HOSP
13. Extremely puffed-up quality EGOMANIA
14. Poker starter ANTE
15. Choice words for gamblers PUT UP OR SHUT UP
17. As per A LA
18. Highway sign word GAS
19. Often-farmed fish TILAPIA
21. Monocle, essentially LENS
23. "Spring ahead" abbr. DST
24. Ones falling in alleys PINS
25. See 47-Across GRAPE
27. Misfortune WOE
28. Network offering home improvement advice DIY
29. "__ they've canceled my blood type": Bob Hope I’M SO OLD
32. Honey in Dijon? AMIE
33. Choice words for super-patriots LOVE IT OR LEAVE IT
37. Geraint's wife ENID
38. Trattoria preference AL DENTE
39. In-flight display no. ALT
40. Geraint's title SIR
41. Rig TRUCK
45. Pair DYAD
47. With 25-Across, wine THE
48. Mountain topper SNOW
49. Warrior in "Rashomon" SAMURAI
51. Queen's consort BEE
54. Has been WAS
55. Choice words for anglers FISH OR CUT BAIT
58. Inner: Pref. ENTO-
59. Galápagos denizen TORTOISE
60. Methods WAYS
61. Left helpless STRANDED

Down
1. NASA space observatory named for a Renaissance astronomer KEPLER
2. Galápagos denizen IGUANA
3. Pointillist's unit DOT
4. Like the cat that swallowed the canary SMUG
5. Spanish morsel TAPA
6. José's ones UNOS
7. Douglas __ FIR
8. Hot retail item FAST SELLER
9. Schlep HAUL
10. Ready to pour ON TAP
11. "What was I thinking?!" STUPID ME!
12. Charlemagne's father PEPIN III
16. Popular HIT
17. Calculus prereq. ALG
20. To this point AS YET
22. Caught a glimpse of SPIED
23. Choice words for those out of options DO OR DIE
26. U.K. record label EMI
27. Warm tops WOOL SHIRTS
30. Bus sched. entry STA
31. Man cave, e.g. DEN
32. States as truth AVERS
33. Detective's needs LEADS
34. Not many ONLY A FEW
35. Carrot nutrient VITAMIN A
36. QB's statistic ATT
42. Showing poor judgment UNWISE
43. Like easier-to-swallow pills COATED
44. Elec. units KWS
46. Failing the white-glove test, say DUSTY
47. Way of the East TAO
50. Sigma preceders RHOS
51. Hamilton foe BURR
52. She rode on Butch's handlebars ETTA
53. Dark, poetically EBON
56. Camper's bed COT
57. Succor AID


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LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Jul 13, Wednesday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Susan Gelfand
THEME: Parallel Bars … each of today’s themed answers is a BAR, and as each lies in the across direction, they are all PARALLEL BARS:
20A. Chocolate-and-crisped-rice candy NESTLE CRUNCH
37A. Solid investment? GOLD INGOT
42A. "It floats" sloganeer IVORY SOAP

57A. Gymnast's event, or what 20-, 37- and 42-Across literally are in this grid PARALLEL BARS
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
5. Pampering places SPAS
The word "spa" migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name "Spa" comes from the Walloon word "espa" meaning "spring, fountain".

9. Spunk MOXIE
Back as far as 1876, Moxie was a brand name of a "medicine" peddled with the claim that it "built up your nerve". In 1924, Moxie was registered as a trademark for a bitter, non-alcoholic beverage (no more claims of nerve-building). And we've used the term "moxie" to mean “nerve” ever since …

20. Chocolate-and-crisped-rice candy NESTLE CRUNCH
The Nestlé Crunch candy bar was introduced way back in 1937.

23. "Jews and Words" co-author AMOS OZ
Amos Oz is an Israeli writer. Oz has written 18 books in Hebrew and his works have been translated into 30 languages, including Arabic.

33. Like a Chihuahua's ears ERECT
Chihuahua is a state in northern Mexico that shares a border with Texas and New Mexico. Chihuahua is the largest state in the country, so has the nickname "El Estado Grande". The state takes its name from the Chihuahuan Desert which lies largely within its borders. And of course the Chihuahua breed of dog takes its name from the state.

42. "It floats" sloganeer IVORY SOAP
Ivory soap is one of Procter & Gambles oldest products, introduced way back in 1879. Ivory soap is noted for its "purity" and also because of its property of floating in water. Despite urban myths to the contrary, the property of floating in water was developed deliberately by a chemist at the time Ivory was being formulated. The soap floats because the ingredients are mixed longer than necessary for homogenization, which introduces more air into the product.

47. Pianist Peter NERO
Peter Nero is a pianist and conductor of “pops” orchestral concerts. Nero had a huge hit in the pop music charts in 1971 with the theme tune from the movie “Summer of '42”.

50. Looker's leg GAM
The American slang term "gams" is used for a woman's legs, but the term goes back to the 18th century "gamb" meaning the leg of an animal on a coat of arms.

52. Beehive, e.g. HAIRDO
That distinctive "beehive" hairstyle is also called a B-52, because the round beehive-shape also resembles the bulbous nose of a B-52 bomber! The style originated in 1958 and is credited to Margaret Vinci Heldt, the owner of a hair salon in downtown Chicago. I'm not a fan of the beehive, but I do have to say that Audrey Hepburn carried it off in "Breakfast at Tiffany's", as did Dusty Springfield in her heyday.

60. Crosswise, nautically ABEAM
The beam is the widest part of a nautical vessel. Something pointed out as lying "abeam" is something that it is 90 degrees from a line through the bow and the stern, in other words directly off to the right or the left.

63. Refusals NOES
Yep the plural of "no" is "noes", and not "nos".

65. Coup group JUNTA
A junta is a group of military officers that rule a country, usually after having seized power forcibly. “Junta” is a Spanish word meaning “council”.

66. Vegan staple TOFU
Tofu is another name for bean curd, and is a Japanese word meaning just that ... bean that has "curdled". Tofu is produced by coagulating soy milk, using either salt or something acidic. Once the protein has coagulated, the curds are pressed into the familiar blocks. Personally I love tofu, but my wife, she absolutely hates it ...

67. German article EINE
"Eine" is the German indefinite article, used with feminine nouns.

70. American-born Jordanian queen NOOR
Queen Noor is the widow of King Hussein of Jordan. Queen Noor was born Lisa Halaby in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Najeeb Halaby. Her father was appointed by President Kennedy as the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, and later became the CEO of Pan Am. Lisa Halaby met King Hussein in 1977, while working on the design of Jordan’s Queen Alia Airport. The airport was named after King Hussein’s third wife who had been killed that year in a helicopter crash. Halaby and the King were married the next year, in 1978.

Down
1. Pop singer Apple FIONA
Fiona Apple is a singer-songwriter and pianist from New York City.

2. Relevant, in law AD REM
The Latin term “ad rem” translates literally as "to the matter".

4. Casino lineup SLOTS
Slot machines earned the nickname "one-armed bandits" simply because they had "one arm", the handle pulled to operate the machine, and they robbed you of all your money like bandits!

6. Paris's Bois de Vincennes, par exemple PARC
The Bois de Vincennes is the largest public park in Paris, and covers almost 2,500 acres. The more famous Parisian park called the Bois de Boulogne covers just over 2,000 acres. Bois de Vincennes is therefore about three times larger than Central Park in New York City.

7. Son of Venus AMOR
Cupid, the Greek god of desire, was also known as Amor. “Cupido” is Latin for “desire” and “amor” is Latin for “love”.

8. 1988 Summer Olympics city SEOUL
The largest metropolitan area in the world is centered on Tokyo, Japan. Seoul, South Korea comes in second with a population of over 20 million people.

9. Pioneer in wireless telegraphy MARCONI
Guglielmo Marconi was an inventor, famous for development of a radio telegraph design that was used across the world. Marconi did a lot of his early radio work in his native Italy, but moved to England as the British government was very interested in supporting his developments.

12. "__ Mine": Beatles song I ME
"I Me Mine" is one of the relatively few Beatles songs to have been written by George Harrison (and indeed performed by him). Harrison chose the same title for his autobiography, published in 1980 just a few weeks before John Lennon was assassinated in New York City.

21. 2000s TV drama that ended in a church LOST
“Lost” is a television drama that ran for six seasons, finishing up in 2010. The show followed the adventures of survivors of a plane crash who get stranded on what seem to be a deserted tropical island. Things then get a bit weird, I hear. I didn’t watch “Lost”, but it seems to be one of those shows that folks really love or really hate …

26. Camper's dessert S'MORE
S'mores are a treat peculiar to North America, usually eaten around a campfire. A s'more consists of a roasted marshmallow and a layer of chocolate sandwiched between two graham crackers. The earliest written reference to the recipe is in a 1927 publication called "Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts". Girl Scouts always did corner the market on cookies and the like!

27. Spud TATER
The word "spud" is used as a slang term for a potato and was first recorded in the mid-1800s, in New Zealand would you believe?

30. Lindsay of "Mean Girls" LOHAN
I think that actress Lindsay Lohan’s big break was in the Disney remake of “The Parent Trap” in 1998. I’ve really only enjoyed one of Lohan’s films though, “Freaky Friday” from 2003 in which she stars alongside the fabulous Jamie Lee Curtis.

"Mean Girls" is a teen comedy movie released in 2004 starring Lindsay Lohan. Tina Fey also puts in a an appearance, which isn’t surprising as she wrote the screenplay.

32. Gung-ho about INTO
"Kung ho" is a Chinese expression meaning "work together, cooperate". The anglicized version "gung ho" was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

33. Psychoanalyst Fromm ERICH
Erich Fromm was a German psychologist. Fromm studied extensively the work of Sigmund Freud, and became very critical of his theories. He was also noted for his political views, and had a socialist leaning. He spent some time in the US and was active in the Socialist Party of America, in the fifties when McCarthyism was running rampant.

34. Variety show REVUE
“Revue” is the French word for “review” …

43. Place for meditation, for some YOGA MAT
In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

48. Animal for which a blood factor is named RHESUS
The Rhesus macaque is also known as the Rhesus monkey. As it is widely available and is close to humans anatomically and physically, the Rhesus macaque has been used in scientific research for decades. The Rhesus monkey was used in the development of rabies, smallpox and polio vaccines, and it also gave its name to the Rhesus factor that is used in blood-typing. It was also Rhesus monkeys that were launched into space by the US and Soviet space programs. Humans and macaques share about 93% of their DNA and had a common ancestor about 25 million years ago.

51. Tropical ray MANTA
The manta ray is the biggest species of ray, with the largest one recorded at over 25 feet across and weighing 5,100 pounds.

53. Hedda Gabler's creator IBSEN
“Hedda Gabler” is a play by the great Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, first published in 1890. Considered one of the greatest theater roles, the title character of Hedda Gabler is sometimes referred to as “the female Hamlet”.

55. Backup-beating brand DRANO
To clean out drains we might buy Crystal Drano which is sodium hydroxide (lye) mixed with sodium nitrate, sodium chloride (table salt) and aluminum. The contents of Drano work in concert to clear the clog. The lye reacts with any fats creating soap which may be enough to break up the clog. Also, the finely-divided aluminum reacts with water creating tremendous heat so that that mixture boils and churns, then any hair or fibers are cut by the sharp edges of the nitrate and chloride crystals. Having said all that, I find that boiling water poured down the drain almost always does the job ...

56. Maker of the MyBlend blender OSTER
The Oster brand of small appliances was introduced in 1924 by John Oster. He started out by making manually-powered hair clippers designed for cutting women's hair, and followed up with a motorized version in 1928. The clippers kept the company in business until 1946 when Oster diversified, buying a manufacturer of liquefying blenders in 1946. The blender was renamed an Osterizer, and was a big hit. Oster was bought up by Sunbeam, which has owned the brand since 1960.

58. Bird on Canada's dollar coin LOON
The great northern loon is the provincial bird of Ontario, and the state bird of Minnesota. The loon once appeared on Canadian $20 bills and also appears on the Canadian one dollar coin, giving the coin the nickname "the Loonie".

60. 1977 Steely Dan album AJA
Steely Dan's heyday was in the seventies when they toured for a couple of years, although the group mainly focused on studio work. The band was formed in 1972 and broke up in 1981. The core of the band reunited in 1993 and they are still going strong today.

62. Tower of London loc. ENG
The spectacular castle called the Tower of London sits right on the north bank of the River Thames in the center of London. The Tower dates back to the years just following the Norman Conquest of England in 1066. The victorious William the Conqueror built the Tower’s central keep (called the White Tower) in 1078. The Tower of London has been used for many purposes over the centuries, as a residence, a prison, and was even home to the Royal Mint. Famously it houses the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom, and has done so since 1303.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Rooters with beers, maybe FANS
5. Pampering places SPAS
9. Spunk MOXIE
14. Stargazer's focus? IDOL
15. Basil or Ginger, e.g. NAME
16. Attention-getters AHEMS
17. "__ put it another way ..." OR TO
18. Switch ender -EROO
19. Pinkish wines ROSES
20. Chocolate-and-crisped-rice candy NESTLE CRUNCH
23. "Jews and Words" co-author AMOS OZ
24. Heavenly lion LEO
25. Ballpark fig. EST
28. Official symbol SEAL
31. Puzzling problem ENIGMA
33. Like a Chihuahua's ears ERECT
37. Solid investment? GOLD INGOT
39. Many an auctioned auto REPO
40. P-like Greek letter RHO
41. Sprinted TORE
42. "It floats" sloganeer IVORY SOAP
45. Lost cause GONER
46. Bird in a clock CUCKOO
47. Pianist Peter NERO
49. Chuckle sound HEH
50. Looker's leg GAM
52. Beehive, e.g. HAIRDO
57. Gymnast's event, or what 20-, 37- and 42-Across literally are in this grid PARALLEL BARS
60. Crosswise, nautically ABEAM
63. Refusals NOES
64. Scoreboard figure, at times STAT
65. Coup group JUNTA
66. Vegan staple TOFU
67. German article EINE
68. Inner turmoil ANGST
69. Six-legged marchers ANTS
70. American-born Jordanian queen NOOR

Down
1. Pop singer Apple FIONA
2. Relevant, in law AD REM
3. Untrue NOT SO
4. Casino lineup SLOTS
5. React to sunlight, maybe SNEEZE
6. Paris's Bois de Vincennes, par exemple PARC
7. Son of Venus AMOR
8. 1988 Summer Olympics city SEOUL
9. Pioneer in wireless telegraphy MARCONI
10. "Oopsie!" OH OH!
11. Survey marks XES
12. "__ Mine": Beatles song I ME
13. Double curve ESS
21. 2000s TV drama that ended in a church LOST
22. Have to have NEED
25. Encourage EGG ON
26. Camper's dessert S'MORE
27. Spud TATER
29. Prefix with business AGRO-
30. Lindsay of "Mean Girls" LOHAN
32. Gung-ho about INTO
33. Psychoanalyst Fromm ERICH
34. Variety show REVUE
35. Noteworthy period EPOCH
36. Eco-friendly tile material CORK
38. Run easily LOPE
43. Place for meditation, for some YOGA MAT
44. Fly high SOAR
45. Hockey score GOAL
48. Animal for which a blood factor is named RHESUS
51. Tropical ray MANTA
53. Hedda Gabler's creator IBSEN
54. Proportion RATIO
55. Backup-beating brand DRANO
56. Maker of the MyBlend blender OSTER
57. Back strokes? PATS
58. Bird on Canada's dollar coin LOON
59. Hit the road LEFT
60. 1977 Steely Dan album AJA
61. Burger holder BUN
62. Tower of London loc. ENG


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LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Jul 13, Tuesday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Steve Blais
THEME: Big Belly … each of today’s themed answers is a slang term for an oversized belly, a GUT REACTION, in a way:
17A. What baguettes may be served in BREAD BASKET
29A. Fifth wheel SPARE TIRE
45A. Cozy place to read a book BAY WINDOW

60A. Emotional response (which might be induced by 17-, 29- and 45-Across?) GUT REACTION
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 06m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
13. Dinghy gear OARS
Our word “dinghy” comes from the Hindi “dingi”, the word for a small boat.

15. Water-carved gulch ARROYO
An arroyo is a small stream, or more often, a dry riverbed.

17. What baguettes may be served in BREAD BASKET
“Baguette” is the French word for “wand, baton” as in “baguette magique” (magic wand).

19. Toronto's prov. ONT
Beautiful Toronto is the largest city in Canada, and the fourth largest city in North America (after New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Houston).

21. Baltic Sea republic ESTONIA
Estonia is one of the former Soviet Socialist Republics and is located in Northern Europe on the Baltic Sea, due south of Finland. Estonia has been overrun and ruled by various empires over the centuries. The country did enjoy a few years of freedom at the beginning of the 20th century after a war of independence against the Russian Empire. However, Estonia was occupied again during WWII, first by the Russians and then by the Germans, and then reoccupied by the Soviets in 1944. Estonia has flourished as an independent country again since the collapse of the USSR in 1991.

23. "Hannah Montana" star Miley CYRUS
Miley Cyrus became famous playing the Disney Channel character "Hannah Montana". Miley is of course the daughter of country singer Billy Ray Cyrus. When she was born, Billy Ray and his wife named their daughter "Destiny Hope", but soon they themselves calling her "Smiley" as she was always smiling as a baby, and this got shortened to Miley over time. Cute ...

33. Bird: Prefix AVI-
The prefix “avi-” means “bird-related” as in “aviculture”, the breeding of birds.

34. Mobster's code of honor OMERTA
Omertà is a code of honor in southern Italian society. The term has been adopted by the Mafia to mean a code of silence designed to prevent a Mafioso from becoming an informer. For example, the famous Joe Valachi was someone who broke the code of silence in 1963, informing on the New York Mafia. Valachi's story was told in the movie "The Valachi Papers", with Charles Bronson playing the lead.

36. Dashing style ELAN
Our word "élan" was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e "style" or "flair".

37. Old sheriff's badge TIN STAR
In the Old West a “tin star” was a sheriff's badge.

42. Jeans giant of the '80s GITANO
Gitano is a brand of jeans sold by Kmart.

44. Grant-giving gp. NEA
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an agency funded by the federal government that offers support and financing for artistic projects. The NEA was created by an Act of Congress in 1965. Between 1965 and 2008, the NEA awarded over $4 billion to the arts, with Congress authorizing around $170 million annually through the eighties and much of the nineties. That funding was cut to less than $100 million in the late nineties due to pressure from conservatives concerned about the use of funds, but it is now back over the $150 million mark. I wonder how long that will last though ...

50. Egyptian life symbols ANKHS
The ankh was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character for "eternal life". The ankh wasn't just used in inscriptions but was often fashioned into amulets and as surrounds for mirrors (perhaps symbolizing a view into another world).

55. Title Gilbert and Sullivan emperor MIKADO
"The Mikado" is a wonderful comic opera by Gilbert and Sullivan, set in the exotic location of Japan. "Mikado" is a former term for the "Emperor of Japan".

68. Cowboy singer Ritter TEX
Tex Ritter was a country singer and actor from Murvaul, Texas. On the big screen, Ritter was known as a “singing cowboy”, and appeared in around 40 westerns in which he belted out a tune or two. Tex’s son was actor John Ritter, who played Jack Tripper so well in the sitcom “Three’s Company”.

Down
1. Mongolian desert GOBI
The large desert in Asia called the Gobi lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi desert is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so called "Green Wall of China".

3. Very, in Vichy TRES
Vichy is a spa town in the center of France. The people from Vichy are known as Vichyssois. After Paris, was occupied by the Germans in WWII, Vichy was chosen as the seat of government for what was called the French State. The Vichy government had theoretical authority even in occupied France, and is remembered for its collaboration with the German authorities. Vichy was chosen as the new seat of government because of its relative proximity to Paris, and simply because the town had the largest hotel room capacity in the “free zone” of the country.

7. Casino gratuity TOKE
“Toke” is an informal term for a tip given to a dealer or other employee at a casino.

9. Nashville's West DOTTIE
Dottie West was a country music singer, a friend and fellow-recording artist of Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn.

12. Jazzy James ETTA
Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song "At Last". Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

14. Alfredo, for one SAUCE
Alfredo sauce is usually associated with the Italian dish called fettuccine Alfredo. The sauce is made from Parmesan cheese and butter, and is named for the Italian restaurant owner Alfredo Di Lelio. Di Lelio’s nephews still own and run a restaurant in Rome called “Il Vero Alfredo”. Here in the US, we often add other ingredients to the basic cheese and butter recipe. And the name “fettuccine Alfredo” is unknown in Italy today.

27. Walled city of Spain AVILA
Avila is famous for the walled defenses around the old city, which date back to 1090. They were constructed out of brown granite, and are still in excellent repair. There are nine gateways and eighty-towers in all. Even the cathedral built between the 12th and 14th centuries is part of the city's defenses, so it looks like a imposing fortress.

28. Kids' digital deal-sealer PINKY SWEAR
The use of "pinkie" comes into English from "pinkje", the Dutch word for the little finger. Who knew?

32. One-named Irish singer ENYA
Enya's real name is Eithne Patricia Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career. She sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

40. "Wuthering Heights" genre GOTHIC
“Wuthering Heights” is the only novel written by Emily Brontë, one that she published using the pen name Ellis Bell. Her sister Charlotte Brontë had just published her famous book “Jane Eyre” under the name Currer Bell.

51. Target competitor KMART
Kmart is the third largest discount store chain in the world, behind Wal-Mart and Target. Kmart is famous for its promotions known as “blue light specials”, a program first introduced in 1965 and discontinued in 1991. I remember being in a Kmart store soon after coming to live in the US. That evening an employee installed a light stand an aisle away from me, switched on a flashing blue light and there was some unintelligible announcement over the loudspeaker system. I had no idea what was going on …

53. Brand for a pooch ALPO
Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with "Alpo" being an abbreviation for "Allen Products". Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

56. "__ She Sweet" AIN’T
“Ain’t She Sweet” is a popular song first published in 1927, composed by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen. Ager wrote the song for his daughter, Shana. Shana grew up to become Shana Alexander, a political commentator on CBS’s “60 Minutes”.

58. Jet-black gem ONYX
Onyx is a form of quartz that comes in many different shades, but most often it's the black version that's used for jewelry. The name "onyx" comes from the Greek word for "fingernail", as onyx in the flesh color is said to resemble a fingernail.

The color “jet black” takes its name from the minor gemstone known as jet. The gemstone and the material it is made of takes its English name from the French name: “jaiet”.

61. GPS suggestion RTE
GPS stands for Global Positioning System. The modern GPS system that we use today was built by the US military who received the massive funding needed because of fears during the Cold War of the use of Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles. We civilians all round the world owe a lot to President Ronald Reagan because he directed the military to make GPS technology available to the public for the common good. President Reagan was moved to do so after the Soviet Union shot down KAL flight 007 carrying 269 people, just because the plane strayed accidentally into Soviet airspace.

62. Camera named for a goddess EOS
I've been using Canon EOS cameras for decades now, and have nothing but good things to say about the cameras and the lenses. The EOS name stands for Electro-Optical System, and was chosen because it evokes the name of Eos, the Titan goddess of dawn from Greek mythology.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Understand GET
4. In a chair SEATED
10. It may be crushed at a bar ICE
13. Dinghy gear OARS
15. Water-carved gulch ARROYO
16. Traitor RAT
17. What baguettes may be served in BREAD BASKET
19. Toronto's prov. ONT
20. Cover, in a way, as a car INSURE
21. Baltic Sea republic ESTONIA
23. "Hannah Montana" star Miley CYRUS
26. Minor argument TIFF
27. Mimic APER
29. Fifth wheel SPARE TIRE
33. Bird: Prefix AVI-
34. Mobster's code of honor OMERTA
36. Dashing style ELAN
37. Old sheriff's badge TIN STAR
39. Self-respect DIGNITY
41. __-Seltzer ALKA
42. Jeans giant of the '80s GITANO
44. Grant-giving gp. NEA
45. Cozy place to read a book BAY WINDOW
47. Identifies in a Facebook photo TAGS
49. Penultimate-round game SEMI
50. Egyptian life symbols ANKHS
52. Numbers to crunch RAW DATA
55. Title Gilbert and Sullivan emperor MIKADO
59. Pub offering ALE
60. Emotional response (which might be induced by 17-, 29- and 45-Across?) GUT REACTION
63. Mud bath site SPA
64. Manuscript fixer EDITOR
65. Just ONLY
66. __ ejemplo: Spaniard's "for example" POR
67. Hate DETEST
68. Cowboy singer Ritter TEX

Down
1. Mongolian desert GOBI
2. Be worthy of EARN
3. Very, in Vichy TRES
4. Pirate's weapon SABER
5. Time to remember ERA
6. Latin art ARS
7. Casino gratuity TOKE
8. Cause of blurry vision, perhaps EYESTRAIN
9. Nashville's West DOTTIE
10. Speck in a magnetic field experiment IRON FILING
11. Kid's plea CAN I?
12. Jazzy James ETTA
14. Alfredo, for one SAUCE
18. Timber trouble DRY ROT
22. Frequently OFTEN
24. Logon requirement USER ID
25. Mar.-to-Jun. season SPR
27. Walled city of Spain AVILA
28. Kids' digital deal-sealer PINKY SWEAR
30. When the cock crows AT DAWN
31. Rent-a-car charges, e.g. RATES
32. One-named Irish singer ENYA
33. Run __: drink on credit A TAB
35. Star brightness measure MAGNITUDE
38. Cut, as logs SAWED
40. "Wuthering Heights" genre GOTHIC
43. One __ customer TO A
46. Painted a picture of, say IMAGED
48. Invite as one's date for ASK TO
51. Target competitor KMART
52. Coarse talk RASP
53. Brand for a pooch ALPO
54. Toiling away AT IT
56. "__ She Sweet" AIN’T
57. Mete (out) DOLE
58. Jet-black gem ONYX
61. GPS suggestion RTE
62. Camera named for a goddess EOS


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LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Jul 13, Monday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Patti Varol
THEME: Ball Club … today’s themed answers all start with a word that is a type of BALL:
20A. *Page-bottom reference indicated by an asterisk FOOTNOTE (giving “football”)
34A. *Skydiver using low-altitude starting points BASE JUMPER (giving “baseball”)
41A. *Nervous wreck BASKET CASE (giving “basketball”)
54A. Angels or Dodgers, and, in a way, what the first words of the answers to starred clues comprise BALL CLUB
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 4m 59s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
14. Toward shelter, at sea ALEE
"Alee" is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing "aweather".

16. Dr. Frankenstein's helper IGOR
Igor has been the assistant to Dracula, Frankenstein and Young Frankenstein among others. Igor is almost invariably portrayed as a hunchback.

Mary Shelley's Gothic novel has the full title of "Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus". The subtitle underscores one of the theme's of the book, a warning about man's expansion into the Industrial Revolution.

17. Musical Horne LENA
Lena Horne was an American jazz singer, actress, dancer and civil rights activist. Horne started out her career as a nightclub singer and then began to get some meaty acting roles in Hollywood. However, she ended up on the blacklist during the McCarthy Era for expressing left wing political views. One of Horne's starring roles was in the 1943 movie "Stormy Weather" for which she also performed the title song.

22. Exotic lizard IGUANA
An iguana is a lizard, and as such is cold-blooded. There are times when pet iguanas need heat from an IR lamp to maintain body temperature.

24. St. Elmo's __ FIRE
St. Elmo is the patron saint of sailors. He lends his name to the electrostatic weather phenomenon (often seen at sea) known as St. Elmo's fire. The "fire" is actually a plasma discharge caused by air ionizing at the end of a pointed object (like the mast of a ship), something often observed during electrical storms.

29. Designer Gucci ALDO
Gucci was founded in Rome in 1921, by Guccio Gucci. Gruccio's son Aldo took over the company after his father's death in 1953. It was Aldo who established the international presence for the brand and opened the company's first overseas store, in New York City.

34. *Skydiver using low-altitude starting points BASE JUMPER (giving “baseball”)
Base jumping is parachuting off fixed objects such as buildings or cliffs. The term “base” is actually an acronym for the four types of objects from which parachutists jump: Buildings, Antennas. Spans/bridges, Earth/cliffs.

37. Dickens's Heep URIAH
Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel "David Copperfield" by Charles Dickens. The character is such a "yes man" that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a "Uriah Heep".

45. Concorde, e.g., for short SST
The most famous supersonic transport (SST) is the retired Concorde. Concorde was developed and produced under an Anglo-French treaty by France’s Aérospatiale and the UK’s British Aircraft Corporation (BAC).

46. Crazy as a __ LOON
The slang term "loon" for a deranged person probably comes from the loud cry of the bird called the loon, but it is also influenced by the word "lunatic".

47. Like a three-piece suit VESTED
Here's another word that often catches me out. What we call a vest in the US is a waistcoat back in Ireland. And the Irish use the word "vest" for an undershirt.

50. Like the Magi WISE
"Magi" is the plural of the Latin word "magus", a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, magi is commonly used with reference to the "wise men from the East" who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born.

51. "On the wall" beauty judge in a film classic MIRROR
In the German fairy tale “Snow White” (and the Disney film), the wicked queen owns a magic mirror, which she asks every morning:
Magic mirror in my hand, who is the fairest in the land?
Walt Disney changed the words slightly for his movie version of the tale:
Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the fairest of them all?

54. Angels or Dodgers, and, in a way, what the first words of the answers to starred clues comprise BALL CLUB
The Anaheim Angels are today more correctly called the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. The “Angels” name dates back to 1961 when the team was founded in the “City of Angels”, Los Angeles. When the franchise moved to Anaheim in 1965 they were known as the California Angels, then the Anaheim Angels, and most recently the Los Angeles Angels at Anaheim.

The Los Angeles Dodgers baseball team of course were known as the Brooklyn Dodgers before the franchise moved to California. Before being known as the Dodgers, the team was known in Brooklyn as the Robins, the Superbas, the Trolley Dodgers, the Bridegrooms/Grooms, the Grays and the Atlantics.

58. Garfield's pal ODIE
Odie is Garfield's best friend and is a slobbery beagle, a character in Jim Davis’s comic strip.

61. Norway's capital OSLO
Oslo, the capital of Norway, is an ancient city that was founded around 1048. The medieval city was destroyed by fire in 1624 and was rebuilt by the Danish-Norwegian king Christian IV and renamed to Christiana. In 1877 there was an official change of the spelling of the city's name to "Kristiana", and then more recently in 1925 the name was restored to the original Oslo. Things have almost gone full circle and now the center of Oslo, the area that would have been contained by the original medieval walls, has apparently been renamed to Christiana.

64. Funnyman Carvey DANA
Dana Carvey, along with the likes of Phil Hartman and Kevin Nealon, was part of the new breed of "Saturday Night Live" comedians credited with resurrecting the show in the late eighties. One of Carvey's most popular characters was the Church Lady, and he became so associated with her that among fellow cast members Carvey was often referred to simply as "the Lady". Carvey had open-heart surgery in 1997 to clear a blocked artery, but the surgical team operated on the wrong blood vessel. To recover, he had to have five more procedures. He ended up suing for medical malpractice and donated his $7.5 million compensation payment to charity.

66. "__ are the times that ...": Paine THESE
Thomas Paine’s famous series of pamphlets called “The American Crisis” starts with the words:
These are the times that try men’s souls.

Thomas Paine was an English author who achieved incredible success with his pamphlet “Common Sense” published in 1776 which advocated independence of colonial America from Britain. Paine had immigrated to the American colonies just two years before his pamphlet was published, and so was just in time to make a major contribution to the American Revolution.

67. State, in France ETAT
In French, a state (état) is a political division (division politique).

Down
2. Topping in a tub OLEO
Emperor Louis Napoleon III of France announced a competition to develop a substitute for butter, a substitute that would be more accessible to the lower classes and more practical for the armed forces. In 1869, a French chemist called Hippolyte Mege-Mouries came up with something that he called oleomargarine, which was eventually manufactured under the trade name "margarine". The name "oleomargarine" also gives us our generic term "oleo".

3. Nevada gambling city RENO
Reno, Nevada was named in honor of Major General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer killed in the Civil War. The city has a famous "Reno Arch", a structure that stands over the main street. The arch was erected in 1926 to promote an exposition planned for the following year. After the expo, the city council decided to keep the arch and held a competition to decide what wording should be displayed, and the winner was "The Biggest Little City in the World".

9. One supplying drive-time music, briefly RADIO DJ
The world's first radio disk jockey (DJ) was one Ray Newby of Stockton, California who made his debut broadcast in 1909, would you believe? When he was 16 years old and a student, Newby started to play his records on a primitive radio located in the Herrold College of Engineering and Wireless in San Jose. The records played back then were mostly recordings of Enrico Caruso.

10. Stimulate, as curiosity PIQUE
The words "whet" and "pique" can both be used in the sense of sharpening or awaking one's interest or desire.

12. Choice cut LOIN
Loin is the tissue along the top of the ribs.

13. Mlle., in Mexico SRTA
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish and mademoiselle (Mlle.) is French for “Miss”.

27. Jewish wedding dances HORAS
The hora (also "horah") is a circle dance that originated in the Balkans. The hora was brought to Israel by Romanian settlers, and is often performed to traditional Israeli folk songs. The dance is a regular sight at Jewish weddings.

29. Made in Taiwan, say ASIAN
Prior to 1945, the island that we know today as Taiwan was called “Formosa”, the Portuguese word for “beautiful”. Portuguese sailors gave the island this name when they spotted it in 1544. The official name for the state of Taiwan is the “Republic of China”.

35. Knotted neckwear ASCOT
An Ascot tie is that horrible-looking (I think!) wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

36. System with dots and dashes MORSE CODE
Samuel Morse was a very accomplished and reputable painter (he was engaged to paint a portrait of President John Adams, for example). In 1825 Morse was in Washington working on a commissioned painting when he received a one-line letter by horse messenger telling him that his wife was ill. He left immediately for his home in New Haven, Connecticut but by the time that Morse arrived his wife had already died and had been buried. This single event spurred him to move from painting to the development of a rapid means of long distance communication, leading to the single-wire telegraph and Morse code.

38. "You had me at __": "Jerry Maguire" line HELLO
"Jerry Maguire" is a 1996 film starring Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding, Jr. and Renée Zellweger. The title character is played by Cruise, and is a sports agent. There are several liines oft quoted from “Jerry Maguire” including:
- “Show me the money!”
- “You complete me”
- “You had me at ‘hello’”

48. Immigrant's subj. ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

50. Light bulb units WATTS
James Watt was a Scottish inventor, a man who figured prominently in the Industrial Revolution in Britain largely due to the improvements he made to the fledgling steam engine. The SI unit of power is called the watt, named in his honor.

51. "The Simpsons" tavern MOE’S
Moe Szyslak is the surly bartender and owner of Moe’s Tavern in "The Simpsons" animated TV show. I don't really care for "The Simpsons", but Hank Azaria who supplies the voice for the Moe character ... him I like ...

55. Atty.-to-be's exam LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) has been around since 1948.

56. Forearm bone ULNA
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the "thumb-side" of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the "pinkie-side".


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Mustard-colored kernels CORN
5. Campaign ad target VOTER
10. Best buds PALS
14. Toward shelter, at sea ALEE
15. Boxing venue ARENA
16. Dr. Frankenstein's helper IGOR
17. Musical Horne LENA
18. Lost some color PALED
19. Refuse to continue QUIT
20. *Page-bottom reference indicated by an asterisk FOOTNOTE (giving “football”)
22. Exotic lizard IGUANA
24. St. Elmo's __ FIRE
25. Yawn inducer BORE
26. Vowel sound in "bug" SHORT U
29. Designer Gucci ALDO
30. That ship SHE
33. Junction point NODE
34. *Skydiver using low-altitude starting points BASE JUMPER (giving “baseball”)
37. Dickens's Heep URIAH
39. Mom, to Auntie SIS
40. __ bear POLAR
41. *Nervous wreck BASKET CASE (giving “basketball”)
44. Ecstatic review RAVE
45. Concorde, e.g., for short SST
46. Crazy as a __ LOON
47. Like a three-piece suit VESTED
49. Supply that exceeds demand GLUT
50. Like the Magi WISE
51. "On the wall" beauty judge in a film classic MIRROR
54. Angels or Dodgers, and, in a way, what the first words of the answers to starred clues comprise BALL CLUB
58. Garfield's pal ODIE
59. Hot under the collar IRATE
61. Norway's capital OSLO
62. Alternative word ELSE
63. Like anchovies SALTY
64. Funnyman Carvey DANA
65. Plant's beginning SEED
66. "__ are the times that ...": Paine THESE
67. State, in France ETAT

Down
1. Young cow CALF
2. Topping in a tub OLEO
3. Nevada gambling city RENO
4. Compulsive tidy-upper NEAT FREAK
5. Vicks mentholated ointment VAPORUB
6. Address the crowd ORATE
7. Prefix with vision TELE-
8. WSW's opposite ENE
9. One supplying drive-time music, briefly RADIO DJ
10. Stimulate, as curiosity PIQUE
11. Juanita's water AGUA
12. Choice cut LOIN
13. Mlle., in Mexico SRTA
21. Point trivially picked NIT
23. Word after support or study GROUP
25. Sanctify BLESS
26. Deliberately doesn't invite SNUBS
27. Jewish wedding dances HORAS
28. Dedicative poet ODIST
29. Made in Taiwan, say ASIAN
30. Wet impact sound SPLAT!
31. Let out, as a sigh HEAVE
32. Messed up ERRED
35. Knotted neckwear ASCOT
36. System with dots and dashes MORSE CODE
38. "You had me at __": "Jerry Maguire" line HELLO
42. Camera-toting traveler, often TOURIST
43. Curse-inducing stare EVIL EYE
48. Immigrant's subj. ESL
49. Avarice GREED
50. Light bulb units WATTS
51. "The Simpsons" tavern MOE’S
52. Gathering dust IDLE
53. Increase RISE
54. Hayloft bundle BALE
55. Atty.-to-be's exam LSAT
56. Forearm bone ULNA
57. Tub toy BOAT
60. Stadium cheer RAH!


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LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Jul 13, Sunday



CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa
THEME: Networking … the initial letters each of today’s themed answers is the acronym for a television channel, an acronym that might show up in a “TV GUIDE” listing:
27A. *"Perhaps" THERE'S NO TELLING (TNT: Turner Network Television)
41A. *Snacks not needing an oven NO-BAKE COOKIES (NBC: National Broadcasting Company)
53A. *"When I say so," militarily speaking AT MY COMMAND (AMC: American Movie Classics)
78A. Signature song for Sammy Davis Jr. THE CANDY MAN (TCM: Turner Classic Movies)
88A. *Practically guaranteed ALL BUT CERTAIN (ABC: American Broadcasting Company)
107. *Ambushed TAKEN BY SURPRISE (TBS: Turner Broadcasting System)
16D. *Fair forecast CLEAR BLUE SKIES (CBS: Columbia Broadcasting System)
48D. *Settling request PLEASE BE SEATED (PBS: Public Broadcasting Service)

91D. Weekly magazine where the initials of the answers to starred clues can be found TV GUIDE
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
6. One of a typical schooner's pair MAST
By definition, a schooner is sailing vessel with two or more masts, but one on which the foremast is shorter than the rear mast(s).

19. Patty Hearst's SLA alias TANIA
The Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) was founded in 1973 by an escapee of the prison system, Donald DeFreeze. The group's manifesto promoted the rights of African Americans although, in the 2-3 year life of the group, DeFreeze was the only black member. Famously, the SLA kidnapped heiress Patty Hearst in 1974. Hearst apparently fell victim to what is called the Stockholm syndrome and became sympathetic to her captors’ cause. She joined the SLA and assumed the name “Tania”.

20. Alice's immortalizer ARLO
Arlo Guthrie is the son of Woody Guthrie. Both father and son are renowned for their singing of protest songs about social injustice. Arlo is most famous for his epic "Alice's Restaurant Massacree", a song that lasts a full 18m 34s. In the song Guthrie tells how, after being drafted, he was rejected for service in the Vietnam War based on his criminal record. He had only one incident on his public record, a Thanksgiving Day arrest for littering and being a public nuisance when he was 18-years-old.

22. Kate's TV mate ALLIE
"Kate & Allie" ran from 1984 to 1989, starring Susan Saint James as Kate, and Jane Curtin as Allie. Jane Curtin won two Emmy awards for her work on the series, while Susan Saint James ... did not.

24. Lab gel medium AGAR
Agar is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

26. "CSI" part? SCENE
I’m told that the TV show "CSI" (which stands for “Crime Scene Investigation”) gets a lot of razzing by law enforcement professionals for its unrealistic portrayal of the procedures and science of criminal investigation. I don't care though, as I just think it's fun television. The original "CSI" set in Las Vegas seems to have "gone off the boil", but the addition of Sela Ward to the cast of "CSI: NY" really, really raised the level of the sister show centered around New York City.

27. *"Perhaps" THERE'S NO TELLING (TNT: Turner Network Television)
TNT stands for Turner Network Television. The TNT cable channel made a big splash in the eighties when it started to broadcast old MGM movies that had been "colorized", not something that was a big hit with the public. In recent years, the TNT programming lineup is touted with the tagline "We Know Drama", and includes shows like "Judging Amy", "ER" and "Cold Case".

32. Fight unit: Abbr. RND
Boxing matches are divided up into rounds (rnds.).

33. Connection facilitators, briefly ISPS
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP's network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs. I'd go with cable if I were you, if it's available in your area ...

40. "__ Mir Bist Du Schoen" (Andrews Sisters hit) BEI
“Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen” was a hit in the 1930s for the Andrews Sisters. The title translates from German into English as “To Me, You Are Beautiful”. The song was originally titled in Yiddish as “Bei Mir Bistu Shein” as it was written for a 1932 Yiddish comedy musical called “Men Ken Lebn Nor Men Lost Nisht”.

41. *Snacks not needing an oven NO-BAKE COOKIES (NBC: National Broadcasting Company)
The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) has had a number of different logos in its history, including the famous peacock with which we are familiar today. The first peacock logo was introduced in the early days of color television and was designed to illustrate how wonderful color television would be, so go buy one! (NBC was owned by RCA, and they had a vested interest in sales of color television sets).

45. Tiger's ex ELIN
Elin Nordegren is the ex-wife of Tiger Woods. Nordegren is a native of Sweden, and it was back in Sweden that she was hired as a nanny by the wife of golfer Jasper Parnevik. The job brought her to the US where she became a popular attraction on the professional golfing circuit. Apparently there was a long line of single golfers who wanted to be introduced to her, with Tiger Woods asking for an introduction for a year before he finally got to go out with her. The pair were married in 2004.

46. Chem lab tube PIPET
A pipette (also “pipet”) is tool used in a lab to transport an accurately measured volume of liquid. Back in my day, we would suck up the liquid into the pipette by applying our mouths to the top of the instrument. This could be quite dangerous, as one ended up with a mouthful of something unsavory if one lifted the top of pipette out of the liquid too soon. Nowadays, things are much safer.

49. Well-coiffed Byrnes EDD
I used to watch "77 Sunset Strip" as a lad growing up in Ireland. It is an American show that ran from 1958 to 1964. Two of the central characters are former government secret agents, now working as private detectives. Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. plays Stu Bailey, and Roger Smith plays Jeff Spencer. And who can forget Kookie, played by Edd Byrnes?

50. Cupid's wings ALAE
The god Cupid has wings (alae), in Latin.

51. __ bean: sprouts source MUNG
Mung beans are native to India and are used in both savory and sweet dishes in many Asian cuisines.

53. *"When I say so," militarily speaking AT MY COMMAND (AMC: American Movie Classics)
AMC, formerly known as American Movie Classics, is one of my favorite television channels. Although the channel's focus has shifted from airing classic movies to including other programming, there's still a lot of quality output. AMC’s flagship show is “Mad Men”.

57. Military meal MESS
"Mess" first came into English about 1300 and described the list of food needed for a meal, from the Old French word "mes" meaning a portion of food or a course at a meal. This usage in English evolved into "mess" meaning a jumbled mass of anything from the concept of "mixed food". At the same time, the original usage in the sense of a food for a meal surfaced again in the military in the 1500s when a "mess" was a communal eating place.

60. Carrie's org. on "Homeland" CIA
“Homeland” is a psychological drama shown on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I’m going to have to check this one out ...

63. Smokey Bear broadcast, briefly PSA
Public service announcement (PSA)

Smokey Bear is the mascot of the US Forest Service. Smokey first appeared in 1944, in an advertising campaign directed towards preventing forest fires.

65. Critic Reed REX
Rex Reed is a film critic who used to co-host “At the Movies” after Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert left the show.

66. Rachael Ray sautéing initialism EVOO
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO)

Rachael Ray is a celebrity chef and host of several shows on the Food Network television channel. Ray comes from a family that owned and managed a number of restaurants in the northeast of the country. One of Ray’s TV shows is “$40 a Day”, in which she demonstrates how to visit various cities in North America and Europe and eat three meals and a snack on a daily budget of just $40.

68. Royal Botanic Gardens locale KEW
Kew Gardens is a beautiful location in southwest London, formally known as the Royal Botanic Gardens. Kew Gardens has the world’s largest collection of living plants.

78. Signature song for Sammy Davis Jr. THE CANDY MAN (TCM: Turner Classic Movies)
Even though there is no asterisk at the front of this clue in the version I am doing, I am pretty sure it is meant to be a themed answer …

“The Candy Man” is a song that was written for the 1971 film “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory”. The song is best known as the signature song for Sammy Davis, Jr.

Sammy Davis, Jr. began his career in entertainment with his father, as they were two members of the vaudeville act, the Will Mastin Trio. The trio, Mastin and the two Davis men, took a break in 1943 while Davis, Jr. served in the US Army. After the war, the three got back together and continued performing. The men remained very close for their whole lives, and their bodies are even buried side-by-side in the Davis family tomb.

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is one of my favorite television channels, delivering just what its name promises: classic movies.

83. Soldiers under Lee REBS
Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in the war in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited Lee to take command of the whole Union Army but he declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

84. Flor del amor ROSA
In Spanish, the rose (rosa) is the flower of love (flor del amor).

85. Great Basin native UTE
The Ute is a group of Native American tribes that now resides in Utah and Colorado. The Ute were not a unified people as such, but rather a loose association of nomadic groups.

86. Oktober endings -FESTS
Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I've been there twice, and it really is a great party ...

87. Fancy molding OGEE
An ogee is like an s-curve. Specifically it is a figure consisting of two arcs that curve in opposite directions (like an S) but both ends of the curve end up parallel to each other (which is not necessarily true for an S).

88. *Practically guaranteed ALL BUT CERTAIN (ABC: American Broadcasting Company)
The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is the world’s largest broadcaster in terms of revenues. ABC was formed in 1943, created out of the former NBC Blue radio network.

93. __-relief BAS
In bas-relief an image projects just a little above the background, as in perhaps a head depicted on a coin.

94. School support gp. PTA
Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

95. A fourth of doce TRES
In Spanish, a fourth of twelve (doce) is three (tres).

105. Homer's neighbor NED
Ned Flanders lives next door to Homer on TV's "The Simpsons". Ned is voiced by actor Harry Shearer and has been around since the very first episode aired in 1989.

107. *Ambushed TAKEN BY SURPRISE (TBS: Turner Broadcasting System)
Turner Broadcasting System (TBS) adopted the slogan “Very Funny” in 2004. The slogan is meant to contrast TBS with its sister channel TNT, which focuses on drama shows. The TNT slogan is “Drama, Period”.

112. Trig function COTAN
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent. Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The reciprocal of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent.

115. Beetles, perhaps AUTOS
The Beetle was the official name of the VW model released in North America, but it was usually referred to as a "Bug" here in the US, and a "Beetle" elsewhere in the world.

118. Benediction opener O GOD
A benediction is a prayer usually spoken at the end of a religious service in which one invokes divine help and guidance.

120. Like marshes SEDGY
Sedges are a family of plants that resemble grasses and rushes. Sedges are more properly called Cyperaceae.

121. Operation Overlord time D-DAY
The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term "D-Day" is used by the military to designate the day on which a combat operations are to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that D just stands for "Day". In fact, the French have a similar term, "Jour J" (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

The Allied Invasion of Normandy during WWII was given the codename “Operation Overlord”. The Normandy landings which kicked off the invasion, and which took place on D-Day (6 June 1944), were given the codename “Operation Neptune”.

123. "The Gondoliers" girl TESSA
"The Gondoliers" is a delightful operetta by Gilbert & Sullivan, first performed in 1889 at the Savoy Theatre in London. Tessa is a maiden selected as a bride in a "line up" by one of the gondoliers. I last saw "The Gondoliers" decades ago, an amateur production in the small town where I was living at the time in Ireland. Great fun!

Down
1. Like some retired racehorses AT STUD
The word "stud", meaning "a male horse kept for breeding", is derived from the Old English word "stod" which described a whole herd of horses.

2. Apollo's nymph DAPHNE
Daphne was one of the Naiads of Greek mythology, a female nymph living near freshwater fountains and springs. Daphne was a particularly beautiful Naiad and so was pursued by the god Apollo. Fearing Apollo’s advances, Daphne turned to her mother Haia for help. Gaia transformed her into a laurel tree, and as a result the laurel became sacred to Apollo.

5. Ore-Ida morsel TATER TOT
Ore-Ida founders came up with the idea for Tater Tots when they were deciding what to do with residual cuts of potato. They chopped up the leftovers, added flour and seasoning, and extruded the mix through a large hole making a sausage that they cut into small cylinders. We eat 70 million pounds of this extruded potato every year!

6. Kettles from Cape Flattery MA AND PA
The author Betty McDonald wrote a memoir called “The Egg and I” that was published in 1945, telling the story of her life as a young wife on a chicken farm in Washington state. The book was adapted into a film of the same name in 1947, with the lovely Claudette Colbert playing Betty McDonald, and the great Fred MacMurray as her husband. Two other characters feature in the storyline: Ma and Pa Kettle. The latter characters were so well received by theater audiences that a whole series of films about them and their fifteen children was made between the years 1949 and 1957.

7. Jason's vessel ARGO
Jason is a hero from Greek mythology, most noted for leading the quest for the Golden Fleece. The Golden Fleece is the fleece of the gold-haired winged ram. For his quest, Jason assembles a group of heroes who were given the name Argonauts, as they journeyed on the ship called the "Argo". The vessel was called the "Argo" in honor of the ship's builder, a man named Argus.

11. Anchor position ATRIP
When an anchor is “aweigh” or “atrip”, it is just clear of the bottom, having just been lifted.

13. Metallic by-product SLAG
The better lead ores are processed in a blast furnace, to extract the metal. The "waste" from this process is called "slag". Slag does contain some lead and it can be processed further in a "slag furnace" to extract the residual metal. Slag furnaces also accept poorer lead ores as a raw material.

14. Followed a Lenten routine FASTED
In Latin, the Christian season that is now called Lent was termed "quadragesima" (meaning "fortieth"), a reference to the forty days that Jesus spent in the desert before beginning his public ministry. When the church began its move in the Middle Ages towards using the vernacular, the term "Lent" was introduced. "Lent" comes from "lenz", the German word for "spring".

15. Big name in siding ALCOA
The Aluminum Corporation of America (ALCOA) is the largest producer of aluminum in the United States. The company was founded in 1888 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where its headquarters are to this day.

16. *Fair forecast CLEAR BLUE SKIES (CBS: Columbia Broadcasting System)
CBS used to be called the Columbia Broadcasting System. CBS is the second largest broadcaster in the world, second only to the BBC in the UK.

28. Hoity-toity sort SNOB
Back in the 1780s, a “snob” was a shoemaker or a shoemaker’s apprentice. By the end of the 18th century the word was being used by students at Cambridge University in England to refer to all local merchants and people of the town. The term evolved to mean one who copies those who are his or her social superior (and not in a good way). From there it wasn't a big leap for “snob” to include anyone who emphasized their superior social standing and not just those who aspired to rank. Nowadays a snob is anyone who looks down on those considered to be of inferior standing.

29. Type starter LINO-
Linotype printing was the main technology used in the publication of newspapers and magazines for most of the 20th century, up until the 1970s when it was gradually replaced by offset printing and computer typesetting. Linotype printing was so called as a complete “line of type” was produced at one time.

38. "High Voltage" rockers AC/DC
The Heavy Metal band known as AC/DC was formed by two brothers in Australia. The group is usually called "Acca Dacca" down under.

39. Bean who played Boromir in "The Lord of the Rings" films SEAN
Sean Bean is an English actor, perhaps best known in North America for playing Boromir in the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy. All you James Bond fans will remember him as the bad guy in “GoldenEye”, the character called Alec Trevelyan.

42. Neat KEMPT
The word “unkempt” means “disheveled, not well-combed”. It derives from the Old English word “cemban” meaning “to comb”. The opposite to the more common “unkempt” is … “kempt”.

43. __ Sutra KAMA
Kama is the Hindu god of love. He is portrayed as a youth bearing a bow and arrows, much like Eros and Cupid.

The word "sutra" is used in Hinduism for a learned text, one usually meant to be studied by students.

The Kama Sutra is renowned for its descriptions of positions that can be used for sexual intercourse, but the sutra includes many other texts that deal with various matters of a sexual nature including how to woo a woman, the conduct of a "chief wife", the conduct of "other" wives, how to make money as a courtesan and much, much more, as if that isn't enough …

44. Waterfront gp. ILA
The International Longshoremen's Association (ILA)

45. Supermodel born Melissa Miller EMME
Emme is the highest paid plus-size model in the world. Emme's real name is Melissa Aronson, and she was born in New York City and raised in Saudi Arabia.

48. *Settling request PLEASE BE SEATED (PBS: Public Broadcasting Service)
The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) was founded in 1970, and is my favorite of the broadcast networks. I love PBS's drama and science shows in particular, and always watch the election results coming in with the NewsHour team.

54. Familia member TIA
"Tia" is the Spanish word for "aunt" (and "tio" means "uncle").

56. Potpourri MIX
The French term "pot pourri" literally translates to "rotten pot", but in France it used to mean "stew". Over time the term evolved in English usage to mean a "medley", and eventually a mixture of dried flowers and spices.

59. Skye cap TAM
A tam o'shanter is a man's cap traditionally worn by Scotsmen. "Tams" were originally all blue (and called "blue bonnets"), but as more dyes became readily available they became more colorful. The name of the cap comes from the title character of Robert Burns' poem "Tam O'Shanter".

The Isle of Skye is off the northwest coast of Scotland in the Inner Hebrides. It is the second largest island in the country, and has been linked to the mainland by a road bridge since 1995. I've never been there, but I hear the views are spectacular.

65. "The Crying Game" actor REA
Stephen Rea is an Irish actor, whose most famous role was that of the "retired" IRA man in the brilliant 1992 film "The Crying Game". He also starred in the chilling movie "Stuck", a 2007 film that is based on a true story about a woman who commits a hit and run on a homeless man. The woman leaves the scene of the crime with the victim still "stuck" in her windshield. The woman leaves the man to die in her garage. Chilling, eh? But as I said, a true story ...

"The Crying Game" is a fascinating film that made quite a splash when it was released in 1992. Although it was set in Ireland and the UK, it didn't do well in cinemas in either country yet made a lot of money over here in the US. I think the politics of the movie were a bit raw for Irish and UK audiences back then. It's an unusual plot, blending Irish political issues with some raw sexuality questions. I won't tell you about the "surprise scene", just in case you haven't seen it and want to do so.

66. Wabbit hunter ELMER
Elmer Fudd is one of the most famous of all the Looney Tunes cartoon characters, the hapless nemesis of Bugs Bunny. If you have never seen it, check out Elmer and Bugs in the marvelous “Rabbit of Seville”, a short cartoon that parodies Rossini’s “Barber of Seville”. Wonderful stuff …

67. U.S. govt. broadcaster VOA
The US began shortwave propaganda broadcasts in early 1942, just after America entered WWII. The first broadcast to Germany was introduced by the "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" and opened with the words:
Today, and every day from now on, we will be with you from America to talk about the war. The news may be good or bad for us -- We will always tell you the truth.
That first broadcast was called "Stimmen aus Amerika" ("Voices from America"), and gave the fledgling broadcasting operation its name. VOA is still going strong today, and was a station I used to listen to as a teenager back in Ireland in the early seventies …

69. Latin 101 word ERAT
“Esse” is the Latin for “to be”. “Sum” means “I am” and “erat” means “he, she was”.

74. 102-Across units BYTES
In the world of computers, a "bit" is the basic unit of information. It has a value of 0 or 1. A "byte" is a small collection of bits (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text.

75. Nottingham's river TRENT
The River Trent in England is one of the few rivers that flows north for much of its route. The Trent rises in Staffordshire and empties into the River Ouse in Yorkshire.

Nottingham is a city in the East Midlands of England. To outsiders, perhaps Nottingham is most famous for its links to the legend of Robin Hood.

76. Schnoz like Durante's PROBOSCIS
Jimmy Durante was a very talented entertainer, with that wonderful, gravelly voice, as well as that large nose that he used in so much of his humor. Durante appeared in the Broadway stage musical "Jumbo" in 1935. In one scene, he leads a live elephant across the stage, and gets stopped by a police officer who asks, "What are you doing with that elephant?" Durante replies "What elephant?" and brings the house down every night.

79. Havana hi HOLA
Havana is the capital city of Cuba. The city was founded by the Spanish in the early 1500s after which it became a strategic location for Spain’s exploration and conquest of the Americas. In particular, Havana was used as a stopping-off point for treasure-laden ships on the return journey to Spain.

80. Course for would-be U.S. citizens ESL
English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

81. Il __: Mussolini DUCE
Benito Mussolini (aka “Il Duce”, the “Duke”) was deposed in 1943 just a few weeks after the Allies invaded Sicily and started to bomb Rome. Fascist politicians voted to oust him, and Italian King Victor Emmanuel had him arrested. Hitler selected Lieutenant Colonel Otto Skorzeny to lead a group of German commandos in a daring rescue of his longtime ally. The rescuers were towed into Italian airspace in gliders, which the commandos flew into a mountainside close to where Mussolini was being held captive. The element of surprise was so significant, that the rescue was effected without a shot being fired. A small plane was flown in to transport Mussolini and Skorzeny out of Italy, and to safety in Vienna. Some months later, Mussolini returned to his homeland and fought on in parts of the country not yet taken by the Allies. As the end drew near, he made a run for Switzerland but was captured by Italian partisans. They executed him and took his body to Milan where it was put on display hanging upside down for all to see.

90. Air__: low-cost carrier TRAN
AirTran is a budget airline that has its principal hub in Atlanta. AirTran’s secondary hubs are in Baltimore-Washington, Milwaukee and Orlando. AirTran has been owned by Southwest Airlines since 2010.

91. Weekly magazine where the initials of the answers to starred clues can be found TV GUIDE
The first national “TV Guide” was issued in 1953. The cover of that first issue featured a photo of newborn Desi Arnaz, Jr., son of Lucille Ball.

92. Heifetz's teacher AUER
Leopold Auer was a Hungarian violinist, as well as a conductor and composer. Auer wrote a small number of works for the violin, the most famous of which is the "Rhapsodie Hongroise" written for violin and piano.

Jascha Heifetz was a violinist from Vilnius in Lithuania who emigrated with his family to the US when he was a child. Heifetz toured Israel in 1953 and included in his recitals the Violin Sonata by Richard Strauss. Strauss was known for his anti-Semitic views, so this piece was always received in silence at his recitals in Israel. Heifetz was attacked with a crowbar outside his hotel in Jerusalem, severely injuring his right arm. He struggled with the injured arm for several years, and eventually had surgery in 1972. Heifetz’s injured arm never really recovered, and he was forced to cease giving concerts.

99. Historic Mesopotamian city EDESSA
Edessa is the old name for Mesopotamian city that is now called Şanlıurfa (aka Urfa, Turkey).

101. Long-armed ape ORANG
Orangutans are arboreal creatures, in fact the largest arboreal animals known to man. They are native to Indonesia and Malaysia, living in the rain forests. Like most species in rain forests these days, orangutans are endangered, with only two species surviving. The word "orangutan" is Malay, meaning "man of the forest".

102. Judean king DAVID
In the story of David and Goliath, the Israelites and the Philistines faced each other in battle at the Valley of Elah. Goliath was the warrior champion of the Philistines and each day he challenged the Israelites to send out their champion to decide the battle in a one-on-one fight. No one was courageous enough to accept the challenge until young David agreed to face the mighty Goliath. And of course David felled the giant soldier with a stone from his sling. David went on to become the second king of the united Kingdom of Israel (after Saul).

103. Cub Scout leader AKELA
Akela is the wolf in the "Jungle Book". He gave his name to the cubmaster in the scouting movement, now known as Akela.

107. Sweeney with scissors TODD
"Sweeney Todd" was originally a 1936 film, and later in 1973 a play, then a 1979 musical and a movie adaptation of the musical in 2007. After Sweeney Todd has killed his victims, his partner in crime Mrs. Lovett helped him dispose of the bodies by taking the flesh and baking it into meat pies that she sold in her pie shop. Ugh!

108. Opine online BLOG
“Blog” is a melding of the words “Web” and “log”. My two blogs are “logs” of all the New York Times and Los Angeles Times crosswords published, and I post them on the “Web” at NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com.

109. Meditative practice YOGA
In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Mature ADULT
6. One of a typical schooner's pair MAST
10. Water holders DAMS
14. Sees eye to eye? FACES
19. Patty Hearst's SLA alias TANIA
20. Alice's immortalizer ARLO
21. Inclusive ending ET AL
22. Kate's TV mate ALLIE
23. Bug-hits-windshield sound SPLAT
24. Lab gel medium AGAR
25. Stage highlight ARIA
26. "CSI" part? SCENE
27. *"Perhaps" THERE'S NO TELLING (TNT: Turner Network Television)
30. Wedding proposal? TOAST
31. You-__: rural addresses UNS
32. Fight unit: Abbr. RND
33. Connection facilitators, briefly ISPS
34. Fireplace place HEARTH
35. Computer in a cubicle DESKTOP
37. Wild talk RANT
39. Roll on the ball field SOD
40. "__ Mir Bist Du Schoen" (Andrews Sisters hit) BEI
41. *Snacks not needing an oven NO-BAKE COOKIES (NBC: National Broadcasting Company)
45. Tiger's ex ELIN
46. Chem lab tube PIPET
49. Well-coiffed Byrnes EDD
50. Cupid's wings ALAE
51. __ bean: sprouts source MUNG
52. Cast member's part ROLE
53. *"When I say so," militarily speaking AT MY COMMAND (AMC: American Movie Classics)
57. Military meal MESS
58. Private insignia ONE STRIPE
60. Carrie's org. on "Homeland" CIA
61. Poor grades DEES
63. Smokey Bear broadcast, briefly PSA
64. Like __ out of hell A BAT
65. Critic Reed REX
66. Rachael Ray sautéing initialism EVOO
68. Royal Botanic Gardens locale KEW
71. Big hauler SEMI
73. Wet expanse SEA
74. Auto trip problem BLOWN TIRE
76. Court answer PLEA
78. Signature song for Sammy Davis Jr. THE CANDY MAN (TCM: Turner Classic Movies)
82. Psychic's verb READ
83. Soldiers under Lee REBS
84. Flor del amor ROSA
85. Great Basin native UTE
86. Oktober endings -FESTS
87. Fancy molding OGEE
88. *Practically guaranteed ALL BUT CERTAIN (ABC: American Broadcasting Company)
93. __-relief BAS
94. School support gp. PTA
95. A fourth of doce TRES
96. Carrion consumer VULTURE
100. Fútbol cheer OLE OLE!
102. Computer info DATA
104. "Wow" GEE
105. Homer's neighbor NED
106. Close call SCARE
107. *Ambushed TAKEN BY SURPRISE (TBS: Turner Broadcasting System)
112. Trig function COTAN
113. No longer happening OVER
114. Places LOCI
115. Beetles, perhaps AUTOS
116. Driver's lic., e.g. IDENT
117. Herb used with potatoes DILL
118. Benediction opener O GOD
119. Oodles SLEWS
120. Like marshes SEDGY
121. Operation Overlord time D-DAY
122. Hinged entrance GATE
123. "The Gondoliers" girl TESSA

Down
1. Like some retired racehorses AT STUD
2. Apollo's nymph DAPHNE
3. Conditional word UNLESS
4. One may be exposed during cross-examination LIAR
5. Ore-Ida morsel TATER TOT
6. Kettles from Cape Flattery MA AND PA
7. Jason's vessel ARGO
8. Shutter part SLAT
9. Sped TORE
10. Gives a hand DEALS TO
11. Anchor position ATRIP
12. Sewer lines MAINS
13. Metallic by-product SLAG
14. Followed a Lenten routine FASTED
15. Big name in siding ALCOA
16. *Fair forecast CLEAR BLUE SKIES (CBS: Columbia Broadcasting System)
17. Hardly dim bulbs EINSTEINS
18. Hallucinate SEE THINGS
28. Hoity-toity sort SNOB
29. Type starter LINO-
34. Cleaned, as a deck HOSED DOWN
36. Low benders KNEES
37. Try a new shade on REDYE
38. "High Voltage" rockers AC/DC
39. Bean who played Boromir in "The Lord of the Rings" films SEAN
42. Neat KEMPT
43. __ Sutra KAMA
44. Waterfront gp. ILA
45. Supermodel born Melissa Miller EMME
46. Stage aid PROP
47. Charged atoms IONS
48. *Settling request PLEASE BE SEATED (PBS: Public Broadcasting Service)
53. Settle things, in a way ARBITRATE
54. Familia member TIA
55. Wet expanse OCEAN
56. Potpourri MIX
59. Skye cap TAM
62. Geological stretch EON
65. "The Crying Game" actor REA
66. Wabbit hunter ELMER
67. U.S. govt. broadcaster VOA
69. Latin 101 word ERAT
70. Forms a union WEDS
72. Relax EASE
73. Wound covering SCAB
74. 102-Across units BYTES
75. Nottingham's river TRENT
76. Schnoz like Durante's PROBOSCIS
77. System of laws LEGAL CODE
79. Havana hi HOLA
80. Course for would-be U.S. citizens ESL
81. Il __: Mussolini DUCE
86. Walk by singly FILE PAST
89. To the nth degree UTTERLY
90. Air__: low-cost carrier TRAN
91. Weekly magazine where the initials of the answers to starred clues can be found TV GUIDE
92. Heifetz's teacher AUER
94. More than enough PLENTY
97. Gets together UNITES
98. Seeds again RESOWS
99. Historic Mesopotamian city EDESSA
101. Long-armed ape ORANG
102. Judean king DAVID
103. Cub Scout leader AKELA
107. Sweeney with scissors TODD
108. Opine online BLOG
109. Meditative practice YOGA
110. Many a bagpiper SCOT
111. Reign RULE


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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

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Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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