LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Aug 2017, Monday










Constructed by: Bruce Haight

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Name Change

Each of today’s themed answers includes a string of circled letters, and that string is the word “NAME” with the order CHANGED:

  • 56A. Postnuptial alteration, and a hint to each set of puzzle circles : NAME CHANGE
  • 16A. High-altitude pilot’s equipment : OXYGEN MASK
  • 22A. Cellphone setting during flights : AIRPLANE MODE
  • 35A. “Nobody’s successful every time” : YOU CAN’T WIN ‘EM ALL
  • 46A. Deli supply : LUNCHEON MEAT

Bill’s time: 5m 12s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Group selfie : USIE

A selfie is a self-portrait, usually one taken with a digital camera or cell phone. A group “selfie” is sometimes referred to as a “groufie” or “wefie”. A couple’s “selfie” is known as an “usie” or “ussie”, although those terms are sometimes also used for a group picture.

10. Hanes competitor : BVD

The men’s underwear known as BVDs are made by the Bradley, Voorhees & Day. The company was started in 1876 to make bustles for women, and is named for its founders.

The Hanes brand of apparel was founded in 1901. A related brand was introduced in 1986 called Hanes Her Way.

13. Sierra __: Freetown’s country : LEONE

The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa, lying on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the “Black Poor” of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of “a problem”, three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were granted British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that’s today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

19. Fundraising school gp. : PTA

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

20. Country singer McCoy : NEAL

Neal McCoy is a country music singer from Jacksonville, Texas. McCoy’s big hits are “No Doubt About It” from 1993 and “Wink” from 1993. Although I’ve never heard any of McCoys songs, I’m guessing that my favorite would be 2005’s “Billy’s Got His Beer Goggles On” …

22. Cellphone setting during flights : AIRPLANE MODE

When one switches a smartphone or similar device to airplane mode, all processes that cause the transmission of radio waves are disabled. As such, Bluetooth, telephony and Wi-Fi are shut down. GPS may work in airplane mode as it works with sending out radio signals.

25. Like the house in a Hawthorne classic : GABLED

I had the pleasure of visiting the charming House of Seven Gables a few years ago in Salem, Massachusetts. The core of the house was built in 1668, for one Captain John Turner, and overlooks Salem Harbor. After a couple of generations, the house had to be sold by the Turners and it was purchased by the Ingersoll family. The author Nathaniel Hawthorne was a relative of the Ingersolls and often visited the house growing up. It was this house that gave Hawthorn the title for his famous Gothic novel “The House of the Seven Gables”.

30. Beer vessel : STEIN

A stein is a type of beer glass. The term is German in origin, and is short for “Steinkrug” meaning “stone jug”. “Stein” is the German for “stone”.

40. Hall of Fame pitcher Ryan : NOLAN

Nolan Ryan is famous for having more career strikeouts that any other baseball pitcher. However, he also holds the record for the most career walks and wild pitches. Another record that Ryan holds is the most no-hitters, a total of seven over his career.

44. “The Wind in the Willows” character with a “Wild Ride” at Disneyland : MR TOAD

Mr. Toad is one of the main characters in the children’s novel “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame. A. A. Milne (of “Winnie-the-Pooh” fame) wrote several plays based on “The Wind in the Willows”, the first of which is “Toad of Toad Hall”. And, Mr Toad’s Wild Ride was (it’s gone now!) one of the original rides at Disneyland when the park opened in 1955.

50. Fancy burger beef : ANGUS

The full name of the cattle breed is Aberdeen Angus, which is also the name used around the world outside of North America. The breed was developed by crossbreeding cattle from the counties of Aberdeenshire and Angus in Scotland. The breed stands out in the US as Angus cattle don’t have horns.

55. Author Silverstein : SHEL

Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children’s books is “The Giving Tree”, which was first published in 1964. “The Giving Tree” tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

56. Postnuptial alteration, and a hint to each set of puzzle circles : NAME CHANGE

Our word “nuptial” is an adjective meaning “of marriage, of the wedding ceremony”. The term derives from “nuptiae”, the Latin for “wedding, marriage”.

59. Window ledge : SILL

“Sill plate” or simply “sill” is an architectural term for a bottom horizontal member to which vertical members are attached. A windowsill is a specific sill plate that is found at the bottom of a window opening.

60. Patron saint of Norway : OLAV

Of the many kings of Norway named Olaf/Olav (and there have been five), Olaf II is perhaps the most celebrated as he was canonized and made patron saint of the country. Olaf II was king from 1015 to 1028 and was known as “Olaf the Big” (or Olaf the Fat) during his reign. Today he is more commonly referred to as “Olaf the Holy”. After Olaf died he was given the title of Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae, which is Latin for “Norway’s Eternal King”.

61. Fall zodiac sign : LIBRA

The constellation of Libra is named for the scales held by the goddess of justice. Libra is the only sign of the zodiac that isn’t named for a living creature.

64. Some fitness ctrs. : YMCAS

The YMCA is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of “a healthy spirit, mind and body”. The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

Down

2. Send a racy message to : SEXT

“Sexting” (a portmanteau of “sex” and “texting”) is the sending of explicit dialog and images between cell phones. The term “sexting” was first coined by the UK’s “Sunday Telegraph Magazine” in a 2005 article. Apparently the practice is “rampant” among teens and young adults. Whatever happened to dinner and a movie …?

3. Georgetown athlete : HOYA

The athletic teams of Georgetown University are known as the Hoyas. The name is derived from “Hoya Saxa”, a traditional cheer yelled out at Georgetown games as far back as 1893. The term is a mixture of Greek and Latin, with the Greek word “hoya” meaning “such” or “what”, and “saxa” translating from Latin as “rocks” or “small stones”. The cheer is usually rendered in English as “what rocks!”.

4. “Hulk” director Lee : ANG

Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

“Hulk” is a 2003 film with Eric Bana starring in the title role, as Hulk, and the superhero’s alter ego Dr. Bruce Banner. “Hulk” receive a mediocre reception, and so it was remade as “The Incredible Hulk” in 2008.

5. Dog on a bun : WEENIE

What we call a wiener in this country is known as a Vienna sausage in Germany. It was first produced by a butcher from Frankfurt who was living in Vienna, hence the name “Wiener”, which is German for “of Vienna”. Paradoxically, the same sausage is called a Frankfurter in Vienna, as it was created by someone from Frankfurt. It’s all very confusing …

6. Hawaii and Alaska are usually inserts on one; Abbr. : US MAP

The states of Hawaii (HI) and Alaska (AK) are usually shown as inserts in maps of the United State of America (USA).

7. “__ We Dance?” : SHALL

“Shall We Dance?” is a celebrated song from the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “The King and I”.

8. iPhone platform : IOS

iOS is what Apple now call their mobile operating system, previously known as iPhone OS.

11. Dull : VAPID

We use the adjective “vapid” today to describe something that is dull, that lacks liveliness. Back in the 1600s, the term was used to describe drinks that were flat. “Vapid” comes from the Latin “vapidus”, which translates literally as “that has exhaled its vapor”.

15. SeaWorld orca : SHAMU

Shamu was the name of the third orca (aka “killer whale”) ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the name “Shamu” is still used by SeaWorld for its killer whale shows. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

21. Designer Geoffrey : BEENE

Geoffrey Beene was an American fashion designer. He had an impressive list of clients that included First Ladies Lady Bird Johnson, Pat Nixon and Nancy Reagan.

22. Knighted actor Guinness : ALEC

Sir Alec Guinness played many great roles over a long and distinguished career, but nowadays is best remembered (sadly, I think) for playing the original Obi-Wan Kenobi in “Star Wars”.

24. Opposite of ja : NEIN

“Nein” is the German for “no”, and “ja” translates as “yes”.

25. “The Naked Maja” artist : GOYA

María Cayetana de Silva was the 13th Duchess of Alba. She was a favorite subject of the Spanish painter Francisco Goya. The duchess is the subject in the famous portraits known as “La maja desnuda” (The Nude Maja) and “La maja vestida” (The Clothed Maja). “Maja” translates from Spanish as “beautiful lady”.

27. Navy/Marines aerobatics squad : BLUE ANGELS

“Blue Angels” is the popular name for the US Navy’s Flight Demonstration Squadron. The group was formed in 1946 and is the oldest of the US military’s flying aerobatic teams. The squadron took its nickname back in ‘46 from the Blue Angel nightclub that was around at that time in New York City.

30. Florida univ. named for a canonized pope : ST LEO

Saint Leo University is a private Roman Catholic school located in the town of St. Leo, Florida. The school was founded in 1889 by a group of Benedictine monks, making it the oldest Catholic college in the state. Saint Leo was named for Pope Leo I.

31. Pan Am rival : TWA

Trans World Airlines (TWA) was a big carrier in the US, but was perhaps even more recognized for its extensive presence in Europe and the Middle East. For many years, especially after the collapse of Pan Am, TWA was considered the unofficial flag carrier for the US. The company started in 1930, the product of a forced merger of Transcontinental Air Transport and Western Air Express. The Transcontinental and Western Air that resulted (the original meaning of the initialism “TWA”) was what the Postmaster General wanted, a bigger airline to which the Postal Service could award airmail contracts.

33. NATO alphabet word for “A” : ALFA

The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. It goes Alfa, Bravo, Charlie … X-ray, Yankee, Zulu.

36. Egyptian crosses : ANKHS

The ankh was the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic character for “eternal life”. The ankh wasn’t just used in inscriptions but was often fashioned into amulets and as surrounds for mirrors (perhaps symbolizing a view into another world). The ankh is also known as “the key of the Nile” and “crux ansata” (Latin for “cross with a handle”).

37. Alaskan seaport : NOME

In 1899, the Alaska city of Nome was briefly known as Anvil City by locals to avoid confusion with the nearby city of Cape Nome. However, the US Post Office refused to approve the change, and so the name was immediately changed back to Nome.

43. Racing shell : SCULL

A scull is a boat used for competitive rowing. The main hull of the boat is often referred to as a shell. Crew members who row the boat can be referred to as “oars”. And, a scull is also an oar mounted on the stern of a small boat. It’s all very confusing …

44. Cougar automaker, for short : MERC

1967 was a big year or American muscle cars. The Pontiac Firebird was introduced that year, as was the Chevrolet Camaro that shared the same platform as the Firebird. At the same time, Ford introduced the Mercury Cougar, which was built on the same platform as the Ford Mustang that went into production just three years earlier.

46. Dogie catcher : LASSO

Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

“Dogie” (sometimes “dogy”) is cowboy slang for a motherless calf in a herd.

49. Novelist Binchy : MAEVE

Maeve Binchy was a fabulous Irish novelist, and in my day a famous newspaper columnist whose column I would read every day. A few of her novels have made it to the big screen, including two I would recommend, “Circle of Friends” starring Chris O’Donnell and Minnie Driver, and “Tara Road” starring Andie MacDowell.

52. “Mad Money” network : CNBC

CNBC is a business news channel owned by NBC. Launched in 1989, up until 1991 CNBC was known as the Consumer News and Business Channel.

The television show “Mad Money” started airing in 2005, and is hosted by the ebullient Jim Cramer. Cramer recommends that essential funds, such as those reserved for retirement, be safely locked away in conservative investment vehicles. Any money left over (still looking for that here!) is classed as “Mad Money” and can be invested in more risky stocks.

53. Taj Mahal city : AGRA

The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the fourth wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple’s 14th child. When Shah Jahan himself passed away 35 years later, he was buried beside his wife Mumtaz, in the Taj Mahal.

57. In the style of : A LA

The phrase “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. “Hogwash!” : PSHAW!

6. Group selfie : USIE

10. Hanes competitor : BVD

13. Sierra __: Freetown’s country : LEONE

14. Lace place : SHOE

15. Take wing : SOAR

16. High-altitude pilot’s equipment : OXYGEN MASK

18. Injection source, briefly : HYPO

19. Fundraising school gp. : PTA

20. Country singer McCoy : NEAL

21. Tub for water : BASIN

22. Cellphone setting during flights : AIRPLANE MODE

25. Like the house in a Hawthorne classic : GABLED

28. Elevate a golf ball : TEE UP

29. Eye impertinently : OGLE

30. Beer vessel : STEIN

32. Genre with spoken lyrics : RAP

35. “Nobody’s successful every time” : YOU CAN’T WIN ‘EM ALL

39. Cake candle count : AGE

40. Hall of Fame pitcher Ryan : NOLAN

41. Facts, for short : INFO

42. Help desk prompt : ASK ME

44. “The Wind in the Willows” character with a “Wild Ride” at Disneyland : MR TOAD

46. Deli supply : LUNCHEON MEAT

50. Fancy burger beef : ANGUS

51. Rowing tools : OARS

52. Baseball topper : CAP

55. Author Silverstein : SHEL

56. Postnuptial alteration, and a hint to each set of puzzle circles : NAME CHANGE

59. Window ledge : SILL

60. Patron saint of Norway : OLAV

61. Fall zodiac sign : LIBRA

62. Photo __: media events : OPS

63. Get one’s feet wet : WADE

64. Some fitness ctrs. : YMCAS

Down

1. Sit (down) unceremoniously : PLOP

2. Send a racy message to : SEXT

3. Georgetown athlete : HOYA

4. “Hulk” director Lee : ANG

5. Dog on a bun : WEENIE

6. Hawaii and Alaska are usually inserts on one; Abbr. : US MAP

7. “__ We Dance?” : SHALL

8. iPhone platform : IOS

9. “A mouse!” : EEK!

10. High-voiced choir lad : BOY SOPRANO

11. Dull : VAPID

12. Robotic aerial spy : DRONE

15. SeaWorld orca : SHAMU

17. Square one : NERD

21. Designer Geoffrey : BEENE

22. Knighted actor Guinness : ALEC

23. Enjoyed home cooking : ATE IN

24. Opposite of ja : NEIN

25. “The Naked Maja” artist : GOYA

26. In awe : AGOG

27. Navy/Marines aerobatics squad : BLUE ANGELS

30. Florida univ. named for a canonized pope : ST LEO

31. Pan Am rival : TWA

33. NATO alphabet word for “A” : ALFA

34. Trudge : PLOD

36. Egyptian crosses : ANKHS

37. Alaskan seaport : NOME

38. Catcher’s glove : MITT

43. Racing shell : SCULL

44. Cougar automaker, for short : MERC

45. How a poor decision might be made : RASHLY

46. Dogie catcher : LASSO

47. Far from cool : UNHIP

48. Wanderer : NOMAD

49. Novelist Binchy : MAEVE

52. “Mad Money” network : CNBC

53. Taj Mahal city : AGRA

54. Little veggies in pods : PEAS

56. Right away : NOW

57. In the style of : A LA

58. Objective : AIM

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10 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 7 Aug 2017, Monday”

  1. Bill, as is my habit, I just finished reading your explanations for the Saturday and Sunday puzzles ….. I could only argue on one clue …

    Sunday, 34 Down … King Harald’s father … Olav – Olav V was king of Norway from 1957 ~ 1991 …. ( He was born in 1903 ….). Your note may erroneously imply that he was king for 88 years.

    And regarding the marriage relations of the British and other european royal famiies, and Olav V being the grandson of Edward VII, the term you probably want to refer to, is properly ‘endogamy’ , rather than incestuous – which implies a much more closer marriage or sexual relationship – like father-daughter ot brother-sister etc. IMHO.

    114 Down. Cleveland -, OH = Hts. Clev. Hts, used to be like Shaker Hts., an abutting- adjacent suburb to Cleveland,\, and the city of rich folks and millionaires. It has a lot of old ( 1820-1920) mansions. But now, it is a somewhat lower level ‘inner ring’ city that struggles economically, and is notable for high city and Real Estate taxes.

    More on the puzzle, itself, later.

  2. As I would expect from Bruce Haight, a little tricky even on a Monday. As I did the puzzle, I thought the theme would have something to do with the word “amen”. Even seeing the reveal clue I thought the same thing. Oh well…”amen”, “name” , “mane”…they’re all anagrams

    @Glenn
    I did the puzzle over at the Washington Post, and it worked fine AND it had circles. Oh boy [sarcasm]…….But it is nice to have a workable place to do these online. We’ll see how long it lasts.

    Best –

  3. 16 minutes, no errors. Very tricky puzzle again for a Monday. Caffeine definitely seems to be a performance-enhancing substance in the crossword world. At least for me since I started doing much worse with these when I quit. But better off I don’t.

    Reposting this since I posted it late yesterday, give more people here a chance to see it that might not read back (As @Jeff mentioned, good to see it helped you): For those complaining about need for a source (Mensa dropped a bunch of clues again this week), I realized that the Washington Post went to the LA Times puzzles once CrosSynergy went out of business. You can find their page here. No ads, a whole lot less annoying, it’s even got circles. From what I can tell, it’s using the same software as the Newsday site is using now, so I would say it’s probably working a whole lot better than the Mensa software. I’m switching all my links to that one instead of Mensa. Anyhow, enjoy everyone!

  4. 8:49, no errors, in spite of fingers that insist on going everywhere but where they are supposed to … I’m very uncoordinated this morning …

    I am happy to report that my answer for Friday’s WSJ contest was correct. Unfortunately, it does not match what is given on the site today. Is it possible that even the setter was mistaken about the solution?! Negotiations are in progress … 😄

  5. For a Monday, it was somewhat challenging – though I finished in a record time – for me. The Northeast was quite perplexing, I could not get BVD despite the fact that there was, about 10 or 15 yrs ago, a “BVD bandit”, in a nearby suburb of Mentor, who used to rob folks in the middle of the night – wearing only his underwear …. it takes all types to make this world. Despite that, he did not commit any sexual crimes – to his credit. I, by far, prefer Fol – Fruit of the Loom. 😉

    Bill, thank you for explaining ‘airplane mode’, since I safely stow my cellphone in any air travel, I always wondered what it was. I never enabled it.

    My brother, with his family, spent a pleasant 5 years, in a cookie and biscuit company, in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in the 70’s. Before the civil wars began, it was a relatively prosperous country – with an upcoming middle class and all.

    I would like to recommend 3 japanese movies, Like Father, like Son …. Walking Tall …. and , Our Little Sister – all by the same director Hirokasu (?) Koreeda …. especially the first one.

    Finally, I was reading up on the economic woes of Iceland ( 2008-2011) and came across a scandinavian rune called the ‘thorn’…. like a ‘p’ with a up-elongated vertical line … pronounced like a ‘th’ as in
    ‘thorn’. So, now I realize that in the ‘Ye Olde Curiosity shoppe’ …. the first word is not a ‘yee’ but a ‘The’ . That was news to me.

    have a nice day, all.

  6. Never heard of ST LEO, as a university. Otherwise, no problem.

    @Vidwan Quite familiar with the Thorn; Also, grateful for NEIN – or any Germanic reference, no matter how small.

  7. Anon., I always thought the complete, formal reply for ‘yes’ in the german was ‘Jawohl’. So ‘Ja’ would be an equivalent to a ‘Yeah’ or ‘yup’ ?
    I wonder if there is an equivalent, in the german, for ‘nah’ ?

    Also ‘St. Leo’ may be one of the new ‘zodiac’ universities. 😉

    1. @Vidwan … I suspect that Sfingi could answer your questions about German, but I haven’t seen any posts from her in some time. (As I recall, she was having some access problems, so maybe that’s why.)

      In any case, I seem to remember a German teacher telling me that “Jawohl” is considered somewhat obsequious – the sort of thing you would say to a commanding officer or a rich employer.

  8. Hey folks!! ✌
    Easy Monday, but not a breeze, which is nice. I actually thought the theme would feature MANE — parts of a horse or something. A good number of interesting references in the gríd.

    Oh! Jawohl is what Schultz used to say to Colonel Klink on “Hogan’s Heroes!” …. Hmmm….My knowledge of German comes​ from a satirical sitcom….😶

    Speaking of sitcoms: still watching Andy Griffith. Season 5, the last to be broadcast in black and white. Don Knotts won FIVE best supporting actor Emmys for that show. 😮!!!

    Say Vidwan, do you ever watch classic Japanese films, from the great masters like Kurosawa and Ozu? Wonderful stuff… They’re some of my all-time favorite films.

    Be well~~™🐈🐰🐕

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