LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Apr 14, Wednesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Steve Blais
THEME: Angry Clues … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase interpreted as what a certain fictional character might do if angered. Well, they’re all fictional except Santa:

17A. What an angry mermaid might do? GO OFF THE DEEP END
26A. What an angry Santa might do? HIT THE ROOF
46A. What an angry Humpty Dumpty might do? GO TO PIECES
59A. What an angry witch might do? FLY OFF THE HANDLE

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 57s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Vishnu incarnation RAMA
In the Hindu tradition, the god known as Vishnu has seven different avatars i.e. incarnations or manifestations. Rama is the seventh of these avatars.

14. “This Old House” carpenter Norm ABRAM
Norm Abram is the master carpenter who appeared on the PBS show “This Old House”, and who later starred in the spinoff series called “The New Yankee Workshop”.

“This Old House” first aired in 1979, on PBS, with Bob Vila as host. After ten years on the show, Vila was able to make extra income with commercial endorsements. These earnings caused conflict with commercial-free PBS, and so Vila was replaced by Steve Thomas.

15. Like many a shoppe OLDE
The word “olde” wasn’t actually used much earlier than the 1920s. “Olde” was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc.

16. Color of Death’s dart, in “Venus and Adonis” EBON
“Venus and Adonis” is a complex poem by William Shakespeare, and quite racy. The plot of the poem is based on extracts from Book X “Metamorphoses”, the narrative poem by Roman poet Ovid. Two lines from Shakespeare’s poem are:

Love’s golden arrow at him should have fled,
And not Death’s ebon dart, to strike dead.

26. What an angry Santa might do? HIT THE ROOF
Saint Nicholas of Myra is the inspiration for Santa Claus. Nicholas was the Bishop of Myra (now in modern-day Turkey) during the 4th century AD, and was known for being generous to the poor. Centuries after he died, his remains were desecrated by Italian sailors and moved to Bari in Italy. One legend has it that the relics were moved again centuries later and reburied in the grounds of Jerpoint Abbey in Co. Kilkenny in Ireland, where you can visit the grave today. I choose to believe that Santa Claus’s relics are indeed buried in Ireland …

30. Frozen dessert franchise TCBY
TCBY is a chain of stores selling frozen yogurt, founded in 1981 in Little Rock, Arkansas. The acronym TCBY originally stood for “This Can’t Be Yogurt”, but this had to be changed due to a lawsuit being pressed by a competitor called “I Can’t Believe It’s Yogurt”. These days TCBY stands for “The Country’s Best Yogurt”.

34. Part of NCAA: Abbr. ATH
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) dates back to the Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. When his son broke his nose playing football at Harvard, President Roosevelt turned his attention to the number of serious injuries and even deaths occurring in college sports. He instigated meetings between the major educational institutions leading to the formation of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS) in 1906, which was given the remit of regulating college sports. The IAAUS became the NCAA in 1910.

36. Pong developer ATARI
At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

Do you remember the arcade video game that was like a game of tennis, with paddles moving up and down to hit what looked like a ball, over what looked like a net? Well, that was the game called “Pong”.

37. Supermodel Cheryl TIEGS
Cheryl Tiegs was only 17-years-old when she appeared as a model on the cover of “Glamour” magazine. After that Tiegs became famous for sequential appearances in the “Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue” throughout the seventies.

39. 1860s govt. for four years CSA
The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

41. Accustom ENURE
“Enure” is a variant spelling of “inure”, meaning to harden oneself against the effects of, to accustom oneself to.

42. Western Wyoming county TETON
Teton County, Wyoming is home to the Grand Teton National Park. Teton has the distinction of having the second highest personal per capita income of any county in the US ($94,672 in 2010), second only to New York County ($111,386 in 2010).

Grand Teton National Park is located just south of Yellowstone NP, and a must see if you are visiting the latter. The park is named after the tallest peak in the magnificent Teton Range known as Grand Teton. The origins of the name “Teton” is not very clear, although my favorite story is that it was named by French trappers, as the word “tetons” in French means “breasts”!

44. __-Foy, Quebec STE
Sainte-Foy was a city in its own right, but as of 2002 it is a neighborhood in Quebec City. Sainte-Foy is an important part of the larger city, partly because it is home to the area’s main airport, Jean Lesage International.

45. Tabula __: blank slate RASA
Tabula rasa (plural: tabulae rasae) is the idea that people are born with a “blank slate”, and that knowledge comes from experience and perception.

46. What an angry Humpty Dumpty might do? GO TO PIECES
Humpty Dumpty is a character in a nursery rhyme, actually an egg although that isn’t specifically called out in the original rhyme:

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,
Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
All the king’s horses and all the king’s men
Couldn’t put Humpty together again.

63. Smallest Great Lake by volume ERIE
Lake Erie is the fourth largest of the five Great Lakes by area (Lake Ontario is the smallest). The lake takes its name from the Erie tribe of Native Americans that used to live along its southern shore. Erie is the smallest of the Great Lakes by volume and the shallowest, something for which nearby residents must be quite grateful. Being relatively shallow, much of Erie freezes over part way through most winters putting an end to most of the lake effect snow that falls in the snow belt extending from the lake’s edge.

65. __’ Pea SWEE
Originally Popeye used the nickname “Swee’pea” to address his girlfriend Olive Oyl. Then along comes a baby, found on Popeye’s doorstep. Popeye adopts the little guy and raises him, calling him “Swee’Pea”.

66. Actress Meg RYAN
Meg Ryan is the stage name of the actress Margaret Mary Hyra. Ryan’s big break came with the excellent 1989 movie “When Harry Met Sally” from which she went on to star in some of the greatest romantic comedies ever made.

Down
1. Internet connectivity frustrations LAGS
Tell me about it …

3. Titan who gave fire to humans PROMETHEUS
In Greek mythology, Prometheus was one of the Titans. He was said to have created man from clay as well as giving fire to humanity, allowing the human race to prosper.

5. “Unbelievable” techno-funk band EMF
EMF is an alternative rock dance band from England. EMF’s biggest hit was 1990’s “Unbelievable” that made it to the number one spot here in the US. The acronym EMF supposedly stands for “Epsom Mad Funkers”.

6. Philosopher Locke JOHN
John Locke was the English philosopher who postulated that the mind is a blank slate (or “tabula rasa”) when we are born, and that we fill that slate with our experiences and observations.

8. Former “Tonight Show” announcer Hall EDD
Edd Hall is most famous as a former announcer for Jay Leno on “The Tonight Show”.

11. Assist with a crime ABET
The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (it literally means “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

12. Chamonix peak MONT
Chamonix-Mont-Blanc is on the eastern border of France, in the Alps. Famously it was the site of the 1924 Winter Olympics, the first ever Winter Olympic Games.

13. Garcia of “Ocean’s Eleven” ANDY
Andy Garcia is a Hollywood actor from Havana, Cuba. Garcia moved to Miami with his family when he was 5 years old, just after the failed Bay of Pigs Invasion. Andy’s father was an avocado farmer in Cuba, and in Miami built a million-dollar fragrance business. Recently, Garcia is known for playing ruthless casino owner Terry Benedict in the “Ocean’s Eleven” series of movies.

18. Pitch-changing pro TUNER
A piano tuner, perhaps.

19. Brian who produced or co-produced several Talking Heads albums ENO
Brian Eno started out his musical career with Roxy Music. However, Eno’s most oft-played composition (by far!) is Microsoft’s “start-up jingle”, the 6-second sound you hear when the Windows operating system is booting up. Eno might have annoyed the Microsoft folks when he stated on a BBC radio show:

I wrote it on a Mac. I’ve never used a PC in my life; I don’t like them.

Talking Heads was a New Wave band from New York City, formed in 1974 and active until 1991. I couldn’t name one of their songs, to be honest …

27. Turner memoir I, TINA
“I, Tina” is the 1986 autobiography of Tina Turner. The book was so successful it was adapted into a movie called “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” The film version was released in 1993 and starring Angela Bassett as Tina Turner.

Tina Turner is actually a stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll”. Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

31. String-pulling game CAT’S CRADLE
Cat’s Cradle is likely to be one of the oldest games played by man, one that sprung up independently in all parts of the world. The game is played by two people and involves the making of a series of figures with a loop of string held by the fingers.

36. Lennox of the Eurythmics ANNIE
Eurythmics is the name used by British pop duo Annie Lennox and Dave Stewart. The pair had previously performed together in the band called the Tourists. Eurythmics had their big break in 1983 with the release of the single “Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)”, a lovely song.

43. Book club leader for 15 years OPRAH
“Oprah’s Book Club” was a segment that started in 1996 on “The Oprah Winfrey Show”. Each book reviewed was a personal recommendation by Winfrey herself. The first book reviewed was “The Deep End of the Ocean” by Jacquelyn Mitchard. The original book club ended in 2011, but there’s now a reboot known as “Oprah’s Book Club 2.0” that focuses on digital media now that “The Oprah Winfrey Show” is no more.

54. Branch of Islam SHIA
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family.

55. Hammer part PEEN
The peen of a hammer is on the head, and is the side of the head that is opposite the striking surface. Often the peen is in the shape of a hemisphere (as in a ball-peen hammer), but usually it is shaped like a claw (mainly for removing nails).

61. Aquafresh tube letters ADA
American Dental Association (ADA)

Aquafresh is a toothpaste that was introduced in 1973. The original product delivered two “stripes” from the tube: a white paste for cavity protection and an aqua gel for fresh breath. This “double protection” formula was augmented in 1983 to “triple protection” with the addition of a red gel for healthy gums.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Minor error LAPSE
6. Catcall JEER
10. Vishnu incarnation RAMA
14. “This Old House” carpenter Norm ABRAM
15. Like many a shoppe OLDE
16. Color of Death’s dart, in “Venus and Adonis” EBON
17. What an angry mermaid might do? GO OFF THE DEEP END
20. Not many SOME
21. Pop’s bro UNC
22. Hard to figure out KNOTTY
23. “Baseball Tonight” airer ESPN
25. Not good POOR
26. What an angry Santa might do? HIT THE ROOF
30. Frozen dessert franchise TCBY
34. Part of NCAA: Abbr. ATH
35. Don’t exist AREN’T
36. Pong developer ATARI
37. Supermodel Cheryl TIEGS
39. 1860s govt. for four years CSA
40. Still in bed NOT UP
41. Accustom ENURE
42. Western Wyoming county TETON
44. __-Foy, Quebec STE
45. Tabula __: blank slate RASA
46. What an angry Humpty Dumpty might do? GO TO PIECES
48. Opportunity, metaphorically DOOR
50. Backside REAR
51. Verdict challenge APPEAL
54. Spot for a facial SPA
56. Pool float RAFT
59. What an angry witch might do? FLY OFF THE HANDLE
62. Undecided TORN
63. Smallest Great Lake by volume ERIE
64. Where subs are assembled DELIS
65. __’ Pea SWEE
66. Actress Meg RYAN
67. Skilled ADEPT

Down
1. Internet connectivity frustrations LAGS
2. Peek-__ A-BOO
3. Titan who gave fire to humans PROMETHEUS
4. Least risky SAFEST
5. “Unbelievable” techno-funk band EMF
6. Philosopher Locke JOHN
7. Gas alternative: Abbr. ELEC
8. Former “Tonight Show” announcer Hall EDD
9. Be strongly pervaded with REEK OF
10. Keep apprised of one’s activities, as a superior REPORT TO
11. Assist with a crime ABET
12. Chamonix peak MONT
13. Garcia of “Ocean’s Eleven” ANDY
18. Pitch-changing pro TUNER
19. Brian who produced or co-produced several Talking Heads albums ENO
24. Terrible twos, one hopes PHASE
25. Chips-to-be POTATO
26. Fan’s opposite HATER
27. Turner memoir I, TINA
28. Parish head RECTOR
29. First stage ONSET
31. String-pulling game CAT’S CRADLE
32. Ogre BRUTE
33. “Holy mackerel!” YIPES!
36. Lennox of the Eurythmics ANNIE
38. Elementary level GRADE ONE
43. Book club leader for 15 years OPRAH
46. One following a course GOLFER
47. Worked for EARNED
49. Big ape OAF
51. Times to call, in ads AFTS
52. Field machine PLOW
53. Flammable pile PYRE
54. Branch of Islam SHIA
55. Hammer part PEEN
57. Lose one’s cool FLIP
58. Quiz TEST
60. Do one’s best TRY
61. Aquafresh tube letters ADA

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LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Apr 14, Tuesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jack McInturff
THEME: It’s a Keeper … each of today’s themed answers started with a type of KEEPER:

18A. Generic product STORE BRAND (giving “storekeeper”)
26A. Xbox One, for one GAME CONSOLE (giving “gamekeeper”)
37A. Referee’s call TIME OUT (giving “timekeeper”)
47A. Image on many tie-dyed shirts PEACE SYMBOL (giving “peacekeeper”)

62A. Angler’s “I don’t have to throw this one back,” and hint to the first word of 18-, 26-, 37- and 47-Across IT’S A KEEPER

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Cabbage side SLAW
The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch name “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

15. Wild West movie OATER
The term “oater” that is used for a western movie comes from the number of horses seen, as horses love oats!

16. Peter Fonda’s beekeeper ULEE
“Ulee’s Gold” is a highly respected film from 1997 in which Peter Fonda plays the title role of Ulee. Ulee’s “gold” is the honey that Ulee produces. It is a favorite role for Peter Fonda and he has shared that playing Ulee brought to mind his father Henry Fonda, who himself kept a couple of hives. So if you see Peter Fonda in “Ulee’s Gold” you’re witnessing some characteristics that Peter saw in his father.

Peter Fonda is the son of actor Henry, brother of actress Jane, and father of actress Bridget. Peter nearly didn’t make it to the stage. He was one of the many children who have been victims of shooting accidents. Peter shot himself in the stomach when he was just 11-years-old, and very nearly died.

20. Southern Florida “trail” that’s a portmanteau of the two cities it connects TAMIAMI
The Tamiami Trail is a section of US Highway 41 in Florida that connects Tampa to Miami. The name “Tamiami” is a portmanteau of “Tampa” and “Miami”.

25. Bert’s buddy ERNIE
I’ve always believed that the “Sesame Street” characters Bert and Ernie were named after two roles played in the Christmas classic “It’s a Wonderful Life”. In the movie, the policeman’s name is Bert and his taxi-driving buddy is named Ernie. However, the “Sesame Street” folks have stated that the use of the same names is just a coincidence.

26. Xbox One, for one GAME CONSOLE (giving “gamekeeper”)
The XBox line of video game consoles is made by Microsoft. The original XBox platform was followed by XBox 360 and most recently by XBox One. Microsoft’s XBox competes directly with Sony’s PlayStation and Nintendo’s Wii.

30. Indiana hoopster PACER
The Indiana Pacers are the professional basketball team based in Indianapolis, who play in the NBA. The name was chosen when the team was formed in 1967. “Pacers” is a homage harness racing pacers (famed in Indiana) and the pace car used in the Indianapolis 500.

31. Aegean island IOS
The Cyclades are a group of islands in the Aegean Sea lying southeast of the Greek mainland. There are about 200 islands in the group, almost all of which are the peaks of a submerged mountain range. Ios is one of the larger islands, 11 miles long and 6 miles wide.

42. Barely makes, with “out” EKES
To “eke out” means to “make something go further or last longer”. For example, you could eke out your income by cutting back on expenses. I always have a problem with the commonly cited definition of “eke out” as “barely get by”. Close but no cigar, I say …

44. Toyota __4: SUV model RAV
The Toyota RAV4 is Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV or “ute” for short). The RAV4 name stands for “Recreational Active Vehicle with 4-wheel drive”. Inventive, huh?

45. Desert stopover OASIS
The most famous oasis in the US is … Las Vegas, in the middle of the Mojave Desert.

47. Image on many tie-dyed shirts PEACE SYMBOL (giving “peacekeeper”)
The peace symbol that we tend to use today was born in the 1950s. It was originally created as the logo for the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND), an organization based in the UK. The CND symbol was designed by artist Gerald Holtom for a 1958 protest march from Trafalgar Square in London to the Atomic Weapons Research Establishment at Aldermaston in Berkshire, England. The use of the symbol simply spread throughout the world and was used by other disarmament and antiwar activists.

51. Woodland deity SATYR
The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the “rude” male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

54. Singer Lisa et al. LOEBS
The singer Lisa Loeb was discovered by actor Ethan Hawke, who lived just across the street from her in New York City. Hawke took a demo of her song “Stay (I Missed You)” and gave it to director Ben Stiller, who in turn used it over the ending credits of his 1994 movie “Reality Bites”. The movie was a hit, the song went to number one, and Loeb became the first artist ever to hit that number one spot without having signed up with a record label. Good for her!

58. Fortified position BASTION
Our word “bastion”, meaning “well-fortified position”, comes from the Old French “bastille”, a word for “fortress”.

62. Angler’s “I don’t have to throw this one back,” and hint to the first word of 18-, 26-, 37- and 47-Across IT’S A KEEPER
We use the verb “to angle” to mean “to fish” because “angel” was an Old English word for a hook.

64. Rooney of “60 Minutes” ANDY
Andy Rooney began his career in newspapers during WWII working for “Stars and Stripes” in London. He had some memorable experiences during the war, including flying on the first American bombing raid over Germany. He was also one of the first American journalists to visit the German concentration camps as they were liberated. He started his segment called “A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney” on CBS’s “60 Minutes” way back in 1978, and so was on our screens for over 40 years. Rooney passed away in 2011. He was a cool, cool guy …

66. Packed like sardines IN OIL
Sardines are oily fish related to herrings. Sardines are also known as pilchards, although in the UK “sardine” is the name for a young pilchard.

69. Group in pews LAITY
Anything described is laic (or “laical, lay”) is related to the laity, those members of the church who are not clergy. The term “laic” ultimately comes from the Greek “laikos” meaning “of the people”.

A pew is a bench in a church, usually with a high back. The original pews were raised and sometimes enclosed seats in the church used by women and important men or families. “Pew” comes from the Old French “puie” meaning “balcony, elevation”.

70. Old-timey “not” NARY
The adjective “nary” means “not one”, as in “nary a soul”.

Down
1. NCO rank SSGT
Staff sergeant (SSgt)

An NCO is a non-commissioned officer in the armed forces. Usually such an officer is one who has earned his or her rank by promotion through the enlisted ranks. A good example would be a sergeant.

2. Kinks girl who “walks like a woman and talks like a man” LOLA
“Lola” is a fabulous song, written by Ray Davies and released by the Kinks back in 1970. Inspired by a real life incident, the lyrics tell of young man who met a young “lady” in a club, danced with her, and then discovered “she” was actually a transvestite. The storyline isn’t very traditional, but the music is superb.

3. University grad ALUM
An “alumnus” (plural … alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural … alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

5. Like some rays and dust COSMIC
Cosmic rays aren’t actually rays at all. They are high energy particles that originate in outer space outside of our solar system. Cosmic rays interact with atoms in our atmosphere creating secondary particles that can reach the Earth’s surface.

Cosmic dust is usually defined as the space dust that exists in our solar system. These dust particles mainly originate from comets and asteroids in our system, but can also be interstellar dust particles that are just “passing through” from other solar systems.

9. La __ Tar Pits BREA
The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It’s well worth a visit if you are in town …

12. Old Finnish cent PENNI
A penni was one hundredth of a markka, the currency of Finland that was used until it was replaced by the euro in 2002. The markka was introduced by the Finns in 1860 to replace the Russian ruble.

13. Marsh plant SEDGE
Sedges are a family of plants that resemble grasses and rushes. Sedges are more properly called Cyperaceae.

19. Belgian composer Jacques BREL
Jacques Brel was a songwriter from Belgium whose songs were most popular in France, although English translations of his works became hits for artists all around the world.

24. Evel on a bike KNIEVEL
Daredevil Evel Knievel contracted hepatitis C from the many blood transfusions that he needed after injuries incurred during stunts. He had to have a liver transplant as a result, but his health declined after that. He eventually passed away in 2007.

28. U.S./Canada’s __ Canals SOO
In the summer of 2010 I spent a very interesting afternoon watching ships make their way through the Soo Locks and Soo Canal between Lake Superior and the lower Great lakes. The name “Soo” comes from the US and Canadian cities on either side of the locks, both called Sault Ste. Marie.

29. Sch. whose mascot is Brutus Buckeye OSU
Ohio State University was founded back in 1870 as the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College. The athletic teams of Ohio State University (OSU) are called the Buckeyes, named after the state tree of Ohio. In turn the buckeye tree gets its name from the appearance of its fruit, a dark nut with a light patch thought to resemble a “buck’s eye”.

30. “The Raven” poet POE
“The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allen Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

38. 401(k) kin, briefly IRA
A 401(k) account is similar to an IRA in that contributions can be made from a paycheck prior to the deduction of income taxes. Additionally, contributions can be fully or partially matched by an employer.

39. Apple product MAC
Macintosh (also “Mac”) is a line of computers from Apple Inc. The first Mac was introduced in 1984, and I remember someone showing me one at work in those early days of personal computing. There was a piece of white plastic connected to the main computer by a cord, and I was amazed when the guy showed me that it controlled where the cursor was on the screen. My colleague told me that this lump of plastic was called “a mouse” …

43. Surreptitious data-collecting computer program SPYWARE
Spyware is software that is installed on a computer to gather information without the owner’s knowledge. Nasty stuff …

48. Estrada of “CHiPs” ERIK
Erik Estrada got his big break in the movie “Airport 1975”, before playing motorcycle police officer Poncherello on the television show “CHiPs” from 1977-81.

53. “We’re off __ the wizard …” TO SEE
“We’re Off to See the Wizard” is a song from the 1939 classic film “The Wizard of Oz”. It was composed by Harold Arlen, with lyrics by Yip Harburg. The song is sung three times in the movie, once as a duet between Dorothy and the Scarecrow, then as a trio with the addition of the Tin Man, and finally as a quartet when the Cowardly Lion joins the group. Famously, Buddy Ebsen started filming as the Tin Man, but had to be replaced by Jack Haley. Still, it’s Ebsen voice that we hear singing “We’re Off to See the Wizard” as the song was never re-recorded with Haley.

56. Playwright Simon NEIL
Neil Simon is one of my favorite playwrights. Simon has written over thirty plays and about thirty screenplays. He has received more nominations for Oscars and Tony Awards than any other writer. My favorite play penned by Simon has to be “Brighton Beach Memoirs”, but the list of his great stage works seems endless and includes “Barefoot in the Park”, “The Odd Couple”, “Sweet Charity”, “Plaza Suite”, “California Suite”, “Biloxi Blues” and “The Goodbye Girl”.

57. Rowlands of “Gloria” GENA
Gena Rowlands is an actress best known for the films made with her husband, actor and director John Cassavetes. More recently, Rowlands played a lead role opposite James Garner in the weepy, weepy 2004 film “The Notebook”. “The Notebook” was directed by her son, Nick Cassavetes.

“Gloria” is a crime thriller movie from 1980 that stars Gena Rowlands as gangster’s girlfriend on the run from the mob. “Gloria” was directed by John Cassavetes, who is Rowlands’ husband.

59. Ancient Andean INCA
The Inca Empire was known as the Tawantinsuyu, which translates as “land of the four quarters”. The Inca Empire was a federal organization having a central government that sat above four “suyu” or “quarters”, four administrative regions.

61. Part of a B’way address NY, NY
Broadway really is, and always has been, the Main Street of New York City. It started out as the Wickquasgeck Trail that was trampled into the Manhattan brush land by the Native Americans of the area. In the days of the Dutch, the trail became the main road though the island of Manhattan, down to the New Amsterdam settlement in the south. The Dutch described it as a “Breede weg”, a broad street or “broad way”. The name Broadway was adopted as the official name for the whole thoroughfare in 1899.

63. Hawaiian dish POI
The corm of some taro plants is used to make poi, the traditional Hawaiian dish (that I think tastes horrible). When a taro plant is grown as an ornamental, it is often called Elephant Ears due to the shape of its large leaves.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Cabbage side SLAW
5. Airplane maneuver CLIMB
10. Cookbook amts. TSPS
14. Go it alone SOLO
15. Wild West movie OATER
16. Peter Fonda’s beekeeper ULEE
17. Nursery school adhesive GLUE
18. Generic product STORE BRAND (giving “storekeeper”)
20. Southern Florida “trail” that’s a portmanteau of the two cities it connects TAMIAMI
22. Generating, as interest on an account EARNING
23. Move covertly SLINK
25. Bert’s buddy ERNIE
26. Xbox One, for one GAME CONSOLE (giving “gamekeeper”)
30. Indiana hoopster PACER
31. Aegean island IOS
32. Computer input DATA
36. Hold the title to OWN
37. Referee’s call TIME OUT (giving “timekeeper”)
41. Young fellow LAD
42. Barely makes, with “out” EKES
44. Toyota __4: SUV model RAV
45. Desert stopover OASIS
47. Image on many tie-dyed shirts PEACE SYMBOL (giving “peacekeeper”)
51. Woodland deity SATYR
54. Singer Lisa et al. LOEBS
55. Readying a field, say PLOWING
58. Fortified position BASTION
62. Angler’s “I don’t have to throw this one back,” and hint to the first word of 18-, 26-, 37- and 47-Across IT’S A KEEPER
64. Rooney of “60 Minutes” ANDY
65. Sly look LEER
66. Packed like sardines IN OIL
67. Subject of adoration ICON
68. Family chart TREE
69. Group in pews LAITY
70. Old-timey “not” NARY

Down
1. NCO rank SSGT
2. Kinks girl who “walks like a woman and talks like a man” LOLA
3. University grad ALUM
4. Cry of distress WOE IS ME
5. Like some rays and dust COSMIC
6. Spanglish speaker, often LATINO
7. “Who am __ argue?” I TO
8. Little more than MERE
9. La __ Tar Pits BREA
10. Show embarrassment TURN RED
11. Done in, as a dragon SLAIN
12. Old Finnish cent PENNI
13. Marsh plant SEDGE
19. Belgian composer Jacques BREL
21. Make aware ALERT
24. Evel on a bike KNIEVEL
26. Stare unsubtly GAWK
27. Pimply condition ACNE
28. U.S./Canada’s __ Canals SOO
29. Sch. whose mascot is Brutus Buckeye OSU
30. “The Raven” poet POE
33. Furthermore ALSO
34. Wagger on the dog TAIL
35. Promos ADS
38. 401(k) kin, briefly IRA
39. Apple product MAC
40. Burial places TOMBS
43. Surreptitious data-collecting computer program SPYWARE
46. Choose not to vote ABSTAIN
48. Estrada of “CHiPs” ERIK
49. “Amen!” SO BE IT
50. Every September, say YEARLY
51. Like milk on the floor SPILT
52. Modify ALTER
53. “We’re off __ the wizard …” TO SEE
56. Playwright Simon NEIL
57. Rowlands of “Gloria” GENA
59. Ancient Andean INCA
60. Fragrance ODOR
61. Part of a B’way address NY, NY
63. Hawaiian dish POI

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