LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Feb 15, Saturday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Barry C. Silk
THEME: None
BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 13m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1934) actor PETER LORRE
The marvelous actor Peter Lorre was born in what is now modern-day Slovakia. Lorre’s real name was Laszlo Lowenstein. He started acting in Vienna when he was quite young, only 17 years old. When Hitler came to power, the Jewish Lowenstein headed to Paris and then London, eventually ending up in Hollywood. Lorre found himself typecast as the wicked foreigner in American movies, but I think he sneered and snarled his way to the bank.

Alfred Hitchcock made two versions of the film “The Man Who Knew Too Much”. The first was made in 1934 while Hitchcock still lived in England. It starred Leslie Banks, Edna Best and Peter Lorre in his first English-speaking role. Hitchcock remade the original in 1956, with James Stewart and Doris Day playing the leads. And by the way, in that movie Doris Day sang the Oscar-winning song “Que Sera, Sera”.

16. NASA unit ONE G
The force of gravity that we all feel is referred to as “one G”. As gravity is a actually an accelerating force, acceleration is measured relative to that force of gravity. So, if we are sitting in a vehicle that accelerates at 3G, then we are experiencing a force that is three times that which we feel from the gravitational pull of the earth. Zero-G is weightlessness that is experienced when in space, outside the influence of the earth’s gravity.

18. Pigmented layer UVEA
The uvea is the middle of the three layers that make up the eyeball.

19. Takeout menu eponym TSO
General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

An eponym is a name for something derived from the name of a person, as in the “sandwich” named for the Earl of Sandwich.

21. 1954 Detroit Auto Show unveiling T-BIRD
Ford manufactured the Thunderbird (T-Bird) from 1955 to 2005, originally as a two-seater sporty convertible. The T-Bird was introduced as a competitor to Chevrolet’s new sports car, the Corvette.

22. Battery, e.g. TORT
The word “tort” is a French word meaning “mischief, injury or wrong”. Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

“Battery” is intentional contact with another person that is deemed to be either harmful or offensive. The related “assault” is the act of creating apprehension that such harmful or offensive contact is imminent.

23. Ride and Brown SALLYS
Sally Ride was a physicist and astronaut, who flew two missions on the space shuttle Challenger. In 1983, she became the first American woman in space, having been preceded by two female cosmonauts (in 1963 and 1982). Ride was 32 years on that first mission, making her the youngest astronaut ever to make it into space. In another first, Ride was the first LGBT astronaut, a fact that was revealed after her death in 2012.

24. Maker of Neo soft drinks RC COLA
Neo is a cola drink that RC Cola introduced in 2013. Neo is marketed as a relatively low calorie coal beverage, with no artificial sweeteners.

27. Capital NNE of Rome ZAGREB
Zagreb is the capital city of the European Republic of Croatia. Zagreb became the capital of Croatia after the dissolution of Yugoslavia.

33. Noggin BEAN
A slang term for a “head” might be “bean” or “noggin”.

34. Chain with a red cowboy hat logo ARBY’S
The Arby’s chain of fast food restaurants was founded in 1964 by two brothers, Forrest and Leroy Raffel. The name “Arby’s” is a homonym of “RB’s”, standing for “Raffel Brothers”.

35. __ Raven: Baltimore neighborhood LOCH
The Baltimore neighborhood of Loch Raven was named for the Loch Raven reservoir that was constructed in 1914 to increase the water supply to the city.

39. Sequoia Park Zoo home EUREKA
Sequoia Park Zoo in Eureka, California was founded in 1907, making it the oldest zoo in the whole state. The zoo picked up a lot of bad press in the 1980s when the people of Eureka raised funds to replace the cramped bear cages with a more humane habitat. During construction, the zoo had nowhere to place the two adults and two young bears while the new home was being built. The zoo’s manager had the two adults euthanized, to the outrage of the public. The two young bears were rescued and taken to an animal park in Oregon, and there was a lot of apologizing by city officials.

41. Actress who starred in two Hitchcock films HEDREN
Tippi Hedren is an actress from New Ulm, Minnesota who is best known for her starring roles in two Alfred Hitchcock classics: “The Birds” (1963) and “Marnie” (1964). Famously, Hedren claimed that Hitchcock destroyed her movie career because she would not succumb to his sexual advances, a charge that has been denied. The story was the subject of the 2012 HBO drama called “The Girl”, which in turn was based on a 2009 Donald Spoto book called “Spellbound by Beauty: Alfred Hitchcock and His Leading Ladies”.

44. Garibaldi’s wife ANITA
Anita Garibaldi was the revolutionary comrade and wife of Italian general and politician Giuseppe Garibaldi. Giuseppe was fighting on behalf of a separatist republic in southern Brazil when he met Anita, a Brazilian native. The two fought side by side in South America, before journeying to Italy to participate in the revolutions of 1848. Anita died the following year from malaria.

45. Tons SCADS
The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear, although back in the mid-1800s “scads” was used to mean “dollars”.

47. “Criminal Minds” network CBS
“Criminal Minds” is a police drama that has aired on CBS since 2005. I haven’t seen this one …

50. Spanish address DONA
In Spain, a title of respect for men is “Don”. The equivalent female title is “Dona”.

53. When the ghost of Hamlet’s father first appears ACT I
In William Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet”, the title character is the Prince of Denmark. The prince’s father is also a character in the play, who makes three appearances as a ghost. The ghost has the same name as the prince, but is referred to as King Hamlet in order to distinguish him from the son.

56. What “D” may mean, monetarily DENVER MINT
The Denver Mint opened up for business in 1906, and today produces more coins than any other mint in the whole world.

Mint marks are inscribed on coins to indicate where the coin was minted. In the US, the current mint marks are:

– “P” for the Philadelphia Mint
– “D” for the Denver Mint
– “S” for the San Francisco Mint
– “W” for the West Point Mint

Down
2. They may be filled from wells PENS
Ink pens may be filled from inkwells. When I was at school, our desks had inkwells that I occasionally used. We used to write sometimes with ink pens that we’d dip into the inkwell. They really made a mess. A favorite trick amongst the boys was to dip the end of a girls’ plated hair in the inkwell

3. Mort Walker dog OTTO
Sgt. Snorkel (“Sarge”) is Beetle Bailey’s nemesis in the cartoon strip that bears his name. Snorkel has a dog called Otto that he dresses up to look just like himself. Otto started off as a regular dog, but artist Mort Walker decide to draw him more like his owner, and soon Otto became a big hit.

4. Bk. about the rebuilding of Jerusalem’s walls NEH
In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Ezra was originally combined with the Book of Nehemiah, with the two being separated in the early days of the Christian Era.

6. Where Mark Twain married Olivia Langdon ELMIRA
Elmira is a city in the southern tier of New York State located closed close to the border with Pennsylvania. Elmira was also the family home of Olivia Langdon, wife of Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain). Mark Twain and family are buried in Elmira’s Woodlawn Cemetery.

8. “A-Hunting We Will Go” songwriter ARNE
“A-Hunting We Will Go” is a song by Thomas Arne that the composer penned for a 1777 production of “The Beggar’s Opera”. I grew up with this song, as it is a popular nursery rhyme on the other side of the pond …

A-hunting we will go, a-hunting we will go
(Heigh-ho, the derry-o, a-hunting we will go
A-hunting we will go, a-hunting we will go)
We’ll catch a fox and put him in a box
And then we’ll let him go

9. Marne modifier TRES
“Très” is French for “very”.

Marne is a department in the northeast of France that is named for the river Marne that runs through it. One of the famous locales within Marne is Champagne, home to the vineyards that produce the famous sparkling wine.

11. Mouse action DOUBLE CLICK
The first computer mouse was invented at the Stanford Research Institute in 1963, by one Douglas Engelbart. Sadly for him, his patent ran out before mice became standard equipment on computers, so he never made any money from his amazing invention.

21. Fictional house “built according to no architectural plan whatever” TARA
Rhett Butler woos Scarlett O’Hara at the Tara plantation in Margaret Mitchell’s “Gone with the Wind”. Tara was founded by Scarlett’s father, Irish immigrant Gerald O’Hara. Gerald named his new abode after the Hill of Tara back in his home country, the ancient seat of the High King of Ireland. Rhett’s rival for the affections of Scarlet is Ashley Wilkes who lives at the nearby Twelve Oaks plantation.

22. Hitchcock thriller set in East Germany TORN CURTAIN
“Torn Curtain” is a marvelous Alfred Hitchcock thriller from 1966 starring Paul Newman and Julie Andrews. It’s a political/spy story set against the backdrop of the Cold War. This was Hitchcock’s fiftieth film, and apparently was fraught will all sorts of difficulties. Newman and Andrews were big stars at the time of shooting and were cast on the insistence of the studio, despite the director’s misgivings. Method actor Paul Newman clashed with Hitchcock when he was trying to establish his character’s motivation. Hitch informed his leading man that the “motivation is your salary”.

23. Friday et al.: Abbr. SGTS
Jack Webb played Sergeant Joe Friday on “Dragnet” on both TV and radio … and what a voice he had! Off the screen Webb was a lover of jazz, and he played the cornet. It was within the world of jazz that he met and fell in love with Julie London, the famous singer with “the smoky voice”. The couple married and had two kids together.

24. Name in Virginia politics ROBB
Chuck Robb is a former Governor of Virginia and former US Senator. Robb is married to Lynda Bird Johnson Robb, the daughter of former President Lyndon B. Johnson. The couple were married in the White House in December 1967.

25. Singer Laine CLEO
Cleo Laine is a jazz singer from England who is noted for her remarkable range of nearly four octaves. Laine is the only female performer to have received Grammy nominations in each of the classical, jazz and popular music categories. My favorite of her recordings is “He Was Beautiful”, which is also known as “Cavatina” and is a version of the theme from the film “The Deer Hunter”.

27. Barking horse relative ZEBRA
Zebras communicate with each other by whinnying and “barking”, which is similar to braying.

28. “The Cherry Orchard” daughter ANYA
“The Cherry Orchard” was Anton Chekhov’s last play. Chekhov wrote the play as a comedy, but when it was first staged in Moscow in 1904 it was directed as a tragedy!

31. Neutral color ECRU
The shade called ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

40. “___ X” MADAME
“Madame X” is a powerful 1966 drama film that is based on the 1908 play by Alexandre Bisson. The title character is played by Lana Turner, and is a tragic figure who has to abandon her husband and young son. There’s a “twist” in this movie that reveals itself in a courtroom scene, a twist that always brings a lump to my throat …

42. Methuselah’s father ENOCH
Enoch was the great-grandfather of Noah, and the great-grandson of Adam.

Methuselah was the son of Enoch and the grandfather of Noah, and the man in the Bible who is reported to have lived the longest. Methuselah passed away seven days before the onset of the Great Flood, and tradition holds that he was 969 years old when he died.

43. Comedian Smirnoff YAKOV
The Ukrainian-born comedian Yakov Pokhis is better known by his stage name, Yakov Smirnoff. Smirnoff was popular on television in the eighties, playing comedic roles with a thick Russian accent. He is a smart cookie, and holds a master’s degree in positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.

45. Acoustical unit SONE
In the acoustic world, the “sone” was introduced as a unit of perceived loudness in 1936.

46. Columbia Pictures co-founder Harry COHN
Columbia Pictures was founded in 1919 as Cohn-Brandt-Cohn Film Sales, by brothers Jack and Harry Cohn, and Joe Brandt. The name was changed to Columbia Pictures in 1924 when the company went public. The Columbia name became closely associated with the wonderful Hollywood screwball comedies of the thirties, thanks to the association with director Frank Capra, and stars like Jean Arthur and Cary Grant.

47. Masala __: Indian beverage CHAI
Masala chai is an Indian drink made with black tea (the “chai) and mixed spices (the “masala”).

49. Proof mark STET
“Stet” is a Latin word meaning “let it stand”. In editorial work, the typesetter is instructed to disregard any change previously marked by writing the word “stet” and then underscoring that change with a line of dots or dashes.

52. “__ Underground”: cult film showcase TCM
“TCM Underground” is a weekly spot on the Turner Classic Movies channel used for the airing of “cult classics”. I rarely have anything good to say about the films shown, especially as they are mainly horror films. But, I do love TCM otherwise …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Shower alternative SPONGE BATH
11. Hollow DALE
15. “The Man Who Knew Too Much” (1934) actor PETER LORRE
16. NASA unit ONE G
17. Correct ON THE MONEY
18. Pigmented layer UVEA
19. Takeout menu eponym TSO
20. Smartens (up) WISES
21. 1954 Detroit Auto Show unveiling T-BIRD
22. Battery, e.g. TORT
23. Ride and Brown SALLYS
24. Maker of Neo soft drinks RC COLA
27. Capital NNE of Rome ZAGREB
29. Prayer opening O, LORD
30. Feelers TENTACLES
33. Noggin BEAN
34. Chain with a red cowboy hat logo ARBY’S
35. __ Raven: Baltimore neighborhood LOCH
36. Square shooter? BOX CAMERA
38. Very small MICRO
39. Sequoia Park Zoo home EUREKA
40. Teaching model MOCK-UP
41. Actress who starred in two Hitchcock films HEDREN
43. Jerk YANK
44. Garibaldi’s wife ANITA
45. Tons SCADS
47. “Criminal Minds” network CBS
50. Spanish address DONA
51. Pointer’s cry LOOK AT THAT!
53. When the ghost of Hamlet’s father first appears ACT I
54. Nanny’s service IN-HOME CARE
55. Fund-raising suffix -THON
56. What “D” may mean, monetarily DENVER MINT

Down
1. Tough __ SPOT
2. They may be filled from wells PENS
3. Mort Walker dog OTTO
4. Bk. about the rebuilding of Jerusalem’s walls NEH
5. Aged GREW OLD
6. Where Mark Twain married Olivia Langdon ELMIRA
7. Amplify BOOST
8. “A-Hunting We Will Go” songwriter ARNE
9. Marne modifier TRES
10. “Yo!” HEY!
11. Mouse action DOUBLE CLICK
12. Metal-bending aid ANVIL BLOCK
13. Distrustful LEERY
14. “Tarnation!” EGADS!
21. Fictional house “built according to no architectural plan whatever” TARA
22. Hitchcock thriller set in East Germany TORN CURTAIN
23. Friday et al.: Abbr. SGTS
24. Name in Virginia politics ROBB
25. Singer Laine CLEO
26. Gently convinced about COAXED INTO
27. Barking horse relative ZEBRA
28. “The Cherry Orchard” daughter ANYA
30. Go a long way TREK
31. Neutral color ECRU
32. Look for a good deal SHOP
34. “Yes!” AMEN!
37. Region AREA
38. Ginormous MONSTER
40. “___ X” MADAME
41. Charged HAD AT
42. Methuselah’s father ENOCH
43. Comedian Smirnoff YAKOV
45. Acoustical unit SONE
46. Columbia Pictures co-founder Harry COHN
47. Masala __: Indian beverage CHAI
48. Building with big doors BARN
49. Proof mark STET
51. Top LID
52. “__ Underground”: cult film showcase TCM

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LA Times Crossword Answers 27 Feb 15, Friday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: John Farmer
THEME: Shows Up … each of today’s themed answers are in the down-direction, and contain a hidden word shown with the circled letters in my grid. That word is the name of a SHOW on television, and is written in the UP-direction:

2D. Bit of deception HOCUS POCUS (“Cops” shows up)
8D. Realization often preceded by “Whew!” IT WAS ALL A DREAM (“Dallas” shows up)
13D. Rodgers and Hart title lyric that precedes “I get no dizzy spells” THIS CAN’T BE LOVE (“CSI” shows up)
20D. James Brown memoir I FEEL GOOD (“Glee” shows up)
29D. One way to lighten the mood CRACK A JOKE (“Kojak” shows up)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 17m 36s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Ophidian menace ASP
In the animal kingdom, the group of reptiles known as snakes (and snake-like lizards) are called “ophidians”. “Ophi” is the Greek word for “serpent”.

8. Brightness stats IQS
Although it is correct these days to say that the abbreviation IQ stands for “intelligence quotient”, the term was actually coined by German psychologist William Stern, so it actually is an abbreviation for the German “Intelligenz-Quotient”.

14. Frat letter RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”.

15. Son of Akhenaten TUT
King Tut is a name commonly used for the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen. Tutankhamen may not have been the most significant of the pharaohs historically, but he is the most famous today largely because of the discovery of his nearly intact tomb in 1922 by Howard Carter. Prior to this find, any Egyptian tombs uncovered by archaeologists had been ravaged by grave robbers. Tutankhamen’s magnificent burial mask is one of the most recognizable of all Egyptian artifacts.

17. Battle of Khafji conflict GULF WAR
The Gulf War was a response to Iraq’s invasion and annexation of Kuwait. The first major ground engagement of the conflict was the Battle Khafji. Saddam ordered his troops to invade Saudi Arabia from Kuwait, resulting in a brief Iraqi occupation of the Saudi city of Khafji. Coalition air and ground forces regained control of the city after just one night.

19. “Battle it out” quintet AEIOU
The phrase “battle it out” is unusual in that it contains the vowels AEIOU, all in alphabetical order.

20. Plasma particle ION
A plasma lamp is a light source that generates light by exciting a plasma inside a glass container, using radio waves to create the plasma of ionized particles.

21. Loafer’s lack LACE
The type of slip-on shoe called a “loafer” dates back to 1939. “Loafer” was originally a brand name introduced by the Fortnum and Mason’s store in London.

23. Pro shop supplies SHAFTS
A pro show might carry a supply of shafts for golf clubs.

26. Opposite of bids ASKS
In the world of securities trading, the “ask price” is the price that a seller states he or she is willing to accept in a transaction. The “bid price” is the highest price that a buyer is willing to pay.

27. Kool-Aid alternative HI-C
Hi-C orange drink was created in 1946, and introduced to the market in 1948, initially in the south of the country. The name Hi-C was chosen to emphasize the high vitamin C content in the drink, as it contained added ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

The drink we know today as Kool-Aid was invented by Edward Perkins and his wife, in Perkins’ mother’s kitchen in southwest Nebraska. Kool-Aid is now the Official Soft Drink of the state.

28. “__ Eterno”: 2004 sports documentary PELE
“Pelé Eterno” is Portuguese for “Pele Forever”, and is the title of a 2004 documentary about the Brazilian soccer star Pelé.

Pelé is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name Pelé for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world’s greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been part of three World Cup winning squads, and is a national treasure in his native Brazil.

30. Detergent with Oxi Booster ERA
Era was the first liquid laundry detergent produced by Procter & Gamble.

31. Bone: Pref. OSTE-
The Greek word for “bone” is “osteon”.

32. “Seasons in the Sun” songwriter BREL
Jacques Brel was a songwriter from Belgium whose songs were most popular in France, although English translations of his works became hits for artists all around the world. One of the more famous English translations was for the song “Season in the Sun”, a big hit in 1974 for Canadian singer Terry Jacks.

33. Dot on an MTA map STN
Station (stn.)

The MTA is the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which has public transportation responsibility in the state of New York (as well as part of Connecticut). MTA might also refer to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which is known as the Metro and sometimes the MTA.

34. “Love in the Time of __”: García Márquez work CHOLERA
“Love in the Time of Cholera” (“El amor en los tiempos del cólera” in the original Spanish) is a 1985 novel by Colombian author Gabriel Garcia Márquez. The book was first published in English in 1988. A famous Hollywood movie version came out in 2007, although it was widely panned by the critics as a poor adaptation of a great novel.

36. ICU staffer LPN
A licensed practical nurse (LPN) might work in an intensive care unit (ICU).

41. Former car-financing org. GMAC
GMAC is short for General Motors Acceptance Corporation. General Motors has only a small stake in GMAC now, and indeed the name has been officially changed to Ally Bank. You and me, we are the biggest shareholders in GMAC/Ally today, since the US government gave the bank $12.5 billion to bail it out in 2008-2009.

45. Rooting sound OINK
The verb “to root” can be used for a pig’s action with the snout, turning objects over.

48. Title girl in a 1965 #1 hit RHONDA
“Help Me, Rhonda” is a Beach Boys hit written by Brian Wilson and Mike Love, released in 1965. When the song was first issued as a track on the album “Today!”, the song was titled “Help Me, Ronda” (note the spelling of “Ronda”). When the song was released as a single a month later, the title used the spelling with which we are familiar: “Help Me, Rhonda”.

50. Sushi topper ROE
Sushi is a Japanese dish that has as its primary ingredient cooked, vinegared rice. The rice is usually topped with something, most often fish, and can be served in seaweed rolls. If you want raw fish by itself, then you have to order “sashimi”.

51. Mall draw SALE
Surprisingly, our word “mall”, meaning “shady walk” or “enclosed shopping space”, comes from the Italian for “mallet”. All of our shopping-style malls are named for “The Mall” in St. James’s Park in London. This tree-lined promenade was so called as it used to a famous spot to play the croquet-like game called “pall-mall”. The game derived its name from the Italian for ball (palla) and mallet “maglio”. The London thoroughfare called the Mall still exists, at one end of which is Buckingham Palace. Indeed, parallel to the Mall is a street called Pall Mall.

52. Sci-fi suffix -OID
The “-oid” suffix indicates “having a similar shape”, from the Greek “eidos” meaning “shape”. So, something described as ellipsoid resembles an ellipse, for example. The term “android” is often used to describe a robot, as the Greek prefix “andro-) translates as a “human”.

59. Brief facilities? LAV
Our word “lavatory” originally referred to a washbasin, and comes from the Latin “lavatorium”, a place for washing. In the 1600s a “lavatory” came to mean a washroom, and in the 1920s a toilet.

61. Early Alaskans ESKIMOS
Although still used in the US, the term “Eskimo” tends to be avoided in Canada and Greenland as there it is considered pejorative.

63. Year abroad ANO
In Spanish, a year (año) starts in January (enero) and ends in December (diciembre).

Down
1. The Police, most of the time TRIO
Apparently back in the seventies, the Police were briefly a four-member band.

The Police was a trio formed in London in 1977, with Sting being the most famous member and the lead singer. The band’s long list of hits includes “Roxanne” (1977), “Message in a Bottle” (1979), “Walking on the Moon” (1979) and “Every Breath You Take” (1983). The Police broke up in 1986, but their reunion tour of 2007/2008 made them the world’s highest-earning musicians for the year 2008.

2. Bit of deception HOCUS POCUS
There appears to be a lot of speculation about the origin of the magician’s phrase “hocus pocus”, but nothing stands out to me as being very clear.

3. A, in Argentina UNA
Argentina is the second largest country in South America (after Brazil), and geographically is the world’s largest Spanish-speaking nation. The name “Argentina” comes from the Latin “argentum”, the word for “silver”. It is thought that the name was given by the early Spanish and Portuguese conquerors who also named the Rio de la Plata (the “Silver River”). Those early explorers got hold of lots of silver objects that they found among the native population.

4. ISP option DSL
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP’s network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs.

5. Shoptalk ARGOT
“Argot” is a French term, the name given in the 17th century to “the jargon of the Paris underworld”. Nowadays argot is the set of idioms used by any particular group, the “lingo” of that group.

6. Treats as persona non grata SHUNS
A “persona non grata” (plural “personae non gratae”) is someone who is not welcome. The phrase is Latin for “an unacceptable person”.

7. D.C. figure POL
Politician (pol.)

9. Charlatans QUACKS
A “quack” is a person who pretends to have knowledge that he or she does not in fact possess. The term especially applies to someone fraudulently pretending to have medical skills. Our modern word is an abbreviation of “quacksalver”, an archaic term with Dutch roots that translates as “haker of salve”, Back in the Middle Ages, quacksalvers would shout out (quack) as they sold their pseudo-medical wares.

A charlatan is someone who makes false claims of skill or knowledge. It is a word we imported from French, although the original derivation is the Italian “ciarlatano”, the term for “a quack”.

13. Rodgers and Hart title lyric that precedes “I get no dizzy spells” THIS CAN’T BE LOVE
“This Can’t Be Love” is a 1938 show tune by from the musical “The Boys from Syracuse” by Rodgers and Hart.

20. James Brown memoir I FEEL GOOD
“I Feel Good: A Memoir of a Life of Soul” is a 2005 memoir by James Brown. The title is a reference to Brown’s 1965 hit song “I Got You (I Feel Good)”.

The singer James Brown was often referred to as “The Godfather of Soul” and sometimes “Mr. Dynamite”. He was born in Barnwell, South Carolina and had a rough and impoverished upbringing. He lived for some years in his aunt’s house which she ran as a brothel, and when he was sixteen he was convicted of armed robbery and was sent to reform school. While in reform school he was noticed by the R&B star Bobby Byrd, who took him under his wing. Byrd helped secure the young man an early release, and thereafter Brown turned his energies to music.

35. Key of Dvorák’s “New World Symphony”: Abbr. E MIN
Antonín Dvořák was a composer from Czechoslovakia who spent three years working and composing in the United States. He was the director of the National Conservatory of Music of America in New York from 1892 to 1895. Certainly here in the US, Dvořák’s best known work is his Symphony No. 9, “From the New World”, which is often referred to as the “New World Symphony”.

38. They can’t be beaten NEMESES
Nemesis was a Greek goddess, the goddess of retribution. Her role was to make pay those individuals who were either haughty or arrogant. In modern parlance, one’s nemesis (plural “nemeses”) is one’s sworn enemy, often someone who is the exact opposite in character but someone who still shares some important characteristics. A nemesis is often someone one cannot seem to beat in competition.

40. Get Wired again RENEW
“Wired” is a technology-focused magazine published since 1993 by Condé Nast in San Francisco.

43. Fight in the sticks RASSLE
“Rassle” is a slang word for “wrestle”.

44. Fred Astaire, by birth OMAHAN
Fred Astaire’s real name was Frederick Austerlitz. Fred was from Omaha, Nebraska and before he made it big in movies, he was one half of a celebrated music hall act with his sister Adele. The pair were particularly successful in the UK, and Adele ended up marrying into nobility in England, taking the name Lady Charles Cavendish.

48. President François Hollande’s birthplace ROUEN
Rouen is the major city in Normandy in northern France. During the days of Norman Britain, Rouen was one of the capitals of the Anglo-Norman dynasties. Rouen was also where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431.

François Hollande was elected President of France in 2012. During the election cycle in 2011, Hollande had been trailing in the polls, behind front-runner Dominique Strauss-Kahn. Hollande took over the lead following Strauss-Kahn’s arrest on New York City on suspicion of sexual assault.

49. Whale relative HIPPO
The name “hippopotamus” comes from the Greek for “river horse”. Hippos are the third largest land mammals, after elephants and rhinos. The closest living relatives to hippos don’t even live on land. They are the whales and porpoises of the oceans.

54. Bulldog fans ELIS
The Yale Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Yale University. The Yale school mascot is “Handsome Dan”, the Yale bulldog.

57. Brother of Jack and Bobby TED
Ted Kennedy was the youngest boy in the family that included his older brothers: Joseph Jr. (killed in action in WWII), John (assassinated) and Robert (assassinated). Ted went into the US Senate in 1962 in a special election held after his brother became US President. He remained in the Senate until he passed away in 2009, making Ted Kennedy the fourth-longest-serving Senator in history.

58. College Football Playoff champion crowned Jan. 12, 2015 OSU
The Ohio State Buckeyes defeated the Oregon Ducks in the 2015 College Football Playoff National Championship.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Fall follower? THUD
5. Ophidian menace ASP
8. Brightness stats IQS
11. Arts supporters PATRONS
14. Frat letter RHO
15. Akhenaten TUT
16. On the level ETHICAL
17. Battle of Khafji conflict GULF WAR
19. “Battle it out” quintet AEIOU
20. Plasma particle ION
21. Loafer’s lack LACE
22. Some audiobooks CDS
23. Pro shop supplies SHAFTS
26. Opposite of bids ASKS
27. Kool-Aid alternative HI-C
28. “__ Eterno”: 2004 sports documentary PELE
29. Boorish CRASS
30. Detergent with Oxi Booster ERA
31. Bone: Pref. OSTE-
32. “Seasons in the Sun” songwriter BREL
33. Dot on an MTA map STN
34. “Love in the Time of __”: García Márquez work CHOLERA
36. ICU staffer LPN
39. “Can’t argue with that!” TRUE!
41. Former car-financing org. GMAC
42. It may come after you ARE
43. Court attire ROBES
45. Rooting sound OINK
46. Hardly bright DIM
47. “Agreed!” AMEN!
48. Title girl in a 1965 #1 hit RHONDA
50. Sushi topper ROE
51. Mall draw SALE
52. Sci-fi suffix -OID
53. Signs of dissatisfaction JEERS
55. Appears … and the contents of this puzzle’s circles? SHOWS UP
57. “Missed your chance!” TOO LATE!
59. Brief facilities? LAV
60. Zing PEP
61. Early Alaskans ESKIMOS
62. Memphis-to-Nashville dir. ENE
63. Year abroad ANO
64. Payroll deduction, perhaps DUES

Down
1. The Police, most of the time TRIO
2. Bit of deception HOCUS POCUS
3. A, in Argentina UNA
4. ISP option DSL
5. Shoptalk ARGOT
6. Treats as persona non grata SHUNS
7. D.C. figure POL
8. Realization often preceded by “Whew!” IT WAS ALL A DREAM
9. Charlatans QUACKS
10. Hardly gloss over STRESS
11. Still-life subject PEACHES
12. Swallowed one’s pride ATE DIRT
13. Rodgers and Hart title lyric that precedes “I get no dizzy spells” THIS CAN’T BE LOVE
18. Roadside warning FLARE
20. James Brown memoir I FEEL GOOD
24. Inclusive pronoun HE/SHE
25. Quartet member ALTO
29. One way to lighten the mood CRACK A JOKE
32. Word before or after name BRAND
35. Key of Dvorák’s “New World Symphony”: Abbr. E MIN
37. Before PRIOR TO
38. They can’t be beaten NEMESES
40. Get Wired again RENEW
43. Fight in the sticks RASSLE
44. Fred Astaire, by birth OMAHAN
48. President François Hollande’s birthplace ROUEN
49. Whale relative HIPPO
54. Bulldog fans ELIS
56. Facial spot SPA
57. Brother of Jack and Bobby TED
58. College Football Playoff champion crowned Jan. 12, 2015 OSU

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