LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Mar 14, Monday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ed Sessa
THEME: Where’s the Pudge? … all of today’s themed answers finish with a word ending with the letters UDGE:

17A. Tennis court official LINE JUDGE
24A. Harbor long-term resentment NURSE A GRUDGE
51A. Creamy confection VANILLA FUDGE
64A. “Stay put!” DON’T BUDGE!
11D. Political commentator with an Internet “Report” MATT DRUDGE
29D. Push gently GIVE A NUDGE

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Insect stage LARVA
The larva is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

16. Mild-mannered reporter Kent CLARK
Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema at the time Superman was created. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

20. Point after deuce AD IN
In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

21. More narcissistic VAINER
Narcissus was a proud and vain hunter in Greek mythology. He earned himself a fatal punishment, being made fall in love with his own reflection in a pool. So, take was he by his own image, that he could not leave it and wasted away and died by the pool. Narcissus gives us our term “narcissism” meaning “excessive love of oneself”.

23. Asian New Year TET
The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is Tet Nguyen Dan, meaning “Feast of the First Morning”. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

27. Portuguese explorer Vasco DA GAMA
Vasco da Gama left on his first voyage of discovery in 1497. da Gama journeyed around the Cape of Good Hope, the southernmost tip of Africa, and across the Indian Ocean making landfall in India. Landing in India, his fleet became the first expedition to sail directly from Europe to the sub-continent. Vasco da Gama was well known for acts of cruelty, especially on local inhabitants. One of his milder atrocities was inflicted on a priest whom he labelled as a spy. He had the priest’s lips and ears cut off, and sent him on his way after having a pair of dog’s ears sewn onto his head.

30. Open court hearing, in law OYER
“Oyer” is a term used to describe the reading out loud of a document in court.

31. News org. UPI
Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) was one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a handful of employees.

32. Construction zone cones PYLONS
“Pylon” is another word for a traffic cone.

36. Earth-orbiting Gagarin YURI
The Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space when his spacecraft Vostok I made a single orbit of the Earth in 1961. Sadly, Gagarin died only seven years later in a plane crash.

42. Early PC interface MS-DOS
MS-DOS (short for Microsoft Disk Operating System) was the main operating system used by IBM-compatible PCs in the eighties and for much of the nineties.

44. More than mono STEREO
Monophonic sound (“mono”) is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

46. Workout facility GYM
Our word “gymnasium” comes from the Greek “gymnasion” meaning “public place where exercise is taken”. The Greek term comes from “gymnos” meaning “naked”, as that physical training was usually done unclothed.

47. Water, in Juárez AGUA
The Mexican city sitting across the border from El Paso is more correctly called Ciudad Juarez. Juarez used to be called El Paso del Norte (the North Pass). It was to be the younger settlement on the northern side of the Rio Grande which would retain the “El Paso” name.

56. End of a prof’s URL EDU
The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

– .com (commercial enterprise)
– .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
– .mil (US military)
– .org (not-for-profit organization)
– .gov (US federal government entity)
– .edu (college-level educational institution)

Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

57. Type of vegetable oil CANOLA
Canola is a type of rapeseed, and Canola oil is made from the seeds. The particular cultivar used in oil production was developed in Canada, and the name Canola in fact comes from “CANadian Oil, Low Acid”.

67. Seventh Greek letter ETA
Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

68. Love, to Luciano AMORE
“Amore” is Italian for “love”.

69. Length-times-width calculations AREAS
The area of a rectangle is calculated by multiplying its length by its width.

71. Yankee shortstop Jeter who announced he will retire at the end of 2014 DEREK
Derek Jeter has played his entire professional baseball career with the New York Yankees, and is the team’s captain. Jeter is the all-time career leader for the Yankees in hits, games played, stolen bases and at bats. He is also the all-time leader in hits by a shortstop in the whole of professional baseball.

Down
1. Whatever she wants, she gets LOLA
“Whatever Lola Wants” is a song from the musical “Damn Yankees”. “Damn Yankees” is actually yet another version of the classic German legend of “Faust”, set in Washington, D.C. in the fifties. The show was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross, a production that turned out to be a very successful follow-up to their prior hit, “The Pajama Game”. The future was looking really rosy for Adler and Ross but, sadly, Jerry Ross died of an obstructive lung disease only a few weeks after “Damn Yankees” opened on Broadway in 1955. He was just 29 years old.

3. Rice-A-__ RONI
Rice-a-Roni was introduced in 1958 by the Golden Grain Macaroni Company of San Francisco. The company was run by an Italian immigrant and his four sons. The wife of one of the sons served a pilaf dish at a family diner that was a big hit, so her brother-in-law created a commercial version by blending dry chicken soup mix with rice and macaroni. Sounds like “a San Francisco treat” to me …

4. Capital of Austria VIENNA
Vienna is the capital of Austria. Vienna has a long musical tradition and was home to Franz Schubert, Johann Strauss (I and II), Josef Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and Gustav Mahler. As such, Vienna is sometimes called the “City of Music”. It is also called the “City of Dreams” as it was home to the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.

6. Dr Pepper and Dr. Brown’s SODAS
Dr Pepper was introduced in 1885 in Waco, Texas, one year before the competing Coca-Cola was released to the market.

Dr. Brown’s is a soft drink brand that is especially popular in New York City and South Florida. The brand was introduced in 1869 as Dr. Brown’s Cel-Ray soda in delis in New York.

7. 1973 Rolling Stones ballad ANGIE
For my money, “Angie” is the greatest ballad ever performed by the Rolling Stones. Despite rumors to the contrary, “Angie” doesn’t refer to a particular woman. If fact, songwriter Keith Richard says that “Angie” is a pseudonym for heroin, and the lyrics tell of his efforts to get off the drug at a detox facility in Switzerland.

8. Davis of “A League of Their Own” GEENA
As well as being a successful Hollywood actress, Geena Davis is an accomplished archer and came close to qualifying for the US archery team for the 2000 Summer Olympics. Davis is also a member of American Mensa. She is quite the lady …

“A League of Their Own” is a comedy drama film released in 1992 that tells a tale about the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League active during WWII. The lead actors were Tom Hanks and Geena Davis. The film spawned one of the most famous quotes in movie history: “There’s no crying in baseball!”

11. Political commentator with an Internet “Report” MATT DRUDGE
Matt Drudge came to fame along with the website he founded called the “Drudge Report”. The “Drudge Report” is a news aggregation site, mainly made up of links to stories published by the world media. The “Drudge Report” hit the big time in 1998 when it was first to report on the Lewinsky scandal, after “Newsweek” allegedly refused to run the story.

18. Sunlamp danger, briefly UV RAY
At either end of the visible light spectrum are the invisible forms of radiation known as infrared (IR) light and ultraviolet (UV) light. IR light lies just beyond the red end of the visible spectrum, and UV light lie just below the violet end.

35. “All Things Considered” airer NPR
“All Things Considered” is the flagship news broadcast from NPR, aired for two hours every evening.

37. Rogers and Clark ROYS
Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers’ real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans’ nickname was “Queen of the West”.

Roy Clark is a country musician, best known as host of the variety show “Hee Haw” from 1969 to 1992.

40. WWII vet, say EX-GI
The initials “G.I.” stand for “Government Issue” and not “General Infantry” as is often believed. GI was first used in the military to denote equipment made from Galvanized Iron and during WWI, incoming German shells were nicknamed “GI cans”. Soon after, the term GI came to be associated with “Government Issue” and eventually became an adjective to describe anything associated with the Army.

42. Synthesizer pioneer MOOG
Robert Moog invented the Moog Synthesizer in the sixties, an electronic device that he used to produce music. I used to own a few of his albums, including a Moog version of Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition”. What a great performance that was …

44. Room in una casa SALA
A room (sala) is a division (división) of a house (casa), in Spanish.

48. Stomach ailments ULCERS
Until fairly recently, a peptic ulcer was believed to be caused by undue amounts of stress in one’s life. It is now known that 70-90% of all peptic ulcers are in fact associated with a particular bacterium.

51. Aqua __: aftershave brand VELVA
The Aqua Velva line of men’s toiletry products includes a famous aftershave. The first product in the line was Aqua Velva aftershave, which was introduced in 1929.

52. Firefighter Red ADAIR
Red Adair was a famous fighter of fires in oil fields, and was a native of Houston, Texas. Adair’s exploits were the inspiration for a 1968 movie called “Hellfighters” starring John Wayne.

53. South American range ANDES
The Andes is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world, running right down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles. The highest peak in the range is Mt. Aconcagua, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth’s surface from the center of the planet. That’s because of the equatorial “bulge” around the Earth’s “waist”.

54. Pays, as the bill FOOTS
The term to “foot the bill” arose during the 1800s. The idea is that one can total the expenses of say a meal, and this total at the “foot” of the bill is picked up by someone at the table.

55. Radii-paralleling bones ULNAE
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinkie-side”.

59. Skunk’s defense ODOR
Skunks have anal scent glands that can be used as defensive weapons. The glands produce sulfur-containing chemicals that have a really awful smell and that can irritate the eyes and skin.

63. Hawaii’s Mauna __ LOA
Mauna Loa on the “big island” of Hawaii is the largest volcano on the planet (in terms of volume). The name “Mauna Loa” is Hawaiian for “Long Mountain”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Insect stage LARVA
6. Sink down in the middle SAG
9. Heavy haulers SEMIS
14. Not quite spherical OVOID
15. Single ONE
16. Mild-mannered reporter Kent CLARK
17. Tennis court official LINE JUDGE
19. Overzealous type ULTRA
20. Point after deuce AD IN
21. More narcissistic VAINER
23. Asian New Year TET
24. Harbor long-term resentment NURSE A GRUDGE
27. Portuguese explorer Vasco DA GAMA
30. Open court hearing, in law OYER
31. News org. UPI
32. Construction zone cones PYLONS
36. Earth-orbiting Gagarin YURI
39. Birds that symbolize peace DOVES
41. Right, vis-à-vis left: Abbr. OPP
42. Early PC interface MS-DOS
43. Glasses, in ads SPEX
44. More than mono STEREO
46. Workout facility GYM
47. Water, in Juárez AGUA
49. Amazingly enough NO LESS
51. Creamy confection VANILLA FUDGE
56. End of a prof’s URL EDU
57. Type of vegetable oil CANOLA
58. Yucky muck GOOP
62. Soup scoop LADLE
64. “Stay put!” DON’T BUDGE!
66. Partner of vim VIGOR
67. Seventh Greek letter ETA
68. Love, to Luciano AMORE
69. Length-times-width calculations AREAS
70. Opposite of NNW SSE
71. Yankee shortstop Jeter who announced he will retire at the end of 2014 DEREK

Down
1. Whatever she wants, she gets LOLA
2. Zealous AVID
3. Rice-A-__ RONI
4. Capital of Austria VIENNA
5. Wd. modifying a noun ADJ
6. Dr Pepper and Dr. Brown’s SODAS
7. 1973 Rolling Stones ballad ANGIE
8. Davis of “A League of Their Own” GEENA
9. Move like a squirrel SCURRY
10. Right-angle bend ELL
11. Political commentator with an Internet “Report” MATT DRUDGE
12. Discount rack abbr. IRREG
13. Glide on ice SKATE
18. Sunlamp danger, briefly UV RAY
22. Narcissists have big ones EGOS
25. Men pocketing baseballs UMPS
26. Sometimes-illegal turns, for short UEYS
27. Fizzling firecrackers DUDS
28. Each A POP
29. Push gently GIVE A NUDGE
33. Valet’s purview LOT
34. Not shut, poetically OPE
35. “All Things Considered” airer NPR
37. Rogers and Clark ROYS
38. Beliefs ISMS
40. WWII vet, say EX-GI
42. Synthesizer pioneer MOOG
44. Room in una casa SALA
45. Conclude by END AT
48. Stomach ailments ULCERS
50. Lentil or pea LEGUME
51. Aqua __: aftershave brand VELVA
52. Firefighter Red ADAIR
53. South American range ANDES
54. Pays, as the bill FOOTS
55. Radii-paralleling bones ULNAE
59. Skunk’s defense ODOR
60. Fairy tale fiend OGRE
61. Eye on the sly PEEK
63. Hawaii’s Mauna __ LOA
65. Terrible BAD

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LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Mar 14, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Nora Pearlstone
THEME: CB Switches … today’s themed answers are well-known phrases with a starting letter C sound that has been switched to a B sound:

23A. Sidewalk vendor’s income? STREET BREAD (from “street cred”)
25A. Steeped salad topping? BREWED OIL (from “crude oil”)
64A. Accident report? BLAME FORM (from “claim form”)
107A. Sketched a Gibb brother? DREW BARRY (from “Drew Carey”)
109A. Villain’s backwoods hideout? BADDIE SHACK (from “Caddyshack”)
15D. Robin selling Roquefort? CHEESE BIRD (from “cheese curd”)
37D. Qualifying exam for opera school? VOCAL BOARD (from “vocal chord”)
46D. Undersea party pooper? MARINE BORE (from “Marine Corps”)
69D. Official loafer of the realm? KINGDOM BUM (from “kingdom come”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 26m 43s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. “Waverley” novelist SCOTT
“Waverley” is a historical novel by Sir Walter Scott that he first had published anonymously in 1814. The book was Scott’s first venture into prose fiction, and it is now regarded as the West’s first historical novel. “Waverley” is about a young English soldier during the Jacobite uprising of 1745 in which Bonnie Prince Charlie sought to regain the British throne for the House of Stuart.

6. Sch. with a Waterbury campus UCONN
The University of Connecticut (UConn) was founded in 1881 as the Storrs Agricultural School, taking its name from the Storrs brothers who donated the land and provided initial funding.

11. Early computer acronym ENIAC
The acronym ENIAC stands for Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator (although many folks insist that the C was for “Computer”). ENIAC was the first general-purpose electronic computer. It was designed to calculate artillery firing tables, but it ended up being used early on to make calculations necessary for the development of the hydrogen bomb. Given its uses, it’s not surprising to hear that development of ENIAC was funded by the US Army during WWII.

20. Competition with ropes RODEO
“Rodeo” is a Spanish word, which is usually translated as “round up”.

22. Pres. or P.M. LDR
A president (pres.) or prime minister (P.M.) is a leader (ldr.).

23. Sidewalk vendor’s income? STREET BREAD (from “street cred”)
“Street cred” is slang for “street credibility”, of which I have none …

28. High land TIBET
Tibet is a plateau region that is part of China, and is located northeast of the Himalayas. Tibet declared its independence from China in 1913, but fell back under Chinese control after the Invasion of Tibet in 1951. The Tibetan leader, the 14th Dalai Lama, fled the country during the 1959 Tibetan Rebellion. Since then, he has led government-in-exile in Dharamsala, India.

34. Trypanosome transmitter TSETSE
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name “tsetse” comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as “fly”. Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as “sleeping sickness”. Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

The tsetse fly is responsible for the transmission of sleeping sickness, and is also responsible for transmission of trypanosomiasis, a disease caused by a parasitic protozoan.

38. All-Star outfielder Raul IBANEZ
Raúl Ibañez is a left fielder and designated hitter for the Los Angeles of Anaheim baseball team.

46. E.T. policers of film MIB
“Men in Black” are said to have appeared in the past whenever there have been reports of UFO sightings. Supposedly, these men are government agents whose job it is to suppress reports of alien landings. The conspiracy theorists got their day in the movies with the release of a pretty good sci-fi comedy in 1997 called “Men in Black”, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones.

49. Notre Dame’s conf. ACC
Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC)

51. “Say it soft and it’s almost like praying” girl of song MARIA
“Maria” is a song from the musical “West Side Story”.

Leonard Bernstein’s musical “West Side Story” is of course based on William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”. The musical is set in New York City and features two rival gangs: the Sharks from Puerto Rico and the Jets with working-class, Caucasian roots. Tony from the Jets falls in love with Maria from the Sharks. All this parallels Romeo from the House of Montague falling for Juliet from the House of Capulet in the Italian city of Verona.

52. Old Bristol-Myers toothpaste IPANA
Ipana toothpaste was introduced in 1915 and was at the height of its popularity in the forties and fifties. Sales declined in the sixties and the product was withdrawn from the US market in the seventies. Bucky the Beaver was the “spokesman” for Ipana. Bucky the Beaver’s slogan was “Brusha… Brusha… Brusha. Get the New Ipana – it’s dandy for your teeth!”

58. Scientology guru Hubbard L RON
L. Ron Hubbard wrote a self-improvement book in 1950 called “Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health”. A few years later the concepts were used in the founding of the Church of Scientology.

59. Silent MUM
The phrase “mum’s the word” has been around since the early 1700s. “Mum” has been used to mean “silent” for centuries, the idea being that “mum” is the sound made when the lips are tightly sealed.

60. Turn right GEE
“Haw!” is a command given to a trained animal that is hauling something (like a horse or an ox). “Haw!” is used to instruct the animal to turn to the left. The equivalent command for a right turn is “Gee!” Just to confuse things, the same commands are used in the British Isles but with the opposite meanings. That must be pretty unsettling for jet-setting plow horses …

62. Cake with a kick BABA
Rum baba (also “baba au rhum” in French) is a small yeast cake saturated in rum, and sometimes filled with whipped cream. Rum baba is derived from the recipe for the tall “babka” yeast cake that was introduced to the world by the Polish communities. The Polish words “baba” and “babka” mean “old woman” or “grandmother” in English. I guess someone must have thought that all grandmothers were saturated in rum!

67. Model Sastre INES
Inés Sastre is a model and actress from Spain.

68. Aimée of “La Dolce Vita” ANOUK
Anouk Aimée is a French film actress. Aimée’s most famous film outside of France is probably the internationally successful 1966 French hit “A Man and a Woman”, in which she played the female lead.

70. L.A.’s __ Center AON
The Aon Center on Wilshire Boulevard in downtown Los Angeles is the second-tallest building in the California (after US Bank Tower, also in Los Angeles). There is also an Aon Center in Chicago, which is the third-tallest building in that city.

74. Eastern guru SWAMI
A swami is a religious teacher in the Hindu tradition.

75. Like slalom courses TWISTY
Slalom is an anglicized version of the Norwegian word “slalam” that translates as “skiing race”.

77. Roaring Twenties Hollywood sex symbol CLARA BOW
Clara Bow was a fabulous star of silent film, with her most famous movie being “It” from 1927. Clara Bow’s performance was so celebrated in the movie that she was forever to be known as the “It-girl”. The term “it” was a euphemism for “sex appeal”, and that is what Clara Bow was known to “exude”. Bow applied her red lipstick in the shape of a heart, and women who copied this style were said to put on a “Clara Bow”.

81. Leftovers cover SARAN
What’s known as plastic wrap in America, we call cling-film in Ireland. Plastic wrap was one of those unintended inventions, a byproduct of a development program to create a hard plastic cover for cars.

82. Lotto variant BEANO
In the US, “Beano” is alternative name for “Bingo”.

83. Base shade? KHAKI
“Khaki” is an Urdu word, translating literally as “dusty”. The word was adopted for its current use as the name of a fabric by the British cavalry in India in the mid-1800s.

84. Kimono accessory OBI
The sash worn as part of traditional Japanese dress is known as an obi. The obi can be tied in what is called a butterfly knot.

The lovely Japanese kimono is a garment worn by men, women and children. The word “kimono” translates simply as “thing to wear”, with “ki” meaning “wear” and “mono” meaning “thing”.

85. Chicago airport code ORD
O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII. As an aside, Butch O’Hare’s father Edward was a lawyer friend of Al Capone who eventually worked undercover for the IRS and helped get the famous gangster convicted on tax evasion. Some years later, Edward was shot to death while driving his car.

86. Liftoff sensation G-FORCE
The force of gravity that we all feel is referred to as “one G”. As gravity is a actually an accelerating force, acceleration is measured relative to that force of gravity. So, if we are sitting in a vehicle that accelerates at 3G, then we are experiencing a force that is three times that which we feel from the gravitational pull of the earth. Zero-G is weightlessness that is experienced when in space, outside the influence of the earth’s gravity.

88. Patriot and Liberty JEEPS
The Jeep is the original off-road vehicle. It was developed by the American Bantam Car Company in 1940 at the request of the US government who recognized the upcoming need for the armed forces as American involvement in WWII loomed. The Bantam Company was too small to cope with demand, so the government gave the designs to competing car companies. The design and brand eventually ended up with AMC in the seventies and eighties.

89. Hosp. scanners MRIS
A CT (or “CAT”) scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful causing damage that is cumulative over time. An MRI on the other hand (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn’t like the term “nuclear” because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it’s just called MRI.

90. Howdy to a mate G’DAY
“G’day” is a greeting in Australia.

94. Diacritic for a long vowel sound MACRON
A macron is a diacritical mark placed above a vowel. It is a horizontal line and is used to indicate that the vowel is long.

A diacritic mark is added to a letter to indicate that it has a special phonetic sound. Examples of diacritic marks are the tilde above the n in Spanish words like “piñata”, and the cedilla under the c in French words like “façade”.

99. Mount sacred to Judaism ZION
Mount Zion is a hill in Jerusalem that his home to a number of important sites including King David’s Tomb, the Room of the Last Supper and the Chamber of the Holocaust. The Catholic cemetery on Mount Zion is also where Oskar Schindler was buried, the German national who saved over 1,000 Jews during the Holocaust.

101. Poise APLOMB
“Aplomb” is such a lovely word, meaning confidence and assurance. It is a French word that literally means “perpendicularity”, or “on the plumb line”. The idea is that someone with aplomb is poised, upright, balanced.

107. Sketched a Gibb brother? DREW BARRY (from “Drew Carey”)
Drew Carey always strikes me as a stand-up guy who does stand-up comedy. Before turning to comedy, Carey served six years with the US Marine Corps.

The Brothers Gibb (hence, the name “The Bee Gees”) were born in England but grew up and started their musical careers in Australia. They moved back to Manchester in the north of England as youths, and there hit the big time.

109. Villain’s backwoods hideout? BADDIE SHACK (from “Caddyshack”)
“Caddyshack” is a comedy that was released in 1980 that was directed by Harold Ramis, his first movie. The film stars Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight and Bill Murray. “Caddyshack” has quite a cult following, but it’s a little too slapstick for me …

116. Map type: Abbr. TOPOG
A topographic map is one that illustrates “land relief” the vertical and horizontal dimensions of the terrain. Typically, this is done using contours lines that show the steepness of slopes.

119. Declines with a check, maybe RSVPS
RSVP stands for “répondez s’il vous plaît”, which is French for “please, answer”.

Down
1. Moose Jaw’s prov. SASK
Moose Jaw is a city in Saskatchewan. Among the city’s claims to fame is that Moose Jaw is home to the Snowbirds, Canada’s military aerobatic team.

2. Diamond Preferred credit card offerer CITI
During the global financial crisis of 2008-2009, the US government rescued Citibank by providing loan guarantees and two payments of $25 billion each. It turns out that the government made a tidy profit on that deal, as Citibank has since repaid the loans in full, along with interest.

3. Hockey legend Bobby et al. ORRS
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

6. Ending for sub- or ex- -URB
Derived from the term “suburb”, an “exurb” is an area beyond the suburbs at the very outskirts of a city. Often “exurb” is used to denote an area inhabited by more wealthy people.

7. __ anglais: English horn COR
The English Horn is also known by its French name “Cor Anglais”, and is a double-reed woodwind instrument.

8. Keats work ODE
The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

12. Up from Méjico NORTE
“El Norte” is the term many people in Central America use for the United States and Canada, “the North” in Spanish.

14. Central California city ATWATER
The central California city of Atwater is an old railroad town. Atwater is home to the magnificent Castle Air Museum located next the site of the former Castle Air Force Base. The museum opened in 1981 and displays over 50 restored aircraft from the WWII, Korean War and Cold War eras.

15. Robin selling Roquefort? CHEESE BIRD (from “cheese curd”)
Roquefort cheese comes from the commune of Roquefort-sur-Soulzon in the South of France.

18. 1957 Bobbettes hit MR LEE
The Bobbettes were an R&B girl group from Harlem, New York, formed in 1955. They had a hit in 1957 with the song “Mr. Lee”, a song about a teacher the girls had in real life. In the song, the girl singing has a crush on Mr. Lee, but in actual fact none of the girls liked the teacher who inspired the song. The original lyrics were not complimentary at all, but were changed for the recording. In 1957, the Bobbettes released the original, more insulting version and had a little success with it. It was called “I Shot Mr. Lee” …

24. Auto racer Fabi TEO
Teo Fabi is a retired racing driving from Italy who competed on the Formula One circuit. Teo often raced against his older brother Corrado Fabi.

26. Scott who sued for his freedom DRED
Famously, the slave Dred Scott was unsuccessful in suing for his freedom in St. Louis, Missouri in 1857.

29. Market BAZAAR
Our word “bazaar” meaning “market” comes from the Persian “bazar”, meaning the same thing.

32. Sporty ’80s Pontiac FIERO
General Motors produced the two-seater Pontiac Fiero sports car from 1984 to 1988. “Fiero” means “proud” in Italian and “wild, fierce, ferocious” in Spanish.

35. What a dot may mean, in mus. STAC
Staccato is a musical direction, signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

39. Earthen wall BERM
A berm is narrow ledge, usually at the top or bottom of a slope. The name “berm” is also used as the shoulder of a road in some parts of the United States.

40. One may weep after being told to do this READ ‘EM
One might say “read ‘em and weep”, perhaps when laying down a hand in poker.

42. McJob holder PEON
A peon is a lowly worker with no real control over his/her working conditions. The word comes into English from Spanish where it has the same meaning.

“McJob” is a slang term for a low-paying position that offers little chance for advancement. The term of course comes from front-line jobs at a McDonald’s fast-food restaurant.

47. Hardly well-thought-out INANE
Our word “inane” meaning silly or lacking substance comes from the Latin “inanitis” meaning “empty space”.

48. Pitching slips BALKS
To balk is to stop and refuse to go on. It’s not just a baseball term …

53. Pet food giant PURINA
Purina began operations in 1894, as an operation for producing feed for farm animals. A few years later, in 1902, the Ralston name was introduced when Webster Edgerly joined the business, Edgerly was the founder of a controversial social movement called Ralstonism. Central to the movement was personal health, with RALSTON standing for Regime, Activity, Light, Strength, Temperation, Oxygen and Nature.

62. Rossini’s Doctor Bartolo, e.g. BASSO
Doctor Bartolo is a character in the “The Barber of Seville”, the extremely popular comic opera by Gioachino Rossini.

63. Sadat of Egypt ANWAR
Anwar Sadat was the third President of Egypt right up to the time of his assassination in 1981. Sadat won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1978 along with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin for the role played in crafting the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty of 1978 at Camp David. It was this agreement that largely led to Sadat’s assassination three years later.

66. Vaudeville family name FOY
Eddie Foy was a famous vaudevillian. Foy achieved most of his fame after he put together a family act that he called “Eddie Foy and the Seven Little Foys”. The Foy family’s story was recounted in a 1955 film called “The Seven Little Foys” starring Bob Hope as Eddie Sr.

72. Nordstrom rival SAKS
Saks Fifth Avenue is a high-end specialty store that competes with the likes of Bloomingdales and Neiman Marcus. The original Saks & Company business was founded by Andrew Saks in 1867. The first Saks Fifth Avenue store was opened on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 1924. There are now Saks Fifth Avenue stores in many major cities in the US, as well in several locations worldwide.

73. Agent Gold on “Entourage” ARI
Ari Gold is a fictional character in the HBO series “Entourage”. “Entourage” tells the story of a rising film star, Vincent Chase (played by Adrian Grenier), a native of New York but now learning to handle himself in Hollywood. Vincent’s Hollywood agent is Ari Gold, played by Jeremy Piven.

78. Two-mile-high city LA PAZ
The administrative capital of Bolivia, La Paz, is officially named Nuestra Senora de La Paz (Our Lady of Peace). La Paz is the seat of the Bolivian government, even though the legal capital of the country is Quito.

79. Memorial news item OBIT
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

88. Their parts are hard to tell apart JIGSAWS
The original jigsaw puzzles were created by painting a picture on a sheet of wood and then cutting the picture into small pieces using a jigsaw, hence the name. Today, almost all jigsaw puzzles are pictures glued onto cardboard. The puzzle pieces are then die-cut, and there’s no jigsaw involved at all.

93. Salutes of a sort TOASTS
The tradition of “toasting” someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

94. Familia member MADRE
In Spanish, a mother (madre) is a member of the family (la familia).

96. ’50s-’60s Yankee Boyer CLETE
Clete Boyer was a third baseman who played Major League Baseball from 1955 to 1971, turning out for the Kansas City Athletics, the New York Yankees and the Atlanta Braves. Boyer also played in Japan with the Taiyo Whales for four season in the mid-seventies.

98. Rules immortal HOYLE
Edmond Hoyle was a writer, most famous for documenting the rules and play of card games. In particular, Hoyle first wrote a book on the game of whist that was very popular. Such was the success of Hoyle’s treatises that we use the phrase “according to Hoyle” to mean “according to some respected authority”. When the Poker Hall of Fame was founded in 1979, Edmund Hoyle was one of the first inductees, even though the game of power was invented after he died.

105. Have __: flip out A COW
The phrase “don’t have a cow” originated in the fifties, a variation of the older “don’t have kittens”. The concept behind the phrase is that one shouldn’t get worked up, it’s not like one is giving birth to a cow.

108. Classic Capek play RUR
Karel Čapek was a Czech writer noted for his works of science fiction. Čapek’s 1920 play “R.U.R.” is remembered in part for introducing the world to the word “robot”. The words “automaton” and “android” were already in use, but Capek gave us “robot” from the original Czech “robota” meaning “forced labor”. The acronym “R.U.R.”, in the context of the play, stands for “Rossum’s Universal Robots”.

110. Lic.-issuing bureau DMV
In most states, the government agency responsible for vehicle registration and the issuing of drivers licenses is called the DMV. This acronym usually stands for the Department of Motor Vehicles, but there are “variations on the theme”. For example, in Arizona the responsible agency is called the Motor Vehicle Division (MVD), and in Colorado the familiar acronym DMV stands for “Division” of Motor Vehicles.

111. Skip, as stones DAP
“To dap” is to skip or bounce across the surface of the water. Dapping is also the name given to the fishing technique of letting a baited hook fall gently onto the water’s surface.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “Waverley” novelist SCOTT
6. Sch. with a Waterbury campus UCONN
11. Early computer acronym ENIAC
16. Standout GEM
19. Many a network AIRER
20. Competition with ropes RODEO
21. One of a dozen MONTH
22. Pres. or P.M. LDR
23. Sidewalk vendor’s income? STREET BREAD (from “street cred”)
25. Steeped salad topping? BREWED OIL (from “crude oil”)
27. Romantic request KISS ME
28. High land TIBET
30. Fill with bubbles AERATE
31. Foot on a farm HOOF
33. “It matters to us” WE CARE
34. Trypanosome transmitter TSETSE
35. Really enjoy SAVOR
38. All-Star outfielder Raul IBANEZ
40. Pondside stalk REED
41. More than walk TROT
42. Equals PEERS
43. Equally, say ADVERB
46. E.T. policers of film MIB
49. Notre Dame’s conf. ACC
50. Smoothie fruit BERRY
51. “Say it soft and it’s almost like praying” girl of song MARIA
52. Old Bristol-Myers toothpaste IPANA
54. Online meeting place CHAT ROOM
56. Announce HERALD
57. Backwoods RURAL
58. Scientology guru Hubbard L RON
59. Silent MUM
60. Turn right GEE
61. What you can’t get if you pass the bar? DRINK
62. Cake with a kick BABA
64. Accident report? BLAME FORM (from “claim form”)
67. Model Sastre INES
68. Aimée of “La Dolce Vita” ANOUK
70. L.A.’s __ Center AON
71. Confrontational opening NON-
72. All there SANE
74. Eastern guru SWAMI
75. Like slalom courses TWISTY
77. Roaring Twenties Hollywood sex symbol CLARA BOW
81. Leftovers cover SARAN
82. Lotto variant BEANO
83. Base shade? KHAKI
84. Kimono accessory OBI
85. Chicago airport code ORD
86. Liftoff sensation G-FORCE
88. Patriot and Liberty JEEPS
89. Hosp. scanners MRIS
90. Howdy to a mate G’DAY
91. Puzzle ENIGMA
93. Gear features TEETH
94. Diacritic for a long vowel sound MACRON
97. Puzzled reactions SHRUGS
99. Mount sacred to Judaism ZION
101. Poise APLOMB
102. Goes for COSTS
103. Restful break CATNAP
107. Sketched a Gibb brother? DREW BARRY (from “Drew Carey”)
109. Villain’s backwoods hideout? BADDIE SHACK (from “Caddyshack”)
113. Baloney ROT
114. Regular’s request, with “the” USUAL
115. “C’mon, pal!” AW, MAN!
116. Map type: Abbr. TOPOG
117. Portland-to-Helena dir. ENE
118. Come together MERGE
119. Declines with a check, maybe RSVPS
120. Plenty SLEWS

Down
1. Moose Jaw’s prov. SASK
2. Diamond Preferred credit card offerer CITI
3. Hockey legend Bobby et al. ORRS
4. Drive, often TEE SHOT
5. Aftershock TREMOR
6. Ending for sub- or ex- -URB
7. __ anglais: English horn COR
8. Keats work ODE
9. Spiffs (up) NEATENS
10. “Out of the question” NO DICE
11. Glower? EMBER
12. Up from Méjico NORTE
13. Having four sharps IN E
14. Central California city ATWATER
15. Robin selling Roquefort? CHEESE BIRD (from “cheese curd”)
16. Smug look GLOAT
17. Proof jobs EDITS
18. 1957 Bobbettes hit MR LEE
24. Auto racer Fabi TEO
26. Scott who sued for his freedom DRED
29. Market BAZAAR
32. Sporty ’80s Pontiac FIERO
33. On alert WARY
35. What a dot may mean, in mus. STAC
36. Prefix meaning “primary” ARCH-
37. Qualifying exam for opera school? VOCAL BOARD (from “vocal chord”)
39. Earthen wall BERM
40. One may weep after being told to do this READ ‘EM
42. McJob holder PEON
44. Continue interminably DRAG ON
45. More repulsive VILER
46. Undersea party pooper? MARINE BORE (from “Marine Corps”)
47. Hardly well-thought-out INANE
48. Pitching slips BALKS
50. Fella BRO
51. Seashell, maybe MEMENTO
53. Pet food giant PURINA
55. Emotional shock TRAUMA
56. Run well HUM
59. Fanatic MANIAC
62. Rossini’s Doctor Bartolo, e.g. BASSO
63. Sadat of Egypt ANWAR
64. One helping swingers? BATBOY
65. Not so elevated LOWER
66. Vaudeville family name FOY
69. Official loafer of the realm? KINGDOM BUM (from “kingdom come”)
72. Nordstrom rival SAKS
73. Agent Gold on “Entourage” ARI
76. Derisive looks SNEERS
77. __ lab CHEM
78. Two-mile-high city LA PAZ
79. Memorial news item OBIT
80. Something made on a star? WISH
83. Brewery lineup KEGS
87. Boosters, as a group FANBASE
88. Their parts are hard to tell apart JIGSAWS
89. Cough drop flavor MENTHOL
90. Increase GROW
92. Hiker’s snack NUT BAR
93. Salutes of a sort TOASTS
94. Familia member MADRE
95. Kitchen protection APRON
96. ’50s-’60s Yankee Boyer CLETE
97. Skinny sort SCRAG
98. Rules immortal HOYLE
100. Nail down, as victory ICE
104. Scruff NAPE
105. Have __: flip out A COW
106. P.O. deliveries PKGS
108. Classic Capek play RUR
110. Lic.-issuing bureau DMV
111. Skip, as stones DAP
112. Ones with seats INS

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