LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Jul 15, Friday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Kurt Krauss
THEME: Omnidirectional … today’s themed answers are in pairs, and contain a DIRECTIONAL word. One answer in each pair is read in one direction, and the other in the opposite direction. To help us out, the direction that we need to read the answers is included in that answer:

40A. Like the answers to eight starred clues … and a hint as to how to fill them in OMNIDIRECTIONAL

12A. *Ring punch RIGHT HOOK
19A. *Manhattan neighborhood EAST HARLEM
57A. *Liberia locale ACIRFA TSEW (reverses to “WEST AFRICA”)
68A. *Ring punch SSORC TFEL (reverses to “LEFT CROSS”)
4D. *Animated TV series set in the Rockies SOUTH PARK
9D. *Promising GNIMOC-DNA-PU (reverses to “UP-AND-COMING”)
23D. *Level-headed DOWN-TO-EARTH
38D. *Challenge to Eiger climbers ECAF HTRON (reverses to “NORTH FACE”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 9m 00s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

4. Star Wars, initially SDI
One of the positive outcomes of President Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI, also “Star Wars”) was a change in US defense strategy. The new approach was to use missiles to destroy incoming hostile weapons, rather than using missiles to destroy the nation attacking the country. The former doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction went by the apt acronym of MAD …

7. Go fishing ANGLE
We use the verb “to angle” to mean “to fish” because “angel” was an Old English word for a hook.

16. IQ test pioneer BINET
The first usable intelligence test was invented by a French psychologist named Alfred Binet. Binet collaborated with Théodore Simon and together they produced the Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale that is still in use today for IQ tests.

17. Start of the line before “Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead!” ET TU, BRUTE?
In William Shakespeare’s play “Julius Caesar”, Caesar is stabbed by a group of conspirators, with Brutus delivering the final blow. Caesar’s last words are “Et tu, Bruté?—Then fall, Caesar.” After Caesar dies, the conspirators celebrate. Cinna declares, “Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead! Run hence, proclaim, cry it about the streets.” After which, Cassius continues with “Some to the common pulpits, and cry out, ‘Liberty, freedom, and enfranchisement!’”

18. Bluebloods ELITE
The idiomatic phrase “blue blood” applies to someone of noble descent. The phrase is a translation from the Spanish “sangre azul”, which was applied to the royal family in Spain. The notion is that someone of noble birth does not have to work outdoors in the fields, and so has untanned skin. The veins showing in the skin had “blue blood”, whereas those veins were masked by the darker skin of the peasant classes.

19. *Manhattan neighborhood EAST HARLEM
The Manhattan district of Harlem is sometimes divided into Central Harlem, West Harlem and East Harlem. East Harlem is also known as Spanish Harlem.

21. 1965 Sophia Loren comedy LADY L
“Lady L” is a comedy film released in 1965 that stars Sophia Loren in the title role, appearing with Paul Newman and David Niven. Loren plays a the wife of a Bavarian prince. although she had humble beginnings in Corsica. Niven plays the prince, and Newman plays Lady L’s lover, the family’s chauffeur. The film was directed by the marvelous Peter Ustinov.

24. Gas sign in green letters HESS
The Hess Corporation is an oil company based in New York City. In 1964, the company started selling toy trucks with the Hess logo on them, in Hess gas stations. The company has been selling them every since, bringing out new models just before Christmas. Hess toy trucks have become quite collectible and the old ones can fetch a pretty penny.

25. Line of work: Abbr. OCC
Occupation (occ.)

29. Talladega unit LAP
The Talladega Superspeedway is the longest oval on the NASCAR circuit with a length of 2.66 miles. It also has seating for a whopping 175,000 spectators. The track opened in 1969, built on an abandoned airfield north of the city of Talladega, Alabama. The circuit is renowned for its supposed Talladega Jinx, which is said to have caused a number of accidents and incidents over the years. There has been a relatively high number of fatalities and crashes, including the death of driver Larry Smith in what was apparently a minor wreck, and the death of driver Davey Allison in a helicopter crash in the raceway’s infield. In another strange occurrence, driver Bobby Isaac left his car on the 90th lap of a race as he claims he heard voices that told him to park and get out of his vehicle.

31. Result of a 1955 merger AFL-CIO
The American Federation of Labor (AFL) was founded in 1886, making it one of the first federations of unions in the country. Over time the AFL became dominated by craft unions, unions representing skilled workers of particular disciplines. In the early thirties, John L. Lewis led a movement within the AFL to organize workers by industry, believing this would be more effective for the members. But the craft unions refused to budge, so Lewis set up a rival federation of unions in 1932, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO). The two federations became bitter rivals for over two decades until finally merging in 1955 to form the AFL-CIO.

43. Role for Dustin RATSO
Enrico Salvatore “Ratso” Rizzo is one of the characters in the groundbreaking 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy”. Rizzo is a down-and-out con man, played by Dustin Hoffman.

The 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy” is a Hollywood adaptation of a novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy. It’s a pretty depressing story about a young Texan (played by Jon Voight) who heads to New York City to make money as a hustler, hiring himself out to women for sex. Pretty soon the young man ends up selling his body for sex with males as well. Prior to release the MPAA gave the movie an R-rating, but the United Artists studio took advice and decided to release it with an X-rating. When “Midnight Cowboy” won the Best Picture Academy Award in 1969, it became the only X-rated film to be so honored.

44. “The Bridge on the River __” KWAI
The river referred to in the movie (and novel) “The Bridge on the River Kwai” is actually called the Khwae Yai River, and is in western Thailand. The original novel by Pierre Boulle was published in French in 1952, and the wonderful movie released in 1957. Both tell the story of construction of part of the Burma Railway and a bridge over the river, using prisoners of war as laborers. The film stars William Holden, Alec Guinness and Jack Hawkins.

45. Marquis de __ SADE
The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat with a reputation for a libertine lifestyle. De Sade was also a writer, well known for his works of erotica. He fell foul of the law for some of his more extreme practices and for blaspheming the Catholic church. On an off, de Sade spent 32 years of his life in prison and in insane asylums.

48. Fraud watchdog org. FTC
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) was established in 1914 with the mission of protecting consumers. The FTC runs the National Do Not Call Registry which can limit the amount of telemarketing calls that consumers receive. To register your number, simply go to the website www.donotcall.gov.

52. Ness, for one LOCH
Loch Lomond is one of the two most famous lakes in Scotland. Loch Ness is famous for its “monster”, and Loch Lomond is famous for the lovely song “The Bonnie Banks o’ Loch Lomond”. Oh, ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I’ll tak’ the low road …

55. Castro and others RAULS
Raul Castro is the younger brother of Fidel Castro. Raul has been President of Cuba since 2008, when Fidel stepped aside.

*Liberia locale ACIRFA TSEW (reverses to “WEST AFRICA”)
Liberia is a country in West Africa. The country was founded in 1847 by former American slaves who were repatriated to Africa. As a result, the Liberian flag resembles the US flag, and the country’s motto is “The love of liberty brought us here”.

61. Don Diego de la Vega, familiarly ZORRO
The character Zorro was created by Johnston McCulley in 1919 for a series of stories and pulp fiction, the first title being “The Curse of Capistrano”. The name “Zorro” is the secret identity of a Spanish colonial nobleman called Don Diego de la Vega.

67. The Bradford kids of ’70s-’80s TV, e.g. OCTET
“Eight Is Enough” is a comedy drama that originally ran from 1977 to 1981 on ABC. Star of the show was Dick Van Patten who played Tom Bradford, a newspaper columnist and father of eight children. The show was inspired by the real life situation of journalist Tom Braden who wrote a book called “Eight is Enough”. Braden co-hosted CNN’s “Crossfire” for ten years with Pat Buchanan and then Robert Novak.

69. Milo of “Barbarella” O’SHEA
Milo O’Shea was a great Irish character actor from Dublin who has appeared in everything from “Romeo and Juliet” to “The West Wing”. Sadly, O’Shea passed away in 2013, in New York City.

“Barbarella” is a cult classic 1968 film that was directed by Roger Vadim. Vadim’s wife at the time was Jane Fonda, and she plays the title character.

Down
2. Young beaver KIT
Beavers are monogamous and mate for life. The offspring of a beaver couple are called kits.

3. Pepper, for one: Abbr. SGT
When the Beatles released their groundbreaking “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band” album in 1967, the typical cost for cover art was about fifty UK pounds. The Beatles’ album cover cast a staggering three thousand pounds. The idea for the artwork came from Paul McCartney, who provided an ink drawing to pop artists Peter Blake and Jann Haworth who came up with the final design. The cover was photographed by Michael Cooper, who was famous for photographing the Rolling Stones. In the “Sgt. Pepper” cover photo, the band members are surrounded by 9 waxworks and 57 life-size cardboard cut-outs of famous people, a group carefully chosen by the Beatles. Elvis isn’t included in the mix, as he was considered “too important”. Also left out were Adolf Hitler and Jesus Christ, both of whom had been suggested by John Lennon.

4. *Animated TV series set in the Rockies SOUTH PARK
“South Park” is an adult-oriented cartoon series on Comedy Central. I don’t do “South Park” …

6. Some furniture stores IKEAS
The IKEA furniture stores use the colors blue and yellow for brand recognition. Blue and yellow are the national colors of Sweden, where IKEA was founded and is headquartered.

7. Biblical brother ABEL
In the story of Cain and Abel in the Book of Genesis, Cain murders his brother Abel. Subsequently, God asks Cain, “Where is Abel thy brother?” Cain replies, “I know not. Am I my brother’s keeper?”

8. Juba’s “White” river NILE
Juba is a city on the White Nile in Africa and the capital of the Republic of South Sudan.

11. Juillet’s season ETE
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) in France, and “juillet” is French for July (note that the name of months aren’t capitalized in French).

13. One of three cartoon nephews HUEY
Donald Duck’s nephews are identical triplets called Huey, Dewey and Louie, and they first appeared on the screen in 1938. Once in a while, due to errors in production, a fourth duck can be seen in the background. This little “mistake” is affectionately called “Phooey Duck” by folks in the industry.

15. Little League belts: Abbr. HRS
Home run (HR)

20. Soweto’s home: Abbr. RSA
Republic of South Africa (RSA)

Soweto is an urban area in the city of Johannesburg, South Africa. The name comes from SOuth WEstern TOwnship, a black township that was set up the days of apartheid. The famous Soweto Uprising took place in 1976, triggered by government policy forcing education to be given in Afrikaans rather than in English.

26. Stronghold CITADEL
A citadel is a fortress built to protect a town or a city. Both the words “city” and “citadel” come from the Latin word “civis” meaning “citizen”.

30. Brest friend AMI
Brest is a port city in northwest France, and is the second largest military port in the country. Brest was an important base for German U-boats during WWII when France was occupied by the Nazis. Brest is the most westerly city in the whole country.

32. Govt. group that began in 1908 FBI
What we know today as the FBI was set up in 1908 as the BOI, the Bureau of Investigation. The name was changed to the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1935. The Bureau was set up at the behest of President Theodore Roosevelt. President Roosevelt was largely moved to do so after the 1901 assassination of President McKinley, as there was a perception that anarchists were threatening law and order. The FBI’s motto uses the organization’s initialism, and is “Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity”.

33. Where kip are spent LAOS
The kip has been the unit of currency in Laos since 1952. One kip is divided into 100 att.

35. Sylvester’s problem LISP
Sylvester J. Pussycat was also known as Puddy Tat, and was a character who appeared in “Looney Tunes” and “Merrie Melodies” cartoons. Sylvester was the cat who was often trying to get the better of Tweety Bird, Speedy Gonzales and Hippety Hopper. Sylvester’s trademark line is the exclamation “Sufferin’ succotash!”, which emphasizes the characters pronounced lisp.

37. London’s __ Gardens KEW
Kew Gardens is a beautiful location in southwest London that was formerly known as the Royal Botanic Gardens. Kew Gardens has the world’s largest collection of living plants.

38. *Challenge to Eiger climbers ECAF HTRON (reverses to “NORTH FACE”)
The Eiger is a mountain in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. It is a noted peak for mountain climbing, with its treacherous north face being the most famous approach to the summit. Over sixty climbers have died since 1935 on that north face.

41. Fawn’s mom DOE
A fawn is a young deer, usually less than a year old.

47. Canon offering, briefly SLR
SLR stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

The Japanese company called Canon is largely known in the US for producing quality cameras. The company started out as Precision Optical Industry Laboratory in 1937 making camera bodies. The name was changed in 1947 to Canon.

49. Dimin.’s opposite CRESC
Crescendo (cresc.) is an Italian word meaning “gradually becoming louder”, and is often seen on a musical score. The term with the opposite meaning is “diminuendo” (dim.).

56. Mad as __ hen A WET
Someone described as “mad as a wet hen” is “very angry”.

58. Algonquian language CREE
The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

59. Bit IOTA
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

60. Sun. message SER
Our word “sermon” comes from the Latin “sermonem” meaning “discourse, talk”. The literal translation of “sermonem” is “a stringing together of words”, from the Latin “serere” meaning “to join”, as in the related word “series”.

62. It turns out lts. OCS
Officer Candidate School (OCS)

The word “lieutenant” come from French, with “lieu” meaning “in place” and “tenant” meaning “holding”. “Lieutenant” then means somebody holding a position in the absence of his or her superior. In America of course “lieutenant” is pronounced loo-tenant, whereas on the other side of the Atlantic we say “lef-tenant”.

64. Nats’ former stadium RFK
Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium was opened in 1961 as the District of Columbia Stadium, and is actually owned by the District of Columbia. The stadium was renamed in 1969, a few months after Robert Kennedy was assassinated. Kennedy had been instrumental the racial integration of the Washington Redskins who played in the stadium for 36 seasons. As Attorney General, Kennedy threatened to oust the Redskins from the federally-owned stadium unless the team agreed to sign African American players.

The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

65. Symbol of peace VEE
One has to be careful making that V-sign depending where you are in the world. Where I came from, the V for victory (or peace) sign has to be made with the palm facing outwards. If the sign is made with the palm facing inwards, it can be interpreted as a very obscene gesture.

66. Eastern Nevada city ELY
Ely is a city in eastern Nevada. The city was founded as a Pony Express stagecoach station. One of Ely’s former residents was First Lady Pat Nixon, who was born there in 1912.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Blesses OKS
4. Star Wars, initially SDI
7. Go fishing ANGLE
12. *Ring punch RIGHT HOOK
16. IQ test pioneer BINET
17. Start of the line before “Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead!” ET TU, BRUTE?
18. Bluebloods ELITE
19. *Manhattan neighborhood EAST HARLEM
21. 1965 Sophia Loren comedy LADY L
24. Gas sign in green letters HESS
25. Line of work: Abbr. OCC
28. Year in Mexico ANO
29. Talladega unit LAP
31. Result of a 1955 merger AFL-CIO
34. Postseason game BOWL
36. Pull in MAKE
39. Treating poorly BAD TO
40. Like the answers to eight starred clues … and a hint as to how to fill them in OMNIDIRECTIONAL
43. Role for Dustin RATSO
44. “The Bridge on the River __” KWAI
45. Marquis de __ SADE
46. Chooses the window instead of the aisle? ELOPES
48. Fraud watchdog org. FTC
50. For each PER
51. Shade provider DYE
52. Ness, for one LOCH
55. Castro and others RAULS
57. *Liberia locale ACIRFA TSEW (reverses to “WEST AFRICA”)
61. Don Diego de la Vega, familiarly ZORRO
63. Frankness UNRESERVE
67. The Bradford kids of ’70s-’80s TV, e.g. OCTET
68. *Ring punch SSORC TFEL (reverses to “LEFT CROSS”)
69. Milo of “Barbarella” O’SHEA
70. Long time EON
71. Major KEY

Down
1. Natural resource ORE
2. Young beaver KIT
3. Pepper, for one: Abbr. SGT
4. *Animated TV series set in the Rockies SOUTH PARK
5. Words before dances DO THE …
6. Some furniture stores IKEAS
7. Biblical brother ABEL
8. Juba’s “White” river NILE
9. *Promising GNIMOC-DNA-PU (reverses to “UP-AND-COMING”)
10. Betray, with “down” LET
11. Juillet’s season ETE
13. One of three cartoon nephews HUEY
14. Little League precursor T-BALL
15. Little League belts: Abbr. HRS
20. Soweto’s home: Abbr. RSA
21. Toiled LABORED
22. Rule exception ANOMALY
23. *Level-headed DOWN-TO-EARTH
26. Stronghold CITADEL
27. Beach party staples COOLERS
30. Brest friend AMI
32. Govt. group that began in 1908 FBI
33. Where kip are spent LAOS
35. Sylvester’s problem LISP
37. London’s __ Gardens KEW
38. *Challenge to Eiger climbers ECAF HTRON (reverses to “NORTH FACE”)
41. Fawn’s mom DOE
42. Tiny songbird TIT
47. Canon offering, briefly SLR
49. Dimin.’s opposite CRESC
53. Handy OF USE
54. Playground retort CAN SO!
56. Mad as __ hen A WET
58. Algonquian language CREE
59. Bit IOTA
60. Sun. message SER
61. Animal house ZOO
62. It turns out lts. OCS
64. Nats’ former stadium RFK
65. Symbol of peace VEE
66. Eastern Nevada city ELY

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LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Jul 15, Thursday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeffrey Wechsler
THEME: Secret Meeting … we have a hidden word in each of today’s themed answers. That word is TRYST, meaning SECRET MEETING:

50A. Romance novel staple, another word for which is aptly hidden in 20-, 32- and 40-Across SECRET MEETING

20A. Defiant challenge TRY STOPPING ME!
32A. Would-be immigrant’s concern ENTRY STATUS
40A. Nashville VIP COUNTRY STAR

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 10m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … MUSS (mess), USURY (usery!!!)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Stock items: Abbr. MDSE
Merchandise (mdse.)

14. Couch potato’s aid TIVO
TiVo was introduced in 1999 and was the world’s first commercially successful DVR (Digital Video Recorder).

15. Bizarre OUTRE
The word “outré” comes to us from French, as you might imagine, derived from the verb “outrer” meaning “to overdo, exaggerate”. “Outrer” is also the ultimate root of our word “outrage”.

16. Severely damaged sea ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

19. Beatle George’s Indian friend RAVI
Raga isn’t really a type of music, but has been described as the “tonal framework” in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners). Western rock music with a heavy Indian influence might be called raga rock.

George Harrison is often referred to as the “quiet Beatle”, although he did have a profound influence on the direction taken by the Fab Four. It was Harrison who first became an admirer of Indian culture and led the rest of the group into the Indian way of life. Harrison went as far as embracing the Hindu religion.

23. Matzo’s lack YEAST
Matzo is a unleavened bread, that is very brittle. The bread is crushed, creating Matzo meal that is then formed into balls using eggs and oil as a binder. The balls are usually served in a chicken stock.

25. Approach to a landing? RISER
The “riser” is the vertical part of a step in a flight of stairs.

A “landing” is the area at the top and bottom of a staircase. Apparently, we called the steps between the landings a “flight” of stairs, because one flies between landings! Can that be true?

28. Grass plot around a sundial, in “Jabberwocky” WABE
Here are the first two verses of “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll, probably the one poem that we all just loved learning to recite at school:

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!

31. __ chi TAI
More properly called tai chi chuan, tai chi is a martial art that is mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

37. “__, With Love” TO SIR
“To Sir, with Love” is an excellent 1967 drama film starring Sidney Poitier that is based on a novel of the same name by E. R. Braithwaite. The film is about an inexperienced teacher in a tough school in the East End of London. If you see the movie keep a lookout for a couple of supporting actors. Lulu plays the student called Babs Pegg, and also sings the hit theme song from the movie. Patricia Routledge plays fellow teacher Clinty Clintridge, and later in her career played Hyacinth Bucket in the enduring BBC comedy series “Keeping Up Appearances”.

39. Scand. country that borders Russia NOR
Norway has been ranked as the country in the world with the highest standard of living almost every year since 2001. Norway is rich in natural resources and has a relatively low population. The people benefit from a comprehensive social security system, subsidized higher education for all citizens and universal health care. And Norway is famous for her success at the Winter Olympic Games, having won more gold medals than any other nation.

40. Nashville VIP COUNTRY STAR
The Tennessee city of Nashville was founded in 1779 near a stockade in the Cumberland River valley called Fort Nashborough. Both the settlement and the fort were named for General Francis Nash, a war hero who died in combat during the American Revolution.

43. Commercial suffix with wheat -ENA
Wheatena is a toasted wheat cereal that has been on the shelves since about 1879. Back in the golden days of radio, Wheatena sponsored the “Popeye the Sailor” show, which resulted in the jingle:

Wheatena is his diet,
He asks you to try it,
With Popeye the sailor man.

44. Antlered deer HART
Nowadays a “hart” is a male red deer, over five years old.

45. Hops driers OASTS
An oast is a kiln used for drying hops as part of the brewing process. Such a structure might also be called an “oast house”.

46. Aqua __: corrosive acid REGIA
Aqua regia is a mixture of concentrated nitric acid and hydrochloric acid. “Aqua regia” translates as “royal water”. The mixture was given this name as it can dissolve the “noble” metals, gold and platinum.

48. X-rated stuff SMUT
“Smut” means “dirt, smudge” and more recently “pornographic material”. The term comes from the Yiddish “schmutz”, which is a slang word used in English for dirt, as in “dirt on one’s face”.

56. Part of RNA RIBO-
RNA and DNA are very similar molecules. One big difference is that RNA is a single strand structure, whereas DNA is famously a double-helix. Another difference is that RNA contains ribose as a structural unit, and DNA contains deoxyribose i.e. ribose with one less oxygen atom. And that ribose/deoxyribose difference is reflected in the full name of the two molecules: ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA).

57. Watergate figure DEEP THROAT
Mark Felt was the Associate Director of the FBI during the Watergate scandal of the early seventies. Felt was also the secret informant who provided secret information to Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein of “The Washington Post”, who broke the story. Felt was given the pseudonym “Deep Throat” by the newspaper’s managing editor, and was a reference to the “deep” background information that was provided and was a play on the “Deep Throat” pornographic film that was released in 1972. To their credit, Woodward and Bernstein refused to reveal the identity of Deep Throat for almost three decades. It was Felt who actually gave up his name to the public, in 2005, after which Woodward and Bernstein confirmed the facts.

59. Barbara of “Mission: Impossible” BAIN
The actress Barbara Bain is perhaps best known for playing the sultry Cinnamon Carter on the TV show “MIssion: Impossible”. One of Cinnamon’s cohorts was Rollin Hand played by Martin Landau, who was Bain’s husband at that time. Bain and Landau also starred together in the sci-fi series “Space: 1999”, which ran in the mid-seventies for a couple of years.

60. Bottled-up sort? GENIE
The “genie” in the bottle takes his or her name from “djinn”. “Djinns” were various spirits considered lesser than angels, with people exhibiting unsavory characteristics said to be possessed by djinn. When the book “The Thousand and One Nights” was translated into French, the word “djinn” was transformed into the existing word “génie”, because of the similarity in sound and the related spiritual meaning. This “génie” from the Arabian tale became confused with the Latin-derived “genius”, a guardian spirit thought to be assigned to each person at birth. Purely as a result of that mistranslation the word genie has come to mean the “djinn” that pops out of the bottle. A little hard to follow, I know, but still quite interesting …

63. Old Norse texts EDDAS
The Poetic Edda and Prose Edda are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology. Both Eddas were written in the 13th century, in Iceland.

Down
1. Org. regulating explosives ATF
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is today part of the Department of Justice (DOJ). The ATF has its roots in the Department of Treasury dating back to 1886 when it was known as the Bureau of Prohibition. “Explosives” was added to the ATF’s name when the bureau was moved under the DOJ as part of the reorganization called for in the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

2. Painter Mondrian PIET
Piet Mondrian was painter from the Netherlands who also lived and worked in Paris, London and New York. Mondrian’s works ranged in style from Impressionism to Abstract.

4. Nylon, for one POLYMER
The polymer known as “nylon” was developed by Dupont in the 1930s. The first application was as bristles on toothbrushes, in 1938. The second application became more famous, for women’s stockings starting in 1940, stockings that came to be known as “nylons”. The polymer was developed as a replacement for silk, which was to become in short supply during WWII.

5. Egyptian Christians COPTS
The Copts make up the largest minority religious group in Egypt. Copts are Christians, with most adhered to the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, and others practicing Coptic Catholicism or Coptic Protestantism. The term “Copt” ultimately derives from a Greek word for Egyptian.

7. Trans Am roof option T-TOP
A T-top is a car roof that has removable panels on either side of a rigid bar that runs down the center of the vehicle above the driver.

The Trans Am was a specialty version of the Pontiac Firebird produced from 1969 to 2002. My favorite Trans Am is KITT, the artificially intelligent car in the eighties TV show “Knight Rider” …

9. “Snowman” in a fur coat YETI
A yeti is a beast of legend, also called an abominable snowman. “Yeti” is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology.

10. Homer’s beloved MARGE
Marge Simpson is the matriarch of the family in “The Simpsons” animated sitcom. Marge is voiced by actress Julie Kavner, who is also well known for playing Brenda Morgenstern in the TV show “Rhoda” in the seventies.

13. Priest who mentored Samuel ELI
In the Bible, Eli is a High Priest of Shiloh, and the teacher of Samuel. As such, his story is told in the Book of Samuel. Eli had two sons, Hophni and Phinehas, both of whom are described as wicked. As a result of their wayward lifestyle, it is prophesied that all of Eli’s male descendents will die before reaching old age.

18. Unreasonable interest USURY
“Usury” was originally the name given to the practice of lending money at interest, but the term now refers to lending at excessive rates of interest.

21. Scientific Bill et al. NYES
That would be “Bill Nye the Science Guy”. Bill’s show ran on Disney for 4 years from 1993-97. I was surprised to learn that Bill Nye was married briefly to Blair Tindall, the author of “Mozart in the Jungle”. That’s a great book, if anyone is interested, and now a comedy-drama series produced by Amazon …

25. “The Bucket List” director REINER
The great director and actor Rob Reiner first came to prominence playing “Meathead”, Archie and Edith Bunker’s son-in-law in “All in the Family”. Since then, Reiner has directed a long string of hit movies including, “The Princess Bride”, “Stand by Me”, “This Is Spinal Tap”, “When Harry Met Sally”, “Misery” and “A Few Good Men”.

“The Bucket List” is a 2007 film starring Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman as two men who have terminal illnesses. The pair go on a road trip with a “wish list” of things they want to do before “kicking the bucket”, hence the name of the movie.

26. Bali citizen INDONESIAN
Bali is the most important tourist destination in Indonesia and is an island lying east of Java. In recent years, Bali’s tourist industry has been badly hit in the aftermath of two terrorist bombings. The first one, in 2002, killed 202 people, mainly foreign tourists in a nightclub.

28. “The Weavers: __ That a Time!”: folk documentary WASN’T
“The Weavers: Wasn’t That a Time!” is a 1982 documentary about the Weavers folk music quartet that is centered on their 1980 appearance at Carnegie Hall for a reunion concert.

The folk group called the Weavers formed back in 1948 in Greenwich Village, New York. The most famous of the founding members was probably Pete Seeger.

30. Third U.S. VP BURR
Aaron Burr was the third vice-president of the US, serving under Thomas Jefferson. In the final year of his term in office, Burr fought an illegal duel and killed his political rival Alexander Hamilton. Burr wasn’t brought to justice, but he did pay the price politically. Thomas Jefferson dropped him from his ticket in the election held the following year.

33. Ancient portico STOA
A stoa was a covered walkway in Ancient Greece. A stoa usually consisted of columns lining the side of a building or buildings, with another row of columns defining the other side of the walkway. The columns supported a roof. Often stoae would surround marketplaces in large cities.

41. “__, I do adore thee”: Shakespeare YOUTH
“The Passionate Pilgrim” is a 1599 anthology of poems that were attributed to “W. Shakespeare”. Of the twenty poems, the authorship of fifteen are disputed by scholars. For example, it has been suggested that the poem shown below was written by the English novelist and balladist Thomas Deloney:

Crabbed Age and Youth
Cannot live together:
Youth is full of pleasance,
Age is full of care;
Youth like summer morn,
Age like winter weather;
Youth like summer brave,
Age like winter bare:
Youth is full of sports,
Age’s breath is short,
Youth is nimble, Age is lame:
Youth is hot and bold,
Age is weak and cold,
Youth is wild, and Age is tame:-
Age, I do abhor thee;
Youth, I do adore thee;
O! my Love, my Love is young!
Age, I do defy thee-
O sweet shepherd, hie thee,
For methinks thou stay’st too long.

42. Swiftian SATIRIC
Jonathan Swift was an Irish author and cleric. Swift is most famous perhaps for his 1726 novel “Gulliver’s Travels”, but we Irishmen also remember him as the Dean of St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin. Swift was renowned for his wit and satire.

48. Old photo tone SEPIA
Sepia is that lovely rich, brown-grey color so common in old photographs. “Sepia” is the Latinized version of the Greek word for cuttlefish, as sepia pigment is derived from the ink sac of the cuttlefish.The “sepia tone” of old photographs is not the result of deterioration over time. Rather, it is the result of a deliberate preservation process which converts the metallic silver in the photographic image to a more stable silver sulfide. Prints that have been sepia-toned can last in excess of 150 years.

51. A Möbius strip has just one EDGE
A Möbius strip is a surface that has only one side. One is easily made by taking a strip of paper and joining the ends together, but with a twist so that it isn’t a regular “band”.

52. Upset, with “off” TEED
The term “teed off” meaning to be angry, has been around since the early fifties. It is probably a polite way of saying something that might be considered more offensive.

55. Chutzpah GALL
Our word “chutzpah” meaning “nerve, gall, impudence” is derived from the Yiddish “khutspe”, which has the same meaning.

56. Box score stat RBI
Run batted in (RBI)

In baseball, the line square is a summary set of statistics for the game. It is seen at every baseball stadium, and includes the number of runs scored by each team per innings, as well as the total number of hits and errors. The more comprehensive box score includes the line score, but also shows the individual performance of each player.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Each A POP
5. Subtly cruel CATTY
10. Stock items: Abbr. MDSE
14. Couch potato’s aid TIVO
15. Bizarre OUTRE
16. Severely damaged sea ARAL
17. “Think you can manage?” FEEL UP TO IT?
19. Beatle George’s Indian friend RAVI
20. Defiant challenge TRY STOPPING ME!
22. Dishevel MUSS
23. Matzo’s lack YEAST
25. Approach to a landing? RISER
28. Grass plot around a sundial, in “Jabberwocky” WABE
31. __ chi TAI
32. Would-be immigrant’s concern ENTRY STATUS
35. Believer’s suffix -ISM
36. Binding oath I DO
37. “__, With Love” TO SIR
38. Comprehend SEE
39. Scand. country that borders Russia NOR
40. Nashville VIP COUNTRY STAR
43. Commercial suffix with wheat -ENA
44. Antlered deer HART
45. Hops driers OASTS
46. Aqua __: corrosive acid REGIA
48. X-rated stuff SMUT
50. Romance novel staple, another word for which is aptly hidden in 20-, 32- and 40-Across SECRET MEETING
56. Part of RNA RIBO-
57. Watergate figure DEEP THROAT
59. Barbara of “Mission: Impossible” BAIN
60. Bottled-up sort? GENIE
61. On a break, say IDLE
62. Rustic accommodations INNS
63. Old Norse texts EDDAS
64. Con’s confines CELL

Down
1. Org. regulating explosives ATF
2. Painter Mondrian PIET
3. Concluded OVER
4. Nylon, for one POLYMER
5. Egyptian Christians COPTS
6. Road runners AUTOS
7. Trans Am roof option T-TOP
8. Road __ TRIP
9. “Snowman” in a fur coat YETI
10. Homer’s beloved MARGE
11. Ones earning play money? DRAMATISTS
12. Helps by arriving early, with “for” SAVES A SEAT
13. Priest who mentored Samuel ELI
18. Unreasonable interest USURY
21. Scientific Bill et al. NYES
24. Ski race equipment TIMERS
25. “The Bucket List” director REINER
26. Bali citizen INDONESIAN
27. Container seen above seats STORAGE BIN
28. “The Weavers: __ That a Time!”: folk documentary WASN’T
29. Quarreling AT IT
30. Third U.S. VP BURR
33. Ancient portico STOA
34. Band commitment TOUR
40. Sear CHAR
41. “__, I do adore thee”: Shakespeare YOUTH
42. Swiftian SATIRIC
47. Screen array ICONS
48. Old photo tone SEPIA
49. Deals (out) METES
51. A Möbius strip has just one EDGE
52. Upset, with “off” TEED
53. Fix MEND
54. Joint NODE
55. Chutzpah GALL
56. Box score stat RBI
58. Business card no. TEL

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