LA Times Crossword Answers 31 May 14, Saturday

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Barry C. Silk
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 15m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. California/Arizona border reservoir LAKE HAVASU
Lake Havasu is the reservoir that resulted from the construction of the Parker Dam in the mid-1930s. The dam is on the Colorado River, and the lake is on the border between California and Arizona. The name “Havasu” comes from a Mohave word meaning “blue”.

16. Salinger’s “__ Stories” NINE
J. D. Salinger’s 1953 collection of short stories includes the works “A Perfect Day for Bananafish” and “For For Esmé—with Love and Squalor”. Dear Esmé turns up a lot in crosswords …

J. D. Salinger was a very reclusive author, most famous for his novel “Catcher in the Rye”. Salinger fought in WWII after he was drafted into the US Army. He saw action on Utah Beach on D-Day, and in the Battle of the Bulge. He also spent a lot of time interrogating prisoners due to his knowledge of French and German, and he was one of the first Americans to go into a liberated concentration camp. He later spent time in hospital suffering from what was then called combat stress reaction, as he tried to deal with what he saw in the German camps.

17. Yellow sticky, often NOTE TO SELF
The Post-it note was invented at 3M following the accidental discovery of a low-tack, reusable adhesive. The actual intent of the development program was the discovery of a super-strong adhesive.

18. With 3-Down, Wingey Wallace’s comic strip girlfriend ETTA
(3D. See 18-Across KETT)
“Etta Kett” was a comic strip that first ran in 1925. The strip ceased to be published in 1974, when creator Paul Robinson passed away. The initial intent was to offer tips to teenagers on manners and social graces, hence the name of the title character Etta Kett (sounds like “etiquette”).

19. __’acte ENTR
The term “entr’acte” comes to us from French, and is the interval between two acts (“entre” deux “actes”) of a theatrical performance. It often describes some entertainment provided during that interval.

20. Pkg. measures WTS
One might check the weight (wt.) of a package (pkg.) for shipping, say.

21. Wife of Jacob RACHEL
According to the Bible, Leah was one of the two wives of Jacob, the other being Leah’s sister Rachel. Jacob’s intention had been to marry Rachel, but the Leah and Rachel’s father “switched” his daughters and provided Leah as the veiled bride. Jacob married Rachel a week later, and lived with the two wives concurrently.

23. Ominous time IDES
There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually “fixed” by law. “Kalendae” were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. “Nonae” were originally the days of the half moon. And “idus” (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

Julius Caesar was assassinated on the 15th (the ides) of March, 44 BC. He was attacked by a group of sixty people in the Roman Senate, and was stabbed 23 times. The first to strike a blow was Servilius Casca, who attacked Caesar from behind and stabbed him in the neck.

25. Smiley creator LE CARRE
George Smiley is the protagonist in several of John Le Carré’s spy novels.

John Le Carré is the pen name of David Cornwell, an English author famous for his spy novels. Cornwell worked for British Intelligence during the fifties and sixties, even as he was writing his spy thrillers. He left MI6 soon after his most famous 1963 novel “The Spy Who Came in from the Cold”, became such a great success.

29. 57501 preceder, on envelopes PIERRE, SD
Here’s an old chestnut of a trivia question for you … what’s the only state capital in the Union in which the name of the capital and the name of its state share no common letters? You guessed it … Pierre, South Dakota …

31. __ ball MATZO
Matzo is a unleavened bread, that is very brittle. The bread is crushed, creating Matzo meal that is then formed into balls using eggs and oil as a binder. The balls are usually served in a chicken stock.

32. A little freedom? LIB
Liberty (lib.)

34. Star of the 1931 film “M” LORRE
“M” is a German movie released in 1931, a thriller written and directed by Fritz Lang. The film starred Peter Lorre in his first major role. Before playing in “M”, Lorre was known for his comic roles, but in this he played the villain, a role in which he very much became typecast in Hollywood.

37. Toon lead singer in a leopard-print leotard JOSIE
“Josie and the Pussycats” is a comic book aimed at teens, published from 1963 to 1982.

43. Japanese sandal ZORI
Zori are thonged sandals commonly worn in Japan. Our modern “flip-flops” are based on the traditional zori design, although the original sandal is a pair of symmetrical shoes.

45. Thrice, in Rx’s TER
“Ter” is the Latin word for “three”, commonly used in the medical world on prescriptions as part of the expression “ter in die”. “Ter in die” is Latin for “three times a day”, abbreviated to “TID”. “Bis in die” (BID) would be twice a day, and “quater in die” (QID) would be four times a day.

There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol “Rx” that’s used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter’s blessing to help a patient recover.

46. Egyptian Christian COPT
The Copts make up the largest minority religious group in Egypt. Copts are Christians, with most adhered to the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, and others practicing Coptic Catholicism or Coptic Protestantism. The term “Copt” ultimately derives from a Greek word for Egyptian.

57. Number that’s physically impossible to write out in standard form GOOGOLPLEX
A “googol” is 10 raised to the power of 100. The term “googol” was coined by the nine-year-old nephew of American mathematician Edward Kasner. The uncle had asked the boy to come up with an interesting name for “a very large number”. Kasner then came up with the name “googleplex”, which he defined as 1 followed by as many zeros one could write before getting tired. He later refined to definition of a googolplex to be 10 to the power of a googol. And yes, the search called “Google” is a deliberate misspelling of “googol”, and Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California is called the Googleplex, a similar deliberate misspelling.

Down
2. “The company for women” company AVON
In 1886, a young man called David McConnell was selling books door-to-door. To enhance his sales numbers he was giving out free perfume to the ladies of the houses that he visited. Seeing as his perfume was more popular than his books, he founded the California Perfume Company in New York City and started manufacturing and selling across the country. The company name was changed to Avon in 1939, and the famous “Avon Calling” marketing campaign was launched in 1954.

4. Honored retiree EMERITUS
Emeritus (female form “emerita”, plural “emeriti”) is a term in the title of some retired professionals, particularly those from academia. Originally an emeritus was a veteran soldier who had served his time. The term comes from the Latin verb “emerere” meaning to complete one’s service.

7. Sleeveless garments VESTS
Here’s another word that often catches me out. What we call a “vest” in the US is a waistcoat back in Ireland. And the Irish use the word “vest” for an undershirt.

8. Summer quaffs ADES
“Quaff” is both a verb and a noun. One quaffs (takes a hearty drink) of a quaff (a hearty drink).

9. Nuevo __: Peruvian currency SOL
The Nuevo Sol has been the currency of Peru since the 1980s.

24. __ Arc, Arkansas DES
The city of Des Arc, Arkansas takes its name from the Bayou des Arc located two mile to the north. The term “arc” is French for “curve, bow”.

25. Petrol purchase LITRE
Petrol is the same thing as gasoline. “Petrol” comes via French from the Latin “petroleum”, itself derived from “petra” meaning “rock” and “oleum” meaning “oil”.

28. Winter soil phenomena ICE NEEDLES
The fascinating phenomenon known as “needle ice” can form when the temperature of the air falls below zero degrees Celsius, while the temperature of the soil is above the freezing point. Water in the soil is brought to the surface by capillary action, where it freezes. As more water comes upwards, the frozen water grows into needles.

29. Trojan War figure PARIS
In Greek legend, Paris was the son of the king of Troy. Paris eloped with Helen, Queen of Sparta, and this act was a major trigger for the Trojan War. Also it was Paris who fatally wounded Achilles by shooting him in the heel with an arrow.

31. Law recipient MOSES
Moses is an important prophet in Christianity and Islam, and the most important prophet in Judaism. It fell to Moses to lead the Israelites out of slavery in Egypt across the Red Sea. He was given the Ten Commandments on Mount Sinai, and then wandered the desert with his people for forty years. Moses then died within sight of the Promised Land.

34. Takes a bath LOSES BIG
In old gambling slang, if you lost all of your money you were “cleaned out”. This expression evolved into the phrase “to take a bath”, meaning “to lose everything”.

35. It merged with Travelers in 1998 CITICORP
When Citicorp and Travelers Group merged in 1998, so did the company logos. The “Citi” name was retained and the Travelers umbrella became a red arc over the “Citi” name.

38. Irreg. spelling VAR
Variant (var.)

40. Xylophonist’s tool MALLET
The glockenspiel and xylophone are similar instruments, the main difference being the material from which the keys are made. Xylophone keys are made from wood, and glockenspiel keys are made from metal.

41. Antecede FOREGO
“To forego” means to precede. “To forgo” means “to do without”. That said, one is a variant spelling of the other. It’s all very confusing …

43. 1983 Woody Allen title role ZELIG
“Zelig” is a 1983 film by Woody Allen. “Zelig” tells the fictitious story, in documentary style, of Leonard Zelig (played by Allen) who has the gift of being able to change his appearance in order to better fit in with the company he keeps. He becomes famous as a “human chameleon”. By using archive footage, the film includes clever “cameos” by real figures from history (like Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover and Susan Sontag).

45. TV watcher’s convenience TIVO
TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world’s first commercially successful DVR (Digital Video Recorder).

48. Best of the Beatles PETE
Musician Pete Best is most famous as the first drummer with the Beatles. Famously, Best was sacked from the band by manager Brian Epstein. However, Epstein took this step reluctantly, and at the request of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison. Several stories have emerged about why the decision was made, but it seems that record producers at Parlophone were insisting that a session drummer be used in the band’s first recordings, and things snowballed from there. And of course, Best was soon replaced by Ringo Starr.

49. Big natural history museum attraction T REX
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written T. rex) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. “Tyrannosaurus” comes from the Greek words “tyrannos” (tyrant) and “sauros” (lizard), and the “rex” is of course Latin for “king”. They were big boys, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

52. Bride in 1969 news ONO
The artist and singer Yoko Ono was married several times, most notably to John Lennon of the Beatles. Ono’s first husband was composer Toshi Ichiyanagi, whom she married in 1956 and divorced in 1962 after being separated for several years. Later in 1962 she married an American jazz musician called Anthony Cox. Ono and Cox had to marry twice as Ono’s divorce hadn’t been properly finalized. The marriage to Cox ended in divorce in 1969, with Ono being awarded full custody of their daughter. Ono married Lennon in 1969.

53. N.Z. currency DOL
The new Zealand dollar was introduced in 1967, replacing the New Zealand pound, which in turn replaced the pound sterling in 1933. An oft-used informal name for the currency is the “kiwi”.

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. California/Arizona border reservoir LAKE HAVASU
11. Has yet to settle OWES
15. “Let a new chapter begin” I’VE MOVED ON
16. Salinger’s “__ Stories” NINE
17. Yellow sticky, often NOTE TO SELF
18. With 3-Down, Wingey Wallace’s comic strip girlfriend ETTA
19. __’acte ENTR
20. Pkg. measures WTS
21. Wife of Jacob RACHEL
23. Ominous time IDES
25. Smiley creator LE CARRE
26. Treated with malice SPITED
29. 57501 preceder, on envelopes PIERRE, SD
30. Place LOCUS
31. __ ball MATZO
32. A little freedom? LIB
33. Lea grazers EWES
34. Star of the 1931 film “M” LORRE
35. Film CINE
36. Yet, poetically E’EN
37. Toon lead singer in a leopard-print leotard JOSIE
38. Outlook VISTA
39. Building and grounds PREMISES
41. Comprehend FATHOM
42. Post-reaping sights SHEAVES
43. Japanese sandal ZORI
44. Bunches OODLES
45. Thrice, in Rx’s TER
46. Egyptian Christian COPT
50. Nonexistent NULL
51. Blew up BOILED OVER
54. “Gotcha” I SEE
55. Liven up INVIGORATE
56. Experiment TEST
57. Number that’s physically impossible to write out in standard form GOOGOLPLEX

Down
1. __ drive LINE
2. “The company for women” company AVON
3. See 18-Across KETT
4. Honored retiree EMERITUS
5. Selling fast HOT
6. Swore AVOWED
7. Sleeveless garments VESTS
8. Summer quaffs ADES
9. Nuevo __: Peruvian currency SOL
10. Remove restrictions from UNFREEZE
11. Like many a garage ONE-CAR
12. Enthusiastically WITH RELISH
13. Signs, as an agreement ENTERS INTO
14. Type of headlight SEALED BEAM
22. Start to bat? ACRO-
24. __ Arc, Arkansas DES
25. Petrol purchase LITRE
26. Weighs options SLEEPS ON IT
27. Dominant team POWERHOUSE
28. Winter soil phenomena ICE NEEDLES
29. Trojan War figure PARIS
31. Law recipient MOSES
34. Takes a bath LOSES BIG
35. It merged with Travelers in 1998 CITICORP
37. Tease, in slang JIVE
38. Irreg. spelling VAR
40. Xylophonist’s tool MALLET
41. Antecede FOREGO
43. 1983 Woody Allen title role ZELIG
45. TV watcher’s convenience TIVO
47. Like zero OVAL
48. Best of the Beatles PETE
49. Big natural history museum attraction T REX
52. Bride in 1969 news ONO
53. N.Z. currency DOL

Return to top of page

LA Times Crossword Answers 30 May 14, Friday

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeffrey Wechsler
THEME: Animal Catchers … today’s themed answers are references to a children’s song “There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly”. The grid then gives us a list of animals that the lady swallowed, each getting successively larger in an attempt to capture the previous animal:

29A. With 35- and 49-Across, start of a refrain whose ending words appear in sequence in the answers to starred clues THERE WAS AN
35A. See 29-Across OLD LADY WHO
49A. See 29-Across SWALLOWED A

6A. *See 29-Across FLY
There was an old lady who swallowed a fly.
I dunno why she swallowed that fly,
Perhaps she’ll die.

17A. *See 29-Across SPIDER
There was an old lady who swallowed a spider,
That wiggled and wiggled and tickled inside her.
She swallowed the spider to catch the fly …

19A. *See 29-Across BIRD
There was an old lady who swallowed a bird;
How absurd, to swallow a bird!
She swallowed the bird to catch the spider …

20A. *See 29-Across CAT
There was an old lady who swallowed a cat.
Imagine that, she swallowed a cat.
She swallowed the cat to catch the bird …

58A. *See 29-Across DOG
There was an old lady who swallowed a dog.
What a hog! To swallow a dog!
She swallowed the dog to catch the cat …

63A. *See 29-Across GOAT
There was an old lady who swallowed a goat.
Just opened her throat and swallowed a goat!
She swallowed the goat to catch the dog …

71A. *See 29-Across COW
There was an old lady who swallowed a cow.
I don’t know how she swallowed a cow!
She swallowed the cow to catch the goat…

72A. *See 29-Across HORSE
There was an old lady who swallowed a horse –
She’s dead, of course.

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 26s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … AMRITA (anrita), EMPANEL (enpanel!!)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Whimpers MEWLS
To mewl is to cry weakly, like a baby, with the word being somewhat imitative.

13. Hindu nectar AMRITA
“Amrita” is a Sanskrit word meaning “immortality”. “Amrita” is also translated as “nectar” as it is a name given to a drink that confers immortality on the gods.

15. Suitor BEAU
A beau is the boyfriend of a belle, a young lady.

16. Pierce player ALDA
Alan Alda had a great television career, especially of course on “M*A*S*H”. Alda won his first Emmy in 1972, for playing Hawkeye Pierce on “M*A*S*H”. He won his most recent Emmy in 2006 for his portrayal of Presidential candidate Arnold Vinick in “The West Wing”. When it comes to the big screen, my favorite of Alda’s movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

18. Pool equipment RACK
The more correct name for the game of pool is pocket billiards. The name “pool” arose after pocket billiards became a common feature in “pool halls”, places where gamblers “pooled” their money to bet on horse races.

24. “Star Wars” saga nickname ANI
Anakin “Ani” Skywalker is the principal character in all six of the “Star Wars” movies. His progress chronologically through the series of films is:

– Episode I: Anakin is a 9-year-old slave boy who earns the promise of Jedi training by young Obi-Wan Kenobi.
– Episode II: Anakin is 18-years-old and goes on a murdering rampage to avenge the killing of his mother.
– Episode III: Anakin is 21-years-old and a Jedi knight, but he turns to the Dark Side and becomes Darth Vader. His wife Padme gives birth to twins, Luke and Leia Skywalker.
– Episode IV: Darth Vader, comes into conflict with his children, Luke Skywalker and the Princess Leia.
– Episode V: Darth Vader attempts to coax his son Luke over to the dark side, and reveals to Luke that he is his father.
– Episode VI: Luke learns that Leia is his sister, and takes on the task of bringing Darth Vader back from the Dark Side in order to save the Galaxy. Vader saves his son from the Emperor’s evil grip, dying in the process, but his spirit ends up alongside the spirits of Yoda and Obi-Wan. They all live happily ever after …

26. Quad Cities city MOLINE
Moline is a city in Illinois located on the border with Iowa. The biggest employer in town by far is John Deere, which has its headquarters there.

The Quad Cities are a group of five cities located on the Iowa-Illinois border and on either side of the Mississippi River. The Iowa cities are Davenport and Bettendorf, and the Illinois cities are Rock Island, Moline and East Moline. The grouping was originally just three cities (Davenport, Rock Island and Moline) and used the name “Tri-Cities”. This changed to “Quad Cities” as East Moline grew to a size comparable to the original three cities. With the growth of Bettendorf, the list of linked cities became five. There has been talk of changing the name to “Quint Cities”, but it doesn’t seem to be catching on.

34. San Jose Earthquakes’ org. MLS
Major League Soccer (MLS)

The Earthquakes are the professional soccer team in San Jose, California. The team was formed in 1996 as the San Jose Clash.

41. Dough extruder? ATM
Automated teller machine (ATM)

44. It may follow T. REX
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written T. rex) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. “Tyrannosaurus” comes from the Greek words “tyrannos” (tyrant) and “sauros” (lizard), and the “rex” is of course Latin for “king”. They were big boys, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

45. “Washington Week” moderator Gwen IFILL
Gwen Ifill is a television journalist, regularly seen on PBS’s “Newshour”. She is also the moderator on the weekly PBS show “Washington Week”. Ifill was also selected to moderate the US Vice Presidential debates in 2004 and 2008.

54. Actress Raymonde of “Lost” TANIA
Actress Tania Raymonde’s big break came with a recurring role in “Malcolm in the Middle”, playing Cynthia Sanders from 2000 to 2003. She is better known now for having played Alex Rousseau in the hit TV show “Lost”.

“Lost” is a science fiction drama that originally aired from 2004 to 2010. The show kicks off with a passenger airliner crashing a tropical island as it flies from Sydney bound for Los Angeles. I haven’t seen the show myself and hear that the intriguing plot didn’t really come to a satisfying conclusion. Others would disagree …

56. Matterhorn’s range ALPS
“Matterhorn” is the German name for the famous Alpine peak that lies on the border between Switzerland and Italy. The Italian name for the same mountain is Monte Cervino, and the French call it Mont Cervin. “Matterhorn” comes from the German words Matte and Horn meaning “meadow” and “peak”. Cervino and Cervin come from the Latin name for the mountain, Mons Silvius meaning “Forest Mountain”.

59. “Just me,” formally IT IS I
The much debated statement “it is I” is actually grammatically correct, and should not be “corrected” to “it is me”. Traditionally, pronouns following linking verbs, such as “is”, “appear” and “seem”, are written in the nominative case. Examples are:

– It is I (who called)
– It was he (who did it)
– It is we (who care)

60. Immature CALLOW
“Callow” means “immature”. The word derives from the Old English “calu”, meaning “bare” and “bald”. The usage relates to young birds that lack feathers.

62. Article in El Diario UNA
“El Diario” is a common name for a newspaper in Spanish-speaking countries. The name translates into English as “The Daily”.

65. Sign of fish PISCES
The astrological sign of the zodiac called Pisces is named for the Pisces constellation. “Pisces” is the Latin word for “fish”, in the plural (singular “piscis”).

67. Youngest Brontë ANNE
Anne was the youngest of the three sisters in the literary Brontë family. Her older sisters wrote novels that are more recognized, but Anne’s two novels do have a following. “Agnes Grey” is based on her own experiences working as a governess. Her other novel, “The Tenant of Wildfell Hall” is written as a long letter from a young man describing the events leading up to his first meeting with his wife-to-be. Anne Brontë’s writing career was cut short in 1849, when she died of pulmonary tuberculosis, at only 29 years of age.

68. Chimps, e.g. APES
The Common Chimpanzee is a species of ape, a member of the Hominidae family (along with gorillas, humans and orangutans). The human and chimpanzee branches of the Hominidae family tree diverged 4-6 million years ago, making the chimp our closest living relatives in the animal kingdom.

70. Prepare scallops, in a way SEAR
A scallop is a marine mollusk that is served as seafood. Scallops are often served baked in milk and this method of preparation has become known as “scalloping”. So, scalloped potatoes are potatoes baked in milk.

Down
1. Cosmetic product MASCARA
“Mascara” is a Spanish word meaning “stain, mask”.

3. “On __”: Stephen King memoir WRITING
Stephen King is a remarkably successful author having sold over 350 million copies of his books, many of which have been made into hit movies. I’ve tried reading two or three, but never finished one. I really don’t do horror …

5. Subject of recent medical research STEM CELL
Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that can become specialized cells. Stem cells are found in embryos (embryonic stem cells), and are especially prevalent about 4-5 days of growth after fertilization. Stem cells are also found throughout the bodies of adults (somatic stem cells). Somatic stem cells are associated with a particular organ and have the potential to regenerate all the cell types of the organ from which they originate.

7. Like many doilies LACY
There was a draper in London in the seventeenth century called Doiley, and he gave his name to the lace fabric that he sold, which in turn gave its name to the ornamental mats we call doilies. I can’t stand doilies …

9. Roman slate TABULA
Tabula rasa (plural: tabulae rasae) is the idea that people are born with a “blank slate”, and that knowledge comes from experience and perception.

11. Major endocrine gland ADRENAL
The adrenal glands, as one might expect from the name, sit on top of the kidneys. Their main function is to secrete hormones that have a role to play in times of stress, the best-known of which is epinephrine (aka adrenaline).

22. “Rocky III” actor MR T
Mr. T’s real name is Laurence Tero Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catch phrase comes from the movie “Rocky III”. In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, “No, I don’t hate Balboa, but I pity the fool”. He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called “I Pity the Fool”, and produced a motivational video called “Be Somebody … or Be Somebody’s Fool!”.

26. Call from a Persian MEOW
The Persian is that long-haired cat with a squashed muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

28. Eastern “way” TAO
The Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

30. LAX listing ETD
Expected time of departure (ETD)

Los Angeles International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and the busiest here on the West Coast of the US. The airport was opened in 1930 as Mines Field and was renamed to Los Angeles Airport in 1941. On the airport property is the iconic white structure that resembles a flying saucer. This is called the Theme Building and I believe it is mainly used as a restaurant and observation deck for the public. The airport used to be identified by the letters “LA”, but when the aviation industry went to a three-letter standard for airport identification, this was changed to “LAX”. Apparently the “X” has no significant meaning.

31. Mr. Rogers on a horse ROY
Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers’ real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans’ nickname was “Queen of the West”.

37. Kareem, formerly LEW
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s name at birth was Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor. Alcindor changed his name when he converted to Islam.

43. __ Islands: Guam locale MARIANA
The Mariana Islands are an archipelago lying south of Japan at the eastern limit of the Philippine Sea. The islands were colonized by the Spanish who named them after Queen Mariana of Austria (who was a Spaniard). The island in the Marianas with which we are most familiar in the US is Guam.

Guam is a US territory in the western Pacific Ocean, the largest of the Mariana Islands. Guam is also the first territory in the United States to see the sun rise on any particular day. As such, the territory has adopted the motto, “Where America’s day begins”. During WWII, the US territory of Guam was occupied by the Japanese for 31 months until it was liberated in the Battle of Guam in July 1944. Of the 18,000 Japanese men holding the island, only 485 surrendered, so almost all perished in the invasion. One Japanese sergeant hid out on the island for an incredible 28 years, finally surrendering in 1972!

46. Draft __ motor: gas furnace component INDUCER
In a gas furnace, a draft inducer motor activates a fan to blow air through the outside vent. About 30 seconds after it starts running, the flame is lit. The fan ensures that the combustion gases exit the house, rather than setting off carbon monoxide alarms inside the house, or worse.

48. “Kicked-up Sandwiches” author LAGASSE
Emeril Lagasse is an American chef, born in Massachusetts. Lagasse first achieved notoriety as executive chef in Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. Now famous for his television shows, his cuisine still showcases New Orleans ingredients and influences. Lagasse started using his famous “Bam!” catchphrase in order to keep his crew awake during repeated tapings of his show.

50. Bluegrass guitarist Flatt LESTER
Earl Scruggs and Lester Flatt are the musicians who founded the bluegrass band called the Foggy Mountain Boys in 1948.

51. Him, to Henri LUI
In French, “lui” is the word for “him” and “elle” is the word for “her”.

52. Low-lying locales DALES
Dales are open valleys, especially in the Lowlands of Scotland and in the North of England. In the same locales, it is common to find dales flanked by “fells”, which are the mountains or hills flanking the valley.

53. The whole shebang ALL
The word “shebang” is probably a derivative of “shebeen”, an Irish word for a “speakeasy”, where liquor was drunk and sold illegally. In English “shebang” was originally a “hut” or a “shed”. Just how this evolved into the expression “the whole shebang”, meaning “everything”, is unclear.

57. Boston __ POPS
The marvelous Boston Pops orchestra specializes in playing light classical and popular music. The Boston Pops was founded in 1885, four years after its sister orchestra, the Boston Symphony (BSO). Many of the musicians from the BSO were also regular members of the Boston Pops.

60. Mob boss CAPO
More properly called a “caporegime”, a “capo” is high-ranking member of the Mafia (Cosa Nostra).

64. Female in WWII WAC
The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was formed in 1942, and the unit was converted to full status the following year to become the Women’s Army Corps (WAC). Famously, General Douglas MacArthur referred to the WACs as his “best soldiers”, saying they worked harder, complained less and were better disciplined than men. The WACs were disbanded in 1978 and the serving members were integrated into the rest of the army.

66. “No more seats” sign SRO
Standing room only (SRO)

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Whimpers MEWLS
6. *See 29-Across FLY
9. Cooperative group TEAM
13. Hindu nectar AMRITA
15. Suitor BEAU
16. Pierce player ALDA
17. *See 29-Across SPIDER
18. Pool equipment RACK
19. *See 29-Across BIRD
20. *See 29-Across CAT
21. High-tech card contents MEMORY
23. Toned down MUTED
24. “Star Wars” saga nickname ANI
25. Web store icon CART
26. Quad Cities city MOLINE
27. French income RENTE
29. With 35- and 49-Across, start of a refrain whose ending words appear in sequence in the answers to starred clues THERE WAS AN
32. __ bloom: pond buildup ALGAL
33. Additionally TOO
34. San Jose Earthquakes’ org. MLS
35. See 29-Across OLD LADY WHO
41. Dough extruder? ATM
44. It may follow T. REX
45. “Washington Week” moderator Gwen IFILL
49. See 29-Across SWALLOWED A
54. Actress Raymonde of “Lost” TANIA
55. Withstood the ordeal BORE UP
56. Matterhorn’s range ALPS
58. *See 29-Across DOG
59. “Just me,” formally IT IS I
60. Immature CALLOW
62. Article in El Diario UNA
63. *See 29-Across GOAT
64. Decline WANE
65. Sign of fish PISCES
67. Youngest Brontë ANNE
68. Chimps, e.g. APES
69. Make a point of STRESS
70. Prepare scallops, in a way SEAR
71. *See 29-Across COW
72. *See 29-Across HORSE

Down
1. Cosmetic product MASCARA
2. Put on a jury EMPANEL
3. “On __”: Stephen King memoir WRITING
4. Cover LID
5. Subject of recent medical research STEM CELL
6. Dread FEAR
7. Like many doilies LACY
8. Guffaw YUK
9. Roman slate TABULA
10. Upper-class rule ELITISM
11. Major endocrine gland ADRENAL
12. Really ticks off MADDENS
14. Field AREA
15. Stew basis BROTH
22. “Rocky III” actor MR T
23. Do some yard work MOW
26. Call from a Persian MEOW
28. Eastern “way” TAO
30. LAX listing ETD
31. Mr. Rogers on a horse ROY
36. Let go DROP
37. Kareem, formerly LEW
38. Let go AXE
39. Gives suddenly, as bad news HITS WITH
40. Son-gun connection OF A
41. Comparable to, sizewise AS BIG AS
42. Like some sporty shoes TWO-TONE
43. __ Islands: Guam locale MARIANA
46. Draft __ motor: gas furnace component INDUCER
47. Hunting 20-Across LIONESS
48. “Kicked-up Sandwiches” author LAGASSE
50. Bluegrass guitarist Flatt LESTER
51. Him, to Henri LUI
52. Low-lying locales DALES
53. The whole shebang ALL
57. Boston __ POPS
60. Mob boss CAPO
61. From the top ANEW
64. Female in WWII WAC
66. “No more seats” sign SRO

Return to top of page