LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Sep 15, Wednesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: C.C. Burnikel
THEME: Wild Card … five of today’s longer answers contain a string of circled letters in the grid. Each string of letters is a rearrangement of the word CARD; each is a WILD CARD:

39D. One of two baseball playoff teams determined next week by a “play-in” game in each major league, and a hint to this puzzle’s circles WILD CARD

17A. Blanket containers CEDAR CHESTS
29A. Burrowing beach denizens SAND CRABS
43A. Lollipops, e.g. HARD CANDY
57A. Where much classical music is heard PUBLIC RADIO
4D. Rolex 24 at Daytona, e.g. ROAD RACE

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 7m 15s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Off-the-cuff AD LIB
“Ad libitum” is a Latin phrase meaning “at one’s pleasure”. In common usage the phrase is usually shortened to “ad lib”. On the stage the concept of an “ad lib” is very familiar. For example, an actor may substitute his or her own words for forgotten lines using an ad lib, or a director may instruct an actor to use his or her own words at a particular point in a performance to promote a sense of spontaneity.

To speak “off the cuff” is to speak extemporaneously. The idea is that someone doing so would not be using learned lines, but rather is speaking with the use of a few notes that have been jotted on his cuffs or shirt sleeves.

17. Blanket containers CEDAR CHESTS
Cedar is used for the manufacture of some wardrobes and chests as it has long been believed that the fragrant oil in the wood is a moth-repellent. However, whether or not cedar oil is actually effective at keeping moths away seems to be in doubt.

20. Matzo meal SEDER
The Passover Seder is a ritual feast that marks the beginning of the Jewish Passover holiday, celebrating the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt.

Matzo is a unleavened bread, that is very brittle. The bread is crushed, creating Matzo meal that is then formed into balls using eggs and oil as a binder. The balls are usually served in a chicken stock.

21. Some RSVPs NOS
RSVP stands for “répondez, s’il vous plaît”, which is French for “please, answer”.

23. “Born to Die” singer Lana Del __ REY
Lana Del Rey is the stage name of singer/songwriter Elizabeth Grant. Del Rey calls herself a “self-styled gangsta Nancy Sinatra”. Nice …

24. Caspian Sea land IRAN
The Caspian Sea is a landlocked body of water lying between Asia and Europe. By some definitions, the Caspian is the largest lake on the planet. The name “Caspian” comes from the Caspi people who lived to the southwest of the sea in South Caucasus.

26. Diamond figure CARAT
A carat is a unit of mass used in measuring gemstones that is equal to 200 mg.

29. Burrowing beach denizens SAND CRABS
Nowadays we use “denizen” to mean simply a resident, but historically a denizen was an immigrant to whom certain rights had been granted, something like today’s “resident alien”.

34. Smart guys? ALECS
Apparently the original “smart Alec” (sometimes “Aleck”) was Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

35. Spanish tourist city AVILA
Avila is famous for the walled defenses around the old city, which date back to 1090. They were constructed out of brown granite, and are still in excellent repair. There are nine gateways and eighty-towers in all. Even the cathedral built between the 12th and 14th centuries is part of the city’s defenses, so it looks like an imposing fortress.

36. Knock on Yelp PAN
To pan something is to criticize it harshly.

yelp.com is a website that provides a local business directory and reviews of services. The site is sort of like Yellow Pages on steroids, and the term “yelp” is derived from “yel-low p-ages”. I have a young neighbor here who used to work for yelp …

39. Responded to reveille WOKE
“Reveille” is a trumpet call that is used to wake everyone up at sunrise. The term comes from “réveillé”, the French for “wake up”.

40. Former Energy secretary Steven CHU
Steven Chu is a former Secretary of Energy in the Obama Cabinet. Chu is a physicist by trade, a winner of the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1997.

42. Hog lover BIKER
“Hog” is a nickname for a Harley-Davidson motorcycle.

The Harley-Davidson motorcycle company was started up in the very early 1900s by two childhood friends, William Harley and Arthur Davidson, . Their first design was in effect an engine hooked up to a pedal bicycle, but the 116 cc cylinder capacity simply couldn’t generate enough power to get up the hills of their native city of Milwaukee. The pair came up with a redesigned model that had a cylinder capacity of 405 cc, which the partners built in a shed at the back of Davidson’s house. In 1906, the partners built their first factory, located where the company’s headquarters is to this day, on Juneau Avenue in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

45. On the ball ALERT
The phrase “on the ball”, meaning “alert”, comes from ball sports. It is a contraction of the expression “keep your eye on the ball”, i.e. stay alert!

47. Brief letters? BVD
The men’s underwear known as BVDs are made by the Bradley, Voorhees & Day. The company was started in 1876 to make bustles for women, and is named for its founders.

48. Artist’s pad LOFT
Back in the 16th century a “pad” was a bundle of straw to lie on, and came to mean a “sleeping place” in the early 1700s. The term was revitalized in the hippie era.

50. Arranged locks DOS
Locks of hair can be arranged in a hairdo. Well, mine can’t …

53. Strips on a sandwich BACON
Our word “bacon” ultimately is Germanic in origin, coming from the noun “bakkon” meaning “back meat”.

56. Frazier foe ALI
Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier had three memorable fights. The first was billed as the “Fight of the Century” and took place in 1971 in Madison Square Garden. It was a fight between two great boxers, both of whom were undefeated up till that point. Frazier won in a unanimous decision after fifteen rounds. A couple of years later, in 1973, Frazier lost his title to George Foreman. Ali and Frazier had a non-title rematch in 1974, with Ali coming out ahead this time, also in a unanimous decision. Later that year, Ali grabbed back the World Heavyweight Title in “The Rumble in the Jungle”, the famous “rope-a-dope” fight against George Foreman. That set the stage for the third and final fight between Ali and Frazier, “The Thrilla in Manila”. Ali won the early rounds, but Frazier made a comeback in the middle of the fight. Ali took control at the end of the bout, so much so that Frazier wasn’t able to come out of his corner for the 15th and final round. He couldn’t come out of his corner because both of his eyes were swollen shut, giving Ali a victory due to a technical knockout (TKO).

57. Where much classical music is heard PUBLIC RADIO
National Public Radio (now just called NPR) was launched in 1970 after President Johnson signed into law the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. The intent of the act was to provide funding for radio and television broadcasting that wasn’t simply driven by profit. As a longtime fan of the state-funded BBC in the UK, I’d have to agree with that intent …

62. Castle in the 1914 musical “Watch Your Step” IRENE
Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-wife team of ballroom dancers who regularly performed on Broadway at the start of the 20th century. The Castles have been credited with creating or at least popularizing the dance known as the “foxtrot”.

63. “Ciao!” BYE!
“Ciao” is Italian for “‘bye”. “Arrivederci” is more formal, and translates as “goodbye”.

64. 1975 Pulitzer winner for criticism EBERT
The film critic Roger Ebert wrote his final blog post at RogerEbert.com on April 2, 2013. In that post, Ebert announced that he was slowing down and handing over the writing of most of the film reviews to a team that he picked himself. He was taking what he called a “leave of presence”, necessitated by his failing health as he continued to fight cancer. Sadly, Roger Ebert passed away just two days later.

Down
1. Media Clic Ice maker BIC
Société Bic is a French company, based in Clichy in France. The first product the company produced, more than fifty years ago, was the Bic Cristal ballpoint pen that is still produced today. Bic also makes other disposable products such as lighters and razors.

3. Help on the Hill AIDE
Washington D.C.’s designer Pierre L’Enfant chose the crest of hill as the site for the future “Congress House”. He called the location “Jenkins Hill” and “Jenkins Heights”. Earlier records show the name as “New Troy”. Today we call it “Capitol Hill”.

4. Rolex 24 at Daytona, e.g. ROAD RACE
24 Hours of Daytona is a 24-hour sports car endurance race that has been held almost every year at Daytona Speedway in Florida since 1962. The race was shortened to 6 hours in 1972 in response to the energy crisis, and in 1973 was cancelled for the same reason.

7. Big name in organic foods EDEN
Eden Foods is the largest supplier of organic dry grocery items in the United States. Based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Eden was founded in 1969 as a co-op grocery store.

10. “King of the Nerds” airer TBS
“King of the Nerds” is a reality TV show that was inspired by the “Revenge of the Nerds” series of movies. The show is hosted by Robert Carradine and Curtis Armstrong, who played two of the nerds in the films. The TV show features “nerdy” people competing in challenges to win a monetary prize, and the much-coveted title of King of the Nerds.

11. Sight-unseen buy PIG IN A POKE
“Poke” is an old term for a sack. One wouldn’t want to buy a pig in a sack, sight unseen.

18. React to a kitchen bulb, maybe CRY
One might tear up while chopping an onion (a kitchen bulb).

25. Miley Cyrus label RCA
Miley Cyrus became famous playing the Disney Channel character “Hannah Montana”. Miley is of course the daughter of country singer Billy Ray Cyrus. When she was born, Billy Ray and his wife named their daughter “Destiny Hope”, but soon they themselves calling her “Smiley” as she was always smiling as a baby, and this got shortened to Miley over time. Cute …

27. Hawaiian Airlines greeting ALOHA
The Hawaiian word “Aloha” has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently “aloha” has come to mean “hello” and “goodbye”, but only since the mid-1800s.

29. Leftovers preserver SARAN
What’s known as plastic wrap in America, we call cling-film in Ireland. The brand name Saran wrap is often used generically in the US, while Glad wrap is common down under. Plastic wrap was one of those unintended inventions, a byproduct of a development program to create a hard plastic cover for cars.

31. Doofus NINNY
“Doofus” (also “dufus”) is student slang that has been around since the sixties. Apparently the word is a variant of the equally unattractive term “doo-doo”.

33. Hägar’s dog SNERT
Snert is the clever dog that belongs to Hägar the Horrible in the classic comic strip.

41. Lenovo products PCS
Lenovo is a Chinese manufacturer of computers. The company is very successful, and sold more personal computers in 2013 than any other vendor worldwide. Famously, Lenovo bought IBM’s personal computer division in 2005.

42. Munich’s state BAVARIA
Bavaria in southeast Germany is the largest state in the country. The capital and largest city in Bavaria is Munich.

47. English channel, briefly BBC
The marvelous British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is mainly funded by the UK government through a television licence fee that is levied annually on all households watching TV transmissions. Currently the fee is 145 UK pounds, about 230 US dollars.

48. Moussaka meat LAMB
Moussaka is a delicious dish from the Balkans that uses eggplant or potato as a base.

49. Facial cosmetics brand OLAY
Oil of Olay was developed in South Africa in 1949. When Oil of Olay was introduced internationally, it was given slightly different brand names designed to appeal in the different geographies. In Ireland we know it as Oil of Ulay, for example, and in France it is Oil of Olaz.

54. Pigged out (on), briefly ODED
Overdose (OD)

55. Ted Williams’ number NINE
As well as playing in left field for the Boston Red Sox, Ted Williams served as a pilot in the Marine Corps in World War II and the Korean War.

58. Addams family cousin ITT
In the television sitcom “The Addams Family”, the family had a frequent visitor called Cousin Itt. Itt is a short man with long hair that runs from his head to the floor. Cousin Itt was played by Italian actor Felix Silla.

59. Heavy ref. OED
The “Oxford English Dictionary” (OED) contains over 300,000 “main” entries and 59 million words in total. It is said it would take a single person 120 years to type it out in full. The longest entry for one word in the second edition of the OED is the verb “set”. When the third edition was published in 2007, the longest entry for a single word became the verb “put”. Perhaps not surprisingly, the most-quoted author in the OED is William Shakespeare, with his most quoted work being “Hamlet”. The most-quoted female author is George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Wild hogs BOARS
6. Wild animal BEAST
11. Bird in a cage, often PET
14. Pinhead IDIOT
15. Off-the-cuff AD LIB
16. Hot feeling IRE
17. Blanket containers CEDAR CHESTS
19. Sign word often seen before “next exit” GAS
20. Matzo meal SEDER
21. Some RSVPs NOS
22. Punch source FIST
23. “Born to Die” singer Lana Del __ REY
24. Caspian Sea land IRAN
26. Diamond figure CARAT
29. Burrowing beach denizens SAND CRABS
34. Smart guys? ALECS
35. Spanish tourist city AVILA
36. Knock on Yelp PAN
37. Mall bag TOTE
38. Given (to) PRONE
39. Responded to reveille WOKE
40. Former Energy secretary Steven CHU
41. No-frills PLAIN
42. Hog lover BIKER
43. Lollipops, e.g. HARD CANDY
45. On the ball ALERT
46. Like reporters, by trade NOSY
47. Brief letters? BVD
48. Artist’s pad LOFT
50. Arranged locks DOS
53. Strips on a sandwich BACON
56. Frazier foe ALI
57. Where much classical music is heard PUBLIC RADIO
60. Spoil MAR
61. “Too rich for me” I’M OUT
62. Castle in the 1914 musical “Watch Your Step” IRENE
63. “Ciao!” BYE!
64. 1975 Pulitzer winner for criticism EBERT
65. Put two and two together ADDED

Down
1. Media Clic Ice maker BIC
2. Often emotional works ODES
3. Help on the Hill AIDE
4. Rolex 24 at Daytona, e.g. ROAD RACE
5. Parade venues STREETS
6. “That’s hogwash!” BAH!
7. Big name in organic foods EDEN
8. Furthermore ALSO
9. Isn’t active, as equipment SITS IDLE
10. “King of the Nerds” airer TBS
11. Sight-unseen buy PIG IN A POKE
12. Stretches of history ERAS
13. Lab work TEST
18. React to a kitchen bulb, maybe CRY
22. Word after go or so FAR
25. Miley Cyrus label RCA
26. Hidden problem CATCH
27. Hawaiian Airlines greeting ALOHA
28. Shoot back RETURN FIRE
29. Leftovers preserver SARAN
30. Dodge AVOID
31. Doofus NINNY
32. One creating enticing aromas BAKER
33. Hägar’s dog SNERT
38. Feign ignorance PLAY DUMB
39. One of two baseball playoff teams determined next week by a “play-in” game in each major league, and a hint to this puzzle’s circles WILD CARD
41. Lenovo products PCS
42. Munich’s state BAVARIA
44. Small point DOT
47. English channel, briefly BBC
48. Moussaka meat LAMB
49. Facial cosmetics brand OLAY
51. Clarinet cousin OBOE
52. Disparaging comment SLUR
54. Pigged out (on), briefly ODED
55. Ted Williams’ number NINE
57. Chart shape PIE
58. Addams family cousin ITT
59. Heavy ref. OED

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LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Sep 15, Tuesday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Mark Bickham
THEME: S and S … each of today’s themed answer is a three-word phrase with AND sitting between two words starting with the letter S:

71A. Metaphor for time … and, when divided into three words, puzzle theme found in the four longest across answers SANDS (or “S AND S”)

17A. Like stickers that smell when rubbed SCRATCH AND SNIFF
27A. Little girl’s makeup, so they say SUGAR AND SPICE
48A. Terse SHORT AND SWEET
62A. Old Glory STARS AND STRIPES

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 5m 50s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Very top ACME
The “acme” is the highest point, coming from the Greek word “akme” which has the same meaning.

10. Shift neighbor, on PC keyboards CTRL
The control key (Ctrl.)

14. St. __ Girl beer PAULI
St. Pauli Girl beer is brewed in Bremen in Germany. The beer gets its name from the former St. Paul’s Monastery in Bremen, next door to which was located the original brewery.

16. Nabisco cookie OREO
The Oreo was the best-selling cookie in the 20th century, and almost 500 billion of them have been sold since they were introduced in 1912 by Nabisco. In those early days the creme filling was made with pork fat, but today vegetable oils are used instead. If you take a bite out of an Oreo sold outside of America you might notice a difference from the homegrown cookie, as coconut oil is added in the overseas version to give a different taste.

The National Biscuit Company was formed in 1898 with the merger of three existing bakery businesses. The company name today is Nabisco, an abbreviated form of National Biscuit Company.

20. Buckwheat dish KASHA
“Kasha” is a type of porridge made from roasted whole-grain buckwheat. The dish is most popular in the Russian and Jewish cultures.

Despite the name, “buckwheat” is not related to wheat, and nor is it a grass. Buckwheat is related to rhubarb. As the seeds are eaten, it is known as a “pseudocereal”. The name comes from “beech wheat”, a reference to the resemblance of buckwheat seeds to beech nuts from the “beech” tree, and the fact that buckwheat seeds are used like “wheat”.

27. Little girl’s makeup, so they say SUGAR AND SPICE
The nursery rhyme “What Are Little Boys Made Of?” is falling out of favor these days as it is considered sexist by modern standards:

What are little boys made of?
What are little boys made of?
Slugs and snails
And puppy-dogs’ tails,
That’s what little boys are made of.

What are little girls made of?
What are little girls made of?
Sugar and spice
And everything nice,
That’s what little girls are made of.

35. Firebird roof option T-TOP
A T-top is a car roof that has removable panels on either side of a rigid bar that runs down the center of the vehicle above the driver.

1967 was a big year or American muscle cars. The Pontiac Firebird was introduced that year, as was the Chevrolet Camaro that shared the same platform as the Firebird. At the same time, Ford introduced the Mercury Cougar, which was built on the same platform as the Ford Mustang that went into production just three years earlier.

42. Bart Simpson’s grandpa ABE
In the animated TV show called “The Simpsons”, Grampa Abe Simpson is voiced by Dan Castellaneta, the same actor who provides the voice for Homer.

45. City near Colombia’s coastline CALI
In terms of population, Cali is the third largest city in Colombia (after Bogotá and Medellin). Santiago de Cali (the full name for the city) lies in western Colombia. Apparently, Cali is a destination for “medical tourists”. The city’s surgeons have a reputation for being expert in cosmetic surgery and so folks head there looking for a “cheap” nose job.

46. Leica competitor NIKON
Nikon was founded in 1917, a merger of three companies making various optical devices. After the merger, the company’s main output was lenses (including the first lenses for Canon cameras, before Canon made its own). During the war, Nikon sales grew rapidly as the company focused on (pun unintended!) equipment for the military including periscopes and bomb sights.

Leica is a German optics company, famous for production of lenses and cameras. The 1913 Leica was the first practical camera that could use 35mm film, a size chosen because it was already the standard for film used in motion pictures.

53. Pop singer Vannelli GINO
Gino Vannelli is a Canadian singer, from Montreal, Quebec. Today. Vannelli is very popular in Holland, and divides his time between his homes in the US and the Netherlands.

54. “Life of Pi” director Lee ANG
Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

The 2012 movie “Life of Pi” is based on a 2001 novel of the same name by Yann Martel. The “Pi” in the title is an Indian boy named Pi Patel who finds himself adrift for 227 days in small boat with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.

55. Flood preventer DIKE
A dike is an embankment usually made of earth and rock that is used to prevent floods.

59. Louisiana cuisine CAJUN
The great explorer Verrazzano gave the name “Arcadia” to the coastal land that stretched from north of present day Virginia right up the North American continent to Nova Scotia. The name Arcadia was chosen as it was also the name for a part of Greece that had been viewed as idyllic from the days of classical antiquity. The “Arcadia” name quickly evolved into the word “Acadia” that was used locally here in North America. Much of Acadia was settled by the French in the 1600s, and then in 1710 Acadia was conquered by the British. There followed the French and Indian War after which there was a mass migration of French Acadians, often via the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) to the French colony of Louisiana. The local dialectic pronunciation of the word “Acadian” was “Cajun”, giving the name to the ethnic group for which Louisiana has been home for about 300 years.

62. Old Glory STARS AND STRIPES
The person who coined the phrase “Old Glory” with reference to the American flag was Captain William Driver, a shipmaster from Salem, Massachusetts. As Driver was leaving on an 1831 voyage aboard the brig Charles Doggett, he unfurled the American flag that he had just been given by a group of friends. As the flag caught the breeze, he uttered the words, “Old Glory!”. That’s the story anyway. On that same voyage, Charles Doggett rescued the famous mutineers of the HMS Bounty, after he found them on Pitcairn Island.

67. Kind of dancer or boots GO-GO
Go-go dancing started in the early sixties. Apparently, the first go-go dancers were women at the Peppermint Lounge in New York City who would spontaneously jump up onto tables and dance the twist. It wasn’t long before clubs everywhere started hiring women to dance on tables for the entertainment of their patrons. Out in Los Angeles, the “Whisky a Go Go” club on Sunset Strip added a twist (pun intended!), as they had their dancers perform in cages suspended from the ceiling, creating the profession of “cage dancing”. The name “go-go” actually comes from two expressions. The expression in English “go-go-go” describes someone who is high energy, and the French expression “à gogo” describes something in abundance.

The original go-go boot from the sixties comes to the knee and has a low heel. Prior to the sixties, boots really weren’t worn much by women other than as protection against bad weather. Now they are a fashion statement.

68. Atlanta campus EMORY
Emory is a private school in Atlanta, Georgia with a focus on graduate research. The school was named after a Methodist Episcopal bishop called John Emory, who was very popular at the time of the school’s founding in 1836.

69. “Auld Lang __” SYNE
The song “Auld Lang Syne” is a staple at New Year’s Eve (well, actually in the opening minutes of New Year’s Day). The words were written by Scottish poet Robbie Burns. The literal translation of “Auld Lang Syne” is “old long since”, but is better translated as “old times”. The sentiment of the song is “for old time’s sake”.

Down
1. Navig. tool GPS
Global Positioning System (GPS)

4. Some flat-screen TVs PLASMAS
Plasma televisions are so called because the screen is made up tiny cells containing electrically charged ionized gases (plasmas). Each of the cells is effectively a tiny fluorescent lamp.

10. Grifter’s specialty CON
A grifter is a confidence trickster, although the term has been used for non-violent criminals in general.

18. “How many times __ man turn his head and pretend that he just doesn’t see?”: Dylan CAN A
Bob Dylan wrote the famous song “Blowin’ in the Wind” in 1963, apparently taking all of ten minutes to finish the whole composition.

30. Alfalfa’s girl DARLA
Alfalfa’s love interest in “Our Gang” was Darla, whose real name was Darla Hood. Hood became quite a successful singer after she grew out of her “Our Gang” role.

32. Push-up target, briefly PEC
“Pecs” is the familiar term for the chest muscle, more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is a the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

40. DVD predecessor VCR
Video Cassette Recorder (VCR)

47. Historic Japanese island battle site IWO JIMA
Iwo Jima is a volcanic island located south of Tokyo that today is uninhabited. The name is Japanese for “Sulfur Island”, referring to the sulfur mining on which Iwo Jima’s economy once depended. There were about a thousand Japanese civilians living on the island prior to WWII. In 1944, there was a massive influx of Japanese military personnel in anticipation of the inevitable US invasion. As the Japanese military moved in, the civilians were forced out and no one has lived there since.

50. Merriam-Webster ref. DICT
George and Charles Merriam founded their publishing company in 1831, and in 1843 purchased the rights to Noah Webster’s dictionary a few months after his death. Merriam-Webster has been publishing mainly dictionaries and reference books ever since.

56. “Othello” villain IAGO
Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. Iago is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. He hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello’s wife. By the end of the play it’s Iago himself who is discredited and Othello (before committing suicide) apologizes to Cassio for having believed Iago’s lies. Heavy stuff …

63. AAA suggestion RTE
The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

64. Dim sum sauce SOY
Soy sauce is made by fermenting soybeans with a mold, in the presence of water and salt. Charming …

Dim sum is a Chinese cuisine made up of small portions of various dishes. The tradition of serving dim sum is associated with the serving of tea, when small delicacies were offered to travelers and guests along with tea as a refreshment. The name “dim sum” translates as “touch the heart” implying that dim sum is not a main meal, just a snack “that touches the heart”.

65. Part of PBS: Abbr. SYS
The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) was founded in 1970, and is my favorite of the broadcast networks. I love PBS’s drama and science shows in particular, and always watch the election results coming in with the NewsHour team.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Diagram with axes and coordinates GRAPH
6. Very top ACME
10. Shift neighbor, on PC keyboards CTRL
14. St. __ Girl beer PAULI
15. Guard site SHIN
16. Nabisco cookie OREO
17. Like stickers that smell when rubbed SCRATCH AND SNIFF
20. Buckwheat dish KASHA
21. Court order to all RISE
22. Fruit seed PIT
23. Drop-down __ MENU
25. Like some microbrews MALTY
27. Little girl’s makeup, so they say SUGAR AND SPICE
33. Crisp covering CRUST
34. Welfare SAKE
35. Firebird roof option T-TOP
38. What cake candles may indicate AGE
39. On the rocks OVER ICE
42. Bart Simpson’s grandpa ABE
43. See 44-Down BEST
45. City near Colombia’s coastline CALI
46. Leica competitor NIKON
48. Terse SHORT AND SWEET
51. Sounded sheepish? BAAED
53. Pop singer Vannelli GINO
54. “Life of Pi” director Lee ANG
55. Flood preventer DIKE
59. Louisiana cuisine CAJUN
62. Old Glory STARS AND STRIPES
66. Words starting many a guess IS IT …
67. Kind of dancer or boots GO-GO
68. Atlanta campus EMORY
69. “Auld Lang __” SYNE
70. Follow the leader OBEY
71. Metaphor for time … and, when divided into three words, puzzle theme found in the four longest across answers SANDS (or “S AND S”)

Down
1. Navig. tool GPS
2. Pool hall triangle RACK
3. Saintly glow AURA
4. Some flat-screen TVs PLASMAS
5. Until now HITHERTO
6. Remnant of an old flame ASH
7. Blacken CHAR
8. Prefix with series MINI-
9. Remnants ENDS
10. Grifter’s specialty CON
11. Exaggerated response of disbelief TRIPLE TAKE
12. Equip anew REFIT
13. Towering LOFTY
18. “How many times __ man turn his head and pretend that he just doesn’t see?”: Dylan CAN A
19. Freeway hauler SEMI
24. Boot from office UNSEAT
26. Work with a cast ACT
27. Natural cut protection SCAB
28. Strong desire URGE
29. “Still wrong, take another stab” GUESS AGAIN
30. Alfalfa’s girl DARLA
31. Coming down the mountain, perhaps SKIING
32. Push-up target, briefly PEC
36. Reed instrument OBOE
37. Cooped (up) PENT
40. DVD predecessor VCR
41. Catches, as in a net ENSNARES
44. With 43-Across, outstanding THE
47. Historic Japanese island battle site IWO JIMA
49. Partner of 9-Down ODDS
50. Merriam-Webster ref. DICT
51. Underlying principle BASIS
52. Restless ANTSY
56. “Othello” villain IAGO
57. Door opener KNOB
58. Periphery EDGE
60. Well-versed in UP ON
61. Uncool type NERD
63. AAA suggestion RTE
64. Dim sum sauce SOY
65. Part of PBS: Abbr. SYS

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