LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 14. Friday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Julian Lim
THEME: Overlaps … today’s themed answers are constructed by adding a phrase that overlaps with the beginning of the answer:

17A. Snap of part of one’s portfolio? PENNY-STOCK PHOTO (from “penny stock” & “stock photo”)
32A. What a Canadian band owes annually? NICKELBACK TAXES (from “Nickelback” & “back taxes”)
38A. Cheap Valentine’s Day gift? DIME-A-DOZEN ROSES (from “dime a dozen” & “a dozen roses”)
57A. Injury sustained before the semis? QUARTER-FINAL CUT (from “quarter final” & “final cut”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Out of the rat race, maybe: Abbr. RET
Retired (ret.)

9. Discombobulate ADDLE
To discombobulate is to faze, disconcert, to confuse.

14. Chatter’s caveat IMO
In my opinion (IMO)

16. Prized mushroom MOREL
The morel is that genus of mushroom with the honeycomb-like structure on the cap. They’re highly prized, especially in French cuisine. Morels should never be eaten raw as they are toxic, with the toxins being removed by thorough cooking.

20. Chocolatey, circular cereal brand OREO O’S
Oreo O’s were made by Post from 1998 to 2007. Oreo O’s were basically O-shaped (like Cheerios) but chocolate-flavored, dark brown in color and with white sprinkles on them. Oh, and lots of sugar.

21. Gerrymanders, say REMAPS
Elbridge Gerry was the fifth Vice President of the US, serving under James Madison. Gerry only served 1½ years of his term however, as he died of heart failure while still in office. While Gerry was the governor of his home state of Massachusetts he signed a bill that allowed redrawing of electoral boundaries in such a way that it benefited his Democratic-Republican Party. The “Boston Gazette” wrote an article about the bill and termed the political tactic “Gerry-Mandering”. And “gerrymandering” is a term we still use today, and not just in this country but all over the world.

25. Org. with den mothers BSA
As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910.

27. Zone for DDE ETO
General Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE) was in command of the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during WWII.

28. Big name in 30-Across MCAN
(30A. Flats, e.g. SHOES)
Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

32. What a Canadian band owes annually? NICKELBACK TAXES (from “Nickelback” & “back taxes”)
Nickelback is a rock band that formed in Hanna, Alberta in 1995 and is now based in Vancouver.

36. “Gun Hill Road” star Morales ESAI
Esai Morales is best known for his role in the 1987 movie “La Bamba”, which depicted the life of Ritchie Valens and his half-brother Bob Morales (played by Esai).

“Gun Hill Road” is a 2011 drama film that is named for a road in the Bronx, New York. Heading the cast is actor Esai Morales. The movie also stars actress Harmony Santana who plays a transgender character. Santana is an openly transgender actress, and her performance in “Gun Hill Road” marked the first time a transgender actor garnered a nomination for a major US acting award (an Independent Spirit Award).

38. Cheap Valentine’s Day gift? DIME-A-DOZEN ROSES (from “dime a dozen” & “a dozen roses”)
Saint Valentine’s Day was chosen by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saints’ day was dropped by the Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

46. Indian intern in “Dilbert” ASOK
“Dilbert” is a comic strip written by Scott Adams, a “neighbor” of mine here in the Bay Area, and the owner of a nice restaurant down the end of my street.

48. Far from draconian LAX
Constitutional law was brought to Athens and Ancient Greece by a legislator called Draco. The legal code that Draco developed was relatively harsh, which is why we use the term “draconian” to describe unforgiving rules.

51. Giants lineman Chris SNEE
Chris Snee is a football player for the New York Giants. Snee is married to the daughter of Tom Coughlin, the Giants coach.

52. “Venerable” Eng. monk ST BEDE
The Venerable Bede was a monk in the north of England in the first century AD. Saint Bede is mainly known as an author and scholar, publisher of “The Ecclesiastical History of the English People”.

55. Motion-sensitive Xbox accessory KINECT
Xbox is made by Microsoft (I’m sure the kids have one around here somewhere!) and introduced in 2001. The current version is known as Xbox 360.

65. Composer Rorem NED
American composer Ned Rorem is famous for his musical compositions, but also for his book, “Paris Diary of Ned Rorem” that was published in 1966. Rorem talks openly about his sexuality in the book, and also about the sexuality of others including Noel Coward, Leonard Bernstein and Samuel Barber, much to some people’s chagrin.

Down
2. Retired professors EMERITI
Emeritus (female form “emerita”, plural “emeriti”) is a term in the title of some retired professionals, particularly those from academia. Originally an emeritus was a veteran soldier who had served his time. The term comes from the Latin verb “emerere” meaning to complete one’s service.

3. “Funky Cold Medina” rapper TONE LOC
Tone Lōc is the stage name of the rapper Anthony Smith.

4. Ballpark rallying cry based on a 1950s hit DAY-O
“Day-O (The Banana Boat Song)” is a traditional folk song from Jamaica. It is sung from the standpoint of dock workers unloading boats on the night shift, so daylight has come, and they want to go home. The most famous version of “Day-O” was recorded by Harry Belafonte, in 1956.

5. “Twin Peaks” actor Tamblyn RUSS
Russ Tamblyn is an actor from Los Angeles who I know best from his performance in 1961’s “West Side Story” in which he played Riff, the leader of the Jets gang. More recently, Tamblyn played Dr. Lawrence Jacoby on the TV series “Twin Peaks”. Russ’s daughter is actress Amber Tamblyn, who plays the lead on the TV show “Joan of Arcadia”.

7. Commerce gp. headed by Roberto Azevêdo WTO
The World Trade Organization (WTO) is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The stated aim of the WTO is to liberalize international trade. The organization was founded in 1995 when an international agreement on trade was reached that effectively replaced the existing General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) that was laid down in 1949.

8. Girdle material LYCRA
What we call spandex in the US is known as Lycra in the British Isles. “Spandex” was chosen as the name for the elastic fiber as it is an anagram of “expands”.

9. Letters on some faces AM/PM
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

10. Capital west of Dubai DOHA
Doha is the capital city of the state of Qatar located on the Persian Gulf. The name “Doha” translates from Arabic as “the big tree”.

11. Big name in cloud storage DROPBOX
In the world of computing, when one operates “in the cloud”, one’s files and key applications are not stored on one’s own computer, but rather are residing “in the cloud”, on a computer(s) somewhere out on the Internet. I do 90% of my computing in the cloud. That way I don’t have to worry about backing up files, and I can operate from any computer if I have to …

13. “Turn to Stone” band ELO
Electric Light Orchestra(ELO)

18. Exiled Cambodian Lon __ NOL
Lon Nol was a soldier and politician in Cambodia, later serving twice as the country’s president. When the Khmer Rouge took over Cambodia in 1975, Nol escaped the country to Indonesia. He eventually found a home in Fullerton, California, where he died in 1985.

23. One-named Milanese model FABIO
Fabio Lanzoni (usually called just “Fabio”) is an Italian fashion model and all-round celebrity. Fabio’s real claim to fame was his appearance on the cover of many, many romance novels in the eighties and nineties.

24. Protein producer RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

26. Mule kin ASS
A hinny is the offspring of a male horse (the “h-” from h-orse) and a female donkey/ass (the “-nny” from je-nny). A mule is more common, and is the offspring of a female horse and male donkey/ass.

31. Symbolic ring HALO
The Greek word “halos” is the name given to the ring of light around the sun or moon, which gives us our word “halo”.

34. It may include a checking account CHESS
In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture it is said to be “in check”. If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in “checkmate” and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce “check!”) so that an accidental and early ending to the game doesn’t occur.

35. Atlantic City game KENO
The name “Keno” has French or Latin roots, with the French “quine” being a term for five winning numbers, and the Latin “quini” meaning “five each”. The game originated in China and was introduced into the West by Chinese immigrants who were working on the first Transcontinental Railroad in the 1800s.

Atlantic City is a major resort on the New Jersey coast that benefits from its proximity to New York City (132 miles) and Philadelphia (55 miles). Atlantic City’s famous boardwalk was first built in 1870, the purpose of which was to keep sand out of the lobbies of the hotels on the beachfront.

38. High-tech connection letters DSL
The acronym “DSL” originally stood for Digital Subscriber Loop, but is now accepted to mean (Asymmetric) Digital Subscriber Line. DSL is the technology that allows Internet service be delivered down the same telephone line as voice service, by separating the two into different frequency signals.

40. Homemade collection of songs MIXTAPE
Even though “tapes” are no longer used, the term “mixtape” still describes any homemade collection of musical tracks. The less retro term for the same thing might be “playlist”.

44. Undid a dele STETTED
“Stet” is the Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” beside the change and then underscoring the change with a line of dots or dashes.

50. Prefix with frost PERMA-
Permafrost is by definition soil that has been below the freezing point of water for two years or more. Usually permafrost is covered by a thin layer of soil that thaws during the warmer months and which can sustain life. Plants can grow in the active layer, but their roots cannot penetrate the permafrost below.

51. Hit with skits and bits SNL
“Saturday Night Live” (SNL)

54. DFW schedule data ETDS
Estimated time of departure (ETD)

Dallas/Fort Worth Airport is the largest hub for American Airlines, and is also the fourth busiest airport in the world in terms of aircraft landings and takeoffs (Atlanta is the world’s busiest, followed by Chicago O’Hare and then Los Angeles International).

56. “Othello” schemer IAGO
Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. Iago is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. He hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello’s wife. By the end of the play it’s Iago himself who is discredited and Othello (before committing suicide) apologizes to Cassio for having believed Iago’s lies. Heavy stuff …

57. Brees and Brady: Abbr. QBS
Drew Brees is a quarterback for the New Orleans Saints. On top of his success in the NFL, when he was a youth Brees was an excellent tennis player. In one competition he actually beat a young Andy Roddick who later became the world’s number one.

Tom Brady plays quarterback for the New England Patriots. Brady is from San Mateo, California, which isn’t very far from here. Brady dated actress Bridget Moynahan for a couple of years, and the pair have a child together.

58. T.G.I. time FRI
“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies.

59. ThinkPad maker IBM
IBM introduced the ThinkPad in 1992, and the brand is still sold today, although no longer manufactured by IBM. IBM sold off its personal computer division in 2005 to Lenovo. A ThinkPad was used aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor in 1993 on a mission focused on repairing the Hubble Telescope. The ThinkPad was being tested to see how it performed in space, given the high levels of radiation found in that environment. Now, there are about 100 (!) ThinkPads on board the International Space Station.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Out of the rat race, maybe: Abbr. RET
4. Country inflection DRAWL
9. Discombobulate ADDLE
14. Chatter’s caveat IMO
15. Family nickname AUNTY
16. Prized mushroom MOREL
17. Snap of part of one’s portfolio? PENNY-STOCK PHOTO (from “penny stock” & “stock photo”)
20. Chocolatey, circular cereal brand OREO O’S
21. Gerrymanders, say REMAPS
22. Medication unit PILL
23. Brawl FRAY
25. Org. with den mothers BSA
27. Zone for DDE ETO
28. Big name in 30-Across MCAN
30. Flats, e.g. SHOES
32. What a Canadian band owes annually? NICKELBACK TAXES (from “Nickelback” & “back taxes”)
36. “Gun Hill Road” star Morales ESAI
37. Recover HEAL
38. Cheap Valentine’s Day gift? DIME-A-DOZEN ROSES (from “dime a dozen” & “a dozen roses”)
45. Sassy ones SNIPS
46. Indian intern in “Dilbert” ASOK
47. Business card abbr. EXT
48. Far from draconian LAX
49. Smartphone downloads APPS
51. Giants lineman Chris SNEE
52. “Venerable” Eng. monk ST BEDE
55. Motion-sensitive Xbox accessory KINECT
57. Injury sustained before the semis? QUARTER-FINAL CUT (from “quarter final” & “final cut”)
60. Two-footer BIPED
61. High-muck-a-muck MR BIG
62. Had a taco ATE
63. Makes tender, in a way STEWS
64. “We __ please” AIM TO
65. Composer Rorem NED

Down
1. Unwrap in a hurry RIP OPEN
2. Retired professors EMERITI
3. “Funky Cold Medina” rapper TONE LOC
4. Ballpark rallying cry based on a 1950s hit DAY-O
5. “Twin Peaks” actor Tamblyn RUSS
6. Barbecue buttinsky ANT
7. Commerce gp. headed by Roberto Azevêdo WTO
8. Girdle material LYCRA
9. Letters on some faces AM/PM
10. Capital west of Dubai DOHA
11. Big name in cloud storage DROPBOX
12. “Well, now …” LET’S SEE
13. “Turn to Stone” band ELO
18. Exiled Cambodian Lon __ NOL
19. Critical KEY
23. One-named Milanese model FABIO
24. Protein producer RNA
26. Mule kin ASS
28. Arizona landscape features MESAS
29. Sporting, with “in” CLAD
30. Desolate STARK
31. Symbolic ring HALO
33. Put in storage KEEP
34. It may include a checking account CHESS
35. Atlantic City game KENO
38. High-tech connection letters DSL
39. Formally attired IN A SUIT
40. Homemade collection of songs MIXTAPE
41. Shock ZAP
42. Like some Lake Erie residents SENECAN
43. Fulfill EXECUTE
44. Undid a dele STETTED
49. Fruity quencher ADE
50. Prefix with frost PERMA-
51. Hit with skits and bits SNL
53. Cook up BREW
54. DFW schedule data ETDS
55. Use needles KNIT
56. “Othello” schemer IAGO
57. Brees and Brady: Abbr. QBS
58. T.G.I. time FRI
59. ThinkPad maker IBM

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LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Jan 14, Thursday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa
THEME: Trojan Horses … today’s themed answers all have a HORSE hidden inside:

20A. Emulate the successful bounty hunter CLAIM A REWARD (hiding “mare”)
29A. “To the best of my memory” AS FAR AS I RECALL (hiding “sire”)
48A. “Shalom aleichem” PEACE BE UPON YOU (hiding “pony”)
55A. Devious traps, and a hint to surprises found in 20-, 29- and 48-Across TROJAN HORSES

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 03s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. “Hurlyburly” playwright David RABE
David Rabe is an American playwright, a veteran of Vietnam. He is the author of a Vietnam War Trilogy of plays:

– “The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel”
– “Sticks and Bones”
– “Streamers”

“Hurlyburly” is a play by David Rabe that was premiered in 1984. The play’s title comes from a line spoken by one of the witches in Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” …

When the hurlyburly’s done
When the battle’s lost and won.

14. __ ballerina PRIMA
The Italian operatic term “prima donna” is used for the lead female singer in an opera company. “Prima donna” translates from Italian as “first lady”. The lead male singer is known as the “primo uomo”. The term “prima donna assoluta” is reserved for a prima donna who is generally accepted as being an outstanding performer. We tend to use “prima donna” for a female performer who has an inflated ego.

15. “Foaming cleanser” of old ads AJAX
Ajax cleanser has been around since 1947, and it’s “stronger than dirt!” That was the most famous slogan over here in the US. On my side of the pond, the infamous slogan was “it cleans like a white tornado”. Bon Ami cleanser has been around much longer. The cleanser was introduced just a few years after Bon Ami soap went to market in 1886.

16. Champagne Tony of ’60s golf LEMA
Tony Lema was a golfer, a native of Oakland, California. In 1962-1966 he had an impressive run of PGA victories, including a famous 1962 win at the Orange County Open. As a joke, he promised that should he win he would serve champagne to the press corps, who quickly gave him the nickname “Champagne Tony”, a name that stuck. In 1966, Lema and his wife were flying in a small, chartered plane to an exhibition tournament in Illinois, when the aircraft ran out of fuel. Ironically, it crashed into a water hazard near the seventh green of a country club in Lansing, Illinois, killing all four people on board. Lema was 32-years-old.

17. Biblical peak SINAI
According to the Bible, Mount Sinai is the mountain on which Moses was given the Ten Commandments. The Biblical Mount Sinai is probably not the mountain in Egypt that today has the same name, although this is the subject of much debate. The Egyptian Mount Sinai has two developed routes that one can take to reach the summit. The longer gentler climb takes about 2 1/2 hours, but there is also the steeper climb up the 3,750 “steps of penitence”.

20. Emulate the successful bounty hunter CLAIM A REWARD (hiding “mare”)
We use “bounty” to mean a reward for capturing or killing a criminal. Back in the early 1700s, a bounty was a gratuity given to a military recruit, and before that, a gift from a sovereign or the state. The term comes into English via French from the Latin “bonitatem” meaning “goodness”.

26. Three NASCAR Unsers ALS
The Unser family seems to have racing cars in its blood. Al Unser, Sr. won the Indy 500 on four occasions. Al’s brother Jerry was the first of the Unsers to compete at Indianapolis. Al’s other brother Bobby, won the Indy three times. Al’s son, Al Junior, won the Indy twice. Al Junior’s son is also a racing driver who competes at the Indy Speedway.

27. Part of D.A.: Abbr. ATT
District Attorney (DA)

28. __ Fáil: Irish “stone of destiny” LIA
The “Lia Fáil” is the coronation stone that is found on the Hill of Tara, the traditional seat of the High Kings of Ireland. “Lia Fáil” translates from Irish as “stone of destiny”.

34. A.L. lineup fixtures DHS
Designated hitters (DHs)

35. Baby powder ingredient TALC
Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” can also be cornstarch.

36. Siesta NAP
We use the word “siesta” to describe a short nap in the early afternoon, taking the word from the Spanish. In turn, the Spanish word is derived from the Latin “hora sexta” meaning “the sixth hour”. The idea is that the nap is taken at “the sixth hour” after dawn.

38. Missal sites PEWS
A pew is a bench in a church, usually with a high back. The original pews were raised and sometimes enclosed seats in the church used by women and important men or families. “Pew” comes from the Old French “puie” meaning “balcony, elevation”.

Missals came into being in medieval times and were used primarily by priests and ministers. A missal is a book containing all the texts necessary for the celebration of Mass through the liturgical year. Nowadays missals are used by the congregation and not just by the celebrants. The term “missal” comes from the Latin for “Mass book”.

48. “Shalom aleichem” PEACE BE UPON YOU (hiding “pony”)
“Shalom aleichem” translates from Hebrew as “peace be upon you”. Sholem Aleichem was also the pen name of Yiddish author Solomon Rabinovich, who wrote the stories about Tevye the Dairyman who inspired the musical “Fiddler on the Roof”.

51. Adolphe who developed a horn SAX
The saxophone was invented by Belgian Adolphe Sax. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax’s grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

52. “Do the Right Thing” director Spike LEE
Shelton Jackson Lee is the real name of Spike Lee, the film director and producer. Lee’s first feature-length film, released in 1986, was “She’s Gotta Have It”. Lee shot the film in just twelve days, and kept the movie within its relatively small budget of only $175,000. “She’s Gotta Have It” grossed over $7 million …

“Do the Right Thing” is a Spike Lee movie, released in 1989. Much of the action in the film is centered on a local pizzeria called “Sal’s” owned by Italian-American Salvatore Frangione (played by Danny Aiello).

53. Intraoffice IT system LAN
LAN (Local Area Network)

54. Attach, as a codicil ADD
A codicil is a document attached to a will that amends the original, rather than replacing it. The term comes from the Latin “coedilcillus” meaning “a short writing”.

55. Devious traps, and a hint to surprises found in 20-, 29- and 48-Across TROJAN HORSES
The story of the Wooden Horse of Troy is told in the Virgil’s poem “The Aeneid”. According to the tale, the city of Troy finally fell to Greeks after a siege that had lasted for ten years. In a ruse, the Greeks sailed away in apparent defeat, leaving behind a large wooden horse. Inside the horse were hidden 30 crack soldiers. When the horse was dragged into the city as a victory trophy, the soldiers sneaked out and opened the city’s gates. The Greeks returned under cover of night and entered the open city.

61. Initial-based political nickname DUBYA
President George W. Bush was nicknamed “Dubya” based on the Texas pronunciation of his middle initial “W”.

66. Govt.-owned home financing gp. GNMA
Ginnie Mae is the familiar nickname for the Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA), a government-owned corporation created in 1968 with the objective of promoting home ownership. The “Ginnie Mae” nickname is derived from the GNMA acronym.

68. Chest muscles, briefly PECS
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

69. Early temptation locale EDEN
In the Christian tradition, the “fall of man” took place in the Garden of Eden when Adam and Eve succumbed to the temptation of eating from the tree of knowledge of good and evil, against the bidding of God. As a result, Adam and Eve were banished from Eden to prevent them becoming immortal by eating from the tree of life. The first humans had transitioned from a state of innocent obedience to a state of guilty disobedience.

Down
1. 12-in. discs LPS
The first vinyl records designed to play at 33 1/3 rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first Long Play (LP) 33 1/3 rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm “single” the following year, in 1949.

2. Bush spokesman Fleischer ARI
Ari Fleischer was the White House Press Secretary for President George W. Bush. Fleischer now runs his own media consulting firm that specializes in representing sports players and organizations. Fleischer helped Mark McGwire handle the media when he had to admit to the use of steroids, and was briefly hired by Tiger Woods as he planned his return to the PGA after dropping out of the spotlight to handle the problems in his personal life.

3. Sardine holder TIN
Sardines are oily fish related to herrings. Sardines are also known as pilchards, although in the UK “sardine” is the name for a young pilchard.

4. Colorful Apple IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated.

8. Cairo market BAZAAR
Our word “bazaar” meaning “market” comes from the Persian “bazar”, meaning the same thing.

11. Store name derived from the prescription symbol REXALL
Rexall was a chain of drugstores in North America which started out in 1902 as a retailers’ cooperative called United Drug Stores. The name “Rexall” was derived from the “Rx” abbreviation used for prescriptions. Rexall used a very interesting marketing concept in 1936. The company sent “The Million Dollar Rexall Streamlined Convention Train” on a tour all over the US. The train had 12 cars which included product displays, convention facilities and a dining car. The idea was to allow local druggists to attend a convention without having the cost of travel, and of course to promote products and the brand.

12. “Bam!” chef EMERIL
Emeril Lagasse is an American chef, born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved notoriety as executive chef in Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous “Bam!” catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

13. Film fish WANDA
I think that the 1988 comedy “A Fish Called Wanda” is very under-appreciated. The film was co-written by and stars John Cleese, and has an exceptional cast including Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline and Cleese’s friend from “Monty Python”, Michael Palin. The “fish” in the film is the con artist Wanda, played by Curtis.

21. Second half of a ball game? ALAI
Even though jai alai is often said to be the fastest sport in the world because of the speed of the ball, in fact golf balls usually get going at a greater clip.

23. 1984 Olympics parallel bars gold medalist Conner BART
Bart Conner is a US gymnast who won gold in the 1984 Olympic Games. Conner is married to the great Romanian gymnast Nadia Comăneci.

25. Nonstick cookware brand T-FAL
Tefal (also T-Fal) is a French manufacturer of cookware, famous for its non-stick line. The name “Tefal” is a portmanteau, of TEFlon and ALuminum, the key materials used in producing their pots and pans.

30. Seaport of Ghana ACCRA
Accra sits on Ghana’s coast and is a major seaport as well as the country’s capital city. The name “Accra” comes from a local word “Nkran” meaning “ants”, a name chosen because of the large number of anthills found in the area when the city was founded.

32. Tree with quivering leaves ASPEN
The “quaking” aspen tree is so called because the structure of the leaves causes them to move easily in the wind, to “tremble, quake”.

37. Mitt Romney’s 2012 running mate PAUL RYAN
Paul Ryan was the Republican nominee for Vice President in the 2012 election, on the ticket with Mitt Romney. Off the political stage, Ryan is famous for his fitness regime. He has shared that much of his motivation to work out and to watch his diet is because there is a history of heart attacks at an early age in his family.

39. “The Celts” singer ENYA
Enya’s real name is Eithne Patricia Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career. She sure does turn up a lot in crosswords …

41. Poker game STUD
Stud poker is the name given to many variants of poker, all characterized by the dealer giving each player a mix of cards face-down and face-up. The cards facing downwards are called “hole cards”, cards only visible to the individual who holds that particular hand. This gives rise to the phrase “ace in the hole”, a valuable holding that only the player with the ace is aware of.

43. Bruins’ campus: Abbr. UCLA
The UCLA Bruins mascots are Joe and Josephine Bruin, characters that have evolved over the years. There used to be “mean” Bruin mascots but they weren’t very popular with the fans, so now there are only “happy” Bruin mascots at the games.

48. Prisoner’s reward PAROLE
The term “parole” is a French word that we use in English, with the French “parole” meaning “word, speech”. Of particular interest is the French phrase “parole d’honneur” which translates as “word of honor”. In the early 1600s we started using “parole” to mean a promise by a prisoner of war not to escape, as in the prisoner giving his “word of honor” not to run off. Over time, parole has come to mean conditional release of a prisoner before he or she has served the full term of a sentence.

49. Strikingly unusual EXOTIC
The word “exotic” means “belonging to another country”, and is derived from the Greek “exo-” meaning “outside”. Exotica are things that are excitingly strange, often from foreign parts.

56. New York team JETS
Just like the New York Giants, the New York Jets are based in New Jersey, headquartered in Florham Park. The Jets and the Giants have a unique arrangement in the NFL in that the two teams share Metlife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Jets were an AFL charter team, formed in 1959 as the Titans of New York. The Titans changed their name to the Jets in 1963.

58. Bout of beefy battlers SUMO
Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in Japan, the country of its origin. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of the organization’s aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

62. ER vitals BPS
One’s blood pressure (BP) might be taken in the emergency room (ER).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Like many abbreviated terms in footnotes LATIN
6. “Hurlyburly” playwright David RABE
10. Beer BREW
14. __ ballerina PRIMA
15. “Foaming cleanser” of old ads AJAX
16. Champagne Tony of ’60s golf LEMA
17. Biblical peak SINAI
18. Confused state DAZE
19. Plodding haulers OXEN
20. Emulate the successful bounty hunter CLAIM A REWARD (hiding “mare”)
23. Halloween creature BAT
26. Three NASCAR Unsers ALS
27. Part of D.A.: Abbr. ATT
28. __ Fáil: Irish “stone of destiny” LIA
29. “To the best of my memory” AS FAR AS I RECALL (hiding “sire”)
33. Chem lab event REACTION
34. A.L. lineup fixtures DHS
35. Baby powder ingredient TALC
36. Siesta NAP
38. Missal sites PEWS
42. Grind RUT
45. Start of a green adage WASTE NOT
48. “Shalom aleichem” PEACE BE UPON YOU (hiding “pony”)
51. Adolphe who developed a horn SAX
52. “Do the Right Thing” director Spike LEE
53. Intraoffice IT system LAN
54. Attach, as a codicil ADD
55. Devious traps, and a hint to surprises found in 20-, 29- and 48-Across TROJAN HORSES
59. Mechanical method ROTE
60. Open and breezy AIRY
61. Initial-based political nickname DUBYA
65. Touched ground ALIT
66. Govt.-owned home financing gp. GNMA
67. Made calls at home UMPED
68. Chest muscles, briefly PECS
69. Early temptation locale EDEN
70. Mails POSTS

Down
1. 12-in. discs LPS
2. Bush spokesman Fleischer ARI
3. Sardine holder TIN
4. Colorful Apple IMAC
5. Finger painting? NAIL ART
6. Hilton rival RADISSON
7. In __: stuck A JAM
8. Cairo market BAZAAR
9. Pushed (oneself) EXERTED
10. Explode BLOW
11. Store name derived from the prescription symbol REXALL
12. “Bam!” chef EMERIL
13. Film fish WANDA
21. Second half of a ball game? ALAI
22. Cut with acid ETCH
23. 1984 Olympics parallel bars gold medalist Conner BART
24. Out of port ASEA
25. Nonstick cookware brand T-FAL
30. Seaport of Ghana ACCRA
31. Bowled over IN AWE
32. Tree with quivering leaves ASPEN
37. Mitt Romney’s 2012 running mate PAUL RYAN
39. “The Celts” singer ENYA
40. Stacked fuel WOOD
41. Poker game STUD
43. Bruins’ campus: Abbr. UCLA
44. Like most new drivers TEENAGE
46. Hot springs resorts SPAS
47. Strengthened TONED UP
48. Prisoner’s reward PAROLE
49. Strikingly unusual EXOTIC
50. Trailing BEHIND
51. Purse part STRAP
56. New York team JETS
57. “Him __”: romantic triangle ultimatum OR ME
58. Bout of beefy battlers SUMO
62. ER vitals BPS
63. “However …” YET
64. Product promos ADS

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