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Greetings from Kilkenny, in Ireland

I am on vacation in Ireland until October 9th. I plan on doing the puzzle each day (with a pint, no doubt), although I may be a little late due to time zone differences. I am sure that you understand. Happy puzzling, and slainte!

Bill

LA Times Crossword Answers 10 Mar 14, Monday






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CROSSWORD SETTER: Brom Hart
THEME: P-Phrases … each of today’s themed answers is a phrase made from t3wo words, each starting with the letter P:
17A. Porky's girlfriend PETUNIA PIG
24A. Feigns sleep, say PLAYS POSSUM
52A. Either of two of the Inspector Clouseau films, with "The" PINK PANTHER
61A. Yipping adoptee POUND PUPPY
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 39s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today's Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. "Famous Potatoes" state IDAHO
Idaho has the nickname the Gem State, mainly because almost every known type of gemstone has been found there. Idaho is also sometimes called the Potato State as potatoes are such a popular crop in the state.

17. Porky's girlfriend PETUNIA PIG
Petunia Pig is a cartoon character in the “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” universes. Petunia is the girlfriend of Porky Pig and has been around since 1937.

21. Utter mess SNAFU
SNAFU is an acronym standing for Situation Normal: All Fouled Up (well, that's the "polite" version!). As you might imagine, the term developed in the US Army, during WWII.

24. Feigns sleep, say PLAYS POSSUM
The idiom “playing possum” means pretending to be dead. The phrase is used in recognition of the behavior of the Virginia Opossum that does just that, plays dead as a defense mechanism.

28. Pitt of "Troy" BRAD
Brad Pitt’s first major role was playing the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston, and he now lives with Angelina Jolie.

“Troy” is a 2004 epic movie that is based on Homer’s “Iliad” and tells the story of the Trojan War. “Troy” has quite the cast, including Brad Pitt as Achilles, Eric Bana as Hector and Diane Kruger as Helen. Most of the filming was done on the island of Malta in the Mediterranean. It was an expensive film to make, with costs running at about $175 million. The film did well at the box office though, with most of the profits being made outside of the US.

30. Three-note chord TRIAD
A triad is a group of three, and specifically in music as a chord is usually made up of three notes.

31. Aboveground trains ELS
Elevated railroad (El.)

32. Per __: for each person, as income CAPITA
“Per capita” is a Latin term used to mean “per person, per unit of population”. The literal translation of the term is “by heads”.

35. Got one's uniform dirty, perhaps SLID
A baseball player’s uniform gets dirty as he slides into a base.

36. Runs away from military duty DESERTS
The verb “to desert” comes into English via Old French from the Latin “deserere” meaning “to abandon, leave”. The noun “desert” has the same root, as a desert might be thought of an “abandoned” place.

38. Israeli parliament KNESSET
The Knesset is the legislative branch of the Israeli government, and does its business in the Givat Ram neighborhood of central Jerusalem.

43. "Exodus" author Leon URIS
"Exodus" is a wonderful novel written by American writer Leon Uris, first published in 1947. The hero of the piece is Ari Ben Canaan, played by Paul Newman in the 1960 film adaptation directed by Otto Preminger.

46. "From __ Zinc": vitamin slogan A TO
The vitamin brand called Centrum uses the slogan “Complete from A to Zinc”.

52. Either of two of the Inspector Clouseau films, with "The" PINK PANTHER
A lot of people think that the Inspector Clouseau character (played originally by Peter Sellers) is "The Pink Panther". It's actually the jewel that was stolen in the original movie. Would you believe there are eleven "Pink Panther" movies in the whole series?

58. Like a lummox INEPT
The word "lummox" comes from East Anglian slang (northeast of London). The term is probably a contraction of "lumbering ox".

68. Sharp-crested ridge ARETE
An arete is ridge of rock defining the border between two parallel valleys that have been formed by glaciation. If the ridge between the valleys is rounded, it is called a "col". However if it is "sharpened", with rock falling way due to successive freezing and thawing, then it is called an "arete". “Arête“ is the French word for "fish bone".

69. Novelist Ferber EDNA
Edna Ferber was a novelist and playwright from Kalamazoo, Michigan. Ferber won a Pulitzer for her novel "So Big", which was made into a film a few times, most famously in 1953 starring Jane Wyman.

71. Leavening agent YEAST
A substance that leavens creates a froth of carbon dioxide bubbles in batter and dough. The bubbles create holes in the dough which remain during baking resulting in a lighter product. The word leaven comes from the Latin "levare", to raise.

Down
1. AOL, for one ISP
AoL (formerly America Online) might be regarded as an Internet service provider (ISP).

4. Semiannual time-change amount HOUR
On the other side of the Atlantic, Daylight Saving Time (DST) is known as "summer time". The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring and backwards in the fall so that afternoons have more daylight.

8. Wire service initials UPI
Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) was one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a handful of employees.

11. Enzyme that breaks down fats LIPASE
Lipase is an enzyme that breaks down fat. Most human lipases are secreted by the pancreas.

13. Plays the banjo, like someone "in the kitchen with Dinah" STRUMS
“Someone’s in the kitchen with Dinah” is a line from the American folk song “I’ve Been Working on the Railroad”. The section with this line is actually “lifted” from an older song published as, “Old Joe, or Somebody in the House with Dinah”.

22. "The Alphabet Song" start ABCD
“The Alphabet Song” was copyrighted in 1835 in the US. The tune that goes with the words is the French folk song “Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman”, used by Mozart for a set of piano variations. The same tune is used for the nursery rhyme “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”.

23. "Dies __": Latin hymn IRAE
"Dies Irae" is Latin for "Day of Wrath". It is the name of a famous melody in Gregorian Chant, one that is often used as part of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass.

29. Craps cube DIE
If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. Craps may be derived from an old English game called "hazard", also played with two dice and which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name "crapaud", a French word meaning "toad".

34. Sunlit courtyards ATRIA
In modern architecture an atrium (plural “atria” or “atriums”) is a large open space usually in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

37. Ireland's __ Féin SINN
Sinn Féin is a political party in Ireland, largely representing the Catholic community in Northern Ireland. It is led by Gerry Adams, and has the stated aim of uniting Ireland north and south. Sinn Féin is Irish for "we ourselves". It is currently the second largest party in the Northern Ireland Assembly, and the fourth largest in the Republic of Ireland’s parliament.

39. [error left as is] SIC
"Sic" indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. "Sic" is Latin for "thus, like this".

41. Many a DeMille movie EPIC
Cecil B. Demille was a movie director and producer who started his professional career in the silent era. DeMille’s movies were often epic works, such “Cleopatra” (1936), “Samson and Delilah” (1949), “The Greatest Show on Earth” (1952) and “The Ten Commandments” (1956). The Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award is named in his honor, and indeed he was its first recipient.

46. Tribe for which a helicopter is named APACHE
The 4-bladed Apache helicopter was introduced back in 1975 as a replacement for the 2-bladed Cobra. The Apache first entered service in 1986, and is still very much in use, mainly with the US Army, the Israel Air Force, the Egyptian Air Force and the Royal Netherlands Air Force.

47. Gave 10% to the church TITHED
A tithe is a traditional payment of one tenth of a person's annual income and is usually given to a church. Tithing is a practice taught in many traditions, and according to a 2002 survey, about 3% of American adults donate 10% or more of their income to a church.

50. Japanese religion SHINTO
It is perhaps best not to describe Shinto as a religion, but more as a "spirituality of the Japanese people", a spirituality that encompasses folklore, history and mythology. Having said that, "Shinto" translates literally as "Way of the Gods". Most people in Japan who are described as practicing Shinto, also practice Buddhism.

53. Phi Beta __ KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa was the first collegiate Greek fraternity in the US, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary. The organization served as a model for future collegiate fraternities and sororities, although in the 19th century Phi Beta Kappa distanced itself from the fraternal focus and transformed into the honor society that it is today, recognizing academic excellence. The initials Phi Beta Kappa stand for "philosophia biou kybernētēs", which translates into "philosophy is the guide of life". The symbol of the Phi Beta Kappa Society is a golden key.

62. "__ Father, who art ..." OUR
"Our Father ..." are the opening words of the Lord's Prayer ("Pater Noster" in Latin), which is probably the best-known prayer in the Christian tradition.

63. One in Québec UNE
Québec is the largest province in Canada, and the only one with French as its sole official language. The name "Québec" comes from an Algonquin word "kebec" meaning "where the river narrows". This refers to the area around Quebec City where the St. Lawrence River narrows as it flows through a gap lined by steep cliffs.

64. Qt. halves PTS
The unit of volume “quart” is so called because it is one quarter of a gallon.


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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. "Famous Potatoes" state IDAHO
6. Speak drunkenly SLUR
10. Addition word PLUS
14. "__ what?": "What next?" SO NOW
15. Adhesive strip TAPE
16. Shopper's memory aid LIST
17. Porky's girlfriend PETUNIA PIG
19. Impressionist APER
20. Very __ yours TRULY
21. Utter mess SNAFU
22. Tire inflater AIR
24. Feigns sleep, say PLAYS POSSUM
28. Pitt of "Troy" BRAD
30. Three-note chord TRIAD
31. Aboveground trains ELS
32. Per __: for each person, as income CAPITA
35. Got one's uniform dirty, perhaps SLID
36. Runs away from military duty DESERTS
38. Israeli parliament KNESSET
43. "Exodus" author Leon URIS
45. Haughtily terse SNIPPY
46. "From __ Zinc": vitamin slogan A TO
49. Skimpy skirts MINIS
51. Cut out, as coupons CLIP
52. Either of two of the Inspector Clouseau films, with "The" PINK PANTHER
56. Cooler cubes ICE
57. World book ATLAS
58. Like a lummox INEPT
60. Lamb serving CHOP
61. Yipping adoptee POUND PUPPY
66. Pile HEAP
67. Undersized 61-Across RUNT
68. Sharp-crested ridge ARETE
69. Novelist Ferber EDNA
70. Twistable cookie OREO
71. Leavening agent YEAST

Down
1. AOL, for one ISP
2. Deer girl DOE
3. Devices to stop tiny invading armies ANT TRAPS
4. Semiannual time-change amount HOUR
5. Admit (to) OWN UP
6. Patronize, as a hotel STAY AT
7. Spot for a cat, or drink like a cat LAP
8. Wire service initials UPI
9. Coffee order: Abbr. REG
10. Thinks ahead PLANS
11. Enzyme that breaks down fats LIPASE
12. Handy USEFUL
13. Plays the banjo, like someone "in the kitchen with Dinah" STRUMS
18. Unwell ILL
21. Wetter than wet SODDEN
22. "The Alphabet Song" start ABCD
23. "Dies __": Latin hymn IRAE
25. Mos. and mos. YRS
26. Fancy tie fabric SILK
27. "Growing" difficulties PAINS
29. Craps cube DIE
33. Spades in a four-spades bridge contract, say TRUMPS
34. Sunlit courtyards ATRIA
37. Ireland's __ Féin SINN
39. [error left as is] SIC
40. Soup legume SPLIT PEA
41. Many a DeMille movie EPIC
42. Use a keyboard TYPE
44. Command to Rover SIT
46. Tribe for which a helicopter is named APACHE
47. Gave 10% to the church TITHED
48. Borrowed, as a library book ON LOAN
50. Japanese religion SHINTO
53. Phi Beta __ KAPPA
54. Put a stop to END
55. Settle, as a debt REPAY
59. Chaste PURE
61. NHL player, e.g. PRO
62. "__ Father, who art ..." OUR
63. One in Québec UNE
64. Qt. halves PTS
65. Nonetheless YET


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5 comments:

Vidwan827 said...

Hello Bill, and friends,

I had a good time with this puzzle. my most difficult word was Li-ase. I had to run through the entire alphabet... hadn't heard of that enzyme.(!)

I didn't get the theme until much later. Thanks for the information about the 'Pink Panther', being the name of the jewel that was stolen ..... I hope I'll remember.

I think Phi Beta Kappa is an honor society ... you can't just join it .... you have to be invited to join it. Its considered a great honor, ... people mention it in their CV, like 'magna cum laude;, etc.

I have a one week old brand new laptop that has become infected with some horrible Malware virus ...

... conduit.com....

.... its just too awful ! Its got itself entrenched and embedded and is totally ruining my life.

It shows up on Google, like a magnifying glass icon.

Please all of you be careful out there !!!

Have a nice day, all.

Piano Man said...

I had to raise my eyebrows when I learned that Petunia Pig has been Porky's girlfriend since 1937. That's 77 years! How many women would wait around that long for a commitment? Perhaps Porky simply finds it too difficult to say "I d-d-d-d-do."

Bill Butler said...

@Vidwan
Thanks for educating me on the difference between an honor society and a fraternal society. I am afriad that whole world is "Greek to me" given my lack of an American education. I made an edit in the post. Sorry to hear about that Conduit "hijacking". There ought to be a law. Really, there ought to be a law ...

@Piano Man
Porcine commitment issues ... too funny :)

Addict said...

Evening Folks,
A quick and easy Monday puzzle with a couple of non Monday words like LIPASE and KNESSET but crosses to the rescue.

Vidwan, I asked my resident computer tech about your problem and if their is a quick fix for it ( HECK, he could have created it for all I know ;~) ).
It must be somewhat new, he has only heard of it. I have him looking for a fix now if that helps.

With that, the gratuitous BYE

Bill Butler said...

Hi there, Addict.

Thanks for that trip down Memory Lane with Porky Pig. It reminds me of a cinema of my youth that showed nothing but cartoons all day long. Happy days ...

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About This Blog

This is the simplest of blogs.

I do the Los Angeles Times puzzle online every evening, the night before it is published in the paper. Then, I "Google & Wiki" the references that puzzle me, or that I find of interest. I post my findings, along with the solution, usually before midnight PST.

I've been writing the NYTCrossword.com blog (about the New York Times crossword) since 2009. I finally started this LAXCrossword.com blog in response to many requests over the years to write about the daily LA Times crossword.

About Me

The name's William Ernest Butler, but please call me Bill. I grew up in Ireland, but now live out here in the San Francisco Bay Area. I am retired, from technology businesses that took our family all over the world.

I answer all emails, so please feel free to email me at bill@paxient.com, contact me on Google+ or leave a comment below.

Crosswords and My Dad

I worked on my first crossword puzzle when I was about 6-years-old, sitting on my Dad's knee. He let me "help" him with his puzzle almost every day as I was growing up. Over the years, Dad passed on to me his addiction to crosswords. Now in my early 50s, I work on my Los Angeles Times and New York Times puzzles every day. I'm no longer sitting on my Dad's knee, but I feel that he is there with me, looking over my shoulder.

This blog is dedicated to my Dad, who passed away at the beginning of this month.

Bill
January 29, 2009

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