LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Jul 14, Thursday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Steve Blais
THEME: Saber Rattling … each of today’s themed answers starts with a RATTLED SABER, an anagram of SABER:

20A. Really opens up BARES ONE’S SOUL
24A. Warrants another mention BEARS REPEATING
45A. Greed and jealousy are among them BASER INSTINCTS

51A. Threat of power, and a hint to the starts of 20-, 24- and 45-Across SABER RATTLING

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 12s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Stephen King title city SALEM
Stephen King’s “’Salem’s Lot” was published in 1975, his second novel. It belongs to the horror genre, so you won’t catch me reading it. The title refers to the Maine town of Jerusalem’s Lot, or ‘Salem’s Lot for short. There’s an interesting story about the actual publication of the first edition. The intended price of $8.95 was changed at the last minute to $7.95, but not all the price changes were made before release. A few copies “escaped” with the dust cover marked $8.95, and they are now worth a lot of money. Go check your bookshelves …

6. USS Enterprise android DATA
Brent Spiner played the android named Lieutenant Commander Data on television’s “Star Trek: The Next Generation”.

14. Beethoven honoree ELISE
“Fur Elise” is a beautiful piece of music written by Beethoven, and is also known as “Bagatelle in A Minor”. “Fur Elise” means simply “For Elise”, but sadly no one knows for sure the identity of the mysterious dedicatee.

17. Steer catcher RIATA
“Reata” is the Spanish word for “lasso”. We tend to use the spelling “riata” in English, but sometimes can use the original Spanish word.

18. Haboob, for one WINDSTORM
A haboob is a type of dust storm seen in very arid parts of the world such as the Sahara desert.

23. Nashville awards gp. CMA
Country Music Association (CMA)

31. Astrologer Dixon JEANE
Jeane Dixon was a famous American astrologer who wrote a popular syndicated astrology column for many years.

32. MD for women GYN
Gynecologist (gyn.)

33. Falco of “Nurse Jackie” EDIE
“Nurse Jackie” is a comedy-drama series centered on an emergency room nurse at a hospital in New York City. The lead character is played by Edie Falco, who also played Tony Soprano’s wife on the “The Sopranos”.

34. River ends? ARS
There is a letter R (ar) at either end of the word “river”.

39. Dark time in poetry E’EN
Evening (e’en)

40. “What kind of a name is ‘Wilbur’ for a man?” speaker MR ED
“Mister Ed” first aired in 1961 and ran for almost five years. It was a very successful show (and even made it to Ireland!). Mister Ed, the talking horse, was a palomino that had the real name of Bamboo Harvester. Mister Ed’s “voice” was that of actor Allan “Rocky” Lane, a star of a lot of B-movie westerns from the forties and fifties. In the show, Mister Ed would only talk to the lead (human) character Wilbur, played by Alan Young, leading to some hilarious situations. Mister Ed had a stunt double and stand-in for the show, another horse called Pumpkin. Pumpkin later played the horse that made frequent appearances on the show “Green Acres”.

49. Trig. ratio COS
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent. Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The reciprocal of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent.

50. “Bus Stop” playwright INGE
Playwright William Inge had a run of success on Broadway in the early fifties. Inge’s most celebrated work of that time was the play “Picnic”, for which he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize. The original 1953 cast of “Picnic” included a young male actor making his debut on Broadway. His name was Paul Newman. Many of Inge’s works are set in the American heartland and so he became known as the “Playwright of the Midwest”.

“Bus Stop” is a marvelous play written by William Inge in 1955. The famous 1956 movie of the same name starring Marilyn Monroe is only very loosely based on the play.

60. Ship that sailed to Colchis ARGO
Jason is a hero from Greek mythology, most noted for leading the quest for the Golden Fleece. The Golden Fleece is the fleece of the gold-haired winged ram. For his quest, Jason assembles a group of heroes who were given the name Argonauts, as they journeyed on the ship called the “Argo”. The vessel was called the “Argo” in honor of the ship’s builder, a man named Argus.

In Greek mythology, Colchis was a wealthy land located at the edge of the world. It was in Colchis that Jason and the Argonauts found the Golden Fleece.

61. Humerus neighbor ULNA
The humerus is the long bone in the upper arm. The bones in the forearm are the radius and ulna. “Ulna” is the Latin word for “elbow”, and “radius” is Latin for “ray”.

Down
1. Balkan native SERB
Serbs are an ethnic group native to the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Although Serbs exist as a minority group in many countries in the region, they are the majority ethnic group in Serbia, in Montenegro and in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

The Balkan Peninsula in Southeast Europe is usually referred to as “the Balkans”. The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains located in present-day Bulgaria and Serbia. “Balkan” is Bulgarian for “mountain”.

2. Latin “others” ALIA
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

4. Miami Sound Machine singer ESTEFAN
Gloria Estefan is a Cuban American singer, born in Havana. She fled Cuba along with her family after the Cuban Revolution, and ended up in Miami. Her father fought for the US military in Vietnam, and also took part in the doomed Bay of Pigs invasion. Years later, Gloria herself was approached by the CIA to work for the agency due to her skill with languages. She ended up doing quite well singing instead …

7. Henri’s lady friend AMIE
A male friend in France is “un ami”, and a female friend is “une amie”.

13. Yosemite __ SAM
Yosemite Sam is a cartoon character who frequently goes up against Bugs Bunny.

19. “Brave New World” drug SOMA
In Aldous Huxley’s 1931 masterpiece, “Brave New World”, the members of his future society are encouraged to partake of the drug called soma. The soma provides hangover-free escapes referred to as “holidays”.

There is a speech by Miranda in “The Tempest” by William Shakespeare that is the source for the title of “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley:

O wonder!
How many goodly creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world,
That has such people in’t.

21. WWII intelligence org. OSS
The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is the successor to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) formed during WWII. The CIA was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947.

24. Three-time A.L. MVP BERRA
Yogi Berra is regarded by many as the greatest catcher ever to play in Major League Baseball, and has to be America’s most celebrated “author” of malapropisms. Here are some greats:

– “It’s ain’t over till it’s over.”
– “90% of the game is half mental.”
– “Nobody goes there anymore. It’s too crowded.”
– (giving directions) “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.”
– “It’s déjà vu all over again.”
– “Always go to other people’s funerals, otherwise they won’t go to yours.”
– “A nickel ain’t worth a dime anymore.”

27. “Quartet in Autumn” English novelist Barbara PYM
Barbara Pym was an English novelist who was known in the 1950s for her social novels “Excellent Women” and “Glass of Blessings”. Pym’s writing career floundered for almost twenty years until an article in “The Times Literary Supplement” named her “the most underrated writer of the 20th century”. That same year (1977), Pym was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and her new novel “Quartet in Autumn” was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize.

28. Clarifier usually abbreviated ID EST
i.e. = id est = that is, in Latin …

29. Bohr of the Manhattan Project NIELS
Niels Bohr was a Danish physicist, who won his 1922 Nobel Prize for his work on quantum mechanics and atomic structure. Later in his life he was part of the team working on the Manhattan Project, developing the first atomic bomb.

The Manhattan project was the joint US-Canada-UK project to develop an atomic bomb during WWII. Initially, the Army headquarters for the program was located on the 18th floor of a building on Broadway in New York City. Eventually, because of that first location, the project adopted the name “Manhattan”.

30. Code carrier GENE
A gene is a section of a chromosome that is responsible for a particular characteristic in an organism. For example, one gene may determine eye color and another balding pattern. We have two copies of each gene, one from each of our parents, with each copy known as an allele.

31. It’s perpendicular to a threshold JAMB
A door or window jamb is the vertical portion of the frame. The term “jamb” comes from the French word “jambe” meaning “leg”.

Years ago I was taking a tour of a beautiful Elizabethan manor house in England, and was told a little “threshing” story by the guide as we stood in one of the rooms. She reminded us that threshing was the removal of seeds from chaff, and told us that back in the day the “chaff” was sometimes called the “thresh”. Thresh would be used on the floors, particularly in the kitchen areas where it would soak up spills and provide some thermal insulation, much as sawdust was used in my favorite pubs many moons ago. She pointed to two slots at the bottom of the door jambs where she said a low board was placed upright on the floor, to hold the thresh in the room. The board was called a “thresh-hold”, giving us our contemporary word “threshold”. I am not sure if all of that is really true, but it makes a nice story.

44. Republic formerly under Danish rule ICELAND
Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in the whole of Europe, with two-thirds of the nation’s population residing in and around the capital city of Reykjavik. Iceland was settled by the Norse people in AD 874, and was ruled for centuries by Norway and then Denmark. Iceland became independent in 1918, and has been republic since 1944.

48. What a QB tries to avoid INT
Interception (Int.)

53. Gossip columnist Barrett RONA
Rona Barrett is a gossip columnist originally from New York City but who plies her trade in Southern California. Barrett started out as with a gossip column that was syndicated in newspapers but then made a successful transition to television. She made regular appearances in news broadcasts and on her entertainment shows in the sixties and seventies.

54. “Copacetic, man” I DIG
Something described as “copacetic” is very fine, very acceptable.

58. Amount past due? TRE
“One, two, three” in Italian is “uno, due, tre”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Stephen King title city SALEM
6. USS Enterprise android DATA
10. Drinks slowly SIPS
14. Beethoven honoree ELISE
15. What may make the future tense? OMEN
16. Start of a solution IDEA
17. Steer catcher RIATA
18. Haboob, for one WINDSTORM
20. Really opens up BARES ONE’S SOUL
22. Circuit protector FUSE
23. Nashville awards gp. CMA
24. Warrants another mention BEARS REPEATING
31. Astrologer Dixon JEANE
32. MD for women GYN
33. Falco of “Nurse Jackie” EDIE
34. River ends? ARS
35. Idealist DREAMER
39. Dark time in poetry E’EN
40. “What kind of a name is ‘Wilbur’ for a man?” speaker MR ED
42. Donation, say AID
43. Seating option AISLE
45. Greed and jealousy are among them BASER INSTINCTS
49. Trig. ratio COS
50. “Bus Stop” playwright INGE
51. Threat of power, and a hint to the starts of 20-, 24- and 45-Across SABER RATTLING
57. Autograph signing locale STAGE DOOR
59. Call, in a way RADIO
60. Ship that sailed to Colchis ARGO
61. Humerus neighbor ULNA
62. Draw together UNITE
63. Withdraw by degrees WEAN
64. Ingredients in some stews PEAS
65. Egyptian pyramid’s eight EDGES

Down
1. Balkan native SERB
2. Latin “others” ALIA
3. One may be habitual LIAR
4. Miami Sound Machine singer ESTEFAN
5. Carefully considered MEASURED
6. It’ll bum you out DOWNER
7. Henri’s lady friend AMIE
8. Arithmetic column TENS
9. Director’s “Done with this segment!” AND SCENE!
10. Put in place SITUATE
11. False __ IDOL
12. A PER
13. Yosemite __ SAM
19. “Brave New World” drug SOMA
21. WWII intelligence org. OSS
24. Three-time A.L. MVP BERRA
25. Lightens EASES
26. “Zounds!” EGADS!
27. “Quartet in Autumn” English novelist Barbara PYM
28. Clarifier usually abbreviated ID EST
29. Bohr of the Manhattan Project NIELS
30. Code carrier GENE
31. It’s perpendicular to a threshold JAMB
36. Lifted RAISED UP
37. A, in Germany EIN
38. Sounded right RANG TRUE
41. Figure with 10 sides DECAGON
44. Republic formerly under Danish rule ICELAND
46. Court cover-up ROBE
47. Pageant symbols TIARAS
48. What a QB tries to avoid INT
51. Multipart story SAGA
52. Auditioner’s goal ROLE
53. Gossip columnist Barrett RONA
54. “Copacetic, man” I DIG
55. Dark time in ads NITE
56. Exits GOES
57. Caught at the theater SAW
58. Amount past due? TRE

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LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Jul 14, Wednesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Gareth Bain
THEME: White Flag … each of today’s answer ends with something one might shout out while waving a WHITE FLAG:

17A. Stereotypical benefactor RICH UNCLE (“Uncle!”)
36A. Of age OLD ENOUGH (“Enough!”)
42A. “Understood” SAY NO MORE (“No More!”)

62A. Waved banner hinted at by the ends of 17-, 36- and 42-Across WHITE FLAG

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 6m 55s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

14. Entrepreneur’s start IDEA
An “entrepreneur” is someone takes on most aspects of a business venture, from the original idea to the execution. The term is imported from French, with “entreprendre” meaning “to undertake”. The original usage in English dates back to the early 1800s, when it applied to a manager and promoter of a theatrical production.

17. Stereotypical benefactor RICH UNCLE (“Uncle!”)
To “say uncle” is an American expression meaning to submit or yield. Its usage dates back to the early 1900s, but nobody seems to know how “uncle!” came to mean “stop!”

19. Spherical dessert BOMBE
The dessert that we called “ bombe” in English, is a shortened version of the French “bombe glacée”. It is a layers of ice cream or sherbet frozen into a hemispherical shape, like half a delicious cannonball on the plate, hence the name.

20. Airport city east of Los Angeles ONTARIO
Ontario is a city located about 35 miles east of the center of Los Angeles. The city was founded and developed by George and William Chaffey in the 1880s, and they named after the Canadian province from whence they came.

23. Many a Prado painting GOYA
Francisco Goya was a Spanish painter, often called the last of the Old Masters and the first of the moderns. Two of Goya’s most famous works are “The Nude Maja” and “The Clothed Maja”.

The Museo del Prado is in Madrid, the capital of Spain, and has one of the finest art collections in the world. The gallery’s most famous work is “Las Meninas” By Velazquez.

25. Baseball card stat RBI
Runs batted in (RBI)

26. Oranges opposite? APPLES
They’re completely unlike, like apples and oranges.

30. “I’d just as soon kiss a Wookiee” speaker LEIA
In the 1980 movie “Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back”, there is a famous exchange between Han Solo and Princess Leia:

Han Solo: Afraid I was gonna leave without giving you a goodbye kiss?
Princess Leia: I’d just as soon kiss a Wookiee.
Han Solo: I can arrange that. You could use a good kiss.

Princess Leia is Luke Skywalker’s sister in the original “Star Wars” trilogy and was played by Carrie Fisher. Carrie Fisher has stated that she hated the famous “cinnamon bun hairstyle” that she had to wear in the films, as she felt it made her face look too round. She also had to to sit for two hours every day just to get her hair styled. Two hours to get your hair done? It takes me just two seconds …

Wookiees are a biped race featured in “Star Wars”, the most notable being Chewbacca, the loyal friend and associate of Han Solo.

32. “__ Boys”: “Little Men” sequel JO’S
Louisa May Alcott’s “Jo’s Boys” is a sequel to her novel “Little Men”, which in turn is a sequel to “Little Women”. “Jo’s Boys” is the final book in the trilogy.

35. Cowboy’s neckwear BOLO
I’ve never worn a bolo tie, and was surprised to discover that it is a relatively recent invention. The first bolo tie was apparently produced in Wickenburg, Arizona in the late 1940s by a silversmith. The bolo takes its name from the boleadora, an Argentine lariat.

44. Opposite of alway NE’ER
In the world of poetry, “alway” is opposite of “ne’er”.

47. Saturated hydrocarbon ALKANE
The “smaller” alkanes are gases and are quite combustible. Methane (CH4) is the main component of natural gas with ethane (C2H6) being the second largest component. Propane (C3H8) is also found in natural gas and is heavy enough to be readily turned into a liquid by compression, for ease of transportation and storage. Butane (C4H10) is also easily liquefied under pressure and can be used as the fuel in cigarette lighters or as the propellant in aerosol sprays. The heavier alkanes are liquids and solids at room temperature.

Technically, a saturated hydrocarbon is an organic compound with no double or triple bonds between carbon atoms. Because it has no double or triple bonds it is “saturated” with hydrogen, has the maximum number of hydrogen atoms that each carbon atom can take. This is particularly important to us when talking about saturated fats (generally unhealthy, animal-sourced fats) and unsaturated fats (generally, healthy plant-sourced fats).

52. Emcees’ responsibilities LEAD-INS
The term “emcee” comes from “MC”, an acronym standing for Master or Mistress of Ceremonies.

56. Gum with a longtime eyepatch-wearing mascot BAZOOKA
The Bazooka brand of bubble gum was introduced by the Topps Company soon after the end of WWII. Bazooka have included comic strips in the wrappers for their gum since the early to mid-fifties. The hero of the strip if Bazooka Joe, a young man who wears an eyepatch.

61. Calculus pioneer EULER
Leonhard Euler was a brilliant Swiss mathematician and physicist, a pioneer in the fields of logarithms and graph theory.

62. Waved banner hinted at by the ends of 17-, 36- and 42-Across WHITE FLAG
The use of a white flag is recognized as a request for a ceasefire or negotiation. As it is usually the weaker party who wants to initiate negotiation, it is also seen as a sign of surrender.

68. Apiary dwellers BEES
An apiary is an area where bees are kept. The Latin word for “bee” is “apis”.

Down
1. Picasso contemporary MIRO
Joan Miró was a Spanish artist. Miro immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miro was “the most Surrealist of us all”.

The artist Pablo Picasso’s full name was Pablo Diego José Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno María de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima Trinidad Ruiz y Picasso, a name he was given right from birth. Got that?

2. Score after deuce AD IN
In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

3. Shakers, but not movers SECT
“Movers and shakers” are doers.

“Shakers” is a the more common name for the religious sect more properly called the United Society of Believer in Christ’s Second Appearing. The sect’s doctrine was based on the teachings of Ann Lee.

5. Prenatal procedures AMNIOS
Amniocentesis is the prenatal test which involves the removal of a small amount of the amniotic fluid surrounding the fetus using a hypodermic needle. The fluid naturally contains some fetal cells, the DNA of which can then be tested to determine the sex of the child and to check for the presence of genetic abnormalities.

7. “Runaway” singer Shannon DEL
Del Shannon was a rock and roll singer who was born Charles Westover in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Shannon’s big hit is the 1961 classic “Runaway”. Sadly, Shannon suffered depression in his later life, and turned his own rifle on himself in 1990.

8. “Don’t change that” STET
“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

9. Emulate Dillinger ROB A BANK
John Dillinger was a notorious bank robber during the Depression Era. Famously, Dillinger was killed by federal agents in an ambush at the Biograph Theater in Chicago, in 1934.

10. Gastroenteritis cause, perhaps E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

11. Pinnacle ACME
The “acme” is the highest point, coming from the Greek word “akme” which has the same meaning.

12. World Baseball Classic team CUBA
The World Baseball Classic is a periodic tournament that has been modelled on the FIFA World Cup of soccer. The tournament was founded, mainly in response to the 2005 decision by the International Olympic Committee to drop baseball as an Olympic sport. The first three World Baseball Classics were won by Japan (2006 & 2009) and the Dominican Republic (2013).

13. Nonkosher TREF
According to Jewish dietary law, “kosher” food is “fit” to eat, and food that is not kosher is called “treif” (or tref).

22. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s lake ERIE
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame can be visited on the shores of Lake Erie in Cleveland, Ohio. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was created in 1983 and started inducting artists in 1986. The Foundation didn’t get a home until the museum was dedicated in Cleveland in 1995. The building looks fabulous in photos (I’ve never visited), and was designed by famed architect I. M. Pei.

29. Fish-eating bird LOON
The great northern loon is the provincial bird of Ontario, and the state bird of Minnesota. The loon once appeared on Canadian $20 bills and also appears on the Canadian one dollar coin, giving the coin the nickname “the Loonie”.

32. Where Herod ruled JUDEA
Herod the Great was made King of the Roman province of Judea (now the southern part of Israel). Herod the Great’s son was Herod Antipas, the Herod who appears in the New Testament in the stories of the execution of Jesus of Nazareth and John the Baptist.

33. City near the Great Salt Lake OGDEN
Ogden, Utah was the first permanent settlement by people of European descent in what is now the state of Utah.

The Great Salt Lake in Utah is extremely shallow, and so the area of the lake fluctuates greatly with the changing volume of water. Back in 1963 the lake shrunk to 950 square miles, whereas in 1988 the area was measured at a whopping 3,300 square miles.

36. Plains people OTOS
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

39. Like pink toys, stereotypically FOR GIRLS
The association of the colors pink with girls and blue with boys is a relatively new concept, one that started to be established in the 1940s. One reason for the “fixing” of color associations with genders at that time was the invention of chemical dyes that could survive hot washes. Prior to this, baby clothes were made in white so that they could be washed frequently without fading.

47. Collectible marbles AGATES
A playing marble made from agate, or a glass imitation, is called an agate.

49. “Chasing Pavements” singer ADELE
The English singer Adele Adkins goes by the stage name “Adele”. Adele describes her musical style as “heartbroken soul”. Not too long ago, Adele wrote and performed the theme song for the latest James Bond film, “Skyfall”.

51. “__ With Me”: hymn ABIDE
“Abide with Me” is a famous hymn in the Christian tradition with words from a poem by Scotsman Henry Francis Lyle that dates back to 1847. Lyle wrote the poem on his deathbed, suffering from tuberculosis. He passed away just three weeks after its completion.

53. Capital of Belgium EURO
The European Union (EU) today stands at a membership of 27 states. The Euro is the official currency of only 16 of the 27. The list of states in the EU that don’t use the Euro includes the UK, Denmark and Sweden.

58. Little of this, little of that OLIO
Olio is a term meaning a hodgepodge or a mixture, coming from the mixed stew of the same name. The stew in turn takes its name from the Spanish “olla”, the clay pot used for cooking.

59. Auto pioneer Benz KARL
It is generally accepted that Karl Benz invented the internal combustion engine, although others were doing similar work around the same time. He certainly was awarded the first patent for an automobile, in 1886. His first automobile, the Patent-Motorwagen, couldn’t get up hills unaided so his wife, Bertha Benz, suggested the introduction of gears. Sure enough, the next model had two gears. Behind every successful man …

60. Like fine port AGED
The city of Oporto in Portugal gave its name to port wine in the late 1600s, as it was the seaport through which most of the region’s fortified wine was exported.

63. Go in haste HIE
“To hie” is to move quickly, to bolt.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Prepare, in a way, as sweet potatoes MASH
5. Says further ADDS
9. Run away, say REACT
14. Entrepreneur’s start IDEA
15. Come together MEET
16. Come to pass OCCUR
17. Stereotypical benefactor RICH UNCLE
19. Spherical dessert BOMBE
20. Airport city east of Los Angeles ONTARIO
21. One brewing in a cup TEA LEAF
23. Many a Prado painting GOYA
25. Baseball card stat RBI
26. Oranges opposite? APPLES
30. “I’d just as soon kiss a Wookiee” speaker LEIA
32. “__ Boys”: “Little Men” sequel JO’S
35. Cowboy’s neckwear BOLO
36. Of age OLD ENOUGH
38. Standoffish ALOOF
40. Pull TUG
41. Friendly address KIDDO
42. “Understood” SAY NO MORE
44. Opposite of alway NE’ER
45. Appt. book divisions HRS
46. Went up ROSE
47. Saturated hydrocarbon ALKANE
49. Had-at link A GO
50. Trilogy, often SAGA
52. Emcees’ responsibilities LEAD-INS
56. Gum with a longtime eyepatch-wearing mascot BAZOOKA
61. Calculus pioneer EULER
62. Waved banner hinted at by the ends of 17-, 36- and 42-Across WHITE FLAG
64. Ruffle FRILL
65. Right hand AIDE
66. Ax FIRE
67. Pledge drive bags TOTES
68. Apiary dwellers BEES
69. Convinced SOLD

Down
1. Picasso contemporary MIRO
2. Score after deuce AD IN
3. Shakers, but not movers SECT
4. “The joke’s on you” HA HA
5. Prenatal procedures AMNIOS
6. Deceptive military tactic DECOY
7. “Runaway” singer Shannon DEL
8. “Don’t change that” STET
9. Emulate Dillinger ROB A BANK
10. Gastroenteritis cause, perhaps E COLI
11. Pinnacle ACME
12. World Baseball Classic team CUBA
13. Nonkosher TREF
18. Strong desire URGE
22. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s lake ERIE
24. Tempts ALLURES
26. Make red-faced ABASH
27. Opposite POLAR
28. Artful stratagems PLOYS
29. Fish-eating bird LOON
31. What a slight favorite has EDGE
32. Where Herod ruled JUDEA
33. City near the Great Salt Lake OGDEN
34. Vacation location SHORE
36. Plains people OTOS
37. Farm grunt OINK
39. Like pink toys, stereotypically FOR GIRLS
43. Word after new or full MOON
47. Collectible marbles AGATES
48. Kick back LAZE
49. “Chasing Pavements” singer ADELE
51. “__ With Me”: hymn ABIDE
52. Took off LEFT
53. Capital of Belgium EURO
54. Landed ALIT
55. DNA lab item SWAB
57. Rubs out OFFS
58. Little of this, little of that OLIO
59. Auto pioneer Benz KARL
60. Like fine port AGED
63. Go in haste HIE

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