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LA Times Crossword Answers 14 Feb 14, Friday






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CROSSWORD SETTER: Xan Vongsathorn
THEME: You First … today’s themed answers are well-known phrases, with the first and second letters reversed so that a U comes FIRST:
17A. Vessel storing a cash stash? URN FOR ONE’S MONEY (from “run for one’s money”)
25A. Layered computer connections? USB SANDWICH (from “sub sandwich”)
44A. Pet named for writer Sinclair? UPTON THE DOG (from “put on the dog”)
58A. Tantrum that devolves into hysterical gibberish? UNCLEAR MELTDOWN (from “nuclear meltdown”)
62A. "Lead the way!", and a phonetic hint to this puzzle's theme YOU FIRST!
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 12m 38s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Fox's "X-Files" partner DANA
"The X-Files" is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history.

11. Rite Aid rival CVS
The name of the drugstore chain CVS once stood for Consumer Value Stores, although these days the company uses the acronym to denote Convenience, Value and Service.

14. Cozy spot? TEAPOT
I don’t know what I’d do without my tea cosy/cozy …

15. Tiny tunes player IPOD NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

17. Vessel storing a cash stash? URN FOR ONE’S MONEY (from “run for one’s money”)
To give one “a run for one’s money” is to give one “a challenge”. The phrase comes from the world of horseracing where one wants a run for one’s money after having bet on a particular horse.

22. "Lady Jane Grey" playwright ROWE
Nicholas Rowe was an English playwright and poet who was appointed Poet Laureate in 1715. His last play was “The Tragedy of Lady Jane Grey”.

Lady Jane Grey was known as the “Nine Days’ Queen”. Lady Jane was the cousin of Edward VI and succeeded to the throne when the king named her his successor on his deathbed. Edward VI was the only son of Henry VIII. Henry’s eldest child Mary was the rightful heir to the throne and she deposed Lady Jane Grey in just a few days to become Queen Mary I (aka “Bloody Mary”). Lady Jane was imprisoned in the Tower of London and eventually beheaded.

25. Layered computer connections? USB SANDWICH (from “sub sandwich”)
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

32. Tracy/Hepburn battle-of-the-sexes film ADAM’S RIB
And here it is! My favorite movie of all time. “Adam’s Rib” is a classic romantic comedy starring the powerful duo, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn, playing two lawyers married to each other. Inevitably, the married couple have to take opposite sides in a high-profile court case, and hilarity ensues. The film is an interesting exploration of the role of men and women in 1949 American society.

40. Stoic philosopher CATO
Cato the Younger was a politician in the late Roman Republic, noted for his moral integrity. He is also remembered for an extended conflict with Julius Caesar.

41. Telescope sighting ASTEROID
The vast majority of asteroids in the Solar System are found in the main asteroid belt, which is located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. Four large asteroids (Ceres, Vesta, Pallas and Hygiea) make up about half the mass of the asteroid belt and are 400-950 km in diameter. The total mass of the belt is just 4% of the mass of our Moon.

43. Hunter of myth ORION
The huntsman of Greek mythology called Orion was the son of Poseidon, the god of the sea. Because of his heritage, Orion was said to have the ability to walk on the sea.

44. Pet named for writer Sinclair? UPTON THE DOG (from “put on the dog”)
The idioms “put on the dog” and “put on the the ritz” mean to dress formally or to make things extra special for a particular event. The phrase can mean to seem more important or richer that one actually is.

51. Part of one's inheritance GENE
A gene is a section of a chromosome that is responsible for a particular characteristic in an organism. For example, one gene may determine eye color and another balding pattern. We have two copies of each gene, one from each of our parents, with each copy known as an allele.

55. Oft-bruised item EGO
Sigmund Freud created a structural model of the human psyche, breaking it into three parts: the id, the ego, and the super-ego. The id is that part of the psyche containing the basic instinctual drives. The ego seeks to please the id by causing realistic behavior that benefits the individual. The super-ego almost has a parental role, contradicting the id by introducing critical thinking and morals to behavioral choices.

63. Actor Hugh LAURIE
English actor and comedian Hugh Laurie was half of a comedy double act with Stephen Fry called simply “Fry and Laurie”. Fry and Laurie met in Cambridge University through their mutual friend, the actress Emma Thompson.

65. 2012 N.L. East champs NATS
The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

Down
1. Handle for a chef? STU
The name (handle) “Stu” might be apt for a chef as it rhymes with “stew”.

2. Juno, to Homer HERA
In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

Homer was a famous poet of Ancient Greece, believed to be the author of the two classic epic poems, the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey". However, some scholars believe that Homer did not actually exist, but rather he is the personification of oral tradition that was passed down through the ages.

7. T. Rex, e.g. DINO
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written T. rex) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. "Tyrannosaurus" comes from the Greek words "tyrannos" (tyrant) and "sauros" (lizard), and the "rex" is of course Latin for "king". They were big boys, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

10. Nav. bigwig ADM
Admiral (Adm.)

11. "Emperor of the Air" novelist CANIN
Ethan Canin is an author, physician and educator at the University of Iowa. Canin’s debut publication is a collection of short stories called “Emperor of the Air”.

18. Column with a slant OP-ED
Op-ed is an abbreviation for "opposite the editorial page". Op-eds started in "The New York Evening World" in 1921 when the page opposite the editorials was used for articles written by a named guest writer, someone independent of the editorial board.

23. Big galoot OAF
"Galoot" is an insulting term meaning an awkward or boorish man, an ape. "Galoot" comes from the nautical world, where it was originally what a sailor might call a soldier or marine.

24. Electrician's unit OHM
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm's Law.

25. Rib-eye rating gp. USDA
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) actually dates back to 1862 when it was established by then-president Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln referred to the USDA as the "people's department" as our economy had such a vast agrarian base back then.

If you’re ever in Australia or New Zealand and looking for a rib eye steak, you need to order a “Scotch fillet”.

28. Character found in kids' books WALDO
The reference is to the series of children's illustrated books called "Where's Waldo?", originally titled "Where's Wally?" in Britain where the books originated.

29. Peak of Crete IDA
There are two peaks called Mount Ida that are sacred according to Greek mythology. Mount Ida in Crete is the island's highest point, and is where one can find the cave in which Zeus was reared. Mount Ida in Asia Minor (located in modern-day Turkey) is where Ganymede was swept up by Zeus in the form of an eagle that took him to Olympus where he served as cupbearer to the gods.

30. Victim of curiosity CAT
Curiosity killed the cat.

35. "__, Sing America": Hughes I TOO
Langston Hughes was a poet active in the Harlem Renaissance, and someone who helped develop the literary form known as "jazz poetry". His poem "I, Too, Sing America" was published in 1925.
I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I'll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody'll dare
Say to me,
"Eat in the kitchen,"
Then.

Besides,
They'll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed--

I, too, am America.

45. "Six Feet Under" son NATE
"Six Feet Under" is reportedly a great TV drama aired on HBO, one that I fully intend to take a look at one day. The "six feet under" is a reference to the show's storyline which features a family funeral business.

46. High-tech troublemakers TROLLS
In Internet terms, a "troll" is someone who attempts to disrupt online group activities. The fishing term "troll" is used to describe such a person, as he or she throws out off-topic remarks in an attempt to "lure" others into some emotional response.

47. Italian port on its own gulf GENOA
Genoa is a seaport in the very north of Italy, in the region known as Liguria. One of Genoa's most famous sons was Christopher Columbus.

49. Help beneficiary, at times SELF
As in “self-help” …

51. Blokes GUYS
“Bloke” is British slang for “fellow”. The etymology of “bloke” seems to have been lost in the mists of time.

52. First name in the freezer section SARA
In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself who now goes by the name Sara Lee Schupf.

54. CPR specialists EMTS
Emergency medical technicians (EMT)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has for decades involved the simultaneous compression of the chest to pump blood using the heart, and artificial respiration by blowing air into the lungs. Nowadays emergency services are placing more emphasis on heart compressions, and less on artificial respiration.

56. Hiker's supply GORP
“Gorp” is the name sometimes used for trail mix, particularly by hikers. It’s not really known for sure how this name came about, but some say it stands for “good old raisins and peanuts” or perhaps “gobs of raw protein”.

59. A, in Stuttgart EIN
Stuttgart is the sixth-largest city in Germany, and is located in southern Germany. The city is sometimes called “the cradle of the automobile” as Karl Benz made his first cars and motorcycles there, as were the first VW Beetle prototypes. Mercedes-Benz and Porsche cars are still manufactured in Stuttgart and the surrounding area.

60. St. Anthony's Cross shape TAU
The Cross of Tau is a variant of the cross symbol used in the Christian tradition. Also known as St. Anthony’s Cross, the Cross of Tau resembles the Greek letter tau, and our letter T. St. Anthony of Egypt bore such a symbol on his cloak, hence the alternate name.

61. Nancy Drew's guy NED
I loved the Nancy Drew mysteries as a kid (I know, as a boy I "shouldn't" have been reading girls' books!). The Nancy Drew stories were written by a number of ghost writers, although the character was introduced by Edward Stratemeyer in 1930. Nancy Drew's boyfriend was Ned Nickerson, a college student from Emerson.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Hedge row SHRUBS
7. Fox's "X-Files" partner DANA
11. Rite Aid rival CVS
14. Cozy spot? TEAPOT
15. Tiny tunes player IPOD NANO
17. Vessel storing a cash stash? URN FOR ONE’S MONEY (from “run for one’s money”)
19. Earlier AGO
20. Strong adhesive EPOXY
21. Some poker tells TICS
22. "Lady Jane Grey" playwright ROWE
24. Farm cry OINK!
25. Layered computer connections? USB SANDWICH (from “sub sandwich”)
31. Bundle SHEAF
32. Tracy/Hepburn battle-of-the-sexes film ADAM’S RIB
37. "You're on!" DEAL!
38. Impact sound SPLAT!
40. Stoic philosopher CATO
41. Telescope sighting ASTEROID
43. Hunter of myth ORION
44. Pet named for writer Sinclair? UPTON THE DOG (from “put on the dog”)
47. Sudden blow GUST
50. Lined up, with "in" A ROW
51. Part of one's inheritance GENE
52. Tend SEE TO
55. Oft-bruised item EGO
58. Tantrum that devolves into hysterical gibberish? UNCLEAR MELTDOWN (from “nuclear meltdown”)
62. "Lead the way!", and a phonetic hint to this puzzle's theme YOU FIRST!
63. Actor Hugh LAURIE
64. Gathered dust SAT
65. 2012 N.L. East champs NATS
66. Had dinner SUPPED

Down
1. Handle for a chef? STU
2. Juno, to Homer HERA
3. Chimed RANG
4. On the market UP FOR SALE
5. Discontented cry BOO!
6. Scattered STREWN
7. T. Rex, e.g. DINO
8. Summit APEX
9. Getting into the wrong business? NOSY
10. Nav. bigwig ADM
11. "Emperor of the Air" novelist CANIN
12. Certain tee V-NECK
13. Sauces for sushi SOYS
16. Denier's words NOT I
18. Column with a slant OP-ED
23. Big galoot OAF
24. Electrician's unit OHM
25. Rib-eye rating gp. USDA
26. Witches, but not warlocks SHES
27. Knocked out BEAT
28. Character found in kids' books WALDO
29. Peak of Crete IDA
30. Victim of curiosity CAT
33. Made a mess of SCREWED UP
34. Surprise strike RAID
35. "__, Sing America": Hughes I TOO
36. Low bell sound BONG
38. Dip, as in gravy SOP
39. Nectarine core PIT
42. Symbol of boredom RUT
43. "Well, looky here!" OHO!
45. "Six Feet Under" son NATE
46. High-tech troublemakers TROLLS
47. Italian port on its own gulf GENOA
48. In its original form UNCUT
49. Help beneficiary, at times SELF
51. Blokes GUYS
52. First name in the freezer section SARA
53. Once, in days past ERST
54. CPR specialists EMTS
56. Hiker's supply GORP
57. Boo-boo OWIE
59. A, in Stuttgart EIN
60. St. Anthony's Cross shape TAU
61. Nancy Drew's guy NED


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4 comments:

Addict said...

I always enjoy the late week puzzles no matter if I get them right or not.

Finished this with no real hangups.
Thought the cluing for 1A was a little off. To me a hedge and shrub are the same thing as with 25A, Sub sandwich is redundant.
11D Canin was all crosses.

X-files was another show I never missed an episode of. Now its all just garbage reality shows.

Procrastination over, time to tackle the snow in the driveway.
Have a good day all.

Vidwan827 said...

Hello Bill, I am baack in town .... not quite .... still stuck in Wash D.C. because of the weather .... hope to get a flight back to Cleveland OH, sometime today.

Best wishes to you all.

Piano Man said...

Interesting about Mount Ida. It seems so familiar because there is a town of Mount Ida in Arkansas. Cliff Arquette (known on TV and radio as Charlie Weaver) used to always read letters from home, introducing them with "Everything's fine in Mount Idy." Idy being his country pronunciation.

Pookie said...

Helloooo everybody!
Had to wait until my scan was finished. Got a message to update Firefox, so I began. Then Norton didn't say all was well.So I stopped the update and shut off the computer. Then ran a scan. I hope I'm safe.
This took FOREVER!!
AND, I got 1D and 14A wrong.
Wanted SOU chef, and Cozy spot was ON A POT, which gave me HNRA instead of HERA. Knew something was wrong, but gave up to come here.
Summit was PEAK, then ACME, then APEX
STREWN was put in and erased twice.
IPOD NANO was TOY PIANO first.
GORP???
Clever theme, though it got the best of me.
Well, I've wasted the whole morning,so bye for now!
Vidwan, glad you're on home turf. Stay safe!

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This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

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The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

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I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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