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Greetings from Kilkenny, in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland until October 9th. I plan on doing the puzzle each day (with a pint, no doubt), although I may be a little late due to time zone differences. I am sure that you understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 10 Jan 14, Friday






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CROSSWORD SETTER: John Verel & Jeff Chen
THEME: A Pangram … a pangram is a crossword in which each letter of the alphabet appears once. Today’s grid is a pangram with a twist, as it includes the essential elements in the celebrated pangram phrase “the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”. In the grid, our QUICK BROWN FOX is shown in the circled letters, and is actually JUMPING over the LAZY DOG at the bottom of the grid:
58A. This puzzle's theme is one PANGRAM

33A. Parts 1 and 4 of this puzzle's theme THE
41A. Puzzle theme, part 3 JUMPS OVER
67A. End of this puzzle's theme LAZY DOG
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 45s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Singer with bandleader Xavier Cugat CHARO
Charo is an actress, comedian and flamenco guitarist from Spain. She is quite famous for her comedic catchphrase “cuchi cuchi”. Charo's real name is ... wait for it ... María del Rosario Pilar Martínez Molina Gutiérrez de los Perales Santa Ana Romaguera y de la Hinojosa Rasten.

Xavier Cugat was an American bandleader born in Spain, who arrived in the United States via Cuba. He worked in Hollywood on movies, although he was also in charge of the Hotel Orchestra in the Waldorf Astoria in New York City for 16 years. Famously he conducted using just one arm, as he would hold his pet Chihuahua in the other. His fourth marriage was to comic actress Charo, in the first marriage ceremony ever to take place in Caesar's Palace.

10. City in Czechoslovakia? OSLO
The string of letters OSLO appears in the word “Czechoslovakia”.

14. Pro __ BONO
The Latin term “pro bono publico” means “for the public good”, and is usually shortened to “pro bono”. The term applies to professional work that is done for free or at a reduced fee as a service to the public.

15. Macho guys HE-MEN
A man described as “macho” shows pride in his masculinity. “Macho” is a Spanish word for “male animal”.

16. The whole kit and kaboodle A TO Z
In the idiomatic expression "the whole kit and caboodle", caboodle (sometimes spelled "kaboodle") is an informal term for a bunch of people, or sometimes the "the whole lot".

19. Night music TAPS
"Taps" is played nightly by the US military, indicating "lights out". It's also known as "Butterfield's Lullaby" as it is a variation of an older bugle call named the "Scott Tattoo", arranged during the Civil War by the Union Army's Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield. The tune is called "taps", from the notion of drum taps, as it was originally played on a drum, and only later on a bugle.

20. Only woman to win the top prize on "The $64,000 Question" JOYCE BROTHERS
Joyce Brothers was a psychologist and TV personality from Brooklyn, New York. Brothers first came to the public’s attention in 1955 when she was a contestant on “The $64,000 Question” game show. She agreed to answer questions as an expert on the subject of boxing at the suggestion of the show’s sponsors, even though she was no expert all. Before appearing on the show, Brothers read every reference book on the subject that she could find. The happy outcome was that she became the only woman ever to win the show’s top prize.

23. Like many a Magic Johnson pass NO-LOOK
Magic Johnson’s real name is Earvin Johnson. Johnson was born and grew up in Lansing, Michigan. Earvin earned the nickname “Magic” when playing basketball in high school, after one particularly great performance on the court.

26. Homer's father ABE
In the animated TV show called “The Simpsons”, Grampa Abe Simpson is voiced by Dan Castellaneta, the same actor who provides the voice for Homer.

27. Lee side: Abbr. CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in the war in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited Lee to take command of the whole Union Army but he declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

29. Actor Max __ Sydow VON
Max von Sydow is a Swedish actor, noted for his appearances in movies filmed in various European languages, everything from English and Norwegian to Danish and Spanish.

30. Brouhaha ADO
"Brouhaha" was a French word that back in the 1550s meant "the cry of the devil disguised as clergy" . Wow!

31. O. Henry quality? LONG O
The letter O in the name “O. Henry” is a long O.

O. Henry was the pen name of writer William Sydney Porter from Greensboro, North Carolina. O. Henry is famous for his witty short stories that have a clever twist in the tail.

38. Blood line AORTA
The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

44. Ersatz PHONY
Something described as “ersatz” is a copy, and usually not a good one. “Ersatz” comes from the German verb “ersetzen” meaning “to replace”.

49. First name in Disney villains CRUELLA
Cruella de Vil is the villain in the 1956 novel “The Hundred and One Dalmatians” written by Dodie Smith. Most famously perhaps, Cruella was played so ably by Glenn Close in the Disney movie adaption “101 Dalmatians”, released in 1996.

51. Doo-wop staple HARMONY
Doo-wop developed in the 1940s and can be described as a vocal-based R&B music. Even though the style has been around since the forties, the name doo-wop wasn't introduced until the early sixties.

54. "The Murders in the __ Morgue" RUE
"The Murders in the Rue Morgue" is a short story by Edgar Allen Poe, and is recognized as the first "detective story" ever written. The murder is solved when it is determined that the murderer was actually an orangutan.

56. Brother of Jacob ESAU
Esau, was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described, “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

57. Plan for the future, briefly IRA
Individual Retirement Account (IRA)

58. This puzzle's theme is one PANGRAM
A pangram is a phrase that includes all the letters of the alphabet. The most famous example in English is “the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”.

62. Kenya's cont. AFR
The Carthaginian Republic was centered on the city of Carthage, the ruins of which are located on the coast of modern-day Tunisia. The Latin name for the people of Carthage was “Afri”. When the Romans took over Carthage, they created a province they called “Africa”. That name extended over time to the whole continent.

63. Kansas City football analyst Dawson LEN
Len Dawson is a retired AFL-NFL quarterback, who played for the Kansas City Chiefs (originally the Dallas Texans).

64. Mother-of-pearl source ABALONE
The large edible sea snails that we call abalone are called “ormer” in the British Isles.

Mother-of-pearl is another name for nacre. Nacre is the strong iridescent material laid down by some mollusks on the inside of their shells, and it's also what makes up pearls. The creature lays down nacre as a defensive mechanism, protecting the soft tissue of its body from the rough surface of the outer shell. Similarly, it uses nacre to encapsulate harmful debris or a parasite that penetrates the shell, and that's how a pearl is formed.

66. Mensa stats IQS
If you ever had to learn Latin, as did I, "mensa" was probably taught to you in Lesson One as it's the word commonly used as an example of a first declension noun. Mensa means "table". The Mensa organization for folks with high IQs was set up in Oxford, England back in 1946. To become a member, one is required to have an IQ that is in the top 2% of the population.

68. Quartet in a George Strait title EXS
:All My Ex's Live in Texas” is a song released in 1987 by country singer George Strait.

George Strait is a country music singer, known as the “King of Country”. The moniker seems to be well deserved as Strait has had more number one hits on Billboard’s list of Hot Country Songs than any other artist.

Down
4. Izu Islands locale TOKYO
The Izu Islands are a chain of volcanic islands stretch south from Tokyo, the capital of Japan.

5. Rear view CHEEKS
There are three gluteal muscles in the human body, the largest of which is the gluteus maximus. It's the gluteus maximus which really dictates the shape and size of the human buttocks. In evolutionary terms, the human "glutes" are larger than those in related species because they play a big role maintaining our erect posture.

6. Trumpeter Alpert HERB
Herb Alpert still plays the trumpet today, but he is also a talented painter and sculptor. His works are seen regularly in exhibitions all around the world.

7. Latin lover's word AMOR
“Amor” is the Latin word for love.

10. Like Cheerios OATEN
Cheerios breakfast cereal has the distinction of being the first oat-based cereal introduced into the market, hitting the grocery store shelves in 1941. Back then, “Cheerios” were known as CheeriOats.

13. Wt. units OZS
Our term “ounce” comes from the Latin “uncia”, which was 1/12 of a “libra”, the Roman “pound”.

21. Chanel No. 1? COCO
The 1st word in Coco Chanel’s name s “Coco”.

Coco Chanel was a French fashion designer. Perhaps because I am a man, clothes design is not my forte, however, if I had to pick a designer whose clothes I really liked, it would be Chanel. She had a way of creating simpler designs that looked so elegant on a woman.

23. "The Lion King" queen NALA
In "The Lion King", Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba.

The highly successful stage musical "The Lion King" started out life as a 1994 animated feature film of the same name from the Disney studio. The film is the highest earning traditionally-animated feature of all time. The animated film "Finding Nemo" has made more money, but it was created using computer animation.

29. No VETO
"Veto" comes directly from Latin and means "I forbid". The word was used by tribunes of Ancient Rome to indicate that they opposed measures passed by the Senate.

32. Classic action figures GI JOES
G.I. Joe was the original "action figure", the first toy to carry that description. G.I. Joe first hit the shelves in 1964. There have been a few movies based on the G.I. Joe figure, but, more famous than all of them I would say is the 1997 movie "G.I. Jane" starring Demi Moore in the title role. I think this movie had some potential, to be honest, but it really did not deliver at all.

34. They may be game winners: Abbr. HRS
Home runs (HRs)

36. Slopeside sight A-FRAME
A A-frame house is one that has a steeply-angled roof, one forming the shape of the letter “A”. The A-frame design is popular in snowy regions, as the roof is so steeply pitched that it does not collect snow.

38. Kind of nitrite or nitrate AMYL
Amyl nitrite is intended for use as a vasodilator, but it is also psychoactive when inhaled, so it has been abused as a recreational drug.

Amyl nitrate is a chemical used an additive in diesel fuel that acts as an ignition improver.

39. Nike competitor AVIA
The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as "avia" is the Latin word for "to fly", and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

42. Not in the bk. UNL
One can opt to have one’s phone number unlisted (unl.), not in the book (bk.).

44. Trig, for calc, often PREREQ
The study of trigonometry (trig.) is often a prerequisite (prereq.) for studying calculus (calc.).

45. 43-Downers? HUMANS
(43D. Mess up ERR)
Alexander Pope's 1709 poem "An Essay on Criticism" is the source of at least three well-known quotations:
- A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.
- To err is human, to forgive divine.
- For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

50. Dino, Desi & Billy drummer ARNAZ
Dino, Desi and Billy were a singing group in the late sixties. Two of the trio were sons of famous parents. “Dino” was Dean Paul Martin, son of singer, actor and comedian Dean Martin. “Desi” was Desi Arnaz, Jr., the son of Desi Arnaz and Lucille Ball. Rounding out the group was a friend called Billy Hinsche.

51. Judean king HEROD
Herod the Great was made King of the Roman province of Judea (now the southern part of Israel). Herod the Great’s son was Herod Antipas, the Herod who appears in the New Testament in the stories of the execution of Jesus of Nazareth and John the Baptist.

52. Mongol tents YURTS
A yurt is a wood-framed dwelling that is used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia. Although a yurt is a substantial structure, it is of course extremely portable.

59. "Law News Now" journal publisher: Abbr. ABA
American Bar Association (ABA)

60. Year abroad ANO
In Spanish, a year (año) starts in January (enero) and ends in December (diciembre).

61. Storage unit MEG
In the world of computing, one kilobyte (1k) is one thousandth of a megabyte (“1 meg”).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Word choice EDIT
5. Singer with bandleader Xavier Cugat CHARO
10. City in Czechoslovakia? OSLO
14. Pro __ BONO
15. Macho guys HE-MEN
16. The whole kit and kaboodle A TO Z
17. Take delight (in) BASK
18. Break down over time ERODE
19. Night music TAPS
20. Only woman to win the top prize on "The $64,000 Question" JOYCE BROTHERS
23. Like many a Magic Johnson pass NO-LOOK
24. Improvise WING IT
26. Homer's father ABE
27. Lee side: Abbr. CSA
29. Actor Max __ Sydow VON
30. Brouhaha ADO
31. O. Henry quality? LONG O
33. Parts 1 and 4 of this puzzle's theme THE
35. Astounds DAZES
37. Objector ANTI
38. Blood line AORTA
40. Some narcs FEDS
41. Puzzle theme, part 3 JUMPS OVER
44. Ersatz PHONY
46. Modern Persian IRANI
49. First name in Disney villains CRUELLA
51. Doo-wop staple HARMONY
53. Sewer's bottoms HEMS
54. "The Murders in the __ Morgue" RUE
56. Brother of Jacob ESAU
57. Plan for the future, briefly IRA
58. This puzzle's theme is one PANGRAM
62. Kenya's cont. AFR
63. Kansas City football analyst Dawson LEN
64. Mother-of-pearl source ABALONE
65. Wasted LIT
66. Mensa stats IQS
67. End of this puzzle's theme LAZY DOG
68. Quartet in a George Strait title EXS
67. Golfer's concern SLICE

Down
1. Recede EBB
2. Snow DO A JOB ON
3. Mouthing off INSOLENT
4. Izu Islands locale TOKYO
5. Rear view CHEEKS
6. Trumpeter Alpert HERB
7. Latin lover's word AMOR
8. Second effort REDO
9. Ring combo ONE-TWO
10. Like Cheerios OATEN
11. Daydream STARGAZE
12. Asymmetric LOPSIDED
13. Wt. units OZS
21. Chanel No. 1? COCO
22. Rear HIND
23. "The Lion King" queen NALA
25. Mix in a bowl TOSS
28. Upon ATOP
29. No VETO
32. Classic action figures GI JOES
34. They may be game winners: Abbr. HRS
36. Slopeside sight A-FRAME
38. Kind of nitrite or nitrate AMYL
39. Nike competitor AVIA
42. Not in the bk. UNL
43. Mess up ERR
44. Trig, for calc, often PREREQ
45. 43-Downers? HUMANS
47. "Deal's off'' NO SALE
48. Up the creek IN A FIX
49. Dog topper CHILI
50. Dino, Desi & Billy drummer ARNAZ
51. Judean king HEROD
52. Mongol tents YURTS
55. "This could get __" UGLY
58. Bud PAL
59. "Law News Now" journal publisher: Abbr. ABA
60. Year abroad ANO
61. Storage unit MEG


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7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Clever puzzle -- alas, couldn't get the theme. Fav clue 31a o Henry quality. I had irony!

Dabbler in XWords. said...

Clues were too obtuse -

There comes a times in men's souls, when he must leave the field and retire for ........ A well earned nap.

Thanks for the lovely trivia ...

Keep on teaching .... Thank you.



Hi, Pookie, VP of marketing .... Hope your kids are well, and both of you as well.

Bill Butler said...

@Anonymous
Glad you enjoyed it. I quite like those cyrptic clues like the O. Henry one, ones that send you off in wrong direction deliberately.

@Dabbler
Happy to hear that the little trivial tidbits are entertaining. I think I'll head off for a nap as well :)

Addict said...

No circles in my puzzle left me searching for that darn quick brown fox! Too many abbreviations for my liking also but I got it done.
Joyce Brothers came out of some cobwebs somewhere.
Ten minutes longer than you Bill, but then there is the coffee time factor.

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Addict.

Long time no hear from.

A 10-minute longer solve, without the circles. That's pretty resepctable, I'd say!

Anonymous said...

Is there any way you can post the grid blank at the bottom of the page so that we can try the puzzle given the clues that are posted?

Bill Butler said...

I'm afraid that I cannot post a blank grid or clues without answers. I'm not in the crossword publication business, and am just a blogger sharing his thoughts about the day's crossword. Crossword publication is for the LA Times itself.

Thanks for checking.

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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

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The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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