LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Aug 14, Sunday

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Pancho Harrison
THEME: Say Cheese … today’s themed answers are all common phrases, but they’ve been clued as though they relate to the world of photography:

24A. The old-time photographer preferred the __ NEGATIVE ASPECT
31A. The IndyCar photographer used __ ZOOM LENSES
52A. The fashion photographer worried about __ MODEL BEHAVIOR
66A. The dating service photographer was happy when __ EVERYTHING CLICKED
84A. The arctic photographer had to consider __ EXPOSURE TIMES
104A. The dessert photographer took a set of __ JELLO SHOTS
112A. The stressed-out photographer __ FINALLY SNAPPED

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 11s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

7. Toronto team, familiarly JAYS
The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

11. Schnauzer of fiction ASTA
Asta is the wonderful little dog in the superb “The Thin Man” series of films starring William Powell and Myrna Loy (as Nick and Nora Charles). In the original story by Dashiell Hammett, Asta was a female Schnauzer, but on screen Asta was played by a wire-haired fox terrier called “Skippy”. Skippy was also the dog in “Bringing up Baby” with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn, the one who kept stealing the dinosaur bone. Skippy retired in 1939, so Asta was played by other dogs in the remainder of “The Thin Man” films.

15. Jack Jones’ record label KAPP
Kapp Records was a record label founded in 1954 by David Kapp. David was a brother of Jack Kapp who has established Decca Records in the US in 1934.

22. Jai __ ALAI
Even though jai alai is often said to be the fastest sport in the world because of the speed of the ball, in fact golf balls usually get going at a greater clip. Although, as a blog reader once pointed out to me, you don’t have to catch a golf ball …

23. #1 hit song from “Flashdance” MANIAC
“Flashdance” is a 1983 romantic drama film about a young welder at a steel plant who aspires to become a professional dancer. The movie’s soundtrack was also a big hit and features songs like “Maniac” and “Flashdance… What a Feeling” performed by Irene Cara that won the Best Original Song Oscar.

29. Last Supper question IS IT I?
At the Last Supper, Jesus told his apostles that one of them would betray him that day. According to the Gospel of Matthew:
And they were exceeding sorrowful, and began every one of them to say unto him, Lord, is it I?

30. A dog, or a little hoarse HUSKY
The Siberian Husky is one of the oldest breeds of dog, and originated in northern Asia. Siberian Huskies were imported into Alaska in great numbers in the early 1900s for use as sled dogs during the gold rush.

38. U.K. record label EMI
EMI was a British music company, with the acronym originally standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

39. Stuffed SATED
“Sate” is a variant of the earlier word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

41. “Suits” network USA
“Suits” is an entertaining show about two lawyers that has aired on the USA Network since 2011. I started watching the show on Amazon Prime recently at the gym, and I must say that I am enjoying it …

44. Sea dog SALT
“Sea dog” and “salt” are familiar terms for a sailor, especially one that has lots of experience.

46. Article 1, Section 3 constitutional subject SENATE
Article One of the US Constitution establishes the US Congress. The second section of Article One establishes the House of Representatives, and the third section establishes the US Senate.

48. Fair subject SCIENCE
As in “Science Fair”.

56. When tripled, and so on YADDA
“The Yada Yada Yada” is actually the name of the 153rd episode of “Seinfeld”. Before “Seinfeld” made “yada yada yada” famous, we were more likely to hear the phrase “yadda yadda”, often used by comedian Lenny Bruce for example.

59. __ tai MAI
The Mai Tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic’s restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum.

61. Stan Lee superheroes X-MEN
X-Men is a team of superheroes created by Stan Lee for Marvel Comics. Nowadays the X-Men are perhaps best known as the subject of a series of movies, with Hugh Jackman playing Wolverine, and Patrick Stewart playing Professor Xavier (or simply “Professor X”). Some very respected actors have also played the villains that X-Men have to battle. For example, the enemy called Magneto is portrayed by veteran Shakespearean actor Sir Ian McKellan.

73. The last Mrs. Chaplin OONA
Oona O’Neill dated J. D. Salinger and Orson Welles in her teens, but ended up marrying Charlie Chaplin. Oona was still pretty young when she married Chaplin, much to the dismay of her famous father, the playwright Eugene O’Neill. After the marriage Eugene disowned Oona as he was pretty upset about 54-year-old Chaplin marrying his 18-year-old daughter.

79. Star athlete in Archie Comics MOOSE
Moose Mason, also called Big Moose, is a recurring character in the “Archie” series of comics. Mason was shown to be poor academically, but great on the sports field. In later comics it was revealed that Moose suffered from dyslexia making it difficult for him to understand what he was being taught. He used to get “straight Fs” in tests, and he thought the F stood for “fantastic” …

89. Lao-tzu followers TAOISTS
Lao Tse (also Lao-Tzu) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism.

91. Meat-filled pastry RISSOLE
A rissole is a small croquette covered in pastry or breadcrumbs that is baked or deep-fried. The filling may be sweet or savory although is usually some minced meat or fish.

94. ER command STAT
The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turnaround time”.

96. Barenboim is its current music director LA SCALA
The La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its name: “Teatro alla Scala” in Italian.

Daniel Barenboim is an Israeli pianist and conductor who was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Barenboim has served as music director with several prestigious orchestras, including the Chicago Symphony. He is currently the music director of La Scala in Milan and of the Berlin State Opera.

100. Modesto vintner GALLO
E J Gallo Winery was founded by Ernest and Julio Gallo in Modesto, California in 1933. Gallo is the largest exporter of wine from the State of California.

The City of Modesto is located in the Central Valley of Northern California, about 90 miles east of San Francisco. Fans of the George Lucas classic “American Graffiti” might recognize Modesto as the setting for the movie. When the city was founded in 1870, the plan was to name it for California businessman William C. Ralston, but he was too “modest” and declined, asking for another name to be found. And so, “Modesto” was born.

103. Peso part CENTAVO
“Centavo” is a Spanish and Portuguese word, and is used for the coin that represents 1/100 of the basic monetary unit of quite a few countries, including Brazil. “Centavo” comes from the Latin “centum” meaning “one hundred” and “-avo” meaning “portion, fraction”.

104. The dessert photographer took a set of __ JELL-O SHOTS
The earliest published recipe for Jell-O shots (or equivalent) was published in 1862 in a book called “How to Mix Drinks” by Jerry Thomas. That recipe called for gelatin, cognac, rum and lemon juice.

106. Arcade pioneer ATARI
At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

109. Mead milieu SAMOA
The official name for the South Pacific country formerly known as Western Samoa is the Independent State of Samoa. “Samoa” is the western part of the island group, with American Samoa lying to the southeast. The whole group of islands used to be known as Navigators Island, a name given by European explorers in recognition of the seafaring skills of the native Samoans.

“Coming of Age in Samoa” sounds like a fascinating book. It was written by American cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead and published in 1928. In the book, Mead examines the behavior of youths in Samoa, making some comparisons with youths in America. One major observation she made was the smooth transition from childhood to adulthood of Samoan girls, compared to what she described as a more troublesome transition in the US.

111. Computer acronym ASCII
ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) lists codes for 32 “control” characters, as well as the 95 printable characters (like a, A, b, B, 1, 2, etc). These binary ASCII codes are the way that our computers can understand what we mean when we type say a letter or a number.

122. Garr of “Tootsie” TERI
The lovely Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“Tootsie” is a 1982 comedy film starring Dustin Hoffman, directed and produced by Sydney Pollack.

125. Michel’s “mine” A MOI
“À moi” (literally “to me”) is the French for “mine”.

126. Norse god of war ODIN
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin’s wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term “Friday” (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin’s son was Thor, and his name gave us the term “Thursday”.

127. Pope works ESSAYS
Alexander Pope was an English poet, famous for his own compositions as well as for a translation of Homer’s works. One of Pope’s most notable poems is “Ode on Solitude” that opens with:

Happy the man, whose wish and care
A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
In his own ground.

Pope wrote that when he was just twelve years old!

Down
1. Mil. decoration DSM
The Distinguished Service Medal is the highest (non-valorous) decoration awarded for services to the US military.

2. Motor extension? -OLA
The original Motorola is now two independent companies called Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions. Motorola started in 1928 as the Galvin Manufacturing Corporation in Chicago. The founder created the brand name “Motorola” for a car radio the company developed in 1930. He linked “motor” (meaning “car”) with “-ola” (meaning “sound”), implying “sound in motion”.

3. Vintner’s prefix OEN-
In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oen-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

The word “vintner” comes from the Latin word “vinum” meaning wine, as one might imagine.

4. Ben Franklin’s belief DEISM
Deism (from the Latin “deus” meaning god) is the belief that a supreme being created the universe, a belief based on observation and reason and without the need for faith. Further, a deist does not accept divine intervention, but rather believes that the supreme being, having created the universe, leaves the world to it own devices.

The noted polymath Benjamin Franklin was one of the US’s Founding Fathers. Franklin was born into a working class family in Boston in 1706. He went on to invent the lightning rod and bifocals. He became the first US Ambassador to France, the US’s Postmaster General and the Governor of Pennsylvania. He played the violin, the harp and the guitar and composed a string quartet. He was also an accomplished chess player, the first to be known by name in the American colonies. The list of the Benjamin Franklin’s accomplishments seems to be endless …

7. Star of TV’s “The Fugitive” JANSSEN
If you recall the beginning of each episode of “The Fugitive” television series, there was a narration that summarized the background to the show. It started off “The Fugitive, a QM Production — starring David Janssen as Dr. Richard Kimble: an innocent victim of blind justice, falsely convicted for the murder of his wife …” Those words were read by actor William Conrad, who made a name for himself in his detective series playing the portly “Cannon”.

9. Hindu mystics YOGIS
A yogi is a practitioner of yoga.

12. Oskar Schindler, to many SAVIOR
Oskar Schindler is of course the protagonist in the Steven Spielberg movie “Schindler’s List”. Schindler was a real person who survived WWII. During the Holocaust, Schindler managed to save almost 1,200 Jews from perishing by employing them in his factories. After the war, Schindler and his wife were left penniless having used his assets to protect and feed his workers. For years the couple survived on the charity of Jewish groups. Schindler tried to make a go of it in business again but never had any real success. He died a pauper in 1974 in Hildesheim, not far from Hanover. His last wish was to be buried in Jerusalem. Schindler was the only former member of the Nazi Party to be buried on Mount Zion.

13. Half of sei TRE
Twice three (tre) is six (sei), in Italian.

14. California’s Santa __ Mountains ANA
Southern California’s Santa Ana Mountains run southeast of Los Angeles. The range was named by Spanish explorer Gaspar de Portolà. Don Gaspar camped below the mountains in 1769 on July 26, the Feast of Saint Anne.

15. Done for KAPUT
“Kaput” is a familiar term meaning “incapacitated, destroyed”, and comes to us from French (via German). The original word “capot” means “not having won a single trick” in the French card game called Piquet.

25. Word with pool or table TIDE
Tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

26. Twain of country SHANIA
Shania Twain is a Country and pop singer from Windsor, Ontario. Her birth name was Eileen Edwards, and this changed to Eilleen Twain when her mother remarried. Twain changed her name to Shania in the early 1990s, around the same time that her musical career started to take off.

31. Piquant ZESTY
Something that is “piquant” is pleasantly sharp in taste and zesty. “Piquant” is the French word for “prickly”.

32. Fred Astaire’s birthplace OMAHA
Fred Astaire’s real name was Frederick Austerlitz. Fred was from Omaha, Nebraska and before he made it big in movies, he was one half of a celebrated music hall act with his sister Adele. The pair were particularly successful in the UK, and Adele ended up marrying into nobility in England, taking the name Lady Charles Cavendish.

34. Dutch cheeses EDAMS
Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

36. Bulldoze, in Bath RASE
To “raze” (in UK English “rase”) is to level to the ground. How odd is it that “raise”, a homophone of “raze”, means to build up??!!

Bath is a beautiful city in South West England of which I have very fond memories. Bath is an old Roman spa town, and the city’s name comes from the Roman baths that have been excavated and restored.

37. St. comprised of two peninsulas MICH
Michigan is the only US state that comprises two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula is mitten-shaped, and it is separated from the Upper Peninsula by the Straits of Mackinac. My wife is from the “U.P”, and is proud to call her herself a Yooper (from “UPer”).

40. Cab in a bottle, say RED
The Cabernet Sauvignon grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the Cabernet franc and Sauvignon blanc grapes.

41. Southwest competitor UNITED
United Airlines used the tagline “Fly the Friendly Skies” in its marketing materials from 1965 to 1996. It was then replaced with “It’s time to fly”. United chose George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue” as the company’s theme music in 1976, and paid the Gershwin estate a fee of $500,000 for the privilege.

Southwest Airlines is the world’s largest low-cost passenger airline. I’ve always admired the Southwest operation and found that the company knows to keep costs under control while maintaining a high level of customer service. One strategy the company used for decades was to only operate Boeing 737 aircraft, which kept maintenance and operating costs to a minimum.

43. AHL’s Iowa Wild, when they were in Houston AEROS
The Aeros were the professional ice hockey team based in Houston, Texas until 2013. The Houston Aeros were added to the International Hockey League in 1994. The franchise name was taken from the World Hockey Association’s Houston Aeros of the seventies, the team for whom Gordie Howe played. When the team moved to Des Moines in 2013 they became the Iowa Wild.

45. Skosh TAD
Back in the 1800s “tad” was used to describe a young child, and this morphed into our usage of “small amount” in the early 1900s. The original use of “tad” for a child is very likely a shortened version of “tadpole”.

“Skosh” is a slang term meaning “a little bit”, originally military slang that came out of the Korean War. “Skosh” derives from the Japanese word “sukoshi” which translates as “few, little, some”.

54. Not of the cloth LAIC
Anything described is laic (or “laical, lay”) is related to the laity, those members of the church who are not clergy. The term “laic” ultimately comes from the Greek “laikos” meaning “of the people”.

62. “Rocky III” actor MR T
Mr. T’s real name is Laurence Tero Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catch phrase comes from the movie “Rocky III”. In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, “No, I don’t hate Balboa, but I pity the fool”. He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called “I Pity the Fool”, and produced a motivational video called “Be Somebody … or Be Somebody’s Fool!”.

“Rocky III” is the movie in which Rocky (Sylvester Stallone) goes up against Clubber Lang (Mr. T). “Rocky III” is a forgettable film, but Mr. T was grateful for his role no doubt as it launched his career and landed him a spot on television’s “The A-Team”. Also making an appearance was professional wrestler Hulk Hogan, an appearance that raised his profile as well and kick-started his career outside of the ring. But for me the most memorable thing is the song “Eye of the Tiger”, which was commissioned for “Rocky III”. A great tune …

63. Genetic letters RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

64. Airer of many RKO films TCM
Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is one of my favorite television channels, delivering just what its name promises: classic movies.

The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO acronym then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

65. Vermont ski resort OKEMO
Okemo is a ski resort near Ludlow, Vermont. If you visit Okemo, you’ll see that it’s also home to the Timber Ripper roller coaster, which operates year round. The Timber Ripper became the state of Vermont’s first roller coaster when it opened for business in December, 2010.

67. Luis’ “Let’s go!” VAMOS!
“To vamoose” is to “to leave”, and comes from the Spanish “vamos” meaning “let’s go”.

69. Calvary inscription INRI
The letters written on the cross on which Jesus died were “INRI”. INRI is an acronym for the Latin “Iesus Nazarenus, Rex Iudaeorum”, which translates into English as “Jesus the Nazarene, King of the Jews”.

Jesus was crucified at a location outside the walls of Jerusalem called Calvary or Golgotha, or “place of the skull” in English.

71. 1999-2004 Olds ALERO
The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

77. Like an Aberdeen newborn WEE
The Scottish city of Aberdeen is located amidst plentiful supplies of granite, which were actively quarried until the 1970s. Many local buildings incorporate the granite in their structure. Aberdeen granite is especially prized for its high levels of mica, which can cause the stone to sparkle like silver.

78. Siouan language OSAGE
Both Dakota and Osage are Siouan languages, really quite similar to each other. Sadly, the Osage language is dying out, with only a handful of speakers left, all quite elderly.

80. Grafton’s “__ for Outlaw” O IS
Sue Grafton writes detective novels, and her “alphabet series” features the private investigator Kinsey Millhone. She started off with “A Is for Alibi” in 1982 and is working her way through the alphabet, most recently publishing “’W’ is for Wasted” in 2009. Apparently Ms. Grafton is working on her “X is for …” novel, and has already decided that “Z is for Zero” will be the final title in the series. What a clever naming system!

83. Bass-baritone Simon ESTES
Simon Estes is an African-American baritone bass, and is considered one of a small group of performers that broke through a racial barrier that was present in the world of opera. Estes moved to Europe in the sixties to try to launch his career in an environment that was perhaps a little less prejudicial to people of African descent. There he performed in all the great opera houses including La Scala and Covent Garden. He did some guest performances in the US through the sixties and seventies, but it wasn’t until 1981 that he was offered a contract to sing with the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.

85. Cirque du __ SOLEIL
Cirque du Soleil is an entertainment company based in Montreal. The company was founded in 1984 by two former street performers, and stages spectacular shows that are a dramatic mix of circus and street entertainment. I’ve seen several Cirque du Soleil shows over the years, and have thoroughly every single one.

86. __ Bator ULAN
The name “Ulan Bator” translates from Mongolian as “the Red Hero”, and is Mongolia’s capital city. The “Red Hero” name was chosen in honor of the country’s national hero, Damdin Sükhbaatar. Sükhbaatar fought alongside the Soviet Red Army in the fight for liberation from Chinese occupation.

87. Staff notation REST
A “rest” is a symbol on a musical staff that indicates a pause.

88. G.W. Bush is the only president who earned one MBA
President George W. Bush graduated from Yale with an A.B. in history in 1968. He later earned a Master of Business Administration from Harvard Business School. President Bush is the only person with an MBA to have held the nation’s highest office.

93. Old TV’s “knight without armor in a savage land” PALADIN
“Have Gun – Will Travel” is a TV Western show that was first broadcast from 1957 to 1963. “Have Gun – Will Travel” had spin-of radio show (and not the other way round (that ran from 1958 to 1960. The how was about a gentleman gunfighter who called himself “Paladin”, played by Richard Boone. I must admit, I haven’t seen this one …

97. Othello’s lieutenant CASSIO
Shakespeare’s “Othello” was first performed in 1604. The main characters in the play are:

– Othello, a general in the army of Venice
– Desdemona, Othello’s wife
– Cassio, Othello’s trusted ensign
– Iago, the villain of the piece

98. Forward, to Fellini AVANTI
Federico Fellini was a film director and scriptwriter from Rimini in Italy. Fellini won more Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film than anyone else.

99. __ Linda, Calif. LOMA
Loma Linda is a city in California located not far from Los Angeles. The name Loma Linda translates from Spanish as “Beautiful Hill”.

101. Underworld god OSIRIS
Osiris was the Egyptian god of the underworld. Osiris was the son of Geb the Earth god, and Nut the sky goddess. His wife Isis was also his sister …

104. Made fun of JAPED
“To jape” means “to joke or quip”. The exact origins of “jape” are unclear, but it does seem to come from Old French. In the mid-1600’s “to jape” was a slang term meaning “to have sex with”. No joke!

107. South American monkey TITI
Titis are monkeys found in much of South America. Totis have tails that are a little bit longer than the length of their heads and bodies.

113. NYC traveler’s option LGA
The accepted three big airports serving New York City are John F. Kennedy (JFK), La Guardia (LGA) and Newark (EWR).

Fiorello La Guardia was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945, racking up three full terms in office. The famous airport that bears La Guardia’s name was built at his urging, stemming from an incident that took place while he was in office. He was taking a TWA flight to “New York” and was outraged when the plane landed at Newark Airport, in the state of New Jersey. The Mayor demanded that the flight take off again and land at a small airport in Brooklyn. A gaggle of press reporters joined him on the short hop and he gave them a story, urging New Yorkers to support the construction of a new commercial airport within the city’s limits. The new airport, in Queens, opened in 1939 as New York Municipal, often called “LaGuardia” as a nickname. The airport was officially relabeled as “LaGuardia” in 1947.

114. Holiday veggie YAM
Although in the US we sometimes refer to sweet potatoes as “yams”, the yam is actually a completely different family of plants. True yams are more common in other parts of the the world than they are in this country, and are especially found in Africa.

115. Verdi’s “__ tu” ERI
The aria “Eri tu” is from Verdi’s opera “Un ballo in maschera” (A Masked Ball). The opera tells the story of the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden during a masked ball.

Giuseppe Verdi was an Italian composer mainly of operas who was active during the Romantic era. Equally as famous as Verdi’s operas, are arias from those operas such as “La donna è mobile” from “Rigoletto”, “The Drinking Song” from “La Traviata” and “The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves” from “Nabucco”.

117. Victorian __ ERA
The Victorian era lasted the length of the Queen Victoria’s reign, from 1837 to 1901. The era was a period of great prosperity and growth, with the population of England and Wales doubling to over 30 million. Mind you, the population of Ireland halved during the same period, from 8 million to 4 million, largely due to the Great Famine.

118. Marshal under Napoleon NEY
Michel Ney was one of the first 18 Marshals of France created by Napoleon. When Bonaparte was eventually defeated for the last time, Ney was arrested and sentenced to death. He was executed in Paris by firing squad. Nay refused to wear a blindfold, and demanded that he himself be allowed to give the order to fire.

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Thingamajig DOODAD
7. Toronto team, familiarly JAYS
11. Schnauzer of fiction ASTA
15. Jack Jones’ record label KAPP
19. Place for an ace? SLEEVE
20. Sitting on ATOP
21. Stock holder? BARN
22. Jai __ ALAI
23. #1 hit song from “Flashdance” MANIAC
24. The old-time photographer preferred the __ NEGATIVE ASPECT
27. Foals’ fathers SIRES
29. Last Supper question IS IT I?
30. A dog, or a little hoarse HUSKY
31. The IndyCar photographer used __ ZOOM LENSES
35. Unassertive type DOORMAT
38. U.K. record label EMI
39. Stuffed SATED
40. Chorus REFRAIN
41. “Suits” network USA
44. Sea dog SALT
46. Article 1, Section 3 constitutional subject SENATE
48. Fair subject SCIENCE
50. Play area THEATER
52. The fashion photographer worried about __ MODEL BEHAVIOR
56. When tripled, and so on YADDA
57. Smack, maybe KISS
59. __ tai MAI
60. Ortega’s “other” OTRO
61. Stan Lee superheroes X-MEN
63. Support bar RAIL
64. Some coins TOKENS
66. The dating service photographer was happy when __ EVERYTHING CLICKED
71. Finally AT LAST
73. The last Mrs. Chaplin OONA
74. “I’m buying!” ON ME!
75. Gardener’s choice LOAM
76. Here-there connection NOR
77. Dazzles WOWS
79. Star athlete in Archie Comics MOOSE
84. The arctic photographer had to consider __ EXPOSURE TIMES
89. Lao-tzu followers TAOISTS
91. Meat-filled pastry RISSOLE
92. “Help me out here, bud” BE A PAL
94. ER command STAT
95. Single ONE
96. Barenboim is its current music director LA SCALA
100. Modesto vintner GALLO
102. Prior to, in poems ERE
103. Peso part CENTAVO
104. The dessert photographer took a set of __ JELL-O SHOTS
106. Arcade pioneer ATARI
109. Mead milieu SAMOA
111. Computer acronym ASCII
112. The stressed-out photographer __ FINALLY SNAPPED
116. Passionate ARDENT
120. Envelope abbr. ATTN
121. Canter, for one GAIT
122. Garr of “Tootsie” TERI
123. In layers TIERED
124. Investment factor RISK
125. Michel’s “mine” A MOI
126. Norse god of war ODIN
127. Pope works ESSAYS

Down
1. Mil. decoration DSM
2. Motor extension? -OLA
3. Vintner’s prefix OEN-
4. Ben Franklin’s belief DEISM
5. Is of use AVAILS
6. Downward movement DECREASE
7. Star of TV’s “The Fugitive” JANSSEN
8. Supped ATE
9. Hindu mystics YOGIS
10. White-robe providers SPAS
11. Not much A BIT OF
12. Oskar Schindler, to many SAVIOR
13. Half of sei TRE
14. California’s Santa __ Mountains ANA
15. Done for KAPUT
16. Pub offerings ALES
17. Prepare for a trip PACK
18. “That’s rough” PITY
25. Word with pool or table TIDE
26. Twain of country SHANIA
28. Shift neighbor ENTER KEY
31. Piquant ZESTY
32. Fred Astaire’s birthplace OMAHA
33. Quieted, in a way OILED
34. Dutch cheeses EDAMS
36. Bulldoze, in Bath RASE
37. St. comprised of two peninsulas MICH
40. Cab in a bottle, say RED
41. Southwest competitor UNITED
42. Disdain SCORN
43. AHL’s Iowa Wild, when they were in Houston AEROS
45. Skosh TAD
47. Set-__: arguments TOS
49. Bring to mind EVOKE
51. Makes serious demands on TAXES
53. Webzine E-MAG
54. Not of the cloth LAIC
55. Puff up in the breeze BILLOW
58. Chant INTONE
62. “Rocky III” actor MR T
63. Genetic letters RNA
64. Airer of many RKO films TCM
65. Vermont ski resort OKEMO
66. Slip by ELAPSE
67. Luis’ “Let’s go!” VAMOS!
68. Laugh-a-minute HOOT
69. Calvary inscription INRI
70. Prepares for use, as software INSTALLS
71. 1999-2004 Olds ALERO
72. Snake venom, e.g. TOXIN
77. Like an Aberdeen newborn WEE
78. Siouan language OSAGE
80. Grafton’s “__ for Outlaw” O IS
81. Bone: Pref. OSTEO-
82. Get underway START
83. Bass-baritone Simon ESTES
85. Cirque du __ SOLEIL
86. __ Bator ULAN
87. Staff notation REST
88. G.W. Bush is the only president who earned one MBA
90. Dole out ALLOCATE
93. Old TV’s “knight without armor in a savage land” PALADIN
97. Othello’s lieutenant CASSIO
98. Forward, to Fellini AVANTI
99. __ Linda, Calif. LOMA
101. Underworld god OSIRIS
103. Ill-tempered type CRANK
104. Made fun of JAPED
105. Conceals HIDES
106. At a distance AFAR
107. South American monkey TITI
108. Farm workers ANTS
110. Vision: Pref. OPTO-
113. NYC traveler’s option LGA
114. Holiday veggie YAM
115. Verdi’s “__ tu” ERI
117. Victorian __ ERA
118. Marshal under Napoleon NEY
119. NFL scores TDS

Return to top of page

LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Aug 14, Saturday

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Martin Ashwood-Smith
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 11m 48s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. W. Coast force LAPD
The Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) is the third largest local law enforcement agency in the country, after New York PD and Chicago PD. Among other things, LAPD is famous for creating the first Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team in the US, in 1965.

15. “Superman” (1978) co-producer Salkind ILYA
Ilya Salkind is a Mexican film and television producer who is mainly associated with the “Superman” films of the seventies and eighties, along with his father Alexander Salkind. It was the Salkinds who cast the role of Superman, eventually choosing Christopher Reeve. Paul Newman and Robert Redford were both offered the part, and both declined. Sylvester Stallone really wanted to play Superman, but he was turned down by the producers. Other name considered were Muhammad Ali, Dustin Hoffman, Al Pacino, James Caan, Clint Eastwood and Steve McQueen.

16. Guacamole maker’s discard AVOCADO PIT
The wonderful avocado comes from a tree that is native to Mexico and Central America. The avocado fruit is sometime called an avocado pear, because of its shape, even though it is not related to the pear at all. The fruit might also be referred to as an alligator pear, due to the roughness of the green skin of some avocado cultivars.

Guacamole is one of my favorite dishes, and is made by mashing avocados and perhaps adding the likes of tomato, onion and lime juice. The guacamole recipe dates back as early as the 16th century, to the time of the Aztecs. “Guacamole” translates as “avocado sauce”.

19. Historic Greenwich Village club THE BITTER END
The Bitter End is a nightclub and coffeehouse in Greenwich Village in New York City. The club opened in 1961 and is still going strong, although it was renamed to The Other End for while during the seventies. Many, many famous comedians and musicians appeared at the Bitter End, especially early in their careers.

21. Ivanhoe, e.g. SAXON
Germanic tribes invaded Great Britain from the early 5th century and created the nation that we now call England. The Anglo-Saxons (sometimes simply “Saxons”), as these tribes came to be called, held sway in the country until 1066, the year of the Norman Conquest. The Anglo-Saxons were descendants of three Germanic tribes:

– The Angles, from Angeln in Northern Germany (and the tribe that gave the name “England”).
– The Saxons, from Lower Saxony and Holland.
– The Jutes, from the Jutland peninsula in Denmark.

“Ivanhoe” is a historical novel by Sir Walter Scott, set in 12th-century England. Sir Arthur Sullivan (of Gilbert & Sullivan fame) wrote a very successful operatic interpretation of the story that played for an unprecedented 155 consecutive performances after it opened in London in 1891. Sullivan asked his long-time collaborator W. S. Gilbert to supply the libretto for “Ivanhoe” but he declined. As “Ivanhoe” was a grand opera, he felt that the librettist’s role was too subordinate to that of the composer, and he preferred the more “equal” relationship afforded by their operetta projects.

22. Lao-__ TSE
Lao Tse (also Lao-Tzu) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism.

26. Volume One words, perhaps A TO
“A to B”, perhaps, or maybe “A to M”.

28. Blame RAP
A rap sheet is a criminal record. “Rap” is a slang term dating back to the 1700s that means “blame, responsibility” as in “to take the rap”. This usage morphed into “rap sheet” in the early 1900s.

39. Exercises in futility WILD-GOOSE CHASES
A “wild-goose chase” is a hopeless quest. It appears that it is yet another phrase that was coined by William Shakespeare. It first appears in print in “Romeo and Juliet” in a line spoken by Mercutio:
Nay, if thy wits run the wild-goose chase, I have done, for thou hast more of the wild-goose in one of thy wits than, I am sure, I have in my whole five.

40. Mortgagee’s calculation INTEREST PAYMENT
Our word “mortgage” comes from the Old French “mort gaige” which translated as “dead pledge”. The idea was that a pledge to repay a loan dies when the debt is cleared.

43. Waste no time HIE
“To hie” is to move quickly, to bolt.

44. Half-day exam given four times a yr. LSAT
Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

50. Mil. trial N-TEST
Nuclear test (N-test)

57. Band with the 1986 #1 hit “Venus” BANANARAMA
Bananarama is a female singing group that formed in London in 1979. Their biggest hit was the 1986 hit “Venus” that topped the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. “Venus” was originally a number-one hit for the Dutch band Shocking Blue, back in 1969/1970.

60. Marquee time NITE
A marquee is a large sign that is placed over the entrance to a theater. The marquee usually displays the names of the film(s) or plays currently showing.

62. Old 442 rivals GTOS
The acronym GTO was used on several touring cars (including a famous Pontiac) and stands for Gran Turismo Omologato, which is an Italian phrase that translates as “Grand Touring Homologated”. Italian car manufacturers started the tradition of calling their luxury performance cars “Gran Turismo”, and calling those cars they approved for racing “Gran Turismo Omologato”. The phrase “gran turismo omologato” translates as “grand touring homologated”, with “homologated” being a technical term signifying official approval.

The Oldsmobile 442 is a so-called “muscle car”, one that was produced by GM from 1964 to 1980. The name “442” comes from the fact that the car has a four-barrel carburetor, a four-speed manual gearbox and dual exhaust.

64. Lacking SANS
In French, one can be with (avec) or without (sans).

Down
1. Joggers of a sort LISTS
A list can jog one’s mind.

3. Brand introduced by Corning in 1915 PYREX
Pyrex glassware is brand name owned by Corning. As well as being used in bakeware and laboratory glassware, Pyrex is often the material of choice for optics in large telescopes used in astronomy.

4. Certain prep schooler DAY BOARDER
A day boarder is a child who attends a boarding school, but doesn’t sleep there. He or she would take most meals at the school.

5. Caravel feature MAST
A caravel was a Portuguese ship that was small and very maneuverable. Caravels had triangular lateen-rigged sails which allowed them to sail quite close to the wind. Caravels were indeed quite small, only accommodating a crew of twenty or so sailors. Christopher Columbus’s Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria were all caravels.

6. British miler Steve OVETT
Steve Ovett is a retired British middle distance runner from England, a gold medal winner in the 1980 Olympics in Moscow. Ovett had a very public rivalry with fellow English Olympian Sebastian Coe.

7. Crams, with “up” BONES
The phrasal verb “to bone up” means “to study”, and is student slang that dates back to the 1880s. The term probably comes a series of books used by students back then called “Bohn’s Classical Library”.

11. Multitude HORDE
A “horde” is a large crowd. “Horde” ultimately derives from the Turkish “ordu” that means “camp, army”.

12. WWII cost-stabilizing agcy. OPA
President Franklin D. Roosevelt set up the Office of Price Administration (OPA) during WWII, with the intent of stabilizing prices and rents during the emergency.

13. Jack letters MIC
Microphone (mic)

A jack is a socket that accepts a plug, allowing a connection to some electrical circuit.

14. Time for les vacances ETE
In French, summer (été) is a common time to take vacation (vacances).

20. Former Acura model INTEGRA
Acura is a division of the Honda Motor Company, their luxury brand. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

27. Chiwere speakers OTOES
Chiwere is a Siouan language spoken by the Otoe people, as well as by the Missouria and Iowa.

31. __ gland: organ that secretes melatonin PINEAL
The pineal gland is a small gland located in the epithalamus, near the center of the brain. The gland gets its name from its shape, like a tiny pine cone. The pineal gland produces melatonin, a hormone that helps maintain our circadian rhythm, so varying levels of melatonin control our sleep-wake cycle.

33. Old West transport, in dialect HOSS
A cowboy might call his horse a “hoss”.

34. Historic Padua neighbor ESTE
The House of Este is a princely dynasty in Europe. The House of Hanover that ruled Britain from 1714 to 1901 (when Queen Victoria died) was perhaps the most notable branch of the House of Este. The House takes its name from the town of Este in the province of Padua in northern Italy.

The city of Padua is in northern Italy, not far from Venice. Padua has many claims to fame. Galileo was one of the lecturers at the University of Padua, for example. And, William Shakespeare chose the city as the setting for his play “The Taming of the Shrew”.

35. Passbook amts. DEPS
A passbook is a paper book used to record banking transactions, usually for a small savings account. The passbook is held by the owner of the account, and not by the bank. The first passbooks appeared in the 1700s, and the name “passbook” was given as the book was regularly passed between the bank and the account holder for updating.

37. DNA compound THYMINE
Nucleobases are molecules that form the backbone of DNA and RNA chains. It is the sequence of these bases in the DNA chain that makes up the so-called “genetic code”. In DNA the four bases are adenine (A), guanine (G), thymine (T) and cytosine (C). The same bases are found in RNA, except that thymine is replaced by uracil (U).

38. Sessions involving steps AA MEETINGS
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was founded in 1935, by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith in Akron, Ohio. As the organization grew, the guiding principles established by the founders were formatted into a 12-step program that was in place by the forties.

47. Pulitzer journalist Seymour HERSH
Seymour Hersh is an investigative journalist based in Washington D.C. Hersh was awarded the 1970 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for his 1969 exposé of the My Lai Massacre.

The My Lai Massacre took place in the Vietnamese village of that name in March, 1968. After an investigation it was determined that at least 347 unarmed civilians, mostly women, children and elderly people, were murdered by a unit of US soldiers. It was also revealed that gang rapes and torture took place during the massacre. At least three servicemen tried to halt the killing, but they were vastly outnumbered by those participating. About two years after the massacre, 26 men were charged with crimes, but only one man was convicted. William Calley was found guilty of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment and hard labor. President Nixon stepped in the day after Calley was sentenced and ordered him transferred from Leavenworth prison and placed under house arrest pending appeal. On appeal the life sentence was reduced to 20 years, and this was further cut to 10 years as an act of clemency by the Secretary of the Army. Calley was released after serving three years in total.

51. “You Must Love Me” musical EVITA
“Evita” was the follow up musical to “Jesus Christ Superstar” for Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. Both of these works were originally released as album musicals, and very successful ones at that (I remember buying them when they first came out). “Evita” was made into a film in 1996, with Madonna playing the title role and Welsh actor Jonathan Pryce playing her husband Juan Perón.

53. Bobby pin target TRESS
A bobby pin is an unobtrusive hairclip. The clip became popular starting in 1899 with the introduction of the “bob cut”, hence the name “bobby pin”.

55. Jeanne __ D’ARC
Joan of Arc (also Jeanne d’Arc, her birth name) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured, Joan was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

57. Hardly big shots? BBS
A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.080″ in diameter) to size FF (.23″). 0.180″ diameter birdshot is size BB, which gives the airgun its name.

58. Klee contemporary ARP
Hans Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. He was sent home …

The artist Paul Klee was born in Switzerland, but studied art in Munich in Germany. You can see many of Klee’s works in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and if you get to Bern in Switzerland, even more of them can be seen at the Zentrum Paul Klee that was opened in 2005.

59. __ Valley: San Francisco area NOE
Noe Valley is a neighborhood in San Francisco. The area is named after José de Jesús Noé who was the last Mexican mayor of Yerba Buena, which is what San Francisco was called when it was part of Mexico.

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. W. Coast force LAPD
5. Trailer MOBILE HOME
15. “Superman” (1978) co-producer Salkind ILYA
16. Guacamole maker’s discard AVOCADO PIT
17. Active SPRY
18. Struggle for a 23-Across SENATE RACE
19. Historic Greenwich Village club THE BITTER END
21. Ivanhoe, e.g. SAXON
22. Lao-__ TSE
23. Goal in an 18-Across SEAT
26. Volume One words, perhaps A TO
28. Blame RAP
30. Give an essentials-only account SPARE THE DETAILS
39. Exercises in futility WILD-GOOSE CHASES
40. Mortgagee’s calculation INTEREST PAYMENT
41. Group project feedback PEER ASSESSMENTS
42. Singer’s asset EAR
43. Waste no time HIE
44. Half-day exam given four times a yr. LSAT
47. Welcome words HIS
50. Mil. trial N-TEST
54. One at the end of the line WIDE RECEIVER
57. Band with the 1986 #1 hit “Venus” BANANARAMA
60. Marquee time NITE
61. Help in a stock exchange? BROKER’S TIP
62. Old 442 rivals GTOS
63. Fast-moving game SPEED CHESS
64. Lacking SANS

Down
1. Joggers of a sort LISTS
2. Top dog ALPHA
3. Brand introduced by Corning in 1915 PYREX
4. Certain prep schooler DAY BOARDER
5. Caravel feature MAST
6. British miler Steve OVETT
7. Crams, with “up” BONES
8. Comforting comment I CARE
9. Up-to-the-minute LATE
10. Wonderlands EDENS
11. Multitude HORDE
12. WWII cost-stabilizing agcy. OPA
13. Jack letters MIC
14. Time for les vacances ETE
20. Former Acura model INTEGRA
24. Gotten up ARISEN
25. Local __ TALENT
27. Chiwere speakers OTOES
29. Attention getters PSSTS
30. Take the wrong way? SWIPE
31. __ gland: organ that secretes melatonin PINEAL
32. Lets out, say ALTERS
33. Old West transport, in dialect HOSS
34. Historic Padua neighbor ESTE
35. Passbook amts. DEPS
36. Net funds ECASH
37. DNA compound THYMINE
38. Sessions involving steps AA MEETINGS
45. Up AWAKE
46. Like a rake TINED
47. Pulitzer journalist Seymour HERSH
48. Hot IRATE
49. They occur before finals SEMIS
51. “You Must Love Me” musical EVITA
52. Place atop SET ON
53. Bobby pin target TRESS
55. Jeanne __ D’ARC
56. Means of emphasis CAPS
57. Hardly big shots? BBS
58. Klee contemporary ARP
59. __ Valley: San Francisco area NOE

Return to top of page