LA Times Crossword Answers 31 Jan 17, Tuesday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Queensland

Today’s themed each end with a type of QUEEN:

  • 60A. Australia’s “Sunshine State” … or where you might find the ends of 18-, 20-, 38- and 55-Across? : QUEENSLAND
  • 18A. TV’s “The Practice,” e.g. : LEGAL DRAMA (giving “drama queen”)
  • 20A. “Bummer!” : WHAT A DRAG! (giving “drag queen”)
  • 38A. Door holder’s witticism : AGE BEFORE BEAUTY (giving “beauty queen”)
  • 55A. Procter & Gamble laundry detergent : IVORY SNOW (giving “Snow Queen”)

Bill’s time: 5m 37s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Greek sandwich : GYRO

A gyro is a traditional Greek dish of meat roasted on a tall vertical spit that is sliced from the spit as required. Gyros are usually served inside a lightly grilled piece of pita bread, along with tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce).

16. Buckeye State : OHIO

Ohio is sometimes referred to as the Buckeye State, taking the name from the state tree. In turn, the buckeye tree gets its name from the appearance of its fruit, a dark nut with a light patch, thought to resemble a “buck’s eye”.

18. TV’s “The Practice,” e.g. : LEGAL DRAMA (giving “drama queen”)

“The Practice” is a legal drama set in a Boston law firm. “The Practice” ran for seven seasons, after which many of the main cast were fired as ABC would only renew the show if its budget was drastically reduced. Regardless of the cuts, “The Practice” only survived one more season, although it did spawn a successful spinoff “Boston Legal”.

20. “Bummer!” : WHAT A DRAG! (giving “drag queen”)

The etymology of the term “drag”, as used in the transvestite world, seems to be unclear. It perhaps relates to the tendency of a transvestite’s skirts to drag along the ground in days of old (although why they just didn’t hitch up their skirts is beyond me!).

22. Ford fiasco : EDSEL

The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel, son of Henry Ford. Sadly, the name “Edsel” has become synonymous with “failure”, which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced. When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

27. Genius Bar pro : TECH

The technical support desk found in Apple Retail Stores is rather inventively called the Genius Bar. The certified support technicians are known as “Geniuses”. The trainees are called GYOs: Grow-Your-Own-Geniuses.

29. JFK’s successor : LBJ

Lyndon Baines Johnson (LBJ) was born in Stonewall, Texas to Samuel Ealy Johnson, Jr. and Rebekah Baines.

32. High-card-wins game : WAR

War is a card game, mainly played by young children.

41. Part of Congress : SENATE

The six-year terms enjoyed by US senators are staggered, so that every two years about one third of the 100 US Senate seats come up for reelection.

42. Somali-born supermodel : IMAN

Iman Mohamed Abdulmajid is a supermodel from Somalia who goes simply by the name “Iman” these days. “Iman” is an Arabic word for “faith”. Iman is smart cookie. Imam has a degree in Political Science and is fluent in five languages: Somali, Arabic, Italian, French and English. Iman was married to English rock star David Bowie from 1992 until his death in 2016.

44. Frat. counterpart : SOR

A sorority (sor.) is a female counterpart to a fraternity (frat.).

49. Deborah of “The King and I” : KERR

The lovely Deborah Kerr was a Scottish actress who made a real name for herself on the American stage and in Hollywood movies. Despite all her success, and six nominations for a Best Actress Oscar, Kerr never actually won an Academy Award. In 1967 she appeared in the James Bond film “Casino Royale” at the age of 46, making her oldest Bond Girl of all time.

“Anna and the King of Siam” is a semi-biographical novel written by Margaret Landon and first published in 1944. The book tells the largely true story of Anna Leonowens who spent five years in Siam teaching English to the children and wives of King Mongkut. The novel was adapted as a 1946 movie of the same name starring Irene Dunne and Rex Harrison. Then followed a 1951 stage musical titled “The King and I”. The musical was written as a vehicle for Gertrude Lawrence, who played Anna. Rex Harrison was asked to play the King, but he turned it down and Yul Brynner was cast instead. A movie version of the stage musical was released in 1956, famously starring Yul Brynner and Deborah Kerr.

51. Fictional Hawaiian police nickname : DANO

The cop show “Hawaii Five-O” originally ran from 1968 until 1980, with Jack Lord and James MacArthur playing detectives Steve McGarrett and “Danno” Williams. The famous theme music was composed by Morton Stevens. The show was rebooted as “Hawaii Five-0”, premiering in 2010, with Alex O’Loughlin and Scott Caan playing Steve McGarrett and “Danno” Williams. Notice the important difference in the titles of the two versions of the show: the former using a capital letter O, and the latter the numeral zero.

55. Procter & Gamble laundry detergent : IVORY SNOW (giving “Snow Queen”)

“The Snow Queen” is a fairy tale penned by Hans Christian Andersen that was first published in 1945. It is believed that Andersen was in love with famed Swedish opera singer Jenny Lind, who treated him as a friend but did not consider him romantically. The story is that Andersen was inspired to write about the icy-hearted Snow Queen after Lind rejected his advances.

60. Australia’s “Sunshine State” … or where you might find the ends of 18-, 20-, 38- and 55-Across? : QUEENSLAND

Queensland is a large state located on the northeast of Australia. The state capital of Brisbane is the third largest city in the country, after Sydney and Melbourne. Queensland was originally part of the state of New South Wales, but was separated in 1859, with the new name chosen in honor of Queen Victoria.

63. Sch. near the U.S.-Mexico border : UTEP

The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) was founded in 1914, originally as the Texas State School of Mines and Metallurgy. To this day there is a mine shaft on the campus, and the mascot of the school’s sports teams is Paydirt Pete, a prospector from the mining industry. The teams are also known as the UTEP Miners and Lady Miners.

67. Outlaw chasers : POSSE

Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

68. Hours next to flight nos. : ETDS

Estimated time of departure (ETD)

Down

3. Second actress to win an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony : RITA MORENO

There are relatively few individuals who have won the “Showbiz Award Grand Slam”, i.e., an Oscar, Tony, Grammy and Emmy. The first five to do so were:

  1. Richard Rodgers in 1962
  2. Helen Hayes in 1977
  3. Rita Moreno in 1977
  4. John Gielgud in 1991
  5. Audrey Hepburn in 1994 (posthumously)

The Puerto Rican singer, dancer and actress Rita Moreno is one of the few performers to have won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony. Moreno got her big break, and won her Oscar, for playing Anita in the 1961 screen adaption of “West Side Story”.

4. GM system with an AtYourService app : ONSTAR

The OnStar system was developed as a joint venture between GM, EDS and Hughes. The product itself was launched in 1996. Today, OnStar is only available on GM cars, although it used to be offered on other makes of car through a licensing agreement. OnStar is a subscription service that packages vehicle security, telephone, satellite navigation and remote diagnostics.

6. Happily __ after : EVER

The stock phrase “Once upon a time” has been used in various forms as the start of a narrative at least since 1380. The stock phrase at the end of stories such as folktales is often “and they all lived happily ever after”. The earlier version of this ending was “happily until their deaths”.

7. Maker of the Genesis game system : SEGA

Sega is a Japanese videogame company headquartered in Tokyo. Sega actually started out 1940 in the US as Standard Games and was located in Honolulu, Hawaii. The owners moved the operation to Tokyo in 1951 and renamed the company to Service Games. The name “Sega” is a combination of the first two letters of the words “Se-rvice” and “Ga-mes”.

9. MLB Cardinal’s cap letters : STL

The St. Louis Cardinals were originally called the “Brown Stockings”, changing their name to the “Perfectos” in 1899. That obviously didn’t go down well with the locals, as the owners changed it one year later to the Cardinals.

10. Lear’s youngest daughter : CORDELIA

“King Lear” is one of William Shakespeare’s tragedies. Lear’s three daughters figure prominently in the story line. The three are, in order of age:

  • Goneril
  • Regan
  • Cordelia

12. Green citrus fruit : LIME

“Limey” is a slang nickname for someone from Britain, and is a term used in particular by people from North America and Australia. “Limey” is thought to be short for “lime-juicer”, an insulting phrase used to describe Royal Navy sailors who were given lime juice while at sea to help stave off scurvy.

13. Baby horse : FOAL

There are lots of terms to describe horses of different ages and sexes, it seems:

  • Foal: horse of either sex that is less that one year old
  • Yearling: horse of either sex that is one to two years old
  • Filly: female horse under the age of four
  • Colt: male horse under the age of four
  • Gelding: castrated male horse of any age
  • Stallion: non-castrated male horse four years or older
  • Mare: female horse four years or older

21. Sock that covers the joint it’s named for : ANKLET

The ankle joint proper is the hinge joint connecting the ends of the tibia and fibula in the leg with the top of the talus in the foot.

25. Biblical queendom : SHEBA

Sheba is referenced in the Bible several times. The “Queen of Sheba” is mentioned as someone who traveled to Jerusalem to behold the fame of King Solomon. No one knows for sure where the kingdom of Sheba was located, although there is evidence that it was actually the ancient Semitic civilization of Saba. The Sabeans lived in what today is Yemen, on the Arabian Peninsula.

27. Ref’s ring decision : TKO

In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can’t get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly “knocked out”. A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter’s safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

30. Margarine that shares its name with Texas’ state flower : BLUE BONNET

The Blue Bonnet brand of margarine uses the slogan “Everything’s better with Blue Bonnet on it”. The slogan inspired the familiar phrase “I’m on it like Blue Bonnet” that can be used in general speech, indicating that the speaker is in control of a situation.

31. Ballet leaps : JETES

A “jeté” is a leap in ballet, coming from the French word “jeter” meaning “to throw”. A “jeté en avant” is a “leap to the front”, towards the audience. A “grand jeté” is a long horizontal jump, a split in the air, leaping from one foot to the other.

36. Red Sox ballpark : FENWAY

The Boston Red Sox is one of the most successful Major League Baseball teams and so commands a large attendance, but only when on the road. The relatively small capacity of Boston’s Fenway Park, the team’s home since 1912, has dictated that every game the Red Sox has played there has been a sell out since May of 2003.

39. Cocktail makers : BARKEEPS

Our word “cocktail” first appeared in the early 1800s. The exact origin of the term is not clear, but it is thought to be a corruption of the French word “coquetier” meaning “egg cup”, a container that was used at that time for serving mixed drinks.

40. Ambulance fig. : EMT

Emergency medical technician (EMT)

46. S.O.S shelfmate : BRILLO

Brillo Pad is a soapy, steel wool pad, patented in 1913. The company claims that the name “Brillo” is derived from the Latin word for “bright”.

S.O.S is a brand name of scouring pads made from steel wool impregnated with soap. The product was invented as a giveaway by an aluminum pot salesman in San Francisco called Ed Cox. His wife gave it the name “S.O.S” as an acronym for “Save Our Saucepans”. Note the punctuation! There is no period after the last S, and that is deliberate. When Cox went to register the trademark, he found that “S.O.S.” could not be a trademark because it was used as an international distress signal. So he dropped the period after the last S, and I hope made a lot of money for himself and his wife.

50. Fish-eating eagle : ERN

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also called the white-tailed eagle, or the sea-eagle.

51. Rapper with a title : DR DRE

Dr. Dre is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

53. Pecans and cashews : NUTS

Our everyday usage of “nut” is often at odds with the botanical definition of the term. Examples of “true nuts” are acorns, chestnuts and hazelnuts. On the other hand, even though we usually refer to almonds, pecans and walnuts as “nuts”, botanically they are classified as “drupes”. Both drupes and true nuts are fruits, the vehicles that flowering plants use to disseminate seeds. True nuts are examples of a “dry fruit”, a fruit that has no fleshy outer layer. Drupes are examples of a “fleshy fruit”, a fruit with a fleshy outer layer that often makes it desirable for an animal to eat. Familiar examples of drupes are cherries, peaches and plums. We eat the fleshy part of these drupes, and discard the pit inside that contains the seed. Other examples of drupes are walnuts, almonds and pecans. The relatively inedible flashy part of these drupes is usually removed for us before they hit our grocery stores shelves. We crack open the pit inside and eat the seed of these drupes. No wonder we use the term “nuts” to mean “crazy”!

54. Nerdy type : GEEK

The original “geek” was a sideshow performer, perhaps at a circus. We use the term today for someone regarded as foolish or clumsy, but also for someone who is technically driven and expert, but socially inept.

58. Binged (on), as snacks : ODED

Overdose (OD)

59. Pans for potstickers : WOKS

“Wok” is a Cantonese word, the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

61. Maple extract : SAP

The sugar maple is the state tree of New York, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin. It is also the primary source of maple syrup.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Greek sandwich : GYRO

5. Happy gatherings : FESTS

10. Baby cow : CALF

14. Control for an equestrian : REIN

15. In full view : OVERT

16. Buckeye State : OHIO

17. Horse feed : OATS

18. TV’s “The Practice,” e.g. : LEGAL DRAMA (giving “drama queen”)

20. “Bummer!” : WHAT A DRAG! (giving “drag queen”)

22. Ford fiasco : EDSEL

23. Provides staff for : MANS

24. “That makes sense” : I SEE

26. Champagne stopper or popper : CORK

27. Genius Bar pro : TECH

29. JFK’s successor : LBJ

32. High-card-wins game : WAR

33. Enjoy : LIKE

35. Submitted tax returns with a click : E-FILED

38. Door holder’s witticism : AGE BEFORE BEAUTY (giving “beauty queen”)

41. Part of Congress : SENATE

42. Somali-born supermodel : IMAN

43. Wide shoe size : EEE

44. Frat. counterpart : SOR

45. Aid in a felony : ABET

47. Traps in an attic? : WEBS

49. Deborah of “The King and I” : KERR

51. Fictional Hawaiian police nickname : DANO

52. Rage : ANGER

55. Procter & Gamble laundry detergent : IVORY SNOW (giving “Snow Queen”)

60. Australia’s “Sunshine State” … or where you might find the ends of 18-, 20-, 38- and 55-Across? : QUEENSLAND

62. “Go back” computer command : UNDO

63. Sch. near the U.S.-Mexico border : UTEP

64. Tweak, say : ALTER

65. Raise a big stink? : REEK

66. Pops a question : ASKS

67. Outlaw chasers : POSSE

68. Hours next to flight nos. : ETDS

Down

1. Branch out : GROW

2. “Okey-dokey” : YEAH

3. Second actress to win an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony : RITA MORENO

4. GM system with an AtYourService app : ONSTAR

5. Helps with the laundry : FOLDS

6. Happily __ after : EVER

7. Maker of the Genesis game system : SEGA

8. Like many Shakespeare plays : TRAGIC

9. MLB Cardinal’s cap letters : STL

10. Lear’s youngest daughter : CORDELIA

11. “I get it” cries : AHAS

12. Green citrus fruit : LIME

13. Baby horse : FOAL

19. Lousy grade : DEE

21. Sock that covers the joint it’s named for : ANKLET

25. Biblical queendom : SHEBA

26. Pet store enclosures : CAGES

27. Ref’s ring decision : TKO

28. Spine-tingling : EERIE

30. Margarine that shares its name with Texas’ state flower : BLUE BONNET

31. Ballet leaps : JETES

32. “Now, where __ I?” : WAS

34. “Sadly … ” : I FEAR …

36. Red Sox ballpark : FENWAY

37. Hair coloring : DYE

39. Cocktail makers : BARKEEPS

40. Ambulance fig. : EMT

46. S.O.S shelfmate : BRILLO

48. Make certain of : ENSURE

50. Fish-eating eagle : ERN

51. Rapper with a title : DR DRE

52. Poolside shade : AQUA

53. Pecans and cashews : NUTS

54. Nerdy type : GEEK

56. 37-Down containers : VATS

57. Singles : ONES

58. Binged (on), as snacks : ODED

59. Pans for potstickers : WOKS

61. Maple extract : SAP

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LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Jan 17, Monday










Constructed by: Kevin Christian & Andrea Carla Michaels

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Noo Ends

Today’s themed answers all end with a “noo” sounding syllable, each spelled differently:

  • 20A. Mork’s signoff : NANU NANU
  • 28A. Eastside Manhattan thoroughfare : FIRST AVENUE
  • 35A. Confidentially, in Cannes : ENTRE NOUS
  • 46A. Boat made from a hollowed tree trunk : DUGOUT CANOE
  • 55A. Request for the latest update : WHAT’S NEW?

Bill’s time: 5m 35s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Song of praise : PSALM

The Greek word “psalmoi” originally meant “songs sung to a harp”, and gave us the word “psalms”. In the Jewish and Western Christian traditions, the Book of Psalms contains 150 individual psalms, divided into five sections.

6. Madagascar primate : LEMUR

Lemurs are the most unusual-looking creatures, native to the island of Madagascar off the east coast of Africa. With their white fur and dark eyes that are very reflective at night, they have a “ghostly” appearance. Indeed, the animals takes their name from Roman mythology in which “lemures” were spirits of the restless dead.

11. “Norma __” : RAE

“Norma Rae” is a 1979 movie starring Sally Field as Norma Rae Webster in a tale of union activities in a textile factory in Alabama. The film is based on the true story of Crystal Lee Sutton told in a 1975 book called “Crystal Lee, a Woman of Inheritance”.

14. Fiber-__ cable : OPTIC

Optical fibers are lengths of glass or plastic that are slightly thicker than a human hair. They are usually bundled into cables, and then used for transmission of data signals. Optical transmission has advantages over electrical transmission, especially in terms of interference and loss of signal strength.

15. Last Olds model : ALERO

The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

17. Massachusetts witch trial town : SALEM

The Salem witch trials were a series of hearings held in 1692 and 1693 in colonial Massachusetts, most famously in Salem. As a result of mass hysteria, twenty people were convicted of practicing witchcraft and were executed. The events were deemed to be a terrible injustice almost immediately. As early as 1696, there was a legal ruling by the Massachusetts General Court that referred to the outcome of the trials as a tragedy. In 2001, the massachusetts legislature officially exonerated all of those convicted.

20. Mork’s sign-off : NANU NANU

The sitcom “Mork & Mindy” was broadcast from 1978 to 1982. We were first introduced to Mork (played by Robin Williams) in a special episode of “Happy Days”. The particular episode in question has a bizarre storyline culminating in Fonzie and Mork having a thumb-to-finger duel. Eventually Richie wakes up in bed, and alien Mork was just part of a dream! Oh, and “Nanu Nanu” means both “hello” and “goodbye” back on the planet Ork. “I am Mork from Ork, Nanu Nanu”. Great stuff …

22. Cute Aussie “bear” : KOALA

The koala bear really does look like a little bear, but it’s not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Koalas aren’t primates, and are one of the few mammals other than primates who have fingerprints. In fact, it can be very difficult to tell human fingerprints from koala fingerprints, even under an electron microscope. Male koalas are called “bucks”, females are “does”, and young koalas are “joeys”. I’m a little jealous of the koala, as it sleeps up to 20 hours a day …

26. Native of Damascus : SYRIAN

Damascus is the second largest city in Syria (after Aleppo), and is the country’s capital. Damascus has the distinction of being the oldest, continuously-inhabited city in the world, having been settled in the 2nd millennium BC.

27. Chinese menu letters : MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

28. Eastside Manhattan thoroughfare : FIRST AVENUE

The famous grid layout of Manhattan’s streets and avenues was the result of the Commissioner’s Plan of 1811. The plan only applied to streets above Houston Street as almost all of the development in lower Manhattan had taken place organically, as the originally colony of New Amsterdam grew. One notable exception from the 1811 plan was New York’s magnificent Central Park, which was not envision until the 1850s.

31. Dijon darling : CHERI

Dijon is a city in eastern France, in the Burgundy region. Dijon is famous for its mustard, a particularly strong variation of the condiment. The European Union doesn’t protect the name “Dijon” so anyone can use it on a label. That seems fair enough to me, given that 90% of the mustard made in and around Dijon is produced using mustard seed imported from Canada!

33. Brain scan: Abbr. : EEG

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a record of electrical activity caused by the firing of neurons within the brain. The EEG might be used to diagnose epilepsy, or perhaps to determine if a patient is “brain dead”.

35. Confidentially, in Cannes : ENTRE NOUS

In French, something might perhaps be discussed “entre deux” (between two) or “entre nous” (between us).

Cannes is a city on the French Riviera, noted as host of the Cannes Film Festival. The decision to host an annual film festival was adopted by the city just before WWII. However, the festival had to wait for the end of the war for its launch in 1946.

39. Univ. near Harvard : MIT

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) was founded in 1861 and first offered classes in 1865, in the Mercantile building in Boston. Today’s magnificent campus on the banks of the Charles River in Cambridge opened in 1916.

46. Boat made from a hollowed tree trunk : DUGOUT CANOE

The boat called a canoe takes its name from the Carib word “kenu” meaning “dugout”. It was Christopher Columbus who brought “kenu” into Spanish as “canoa”, which evolved into our English “canoe”.

51. Zambia neighbor : ANGOLA

Angola is a country in south-central Africa, on the west coast. Angola is the fourth largest diamond exporter in Africa, after Botswana, the Congo and South Africa. Such a valuable export hasn’t really helped the living standard of the country’s citizens as life expectancy and infant mortality rates are among the poorest on the continent.

The landlocked nation of Zambia in Southern Africa was ruled by the British for many years as a colony known as Northern Rhodesia. Northern Rhodesia finally gained independence in 1964, adopting the name Zambia. The new name comes from the Zambezi river, which forms much of the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. The famous Victoria Fall lies on the Zambezi, on that border.

54. Pastoral poem : IDYLL

An “idyll” (also “idyl”) is a short poem with a pastoral theme, usually depicting the scene in romantic and idealized terms. The word comes from the Greek “eidyllion”, which literally translates to “little picture” but was a word describing a short, poem with a rustic theme.

59. Kind of Boy Scout badge : MERIT

As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910. And, the Boy Scouts motto is “Be Prepared”.

61. Ancient region of Asia Minor : IONIA

The geographic region called Ionia is located in present day Turkey. Ionia was prominent in the days of Ancient Greece although it wasn’t a unified state, but rather a collection of tribes. The tribal confederacy was more based on religious and cultural similarities than a political or military alliance. Nowadays we often refer to this arrangement as the Ionian League.

Asia Minor is also known as Anatolia. It is the geographic part of Asia that protrudes out into the west, towards Europe, and is roughly equivalent to modern-day Turkey.

63. “Lux” composer Brian : ENO

“Lux” is a 2012 album released by musician Brian Eno. The album is a collection of ambient music that Eno previously composed as background “soundscapes” for art galleries and airport terminals.

64. Tylenol alternative : ALEVE

Aleve is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

Tylenol is pain relieving drug, with the active ingredient acetaminophen (which we call paracetamol back in Ireland, and outside of America).

65. “Filthy” moolah : LUCRE

Our word “lucre” meaning “money, profits” comes from the Latin “lucrum” that means the same thing.

67. Eight plus one, to aviators : NINER

In the NATO phonetic alphabet, the number 9 is pronounced “niner”.

Down

2. Language of Chile : SPANISH

The land of Chile has a very distinctive shape. It is a narrow strip that runs up the west coast of South America. The average width of the country is only a little over 100 miles, and yet its length is about 2,700 miles. Chile is touted as the longest country in the world, although I am not so sure what that means exactly. I mean, Russia extends about 4,800 miles from east-to west, so maybe “longest” implies long in the north-south direction?

4. Property encumbrance : LIEN

A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone’s property until a debt is paid. When an individual takes out a car loan, for example, the lending bank is usually a lien holder. The bank releases the lien on the car when the loan is paid in full.

5. Golden Arches egg sandwich : MCMUFFIN

The McDonald’s McMuffin breakfast sandwich was introduced, without the knowledge of the corporate office, by the operator of a Santa Barbara, California franchise in 1972. Back then, McDonald’s only offered food for lunch and dinner. The initial reaction of the corporate office on hearing about the McMuffin was to reprimand the Santa Barbara franchise operator, before embracing the concept.

6. Hollywood’s Hedy : LAMARR

Hedy Lamarr was an American actress, originally from Vienna in modern-day Austria. Not only was Lamarr a successful Hollywood performer, during WWII she was the co-inventor of the frequency-hopping spread-spectrum method of transmitting radio signals that is still used to this day in wireless communication. Impressive …

7. Stylish vigor : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style” or “flair”.

9. Ocean State sch. : URI

The University of Rhode Island (URI) was first chartered as an agricultural school, back in 1888. URI’s main campus today is located in the village of Kingston.

Rhode Island is the smallest state in the union, but is the second most densely populated. (after New Jersey). Rhode Island is known as the Ocean State, largely because about 14% of the state’s area is made up of ocean bays and inlets. Exactly how Rhode Island got its name is a little unclear. What is known is that way back in 1524, long before the Pilgrims came to New England, the Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano likened an island in the area to the Island of Rhodes in the Mediterranean. There were subsequent references to “Rhode Island” in English publications, before the colonists arrived.

10. 1990 Stallone boxing film which at the time was thought to be the conclusion of its series : ROCKY V

1990’s “Rocky V” was intended to be the last in the “Rocky” series of films. It seems that all parties were unhappy with the movie, both the critics and Sylvester Stallone, who wrote the screenplay and starred. Stallone eventually made a sixth film though, 2006’s “Rocky Balboa”, which got a much better reception.

11. Caesar salad lettuce : ROMAINE

Romaine is also known as cos lettuce, with the “romaine” name being most common here in North America.

The Caesar Salad was created by restaurateur Caesar Cardini at the Hotel Caesar’s in Tijuana, Mexico. The original recipe called for whole lettuce leaves that were to be lifted up by the stem and eaten with the fingers.

13. Flammable hydrocarbon : ETHANE

Ethane is the second largest component of natural gas, after methane. Ethane’s main use is in the production of ethylene, a compound that is widely used in the chemical industry.

24. “Breaking Bad” channel : AMC

AMC, formerly known as American Movie Classics, is one of my favorite television channels. Although the channel’s focus has shifted from airing classic movies to including other programming, there’s still a lot of quality output. AMC’s flagship shows are “Mad Men” and “Breaking Bad”.

The AMC drama “Breaking Bad” is a well-written show about a high school teacher stricken by lung cancer who turns to a life of crime to make money. It turns out that the teacher has a talent for making high-quality crystal meth. The show was created by Vince Gilligan who had spent many years as producer and writer of “The X-Files”. There is a “Breaking Bad” spin-off show running on AMC called “Better Call Saul” that focuses on the life of lawyer Saul Goodman. I hear that it’s pretty good …

26. Palm starch : SAGO

When I was growing up in Ireland I was very familiar with pearl sago, which is very similar to pearl tapioca. Pearls of sago are simply little balls of sago starch used to make breads, pancakes, biscuits, or the steamed puddings that we ate as kids. Sago comes from pith of the sago palm tree. To get at the starch the tree has to be cut down and the trunk split to reveal the pith. The pith is crushed and manipulated to make the starch available, which is then washed out of a fibrous suspension. One sago palm tree yields about 150-300 kg of starch. Personally I love the stuff, but then, I am a bit weird …

30. X, to Cato : TEN

Cato the Elder was a Roman statesman, known historically as “the elder” in order to distinguish him from his great-grandson, Cato the Younger. Cato the Elder’s ultimate position within Roman society was that of Censor, making him responsible for maintaining the census, and for supervising public morality.

37. GOP fundraising org. : RNC

National leadership of the Republican Party is provided by the Republican National Committee (RNC). Only one chairperson of the RNC has been elected to the office of US president, and that was George H. W. Bush.

The Republican Party has had the nickname Grand Old Party (GOP) since 1875. That said, the phrase was coined in the “Congressional Record” as “this gallant old party”. The moniker was changed to “grand old party” in 1876 in an article in the “Cincinnati Commercial”. The Republican Party’s elephant mascot dates back to an 1874 cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast for “Harper’s Weekly”. The Democrat’s donkey was already an established symbol. Nast drew a donkey clothed in a lion’s skin scaring away the other animals. One of the scared animals was an elephant, which Nast labeled “The Republican Vote”.

40. “Lust for Life” punk rocker : IGGY POP

Iggy Pop is a punk rock performer from Muskegon, Michigan. When he was in high school, he was a drummer for a local band called the Iguanas, and so was given the nickname “Iggy”.

44. 2000s crime drama set in Baltimore : THE WIRE

I didn’t watch the HBO series called “The Wire” when it first aired. We ending up buying all five series on DVD and we watched the whole thing a few years ago. It’s is a great drama series, and I thoroughly recommend it. Personally, I think that HBO produces some of the best dramas on American television.

45. Cast a spell on : HEX

“Hexen” is a German word meaning “to practice witchcraft”. The use of the word “hex” in English started with the Pennsylvania Dutch in the early 1800s.

46. Dan of old MGM musicals : DAILEY

Dan Dailey was a Hollywood actor from New York City. Dailey’s third marriage was to Gwen Carter O’Connor, who was once married to dancer and actor Donald O’Connor.

47. Tracey on whose show “The Simpsons” debuted : ULLMAN

Tracey Ullman is an outrageous comic actress from the UK. She moved to the US and brought out her own series in the late eighties called “The Tracey Ullman Show”. Famously, it was from “The Tracey Ullman Show” that “The Simpsons” was spun off in 1989.

49. Dinner plate scrap : ORT

Orts are small scraps of food left after a meal. “Ort” comes from Middle English, and originally described scraps left by animals.

55. Chirpy bird : WREN

A wren is a small songbird belonging to the family troglodytidae and the genus troglodytes. Wrens are known for making dome-shaped nests.

56. Home with drones : HIVE

Drone bees and ants are fertile males of the species, whose sole role in life seems to be to mate with a queen.

60. Yale collegian : ELI

Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

62. __ Lingus: Irish carrier : AER

Aer Lingus is my favorite airline! Well, the service isn’t that great, but when I get on board an Aer Lingus plane I feel like I am back in Ireland. Aer Lingus is the national airline of Ireland, with “Aer Lingus” being a phonetic spelling of the Irish “aer-loingeas” meaning “air fleet”. These days Aer Lingus can only lay claim to the title of Ireland’s oldest airline as it is no longer the biggest. That honor goes to the controversial budget airline called Ryanair.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Song of praise : PSALM

6. Madagascar primate : LEMUR

11. “Norma __” : RAE

14. Fiber-__ cable : OPTIC

15. Last Olds model : ALERO

16. Make a decision : OPT

17. Massachusetts witch trial town : SALEM

18. Frenzied : MANIC

19. Speedometer reading: Abbr. : MPH

20. Mork’s sign-off : NANU NANU

22. Cute Aussie “bear” : KOALA

24. What we breathe : AIR

25. In favor of : FOR

26. Native of Damascus : SYRIAN

27. Chinese menu letters : MSG

28. Eastside Manhattan thoroughfare : FIRST AVENUE

31. Dijon darling : CHERI

33. Brain scan: Abbr. : EEG

34. Had the best record in : LED

35. Confidentially, in Cannes : ENTRE NOUS

39. Univ. near Harvard : MIT

41. Unspecified number : ANY

42. Choppers : TEETH

46. Boat made from a hollowed tree trunk : DUGOUT CANOE

50. Ship, to a sailor : SHE

51. Zambia neighbor : ANGOLA

52. Suffix with east : -ERN

53. Male or female : SEX

54. Pastoral poem : IDYLL

55. Request for the latest update : WHAT’S NEW?

58. Cozy cat seat : LAP

59. Kind of Boy Scout badge : MERIT

61. Ancient region of Asia Minor : IONIA

63. “Lux” composer Brian : ENO

64. Tylenol alternative : ALEVE

65. “Filthy” moolah : LUCRE

66. “Sure thing” : YEP

67. Eight plus one, to aviators : NINER

68. Disdainful grin : SNEER

Down

1. Places to buy stamps: Abbr. : POS

2. Language of Chile : SPANISH

3. On the loose : AT LARGE

4. Property encumbrance : LIEN

5. Golden Arches egg sandwich : MCMUFFIN

6. Hollywood’s Hedy : LAMARR

7. Stylish vigor : ELAN

8. Café chalkboard listing : MENU

9. Ocean State sch. : URI

10. 1990 Stallone boxing film which at the time was thought to be the conclusion of its series : ROCKY V

11. Caesar salad lettuce : ROMAINE

12. Give a hand to : APPLAUD

13. Flammable hydrocarbon : ETHANE

21. There’s __ in “team” : NO I

23. Bully’s threat ender : OR ELSE!

24. “Breaking Bad” channel : AMC

26. Palm starch : SAGO

29. “Later, bro” : SEE YA

30. X, to Cato : TEN

32. Update factory machinery : RETOOL

36. “Toodles!” : TATA!

37. GOP fundraising org. : RNC

38. Kitchen implements : UTENSILS

39. Humdrum : MUNDANE

40. “Lust for Life” punk rocker : IGGY POP

43. Defining quality : ESSENCE

44. 2000s crime drama set in Baltimore : THE WIRE

45. Cast a spell on : HEX

46. Dan of old MGM musicals : DAILEY

47. Tracey on whose show “The Simpsons” debuted : ULLMAN

48. More orderly : NEATER

49. Dinner plate scrap : ORT

55. Chirpy bird : WREN

56. Home with drones : HIVE

57. Sentence subject, as a rule : NOUN

60. Yale collegian : ELI

62. __ Lingus: Irish carrier : AER

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