LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Nov 14, Sunday

Frequently Asked Question: Why isn’t the puzzle in my paper the same as the one shown on your blog?
If the puzzle in your paper doesn’t match the one that I solved, it is probably a Sunday crossword. On Sundays, the “LA Times” chooses to publish Merl Reagle’s excellent crossword, and not their own “LA Times” Crossword. The “LA Times” puzzle is still sent out in syndication, and is also published in the “LA Times” online. I’ve been asked to blog about Merl Reagle’s crossword, but frankly I don’t have the time. Sunday puzzles have lots of clues!

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Michele Kane
THEME: Résumés … each of today’s themed answers comprises two words beginning the letters CV:

119D. Résumés, briefly, and a hint to this puzzle’s eight longest answers CVS

23A. Apple product CIDER VINEGAR
42A. Modern security threat COMPUTER VIRUS
62A. What most coupons lack CASH VALUE
76A. Election night drama CLOSE VOTE
94A. Lustrous fabric CRUSHED VELVET
119A. “Glee” song, e.g. COVER VERSION
17D. Technique employed on many police shows CINEMA VERITE
62D. Stand in a bedroom CLOTHES VALET

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 19m 32s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. 1622 newlyweds ALDENS
John Alden is said to have been the first person to disembark from the Mayflower and to have set foot on Plymouth Rock in 1620. Alden himself was not a Pilgrim as such, and was a carpenter working on the Mayflower before it sailed. He apparently decided to travel with the ship at the last minute, perhaps in pursuit of the passenger who would become his wife, Priscilla Mullens. Alden ended up in a love triangle with Priscilla and Captain Miles Standish, a relationship which is recounted in the Longfellow poem “The Courtship of Miles Standish”. John and Priscilla were the parents of a son, John Alden, who was later to be accused during the Salem witch trials.

20. One of two capitals on I-84 BOISE
Interstate 84 is a highway that exists in two sections, which are not connected. In the west of the country, I-84 starts from Portland, Oregon and ends at I-80 near Echo, Utah. In the east, I-84 starts at I-81 near Dunmore, Pennsylvania and ends at I-90 near Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Along the way, I-84 passes through two state capitals: Boise, Idaho and Hartford, Connecticut.

21. Southernmost U.S. state HAWAII
The most southerly state in the US is Hawaii, and the most northerly is Alaska. Alaska is also the most westerly state, and believe it or not, it is also the most easterly state. That’s because Alaska’s Aleutian Islands stretch across the 180-degree of longitude into the Eastern Hemisphere.

26. Block STYMIE
The word “stymie” comes from golf, and is a situation on the green in which one’s approach to the hole is blocked by an opponent’s ball. The term is also used figuratively as a verb meaning “hinder, block, thwart”.

32. Lullaby-like Chopin work BERCEUSE
A “berceuse” is a musical work that resembles a lullaby, that is soothing and reflective. The term comes from French, in which it describes a woman who rocks a baby to sleep. “Bercer” is French for “to rock”. The composer Frédéric Chopin is perhaps most associated with the form.

Frédéric Chopin was a Polish composer who spent most of his life in France. He was most famous for his piano works in the Romantic style. Chopin was a sickly man and died quite young, at 39. For many of his final years he had a celebrated and tempestuous relationship with the French author George Sand (the nom de plume of the Baroness Dudevant). Those years with Sand may have been turbulent, but they were very productive in terms of musical composition.

36. __ Dhabi ABU
Abu Dhabi is one of the seven Emirates that make up the federation known as the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The two largest members of the UAE (geographically) are Dubai and Abu Dhabi, the only two of the seven members that have veto power over UAE policy. Before 1971, the UAE was a British Protectorate, a collection of sheikdoms. The sheikdoms entered into a maritime truce with Britain in 1835, after which they became known as the Trucial States, derived from the word “truce”.

38. Traffic cop’s gp.? DEA
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

41. Lunes, por ejemplo DIA
In Spanish, Monday (lunes), for example (por ejemplo) is a day (dia).

42. Modern security threat COMPUTER VIRUS
A computer virus has characteristics very similar to a virus found in nature. It is a small computer program that can copy itself and can infect another host (computer).

47. Anatomy feature in a ’50s musical nickname PELVIS
Elvis Presley had a few nicknames, most notably “the King of Rock and Roll”, or just “the King”. One nickname that he was not at all fond of was “Elvis the Pelvis”, a reference to his famous hip gyrations.

50. Deejay Casey KASEM
Not only was Casey Kasem closely associated with the radio show “American Top 40”, but he is also well known for playing the voice of Shaggy Rogers on the “Scooby-Doo” animated series. Sadly, Kasem passed away in 2014 having suffered from Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia.

52. Pittsburgh’s __ Park PNC
PNC Park is the home to the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team. The park is sponsored by PNC Financial Services, the sixth largest bank in the US, and founded and based in Pittsburgh.

55. Queequeg feature, briefly TAT
Queequeg is a character in Herman Melville’s classic tale “Moby Dick”. Queequeg is the chief harpooner on the boat. He is the son of South Sea chieftain, and is also a cannibal who is covered in tattoos.

57. Salt in a lab NACL
Sodium chloride (NaCl, common salt) is an ionic compound, a crystal lattice made up of large chloride (Cl) ions in a cubic structure, with smaller sodium (Na) ions in between the chlorides.

59. Eye-fooling pictures OP ART
Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

61. “Of Human Bondage” (1934) studio RKO
“Of Human Bondage” is a 1934 film adaptation of the W. Somerset Maugham’s 1915 novel of the same name. The lead roles are played by Leslie Howard and Bette Davis. The film was remade in 1946 (starring Paul Henreid and Eleanor Parker) and in 1964 (starring Laurence Harvey and Kim Novak).

65. Nada, in Nice RIEN
The word “nothing” translates to “nada” in Spanish and “rien” in French.

The French city of Nice is on the Mediterranean coast in the southeast of the country. Although Nice is only the fifth most populous city in France, it is home to the busiest airport outside of Paris. That’s because of all the tourists flocking to the French Riviera.

72. Calendario units ANOS
In Spanish, we start years (año) in January (enero) as noted on a calendar (calendario).

80. Loren’s husband Carlo PONTI
The renowned Italian film producer Carlo Ponti was not quite as famous as his celebrity wife, Sophia Loren. Ponti met Loren as a contestant in a beauty contest he was judging in 1950. Back then she was a budding young actress still using her real name, Sofia Lazzaro. The two married in 1957 even though divorce was illegal at the time in Italy, so Ponti was still married to his first wife.

81. Jalopy HEAP
The origins of our word “jalopy” meaning “dilapidated old motor car” seem to have been lost in time, but the word has been around since the 1920s. One credible suggestion is that it comes from Jalapa, Mexico as the Jalapa scrap yards were the destination for many discarded American automobiles.

82. Bambi relative ENA
Ena is Bambi’s aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel “Bambi, A Life in the Woods” written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

85. Annual reason for losing sleep: Abbr. DST
On the other side of the Atlantic, Daylight Saving Time (DST) is known as “summer time”. The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring and backwards in the fall so that afternoons have more daylight.

87. French 101 word ETRE
The French for “to be” is “être”, and for “you are” is “vous êtes”.

89. New Look creations DIORS
Fashion designer Christian Dior showed off his first collection in 1947, to great acclaim. The editor-in-chief of “Harper’s Bazaar” remarked “it’s such a new look!” as there was a clear contrast with the austere designs that dominated the war years. The remark resulted in the collection being labelled forever as the “New Look”.

98. Pauley Pavilion player BRUIN
The Pauley Pavillion on the UCLA campus is home to the school’s basketball, volleyball and gymnastics teams. The arena was completed in 1965 and is named for Edwin P. Pauley who contributed the lion’s share of the funds needed for construction. The Pauley Pavilion was also the venue for the gymnastic events in the 1984 Summer Olympic Games.

100. Ike’s command ETO
General Dwight D. Eisenhower (“Ike”) was in command of the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during WWII. If you’re a WWII buff like me, then I recommend you take a look at a great, made-for-TV movie starring Tom Selleck as Eisenhower called “Ike: Countdown to D-Day” that came out in 2004.

101. Joseph of ice cream fame EDY
Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dryer and Joseph Edy.

107. Goldsmith’s “The __ of Wakefield” VICAR
“The Vicar of Wakefield” is a novel by Irish writer Oliver Goldsmith that was first published in 1766. The novel became very popular quite quickly, and is remarkable in that it is mentioned in several other classic works that followed, including George Eliot’s “Middlemarch”, Jane Austen’s “Emma”, Charles Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities” and “David Copperfield”, Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” and Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women”.

114. Balmoral attraction CASTLE
Balmoral Castle is a favorite summer hangout for the British Royal Family, located in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The castle and estate was originally purchased for the family in 1852 by Prince Albert, consort to Queen Victoria. When Princess Diana died in a car crash in 1997, the Queen and her family, including Charles and his children, were in residence at Balmoral. It was there that she decided to stay after the loss, as opposed to returning to London and leading a public period of mourning. As we now know, that decision created a tremendous amount of public dismay.

119. “Glee” song, e.g. COVER VERSION
The TV show called “Glee” has proven to be very popular. The storyline focuses on a high school glee club in Lima, Ohio called New Directions.

123. Fast tempo VIVACE
“Vivace” is a musical direction indicating a lively mood and fast tempo. The term is Italian for “lively, vivid”.

125. MLB All-Century Team outfielder PETE ROSE
Pete Rose was a talented baseball player who holds the record for all-time Major League hits. In recent years of course his reputation has been tarnished by admissions that he bet on games in which he played and managed.

127. Diving ducks SMEWS
The smew is a beautiful-looking species of duck found right across northern Europe and Asia.

Down
2. San Francisco’s __ Tower COIT
Coit Tower is a renowned memorial in San Francisco that sits atop Telegraph Hill. The full name of the structure is the Lillian Coit Memorial Tower, recognizing a generous bequest to the city by wealthy socialite Lillie Hitchcock Coit. There is an urban myth in these parts that the tower was designed to resemble the nozzle of a fire hose, as Lillie used to like chasing fires and hanging out with firefighters.

6. Sushi bar selection AHI
Yellowfin tuna is usually marketed as “ahi”, its Hawaiian name. Yellowfin tuna is one big fish, often weighing over 300 pounds.

7. “Penny __” LANE
When in their teens, Paul McCartney and John Lennon would often head into the center of Liverpool together on the bus. The convenient place for them to meet was at the end of Penny Lane. Years later, Paul McCartney wrote the song “Penny Lane”, which was a big hit in 1967. “Penny Lane” was released as a double A-side record with “Strawberry Fields Forever” penned by John Lennon. Coincidentally, Strawberry Field was also a real location, not far from Penny Lane in Liverpool. Strawberry Field was a Salvation Army Children’s Home in the garden of which Lennon would play as a child. I don’t think Lennon and McCartney ever really forgot their roots …

8. Social misfit DWEEB
Dweeb, squarepants, nerd … all are not nice terms that mean the same thing, someone excessively studious and socially inept.

9. Three on a 47-Down EAGLE
(47D. Long hole PAR FIVE)
The following terms are routinely used in golf for scores relative to par:

– Bogey: one over par
– Par
– Birdie: one under par
– Eagle: two under par
– Albatross (also “double eagle”): three under par
– Condor: four under par

No one has ever recorded a condor during a professional tournament.

10. Actress Vardalos NIA
Not only is the delightful Nia Vardalos the star of the 2002 hit movie “My Big Fat Greek Wedding”, she also wrote the screenplay. The film never made it to number one at the box office, but it still pulled in more money than any other movie in history that didn’t make it to number one. That record I think reflects the fact that the film wasn’t a blockbuster but rather a so-called “sleeper hit”, a movie that people went to see based on referrals from friends. The big fat mistake came when a spin-off TV show was launched, “My Big Fat Greek Life”. It ran for only 7 episodes.

11. Title for golf’s Nick Faldo SIR
Nick Faldo is an English golfer, a winner of six major tournaments and a former World No. 1. For some years now Faldo has been the lead golf analyst for CBS Sports. In 2009 he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II, so if you’re chatting with him, don’t forget to address him as Sir Nick …

13. Like a landlubber on the open sea, say QUEASY
A ”lubber” is a clumsy person and a “landlubber” is a contemptuous term used by sailors for a man of the land. Sailors might call an inexperienced seaman a landlubber or perhaps just a “lubber”.

15. Culture medium AGAR
Julius Richard Petri was a German bacteriologist and was the man after whom the Petri dish is named. The petri dish can have an agar gel on the bottom which acts a nutrient source for the specimen being grown and studied, in which case the dish plus agar is referred to as an “agar plate”.

17. Technique employed on many police shows CINEMA VERITE
Cinéma vérité is a French term meaning “truthful cinema”, and it describes films made in a documentary style, often deliberately provoking a strong reaction from the audience.

18. Regular “Jeopardy!” sponsor ALEVE
Aleve is a brand name for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

19. “Girl, Interrupted” star RYDER
“Girl, Interrupted” is a memoir first published in 1993 written by Susanna Kaysen. The book tells of her time spent in a psychiatric hospital in the sixties suffering from borderline personality disorder. The book was adapted into a very successful film released in 1999 in which Winona Ryder played Kaysen. The title of book and film refer to the painting by Vermeer called “Girl Interrupted at her Music”.

24. African grassland VELDT
Also known as Veld, Veldt is the name given to large rural spaces in southern Africa. We might use the term “boondocks” for the same thing. The word comes from the German for “field”.

33. Basic educ. trio RRR
The “three Rs” are Reading, ‘Riting and ‘Rithmetic.

44. Sch. with a Lowell campus UMASS
The University of Massachusetts Lowell was formed in 1972 with the merger of Lowell State college and Lowell Technological Institute.

53. Naval noncom: Abbr. CPO
A Chief Petty Officer (CPO) is a non-commissioned officer in the Navy and Coast Guard. The “Petty” is derived from the French word “petit” meaning “small”.

62. Stand in a bedroom CLOTHES VALET
A “clothes valet” is an item of furniture on which a man can hang a suit. More elaborate versions include spots for shoes and perhaps keys or coins.

63. Dodge Viper engine V-TEN
The Dodge Viper is an American sports car with a V-10 engine. The Viper was introduced in 1991, and is still in production today.

67. Tennyson’s “__ Arden” ENOCH
Alfred, Lord Tennyson published his poem “Enoch Arden” in 1864. It tells the tale of Enoch Arden who went to sea in order to support his wife and children. He gets shipwrecked, and is lost for ten years, presumed drowned. When Enoch returns, he finds his wife happily married to another man, a man had been his lifelong rival. Sad stuff …

71. __ Nast CONDE
Condé Nast has a very large portfolio of publications, including “Vogue”, “GQ”, “House and Garden”, “Golf Digest”, “Wired”, “Vanity Fair” and “The New Yorker”.

74. LAX listing ETD
Expected time of departure (ETD)

Los Angeles International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and the busiest here on the West Coast of the US. The airport was opened in 1930 as Mines Field and was renamed to Los Angeles Airport in 1941. On the airport property is the iconic white structure that resembles a flying saucer. This is called the Theme Building and I believe it is mainly used as a restaurant and observation deck for the public. The airport used to be identified by the letters “LA”, but when the aviation industry went to a three-letter standard for airport identification, this was changed to “LAX”. Apparently the “X” has no significant meaning.

80. Nabokov title professor PNIN
“Pnin” is a novel written in English by Vladimir Nabokov, and published in 1957. The title character is Timofey Pnin, a Russian-born professor living in the US. “Pnin” raised some money for Nabokov, as it was published in installments in “The New Yorker” magazine. He needed the money while he worked hard to find someone to publish his more edgy novel, “Lolita”.

88. 1999 Ron Howard film EDTV
“EDtv” is a comedy film directed by Ron Howard starring Matthew McConaughey, released in 1999. The plot has a “Big Brother” feel to it, as it is about a TV show broadcasting someone’s life, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

96. Singers’ reality show, with “The” VOICE
“The Voice” is yet another reality television show. “The Voice” is a singing competition in which the judges hear the contestants without seeing them in the first round. The judges then take on chosen contestants as coaches for the remaining rounds. “The Voice” is a highly successful worldwide franchise that originated in the Netherlands.

99. Weasel out RENEGE
To renege on something is to back out of it. It’s a word commonly used in card games like bridge and whist. A renege is when a player doesn’t follow suit, even though there may be a card of the suit led in his/her hand.

103. “In bad company,” to Bierce ALONE
Ambrose Bierce was, among other things, an American satirist. He wrote a satirical lexicon called “The Devil’s Dictionary” published in 1911. The book is still popular today, with an updated version released in 2009. It includes “new” definitions from Bierce that were not included in his original work. Roy Morris, Jr. wrote a biography about Bierce called “Ambrose Bierce: Alone in Bad Company”.

104. First __: Shakespeare collection FOLIO
“First Folio” is the name commonly used for a collection of William Shakespeare’s plays published in 1623 under the title “Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories & Tragedies”. The “First Folio” originally sold for one pound, which is about $230 in today’s money. About 750 copies were made, and there are just under 230 copies believed to still exist. A copy stolen from Durham University in 1998 was recovered in 2008, and was valued at about 15 million pounds.

105. Intelligence SAVVY
The term “savvy”, meaning “understanding”, comes from the French “savez-vous?” “Savez-vous?” translates as “do you know?”

109. Indian state ASSAM
Assam is a state in the very northeast of India, just south of the Himalayas. Assam is noted for its tea as well as its silk.

111. Former golf announcer Dave MARR
Dave Marr was a golfer who won the 1965 PGA Championship. Marr made a second career for himself after retiring from the game, serving as a golf analyst on television.

113. Violist’s direction ARCO
“Arco” is a musical direction instructing a string player to return to normal bowing technique after a passage played using some other technique (perhaps pizzicato).

115. MGM co-founder LOEW
Marcus Loew was a New Yorker, born into a poor Jewish family. He started out in a penny arcade business and used its profits to buy into a nickelodeon. He built a whole chain of movie theaters, and then moved into the production of films so that he could guarantee supply of features that he could show in his theaters. Eventually he pulled together the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film production company, passing away just three years after he inked the deal.

118. Doctor of music? DRE
Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

119. Résumés, briefly, and a hint to this puzzle’s eight longest answers CVS
A curriculum vitae (CV) is a listing of someone’s work experience and qualifications, and is used mainly in making a job application. The term “curriculum vitae” can be translated from Latin as “course of life”.

A résumé is a summary of a person’s job experience and education and is used as a tool by a job seeker. In many countries, a résumé is equivalent to a curriculum vitae. “Résumé” is the French word for “summary”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Fuss ACT UP
6. 1622 newlyweds ALDENS
12. Police show staple SQUAD CAR
20. One of two capitals on I-84 BOISE
21. Southernmost U.S. state HAWAII
22. With strong desire HUNGRILY
23. Apple product CIDER VINEGAR
25. Kept RETAINED
26. Block STYMIE
27. Slippery fish EEL
28. Outer space feature NO AIR
29. Genesis woman EVE
30. Convinces SELLS
32. Lullaby-like Chopin work BERCEUSE
35. USA part: Abbr. AMER
36. __ Dhabi ABU
38. Traffic cop’s gp.? DEA
40. Boisterous ROWDY
41. Lunes, por ejemplo DIA
42. Modern security threat COMPUTER VIRUS
47. Anatomy feature in a ’50s musical nickname PELVIS
50. Deejay Casey KASEM
51. Perceptive KEEN
52. Pittsburgh’s __ Park PNC
54. Like a sick student, probably ABSENT
55. Queequeg feature, briefly TAT
57. Salt in a lab NACL
59. Eye-fooling pictures OP ART
61. “Of Human Bondage” (1934) studio RKO
62. What most coupons lack CASH VALUE
64. Canine complaint WOOF!
65. Nada, in Nice RIEN
66. Firmly fixed WELL-SET
68. Slo-mo studier REF
70. “I don’t think so” NICE TRY
72. Calendario units ANOS
73. Consider DEEM
76. Election night drama CLOSE VOTE
79. Tippler SOT
80. Loren’s husband Carlo PONTI
81. Jalopy HEAP
82. Bambi relative ENA
83. Sore ACHING
85. Annual reason for losing sleep: Abbr. DST
87. French 101 word ETRE
89. New Look creations DIORS
93. Future doctor’s work, maybe THESIS
94. Lustrous fabric CRUSHED VELVET
97. D.C. bigwig SEN
98. Pauley Pavilion player BRUIN
100. Ike’s command ETO
101. Joseph of ice cream fame EDY
102. Draining aid EAVE
104. Cheapest way in FREE PASS
107. Goldsmith’s “The __ of Wakefield” VICAR
110. As per A LA
111. Haunted house noises MOANS
112. “Got it!” AHA!
114. Balmoral attraction CASTLE
117. Risked perjury charges TOLD A LIE
119. “Glee” song, e.g. COVER VERSION
122. Precise UNERRING
123. Fast tempo VIVACE
124. Showed entirely BARED
125. MLB All-Century Team outfielder PETE ROSE
126. Sneaky devil SLY FOX
127. Diving ducks SMEWS

Down
1. Basics ABCS
2. San Francisco’s __ Tower COIT
3. Enviable assets TIDY SUMS
4. “I’m available” USE ME
5. Jeopardy PERIL
6. Sushi bar selection AHI
7. “Penny __” LANE
8. Social misfit DWEEB
9. Three on a 47-Down EAGLE
10. Actress Vardalos NIA
11. Title for golf’s Nick Faldo SIR
12. Hide from view SHROUD
13. Like a landlubber on the open sea, say QUEASY
14. Loosen, in a way UNTIE
15. Culture medium AGAR
16. Soft & __: deodorant DRI
17. Technique employed on many police shows CINEMA VERITE
18. Regular “Jeopardy!” sponsor ALEVE
19. “Girl, Interrupted” star RYDER
24. African grassland VELDT
28. Ski resort refresher? NEW SNOW
31. Look for SEEK
33. Basic educ. trio RRR
34. Something to pull off COUP
35. Doesn’t feel great AILS
36. “Oh no!” ACK!
37. Eye-catching wrap BOA
39. Place to play ARENA
41. Not a good thing to go into DEBT
43. “He loves me” pieces PETALS
44. Sch. with a Lowell campus UMASS
45. Italian restaurant choice VEAL
46. Bring upon oneself INCUR
47. Long hole PAR FIVE
48. Comic book artist INKER
49. Like some beaches STONY
53. Naval noncom: Abbr. CPO
56. Not a good thing to go to THE DOGS
58. Parasite LEECH
60. Exceptional A-ONE
62. Stand in a bedroom CLOTHES VALET
63. Dodge Viper engine V-TEN
65. Stores, markets, etc. RETAIL
66. Attended WAS AT
67. Tennyson’s “__ Arden” ENOCH
69. Runs FLEES
71. __ Nast CONDE
74. LAX listing ETD
75. Makes a poor stroke MISCUES
77. Pledge OATH
78. Shopper’s indulgence SPREE
80. Nabokov title professor PNIN
84. “Uh-huh” I SEE
86. Business __ TRIP
88. 1999 Ron Howard film EDTV
90. Exhaust OVERTIRE
91. Sunburn color RED
92. Farm structure STY
95. One, to Juanita UNA
96. Singers’ reality show, with “The” VOICE
98. Intelligence BRAINS
99. Weasel out RENEGE
102. Devour EAT UP
103. “In bad company,” to Bierce ALONE
104. First __: Shakespeare collection FOLIO
105. Intelligence SAVVY
106. Paper bundle SHEAF
108. Dieter’s count CARBS
109. Indian state ASSAM
111. Former golf announcer Dave MARR
113. Violist’s direction ARCO
115. MGM co-founder LOEW
116. Extremes ENDS
118. Doctor of music? DRE
119. Résumés, briefly, and a hint to this puzzle’s eight longest answers CVS
120. Texas resource OIL
121. Bug VEX

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LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Nov 14, Saturday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Chen
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 14m 47s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. It’s a bluff SCARP
A scarp is a steep slope or a line of cliffs, especially one created by erosion. An alternative name is an escarpment.

14. Kit and kaboodle TOTAL
In the idiomatic expression “the whole kit and caboodle”, caboodle (sometimes spelled “kaboodle”) is an informal term for a bunch of people, or sometimes the “the whole lot”.

15. She plays Jackie on “Nurse Jackie” EDIE
“Nurse Jackie” is a comedy-drama series centered on an emergency room nurse at a hospital in New York City. The lead character is played by Edie Falco, who also played Tony Soprano’s wife on the “The Sopranos”.

16. “99 Luftballons” band NENA
Nena is a German singer (“Nena” became the name of her band as well) who had a big hit with one of my favorite songs of the eighties “99 Luftballons”. The English translation of the German title (“99 Red Balloons”) isn’t literal, with the color “red” added just so that the title had the right number of syllables for the tune. “Luftballon” is the name given to a child’s toy balloon in German.

17. Taqueria adjective ASADA
“Carne Asada” translates from Spanish as “roasted meat”.

20. Six-Day War setting SINAI
The Six-Day War took place from June 5th to June 10th, 1967, and was fought between Israel and its neighbors Egypt, Jordan and Syria. By the time the ceasefire was signed, Israel had seized huge swaths of land formerly controlled by Arab states, namely the Gaza Strip, the Sinai Peninsula, the West Bank of the Jordan River and the Golan Heights. The overall territory under the control of Israel grew by a factor of three in just six days.

21. Target, say MEGASTORE
Target Corporation was founded by George Draper Dayton in 1902 in Minneapolis, Minnesota as Dayton Dry Goods Company. Dayton developed into a department store, and the company opened up a discount store chain in 1962, calling it Target. Today Target is the second-largest discount retailer in the country, after Walmart.

22. Prince Valiant’s heir apparent ARN
“Prince Valiant” is a comic strip that first appeared in 1937 when it was created by Hal Foster. Edward, Duke of Windsor called the “Prince Valiant” comic strip the “greatest contribution to English literature in the past one hundred years”. I’m not so sure …

23. Beat on “Survivor” OUTLASTED
The reality show “Survivor” is based on a Swedish television series created in 1997 called “Expedition Robinson”.

24. Superstitious admonition DON’T JINX IT
A jinx is a charm or a spell, and the word “jinx” comes from an older word “jyng” from the 17th-century. A “jyng” was another word for the wryneck, a type of bird much used in witchcraft.

28. Crushed, as a spice PESTLED
I’ve always loved the sound of the words “mortar” and “pestle”, ever since I was first introduced to them in the chemistry lab. The Romans called a receptacle for pounding or grinding things a “mortarium”, giving us “mortar”. Mortarium was also the word for the product of pounding and grinding, which gives us our “mortar” that’s used with bricks to build a wall. And further, short stubby cannons used in the 16th century resembled a grinding bowl and so were called “mortars”, which evolved into our contemporary weapon of the same name. As far as the pestle is concerned, it is also derived from its Latin name “pistillum”, which comes from the word for “crush”.

48. First name in rap TUPAC
Rapper Tupac Amaru Shakur adopted the inventive stage name “2Pac”. He was a hard man, spending eleven months in prison for sexual assault. At only 25 years of age he was killed in a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas.

51. “Sleepy Hollow” director TIM BURTON
Movie director and producer Tim Burton makes my least favorite types of movie: dark, gothic, horror fantasies. The list of his titles includes “Edward Scissorhands”, “Sleepy Hollow”, “Sweeney Todd”, “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” and “Alice in Wonderland”. Also included in each of these movies is Johnny Depp in a starring role, as Depp and Burton are good friends and frequent collaborators. Another frequent star in Burton movies is English actress Helena Bonham Carter, who has been his domestic partner since 2001.

“Sleepy Hollow” is a Tim Burton film released in 1999. It is a screen adaptation of the short story “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Washington Irving. Stars of the film are Johnny Depp and Christina Ricci.

52. One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” IRINA
Olga, Masha and Irina were the “Three Sisters” in the play by Anton Chekhov. The three title characters were inspired by the three Brontë sisters, the English authors.

Anton Chekhov was a Russian writer of short stories and a playwright, as well as a physician. He wrote four classic plays that are often performed all around the world, namely “The Seagull”, “Uncle Vanya”, “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard”. All the time Chekhov was writing, he continued to practice medicine. He is quoted as saying “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”

53. Abbr. for the nameless? ET AL
Et alii (et al.) is the equivalent of et cetera (etc.), with et cetera being used in place of a list of objects, and et alii used for a list of names. In fact “et al.” can stand for et alii (for a group of males, or males and females), aliae (for a group of women) and et alia (for a group of neuter nouns, or for a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

54. Rocky heights TORS
A tor is a high rocky hill. “Tor” comes from the Old English “torr”, the word for a tower or rock, which in turn comes from the Old Welsh “twrr” meaning a heap or a pile.

57. Weapon of yore SNEE
“Snick or snee” is the name given to cut and thrust while fighting with a knife. The phrase is rooted in a pair of Dutch words and it gave its name to a “snee”, a light sword-like knife.

58. “Grumpy Old Men” actor Davis OSSIE
Ossie Davis was a very successful African-American actor, but also a director, poet, playwright and social activist. One of Davis’s better known performances was in the 1993 movie “Grumpy Old Men”, in which he played the owner of the bait shop by the lake.

“Grumpy Old Men” is a wonderful romantic comedy film from 1993 starring the great actors Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau and Ann-Margret along with an excellent supporting cast. “Grumpy Old Man” was the sixth on-screen collaboration between Lemmon and Matthau, but the first in over a decade.

Down
1. King’s Cross and others: Abbr. STAS
King’s Cross is a large railway station in London that first opened for business in 1852. The station is named for King’s Cross, the area of the city in which it is located. In turn, the King’s Cross area takes its name from a monument to King George IV that no longer exists. The station is well-known to many young people around the world as it is from King’s Cross that the Hogwarts Express departs (from the secret platform 9¾) in the “Harry Potter” series of books.

2. Mozart title starter COSI
Mozart’s comic opera “Così fan tutte” is also known in English as “The School for Lovers”. The literal translation of the opera’s title is “Thus do all (women)”, or “Women are like that”.

4. Gun site RADAR TRAP
Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called Radio Detection And Ranging, which was shortened to the acronym RADAR.

6. Last of an annual trio BELMONT
The Belmont Stakes is a horse race held in June each year, at Belmont Park racetrack in Elmont, New York. The Belmont is the last of the US Triple Crown races, following the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness.

7. Ciao relatives ADIEUX
“Adieu” is the French for “goodbye” or “farewell”, from “à Dieu” meaning “to God”. The plural of “adieu” is “adieux”.

“Ciao” is Italian for “‘bye”. “Arrivederci” is more formal, and translates better as “goodbye”.

8. Certain brogue WINGTIP
A brogue is more commonly called a wingtip here in the US, I think. The shoe design originated in Ireland and Scotland, and “brog” the Irish word (and similar Scottish word) for shoe gives rise to the name. The brogue/wingtip design includes decorative perforations in the leather uppers. The toe cap of a brogue curves back in a shape that suggest the tip of a brid’s wing, hence the alternative name.

11. Inebriate BESOT
Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning a fool. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

12. Between, to Berlioz ENTRE
Hector Berlioz was a French composer active in the Romantic period. Berlioz’s most famous work is probably his “Symphonie fantastique”.

13. Extremely shocked? TASED
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called “Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle”. The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym TASER stands for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle”.

19. World Cup chant USA!
The 1994 FIFA World Cup was held in the US, with nine cities across the country acting as host. The average attendance at the games was about 69,000, which set a record for a FIFA World Cup that persists to this day. Brazil won the tournament, beating Italy in a penalty shootout.

24. Key of Pachelbel’s Canon: Abbr. D MAJ
Johann Pachelbel was a composer from Germany active in the Baroque Era. Pachelbel’s music was very popular during his own lifetime, and today his best-known work is his “Canon in D”. which has become one of the most popular choices during modern wedding ceremonies.

25. River through northern France OISE
The River Oise rises in Belgium and joins up with the River Seine just outside Paris.

29. Like-minded SIMPATICO
Someone described as “simpatico” is likable, or like-minded. The term comes into English via Spanish or Italian from the Latin “sympathia” meaning “community of feeling”.

31. Vital components LINCHPINS
A linchpin is a clip or fastener that is used on the end of an axle to prevent a wheel from sliding off. The term is also used figuratively to describe anything that is a vital element in a system.

37. Used to buy SPENT ON
My money was used to buy, was spent on …

40. Request for more ENCORE
“Encore” is French for “again, one more time”, and is a shout that an audience member will make here in North America to request another song, say. But, the term is not used this way in France. Rather, the audience will shout “Bis!” instead, which is the Italian for “twice!”

41. Pittances MITES
A mite is a small amount, as in “the widow’s mite”, the story from the Bible.

42. Jazz singer O’Day ANITA
Anita O’Day was the stage name of the jazz singer Anita Colton. O’Day had problems with heroin and alcohol addiction leading to erratic behavior and earning her the nickname “The Jezebel of Jazz”.

43. “Cold Mountain” hero INMAN
The novel “Cold Mountain” was written in 1997 by Charles Frazier. It’s the tale of a deserter in the Civil War named W. P. Inman and his trek home to his beloved Ada Monroe, who is living the rural community of Cold Mountain in North Carolina. The plot has been compared with Homer’s “The Odyssey”, which tells of the long journey home of Odysseus to Ithaca after the Trojan War. In the 2003 film adaptation of the same name, Ada Monroe is played by Nicole Kidman, and Inman is played by Jude Law.

45. Coin first minted under Louis IX ECU
The ecu is an Old French coin. When introduced in 1640, the ecu was worth three livres (an older coin, called a “pound” in English). The word “ecu” comes from the Latin “scutum” meaning “shield”. The original ecu had a coat of arms on it, a shield.

Louis IX was the King of France from 1226 until 1270. Louis IX is the only king of France to have been made a saint. This Saint Louis was the man who gave his name to the city of St. Louis, Missouri.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. It’s a bluff SCARP
6. Let it all out, perhaps BAWL
10. “Yeah, what-evs” I BET
14. Kit and kaboodle TOTAL
15. She plays Jackie on “Nurse Jackie” EDIE
16. “99 Luftballons” band NENA
17. Taqueria adjective ASADA
18. Tongue specialists? LINGUISTS
20. Six-Day War setting SINAI
21. Target, say MEGASTORE
22. Prince Valiant’s heir apparent ARN
23. Beat on “Survivor” OUTLASTED
24. Superstitious admonition DON’T JINX IT
27. Laborer on the move MIGRANT
28. Crushed, as a spice PESTLED
34. Obliquely ASLANT
35. Without serious consideration AIRILY
36. “Yikes!” JEEPERS!
38. Considerable IMMENSE
39. Undeveloped areas OPEN SPACES
41. Title bout, say MAIN EVENT
46. Reminder of an old flame? ASH
47. Purity INNOCENCE
48. First name in rap TUPAC
51. “Sleepy Hollow” director TIM BURTON
52. One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” IRINA
53. Abbr. for the nameless? ET AL
54. Rocky heights TORS
55. Small change CENTS
56. Judicious SANE
57. Weapon of yore SNEE
58. “Grumpy Old Men” actor Davis OSSIE

Down
1. King’s Cross and others: Abbr. STAS
2. Mozart title starter COSI
3. Obliquely AT AN ANGLE
4. Gun site RADAR TRAP
5. Easy-to-miss miss PLAIN JANE
6. Last of an annual trio BELMONT
7. Ciao relatives ADIEUX
8. Certain brogue WINGTIP
9. Court groups LEGAL TEAMS
10. 19-Down, e.g.: Abbr. INITS
11. Inebriate BESOT
12. Between, to Berlioz ENTRE
13. Extremely shocked? TASED
19. World Cup chant USA!
24. Key of Pachelbel’s Canon: Abbr. D MAJ
25. River through northern France OISE
26. Ones who are retiring INTROVERTS
29. Like-minded SIMPATICO
30. Cherishes TREASURES
31. Vital components LINCHPINS
32. Conditional word ELSE
33. Turns red, perhaps DYES
37. Used to buy SPENT ON
38. Pungent, for example INTENSE
40. Request for more ENCORE
41. Pittances MITES
42. Jazz singer O’Day ANITA
43. “Cold Mountain” hero INMAN
44. Lofty NOBLE
45. Coin first minted under Louis IX ECU
49. Against ANTI
50. Court event CASE

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