LA Times Crossword Answers 6 Aug 2017, Sunday










Constructed by: Clive Probert

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

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Theme: Something’s Fishy

Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but one or two words have been changed to a type of fish:

  • 27. “Me, blab to flatfish? No way!” : I NEVER TOLD A SOLE (from “I never told a soul”)
  • 46. “Take whichever one you want for your fish and chips”? : PICK A COD, ANY COD (from “pick a card, any card”)
  • 54. Fish playing on keys? : PIANO TUNA (from “piano tuner”)
  • 67. Fish on stage? : PLATFORM EEL (from “platform heel”)
  • 81. “Stop imitating a pond fish”? : DON’T BE KOI (from “don’t be coy”)
  • 88. Blue fish, maybe? : EMOTIONAL SHARK (from “emotional shock”)
  • 106. Fish duo’s routine when something seems fishy? : GOOD CARP, BAD CARP (from “good cop, bad cop”)

Bill’s time: 15m 08s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Einstein equation word : MASS

In Albert Einstein’s famous equation E=mc^2, “E” stands for energy, “m” stands for mass, and “c” stands for the speed of light.

5. Urges to attack, with “on” : SICS

“Sic ’em” is an attack order given to a dog, instructing the animal to growl, bark or even bite. The term dates back to the 1830s, with “sic” being a variation of “seek”.

9. They may be tied around saddle horns : RIATAS

A riata is a lariat or a lasso. “Riata” comes from “reata”, the Spanish word for lasso.

15. Lhasa __ : APSO

The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after “Lhasa” (the capital city) and “apso” (a Tibetan word meaning “bearded”). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

20. Workplace regulator: Abbr. : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

22. Surgeon general under Reagan : KOOP

C. Everett Koop was Surgeon General from 1982-89, appointed by President Reagan. Koop was a somewhat controversial character and one who brought the position of Surgeon General into the spotlight more than was historically the case. Partly this was due to his pro-life position, his anti-tobacco stance and the fact that AIDS became a prominent issue while he was in office.

23. First name in game shows : MERV

Merv Griffin was quite the entertainer, truly a mogul in the business. He started his career as a singer on the radio during the big band era. In the sixties he hosted his own talk show, and then famously developed such great game shows as “Jeopardy!” and “Wheel of Fortune”.

24. “__, SpaghettiOs!”: Campbell’s slogan : UH-OH

SpaghettiOs were developed by the Campbell Soup Company in 1965. Campbell’s wanted a pasta dish that could be marketed as being more “kid-friendly” and “less messy for kids”.

27. “Me, blab to flatfish? No way!” : I NEVER TOLD A SOLE (from “I never told a soul”)

The group of flatfish known as soles take their name from “solea”, the Latin word for “sandal”. And, they kind of have that shape.

31. Spelling song : YMCA

“YMCA” was released in 1978 by Village People and has been adopted as an anthem by the gay community. The song was written by Victor Willis, a straight member of the mostly gay band, and he clarifies that the lyrics are extolling the virtues of the “YMCA” as a source of recreation for black urban youth. I think he might have been winking when he said that …

33. Relief, spelled out? : ROLAIDS

The Rolaids brand of antacid was invented in the late twenties. The “Rolaids” name came from the fact that original packing was a foil “roll”. The product has a tagline: Rolaids—that’s how you spell relief. That slogan dates back to a 1970s TV campaign:

How do you spell relief?
R-O-L-A-I-D-S

36. Mumbai hrs. : IST

Indian Standard Time (IST) is used right across India (and Sri Lanka), and is 5½ hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). IST seems to have more than its fair share of critics. Some complain about the use of a single time zone across such a vast country, creating some inconvenience for those inhabiting the extreme east and west of India. My own personal gripe used to be with the “half-hour” difference, when I used to work with colleagues in India. My ability to calculate differences in times is poor enough when adding or subtracting whole hours, never mind half-hours …

Mumbai is the most populous city in India, and the second most populous city in the world (after Shanghai). The name of the city was changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995.

39. NYSE valuation measure : P/E RATIO

The P/E (price-to-earnings) ratio of a stock is the stock’s price compared to the earnings of the company per share (EPS). The idea behind the P/E ratio is that a stock with a relatively low P/E is usually a good buy, an indicator that the stock price should rise on the strength of solid earnings.

42. Oscar __ Renta : DE LA

Oscar de la Renta is a fashion designer who really came to prominence in the sixties when his designs were worn by Jacqueline Kennedy.

43. Simile middle : … AS A …

A simile is a figure of speech in which a comparison is made between two things that are unalike. For example, a person might be described as “cute as a kitten” or as “busy as a bee”.

46. “Take whichever one you want for your fish and chips”? : PICK A COD, ANY COD (from “pick a card, any card”)

In the British Isles, the most common fish that is used in traditional “fish and chips” is Atlantic cod. Cod has been overfished all over the world, and is now considered to be an endangered species by many international bodies. Confrontations over fishing rights in the North Atlantic led to conflicts called “the Cod Wars” between Iceland and the UK in the 1950s and the 1970s, with fishing fleets being protected by naval vessels and even shots being fired.

52. Antioxidant food preservative : BHT

Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is a food additive that is allowed in our food. BHT is an antioxidant.

56. French four-time Formula One champ Prost : ALAIN

Alain Prost is a retired racing driver from France who won the Formula One Drivers’ Championship on four occasions from 1985 to 1993.

63. Mercury’s Greek counterpart : HERMES

Hermes was the Greek god of transitions and boundaries, one who intercedes between mortals and the divine. The Roman equivalent to Hermes was the god Mercury.

66. Louis XIV, par exemple : ROI

Louis XIV is perhaps the most famous of the kings (“rois”) of France and was known as the Sun King (“le Roi Soleil”). Louis XIV was king from 1638 to 1715. That reign of over 72 years is the longest reign of any European monarch.

71. Telepathy, e.g. : ESP

Extrasensory perception (ESP)

74. Furtive graffiti guy : KILROY

The omnipresent doodle and graffiti “Kilroy was here” dates back to WWII, although the exact origins are in doubt. A similar character exists in other countries, with a different name. In Australia, “Foo was here” and in Britain “Chad was here”. It’s felt that Chad might have been the original, and he probably pre-dated the Second World War.

80. Dark crime films : NOIRS

The expression “film noir” has French origins, but only in that it was coined by a French critic in describing a style of Hollywood film. The term, meaning “black film” in French, was first used by Nino Frank in 1946. Film noir often applies to a movie with a melodramatic plot and a private eye or detective at its center. Good examples would be “The Big Sleep” and “D.O.A”.

81. “Stop imitating a pond fish”? : DON’T BE KOI (from “don’t be coy”)

Koi are also called Japanese carp. Koi have been bred for decorative purposes and there are now some very brightly colored examples found in Japanese water gardens.

85. Boater, for one : HAT

A boater is a straw hat often associated with boating, hence the name.

86. Decree : FIAT

A fiat is an arbitrary rule that is imposed, and is the Latin for “let it be done”.

93. Sights from the Gateway Arch : BARGES

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis is located on the banks of the Mississippi River, and is the tallest monument in the United States. It was designed by Eero Saarinen, with the help of structural engineer Hannskarl Bandel. They did their design work back in 1947, but construction wasn’t started until 1963. In 1980, a daredevil took it upon himself to parachute onto the top of the arch, intending to further jump from the apex of the arch and parachute to the ground. He hit the arch alright, and slid all the way down one of the arches to his death. No comment …

95. Petits __: garden peas : POIS

“Pois” is French for “peas”, and “petits pois” translates as “small peas”.

98. Food scrap : ORT

Orts are small scraps of food left after a meal. “Ort” comes from Middle English, and originally described scraps left by animals.

99. Bar food? : GRANOLA

The name “Granola” (and “Granula”) were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

101. Great Smokies st. : TENN

The Great Smoky Mountains are a subrange of the Appalachians and are located in North Carolina and Tennessee. The “Smokies” lie almost entirely within the bounds of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which is the most-visited national park in the whole country. The name “Smoky” is a reference to the natural fog often seen hanging over the range. The fog is actually a vapor made up of volatile organic compounds released by the vegetation covering the peaks.

103. Arles articles : UNES

Quite a few years ago now, I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city’s design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and was where he painted many of his most famous works, including “Cafe Terrace at Night” and “Bedroom in Arles”.

105. Persia, now : IRAN

Before 1935, the country we know today as Iran was called Persia by the Western world. The official name of the country since the Iranian Revolution of 1979 is the “Islamic Republic of Iran”.

106. Fish duo’s routine when something seems fishy? : GOOD CARP, BAD CARP (from “good cop, bad cop”)

Carp are freshwater fish that are used as food around the world, although they aren’t very popular in North American kitchens. The ornamental fish that we know as goldfish and koi are all types of carp.

114. __ Baker, subject of “Thirteen Reasons Why” : HANNAH

“13 Reasons Why” (“Th1rteen R3asons Why” onscreen) is a Netflix TV drama that is based on the 2007 Jay Asher novel “Thirteen Reasons Why”. The show’s title is a reference to thirteen cassette tapes left by a high school student Hannah Baker who committed suicide, with the tapes detailing thirteen reasons why she ended her life.

119. Rte. 66 state : ARIZ

The famous old highway called Route 66 has largely been replaced by modern interstates. It ran from Chicago to Los Angeles, right through the heart of America, and so it was often called the “Main Street of America”. The road gained notoriety because of Nat King Cole’s song “(Get Your Kicks On) Route 66”, and also because of the sixties TV show called “Route 66”.

120. Pakistani language : URDU

Urdu is one of the two official languages of Pakistan (the other being English), and is one of 22 scheduled languages in India. Urdu partly developed from Persian and is written from right to left.

121. June 6, 1944 : D-DAY

The most famous D-Day in history was June 6, 1944, the date of the Normandy landings in WWII. The term “D-Day” is used by the military to designate the day on which a combat operations are to be launched, especially when the actual date has yet to be determined. What D stands for seems to have been lost in the mists of time although the tradition is that D just stands for “Day”. In fact, the French have a similar term, “Jour J” (Day J), with a similar meaning. We also use H-Hour to denote the hour the attack is to commence.

123. Monument Valley feature : MESA

The spectacular Monument Valley, with it’s magnificent sandstone buttes and mesas, lies within the bounds of the Navajo Nation Reservation near the Four Corners region in the Southwest. The valley has served as a backdrop in many Hollywood movies. I always remember it as the location where Forrest Gump decided to stop running back and forth across the country.

124. Tree hugger : MOSS

There is a traditionally-held belief that in the northern hemisphere there is a heavier growth of moss on the north-facing side of trees. The assumption is that the sun creates a drier environment on the south side of the tree, an environment that is less conducive to the growth of moss.

Down

1. “La Bohème” soprano : MIMI

“La bohème” by Giacomo Puccini is the second most frequently performed opera in the US (after “Madama Butterfly”, also by Puccini). The lead female role in the piece is Mimì, a seamstress.

2. Yemen’s Gulf of __ : ADEN

The Gulf of Aden is the body of water that lies south of the Red Sea, and just north of the Horn of Africa.

6. Beatty/Hoffman flop : ISHTAR

I guess “Ishtar” did bomb and was a indeed a disaster, because I’ve never come across the title outside of crosswords. The film stars Warren Beatty and Dustin Hoffman as lounge singers working in Morocco! There’s a Cold War plot and, thank goodness, it’s a comedy. It’s so bad apparently, that it never even made it to DVD.

8. Humorist Mort : SAHL

Mort Sahl is a Canadian-born actor and comedian who moved to the US with his family when he was a child. Sahl became friends with John F. Kennedy. When Kennedy became president, Sahl wrote a lot of jokes for the President’s speeches, although he also told a lot of Kennedy jokes in his acts. After the President was assassinated in 1963, Sahl was intensely interested in finding out who was behind the crime and even got himself deputized as a member of one of the investigating teams. He was very outspoken against the results of the Warren Commission report on the assassination, and soon found himself out of favor with the public. It took a few years for him to make his comeback, but come back he did.

9. Go wild : RUN AMOK

The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy …

15. Alphabetically first dog in the AKC’s Working Group : AKITA

The Akita breed of dog is named for its point of origin, the Akita Prefecture in Japan. When Helen Keller visited Japan in 1937, she asked for and was given an Akita breed of dog, with the name of Kamikaze-go. Sadly, the dog died within a year from distemper. The following year the Japanese government officially presented Keller with a replacement dog. Supposedly Keller’s dogs were the first members of the breed to be introduced into the US.

16. Grand Prix, e.g. : PONTIAC

General Motors (GM) introduced the Pontiac brand in 1926, naming the badge for the city where the cars were produced: Pontiac, Michigan. GM dropped the Pontiac brand in the aftermath of the government bailout of 2008, in a move to reduce costs.

28. __ penguin : EMPEROR

The Emperor Penguin is the largest species of penguin, weighing in at 49-99 pounds fully grown. The Emperor Penguin is known for the incredible journey taken by the adults during the breeding season in the Antarctic winter. Females lay an egg and then trek 30-70 miles from the breeding colony to the sea to feed, returning to feed their chicks.

30. Singer Morissette : ALANIS

Alanis Morissette is a Canadian singer-songwriter. After releasing two pop albums in Canada, in 1995 she recorded her first album to be distributed internationally. Called “Jagged Little Pill”, it is a collection of songs with more of a rock influence. The album was a huge success, the highest-selling album of the 1990s, and the highest-selling debut album by any artist at any time (selling over 30 million units).

34. King Harald’s father : OLAV

Olav V was King of Norway from 1957 until 1991. Tremendously popular and down-to-earth, Olav V was known as “the People’s King” (“Folkekongen” in Norwegian). He was also a grandchild of Edward VII, who was on the British throne from 1901 to 1910.

King Harald V ascended to the throne of Norway in 1991 when his father King Olav V passed away. The European Royal houses are famously quite “incestuous”, so King Harald V of Norway is in the line of succession for the throne of England (albeit around no. 60).

37. Florida tribe : SEMINOLE

The Seminole people originally came from what is know called Florida. Increasing migration of European Americans into Seminole lands led to the three Seminole Wars, the first starting in 1818, the last ending in 1858. The basic outcome of the wars was the relocation of the vast majority of Seminoles to reservations in Oklahoma.

41. Weymouth of Talking Heads : TINA

Tina Weymouth is one of the founding members of the group called Talking Heads. Talking Heads was a New Wave band from New York City, formed in 1974 and active until 1991. I couldn’t name one of their songs, to be honest …

51. Fabric from Iraq : MUSLIN

Muslin is a cotton fabric that was first encountered by Europeans in Mosul, Iraq. The city of Mosul loaned its name to the fabric. Despite the name, muslin actually originated in and around Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh.

55. Toll rd. : TNPK

Back in the 15th century, a turnpike was a defensive barrier across a road. By the 17th century the term was used for a barrier that stopped travelers until a toll was paid. By the 18th century a turnpike was the name given to a road with a toll.

56. Ship-to-ship greetings : AHOYS

“Ahoy!” is a nautical term used to signal a vessel. When the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, he suggested that “ahoy” be used as a standard greeting when answering a call. However, Thomas Edison came up with “hello”, and we’ve been using that ever since.

59. Last Sunday, this Sunday : A WEEK AGO

We have seven days in a week because there are seven classical planets in the Solar System. The days were named for the planets during the Roman era:

  • Sun (Sunday)
  • Moon (Monday)
  • Mars (Tuesday)
  • Mercury (Wednesday)
  • Jupiter (Thursday)
  • Venus (Friday)
  • Saturn (Saturday)

60. Credit card introduced by Sears : DISCOVER

Sears introduced the Discover Card in 1985. The Discover Card brought with it some innovative features for the period, such as no annual fee and a higher-than-normal credit limit. As other credit card companies adopted those ideas, Discover Card later introduced cash-back bonuses on purchases.

68. Big Island greetings : ALOHAS

The largest island in the state of Hawaii is named Hawaii, and nicknamed “the Big Island”. Of the Hawaiian islands that I’ve had the pleasure to visit, the Big Island is definitely my favorite.

81. Scuttlebutt : DIRT

Just as modern day office workers gather around the water cooler to gossip, on board a ship back in the early 1800s the sailors would gather around the water barrel on the deck to shoot the breeze. That water barrel was called a “scuttlebutt”, from “scuttle” (opening in a ship’s deck) and “butt” (barrel). Quite interesting …

82. Kentucky __, event before the Derby : OAKS

The Kentucky Oaks is a race that is held on the Friday before the Kentucky Derby. Both races are limited to three-year-old Thoroughbreds, but the Oaks is limited to fillies.

84. __-Aid : KOOL

The drink we know today as Kool-Aid was invented by Edward Perkins and his wife, in Perkins’ mother’s kitchen in southwest Nebraska. Kool-Aid is now the Official Soft Drink of the state.

86. Flora partner : FAUNA

The fauna is the animal life of a particular region, and the flora is that region’s plant life. The term “fauna” comes from the Roman goddess of earth and fertility who was called Fauna. Flora was the Roman goddess of plants, flowers and fertility.

88. Work unit : ERG

An erg is a unit of mechanical work or energy. It is a small unit, as there are 10 million ergs in one joule. it has been suggested that an erg is about the amount of energy required for a mosquito to take off. The term comes from “ergon”, the Greek word for work.

90. Oval-shaped instrument : OCARINA

An ocarina is an ancient wind-instrument that sounds like and is played like a flute. Usually an ocarina has an egg-shaped body with a number of finger holes cut into the material making up the instrument (usually ceramic). There is a tube protruding from the body through which one blows to make sounds. The air vibrates within the body of the instrument, and the pitch of the vibrations is changed by covering and uncovering the finger-holes. Ocarinas date back as far as 12,000 years ago when they were used both in China and Central America. The ocarina was brought to Italy in the 1800s where it became popular as a child’s toy, but also as a serious instrument. It was given the name “ocarina” as its shape resembles that of a goose, and “ocarina”is a diminutive word stemming from “oca”, the Italian word for “goose”.

91. __ Gorge, near Buffalo : NIAGARA

The Niagara Gorge runs about 7 miles downstream from the base of Niagara Falls, along the Canada-US border. The gorge was formed by the Niagara River, and during this formation, Niagara Falls has gradually receded upstream.

92. Big shots : HONCHOS

“Honcho” is a slang term for a leader or manager. The term comes to us from Japanese, in which language a “hancho” is a squad (han) leader (cho).

93. Windfall : BONANZA

A bonanza is a mine with a rich pocket of ore that can be exploited. “Bonanza” is the Spanish word for a rich lode, and we imported the term into English. “Bonanza” originally meant “fair weather at sea”, and from that came to mean “prosperity, good fortune”. Ultimately, “bonanza” comes from the Latin “bonus” meaning “good”.

97. Arrogance : HUBRIS

Hubris is arrogance or overbearing pride.

100. Stylish in dress : NATTY

A natty dresser is one who dresses smartly. The term may come from the Middle English “net” meaning “fine, elegant”, in which case it shares its etymology with the word “neat”.

104. Rugby formation : SCRUM

If you’ve ever seen a rugby match, you’ll recognize the “scrum”, where the players designated as “forwards” bind together and push against the forwards on the opposing team. It’s a way of restarting the game after various types of stoppages. Scrum is short for “scrummage”, which in itself is a variation of “scrimmage”. And “scrimmage” has its roots in the word “skirmish”. If you get the chance, take a look at the Matt Damon-Morgan Freeman movie called “Invictus”, directed by Clint Eastwood. It’s all about rugby in South Africa after Nelson Mandela came to power. A powerful film …

108. Reprimand, with “out” : REAM

I must admit that I find the slang term “to ream out”, with its meaning “to scold harshly”, to be quite distasteful. The usage of the word as a reprimand dates back to about 1950.

111. Great American Ball Park team : REDS

Great American Ball Park is named after Great American Insurance Group. It seems a pity to me that the name was chosen for a sponsor, as it is such a grand name for a field dedicated to America’s pastime. Oh, and it is home to the Cincinnati Reds baseball team.

114. Cleveland __, OH : HTS

Cleveland Heights is a city in Ohio, and a suburb of Cleveland.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Einstein equation word : MASS

5. Urges to attack, with “on” : SICS

9. They may be tied around saddle horns : RIATAS

15. Lhasa __ : APSO

19. Start of a plan : IDEA

20. Workplace regulator: Abbr. : OSHA

21. Carpet installer’s step one : UNROLL

22. Surgeon general under Reagan : KOOP

23. First name in game shows : MERV

24. “__, SpaghettiOs!”: Campbell’s slogan : UH-OH

25. It may call for an R rating : NUDITY

26. __ the finish : IN AT

27. “Me, blab to flatfish? No way!” : I NEVER TOLD A SOLE (from “I never told a soul”)

30. Memo starter : ATTN

31. Spelling song : YMCA

32. Hosp. area : EMER

33. Relief, spelled out? : ROLAIDS

36. Mumbai hrs. : IST

39. NYSE valuation measure : P/E RATIO

42. Oscar __ Renta : DE LA

43. Simile middle : … AS A …

44. They often affect performance : NERVES

46. “Take whichever one you want for your fish and chips”? : PICK A COD, ANY COD (from “pick a card, any card”)

50. Glasses problem : SMEAR

51. Nonsharing word : MINE

52. Antioxidant food preservative : BHT

53. Bus sign word : VIA

54. Fish playing on keys? : PIANO TUNA (from “piano tuner”)

56. French four-time Formula One champ Prost : ALAIN

58. One in a black suit : SPADE

62. Apprentices : INTERNS

63. Mercury’s Greek counterpart : HERMES

65. Pool activity : SWIM

66. Louis XIV, par exemple : ROI

67. Fish on stage? : PLATFORM EEL (from “platform heel”)

71. Telepathy, e.g. : ESP

72. More : ELSE

74. Furtive graffiti guy : KILROY

75. Reason for turning on closed captioning : DIALECT

78. Property transfer documents : DEEDS

80. Dark crime films : NOIRS

81. “Stop imitating a pond fish”? : DON’T BE KOI (from “don’t be coy”)

83. Class : ILK

85. Boater, for one : HAT

86. Decree : FIAT

87. Bequeath : LEAVE

88. Blue fish, maybe? : EMOTIONAL SHARK (from “emotional shock”)

93. Sights from the Gateway Arch : BARGES

94. __ center : REC

95. Petits __: garden peas : POIS

96. Made more baskets than : OUTSHOT

98. Food scrap : ORT

99. Bar food? : GRANOLA

101. Great Smokies st. : TENN

103. Arles articles : UNES

105. Persia, now : IRAN

106. Fish duo’s routine when something seems fishy? : GOOD CARP, BAD CARP (from “good cop, bad cop”)

113. Arguing : AT IT

114. __ Baker, subject of “Thirteen Reasons Why” : HANNAH

115. Pull in : EARN

116. Stagger : REEL

117. Fender problem : DENT

118. Honest with : TRUE TO

119. Rte. 66 state : ARIZ

120. Pakistani language : URDU

121. June 6, 1944 : D-DAY

122. Talks back to : SASSES

123. Monument Valley feature : MESA

124. Tree hugger : MOSS

Down

1. “La Bohème” soprano : MIMI

2. Yemen’s Gulf of __ : ADEN

3. Dried-up : SERE

4. Astute : SAVVY

5. They may be anonymous : SOURCES

6. Beatty/Hoffman flop : ISHTAR

7. Half a tot’s train? : CHOO

8. Humorist Mort : SAHL

9. Go wild : RUN AMOK

10. Occupied : IN USE

11. Passion : ARDOR

12. Work hard : TOIL

13. Like a dress back from the tailor : ALTERED

14. Crafty : SLY

15. Alphabetically first dog in the AKC’s Working Group : AKITA

16. Grand Prix, e.g. : PONTIAC

17. Stinker : SO-AND-SO

18. Choose : OPT

28. __ penguin : EMPEROR

29. Flight maintenance word : DE-ICE

30. Singer Morissette : ALANIS

34. King Harald’s father : OLAV

35. Down : SAD

36. Uplifted : INSPIRED

37. Florida tribe : SEMINOLE

38. Dissertation : TREATISE

40. Could hear __ drop : A PIN

41. Weymouth of Talking Heads : TINA

42. Serve a sentence : DO TIME

45. Windmill part : VANE

47. More competent : ABLER

48. Third time, proverbially : CHARM

49. Jabbers : YAPS

51. Fabric from Iraq : MUSLIN

55. Toll rd. : TNPK

56. Ship-to-ship greetings : AHOYS

57. “You __ bother” : NEEDN’T

59. Last Sunday, this Sunday : A WEEK AGO

60. Credit card introduced by Sears : DISCOVER

61. Least meaningful, as compliments : EMPTIEST

64. Skirt feature : SLIT

68. Big Island greetings : ALOHAS

69. It can come before a sentence : TRIAL

70. Defensive structures : FORTS

73. Word processing menu : EDIT

76. Dissipated : ABLATED

77. Lustful look : LEER

79. Easy to get into : SLIP-ON

81. Scuttlebutt : DIRT

82. Kentucky __, event before the Derby : OAKS

84. __-Aid : KOOL

86. Flora partner : FAUNA

88. Work unit : ERG

89. Deserved : MERITED

90. Oval-shaped instrument : OCARINA

91. __ Gorge, near Buffalo : NIAGARA

92. Big shots : HONCHOS

93. Windfall : BONANZA

97. Arrogance : HUBRIS

100. Stylish in dress : NATTY

101. Gets buff, with “up” : TONES

102. Online social arrangement : E-DATE

104. Rugby formation : SCRUM

107. Burden : ONUS

108. Reprimand, with “out” : REAM

109. Peel : PARE

110. Prefix with dynamic : AERO-

111. Great American Ball Park team : REDS

112. Math sign : PLUS

113. Use a 112-Down : ADD

114. Cleveland __, OH : HTS

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7 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 6 Aug 2017, Sunday”

  1. 27:24 after finding and fixing a typo: ESP had somehow gotten changed to PSP. However, I then also had to fix a “real” mistake: PER AGIO (a total guess) to P/E RATIO. Geez …

  2. 36:47, mercifully straightforward. First weekend I can remember doing the Fri, Sat and Sun LAT and NYT puzzles without incident in any of the 6 puzzles. Maybe I should just quit now. Fun theme on this one with some similarities to today’s NYT theme. PICK A COD ANY COD made me laugh more than it should have…

    “Thirteen Reasons Why” sounds dreadfully depressing. I have no idea what motivates people to want to watch such a thing. Is that really entertaining to some people? Oh well, different strokes I suppose…

    Kudos to whomever came up with “How do you spell relief..?” Decades later it’s as identifiable an ad as you can think of.

    Best –

  3. @David K — Don’t feel too bad about PER AGIO. I first went with PER ANNO (thinking “year”). At least you missed by only one letter😏. @Jeff — PICK A COD … was my favorite, too (followed closely by GOOD CARP …). PLATFORM EEL? Meh. All, around, a fun Sunday diversion. Thanks, CP. @Bill — Thanks SO much for including your word derivations (e.g., “scuttlebutt”). I LOVE that stuff!

  4. FYI – Netflix is being pressured to stop airing “Thirteen Reasons Why” after a significant number of Google searches on suicide methods were made in the week following the initial showing. It ought to be interesting to see how Netflix responds, as this could motivate young people to think more about suicide of their own.

    I have always seen “turnpike” abbreviated as TPKE, and so was hung up on that for a while.

    I can attest to the fact that moss grows heavier on the north side of a tree. In fact we were taught that as a survival item in the Boy Scouts way back when. I myself have gotten some comfort when lost in the woods by knowing what direction I am headed as evidenced by moss growth.

  5. 81 minutes no errors on this. Pretty difficult for all the weirdness.

    For those complaining about need for a source (Mensa dropped a bunch of clues again this week), I realized that the Washington Post went to the LA Times puzzles once CrosSynergy went out of business. You can find their page here. No ads, a whole lot less annoying, it’s even got circles. From what I can tell, it’s using the same software as the Newsday site is using now, so I would say it’s probably working a whole lot better than the Mensa software. I’m switching all my links to that one instead of Mensa. Anyhow, enjoy everyone!

  6. Really????!!!! One letter off!!😣 I’m exceedingly vexed. At least I wasn’t alone in having issues with that DEICE/PERATIO thing. I had DEUCE, which gave me the nonsense PER ATUO.
    Other than that, it was a nice puzzle. Cute theme answers.
    Jeff, nice job on the late-week grids! 😊
    See y’all Monday!!
    Be well~~™🍀

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