LA Times Crossword Answers 9 Aug 2017, Wednesday










Constructed by: Richard Monsaythe & C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Catchphrase

Today’s themed answers might be described as CATCHPHRASES, as each ends with something one might CATCH:

  • 63A. Familiar slogan … or, based on its last word, what each answer to a starred clue is? : CATCHPHRASE
  • 17A. *One may follow the wedding dress : BRIDAL TRAIN (giving “catch a train”)
  • 39A. *Avant-garde : NEW WAVE (giving “catch a wave”)
  • 10D. *Westminster’s top canine : BEST IN SHOW (giving “catch a show”)
  • 29D. *Harsh and wintry : BITTER COLD (giving “catch a cold”)

Bill’s time: 5m 26s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Heckler’s array : JEERS

Originally, the verb “to heckle” meant to question severely, and for many years was associated with the public questioning of parliamentary candidates in Scotland. In more recent times, the meaning has evolved into questioning that is less polite and that is directed at standup comics.

6. Slender woodwind : OBOE

The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name “oboe” comes from the French “hautbois” which means “high wood”. When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance you’ll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an “A”. The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe’s “A”.

10. Crony : BUD

A crony is a friend or companion. The term originated as slang in Cambridge University in England in the 1600s. “Crony” is probably derived from the Greek “khronios” meaning “long-lasting”.

14. With 24-Across, Chilean poet with a Nobel Prize : PABLO …
(24A. See 14-Across : … NERUDA)

Pablo Neruda was the pen name, and eventually the legal name, used by Chilean writer Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Basoalto chose the name as a homage to Czech poet Jan Neruda.

20. Drunk : SOT

Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning “fool”. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

21. Pontiac that was Motor Trend’s 1968 Car of the Year : GTO

The Pontiac GTO was produced by GM from 1964 to 1974, and again by a GM subsidiary in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original GTO’s design is credited to Pontiac chief engineer at the time John DeLorean, who later was found the DeLorean Motor Company.

22. Orchestra overseer : MAESTRO

“Maestro” is often used to address a musical conductor. “Maestro” (plural “maestri”) is the Italian word for “master, teacher”. The plural in English is usually “maestros”.

27. Swedish pop quartet : ABBA

Only three members of the quartet that made up the pop group ABBA were born in Sweden. Anni-Frid Lyngstad was born in Norway just after the end of WWII, the daughter of a Norwegian mother and a father who was German soldier and a member of the German occupying force during the war. The father returned to Germany with the army, and in 1947, Anna-Frid was taken with her family to Sweden. They left fearing reprisals against those who dealt with the German army during the occupation.

30. Arnold’s crime : TREASON

Treason is a serious crime committed against the nation (or the sovereign). One who commits “treason” is called a “traitor”. In the past, the term treason also applied to lesser crimes (like a woman killing her husband) so there was a differentiation between high treason against the king, and “petit treason”, against a more common citizen.

Benedict Arnold was a general in the Continental Army during the American War of Independence, who defected to the British Army. While serving with the Continental Army, Arnold was given command of the fort at West Point. He planned on surrendering the fort to the British, but his plot was discovered before he could do so and he made a narrow escape. Arnold was made a brigadier general in the British Army and he led British forces in several raids against American troops. After the war ended, Arnold moved to London and worked in the merchant business. He died there in 1791.

39. *Avant-garde : NEW WAVE (giving “catch a wave”)

People described as avant-garde are especially innovative. “Avant-garde” is French for “advance guard”.

50. Feudal drudge : SERF

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

52. Low-risk govt. securities : T-NOTES

A Treasury note (T-Note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-Note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-Bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-Bond matures in 20-30 years.

55. Strategy : TACTICS

The terms “strategy” and “tactic” are often confused. In the original frame of reference, namely war, strategy is decided prior to battle. Tactics are implemented during the battle, and are consistent with the strategy.

58. Granola morsel : OAT

The name “Granola” (and “Granula”) were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

59. 27-Down user’s need : PIN
(27D. Bread box? : ATM)

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then PIN number is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then ATM machine is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

67. Poetry Muse : ERATO

In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry, and is often depicted playing a lyre.

68. __ Hebrides : INNER

The Hebrides is a group of islands just off the west coast of Scotland. The Hebrides are divided into two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides.

69. Knight who played a newsman : TED

Ted Knight was the actor best known for playing the slow-witted news anchor Ted Baxter on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. Knight’s most famous role on the big screen was Judge Elihu Smails in the 1980 comedy “Caddyshack”.

71. Checked out before a heist : CASED

The term “case the joint” is American slang dating back at least to 1915, meaning to examine a location with the intent of robbing it. The origins of the phrase are apparently unknown.

Down

2. Currency since 1999 : EURO

The reverse side of euro coins feature a common design, a design that includes the 12-stars featured on the Flag of Europe. The number of stars is not related to the number of states in the European Union, nor has it ever been. The number of stars in the design was the subject of much debate prior to its adoption in 1955 by the Council of Europe. Twelve was a deliberate choice, as at that time there was no political connotation, and twelve was considered to be a symbol of unity.

7. Trivia night locale : BAR

Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

8. The Affordable Care Act became law during it : OBAMA ERA

The correct name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (ACA).

9. “On the Waterfront” director Kazan : ELIA

Elia Kazan won Oscars for best director in 1948 for “Gentleman’s Agreement” and in 1955 for “On The Waterfront”. In 1999 Kazan was given an Academy Lifetime Achievement Award. He also directed “East of Eden”, which introduced James Dean to movie audiences, and “Splendor in the Grass” that included Warren Beatty in his debut role.

The 1954 drama “On the Waterfront”, starring Marlon Brando, told a story of violence and corruption among longshoremen. The movie was based on a series of 24 articles written by investigative journalist Malcolm Johnston and published in “The New York Sun”. The original news stories uncovered mob infiltration on the New York City Waterfront, but the location for the film was chosen as Hoboken, New Jersey.

10. *Westminster’s top canine : BEST IN SHOW (giving “catch a show”)

The first Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was held in 1877, which makes it the second oldest sporting event in the country (narrowly beaten out by the Kentucky Derby, first run in 1875). The show was originally limited to gun dogs and was established by a group of hunters who routinely met at the Westminster Hotel in Manhattan, New York.

11. Take by force : USURP

To usurp is to seize and hold by force, say the power or authority of a ruler. The term “usurp” comes to us from Latin via French, from “usus” (a use) and “rapere” (to seize).

18. P.O. box item : LTR

Letter (ltr.)

28. La __ Tar Pits : BREA

The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It’s well worth a visit if you are in town …

29. *Harsh and wintry : BITTER COLD (giving “catch a cold”)

The common cold is caused by a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract. There are over 200 strains of virus that are known to cause the disease.

31. Off-rd. transports : ATVS

All-terrain vehicle (ATV)

32. Pedometer unit : STEP

A pedometer is an instrument worn by a runner or walker that measures the number of steps taken. The name of the device comes from “pes”, the Latin for “foot”.

37. Luau torch type : TIKI

A tiki torch is a bamboo torch that’s very commonly used in Tiki culture. Tiki culture is a relatively modern invention dating from the 20th century, and is the experience created in Polynesian-style restaurants. The word “Tiki” is borrowed from Polynesia.

Nowadays the word “luau” denotes almost any kind of party on the Hawaiian Islands, but to the purist a luau is a feast that always includes a serving of “poi”, the bulbous underground stems of taro baked with coconut milk.

40. Attended without a partner : WENT STAG

Back where I come from, bachelor parties are called stag parties, and bachelorette parties are known as hen parties.

42. Chinese menu abbr. : MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

44. Heaviest U.S. president : TAFT

William Howard Taft may have been the 27th President of the United States, but his lifelong ambition was to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. President Taft was able to realize that dream in 1921, eight years after losing his bid for re-election as president. As Chief Justice, this former US President swore in two new presidents: Calvin Coolidge (in 1925) and Herbert Hoover (in 1929). William Howard Taft is also remembered as the most obese president. In the last year of his presidency, he weighed about 340 pounds (he was 5 feet 11 inches tall). Twelve months after leaving the White House, President Taft had dropped 80 pounds and substantially lowered his blood pressure.

46. Extra NBA periods : OTS

In overtime (in OT)

50. Mar. 17 figure : ST PAT

There is a fair amount known about Saint Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as Saint Patrick’s Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

51. “Guitar Town” rocker Steve : EARLE

Steve Earle is an American songwriter and performer, with a reputation as a man who has lived a hard life. Earle’s brushes with the law and drug addiction problems have earned him the nickname “the hardcore troubadour”.

56. Zamboni’s milieu : ICE

The first ice resurfacing machine was developed in 1949 by one Frank Zamboni. The machine works by simultaneously executing a number of tasks. First, the surface of the ice is scraped off by a sharp blade. Next the ice is “washed” with water sprayed from the front of the Zamboni, and that wash water is vacuumed back up and filtered to remove impurities. Water is then reapplied to the scraped ice by a wet towel dragging behind the machine, forming a new skating surface.

57. “Fame”-ous Irene : CARA

Irene Cara (as well as acting in “Fame”) sang the theme songs to the hit movies “Fame” and “Flashdance”.

61. Stereotypical Geek Squad employee : NERD

Best Buy is a retailer specializing in the supply of consumer electronics. Best Buy services include the famous “Geek Squad”, a band of technical experts that will help solve your computer and other consumer electronic problems.

64. WNBA position : CTR

Center (ctr.)

The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) was founded in 1996. The WNBA had to compete with the American Basketball League (ABL), a professional women’s basketball league that started playing games the same year the WNBA was founded. The ABL folded in its third season.

65. Genetics lab subject : RNA

Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

Return to top of page

Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Heckler’s array : JEERS

6. Slender woodwind : OBOE

10. Crony : BUD

13. Taxpayer’s dread : AUDIT

14. With 24-Across, Chilean poet with a Nobel Prize : PABLO …

16. Suffix with Vietnam : -ESE

17. *One may follow the wedding dress : BRIDAL TRAIN (giving “catch a train”)

19. Total : SUM

20. Drunk : SOT

21. Pontiac that was Motor Trend’s 1968 Car of the Year : GTO

22. Orchestra overseer : MAESTRO

24. See 14-Across : … NERUDA

26. Places for holsters : HIPS

27. Swedish pop quartet : ABBA

30. Arnold’s crime : TREASON

33. Stand for a photo? : TRIPOD

36. Evaluation for a would-be painter : ART TEST

38. Got together : MET

39. *Avant-garde : NEW WAVE (giving “catch a wave”)

41. “The guy over there” : HIM

43. Makes harmonious : ATTUNES

45. Frightens : SPOOKS

47. “Whoa, bro!” : EASY NOW!

49. Tiny branch : TWIG

50. Feudal drudge : SERF

52. Low-risk govt. securities : T-NOTES

55. Strategy : TACTICS

58. Granola morsel : OAT

59. 27-Down user’s need : PIN

62. Master : PRO

63. Familiar slogan … or, based on its last word, what each answer to a starred clue is? : CATCHPHRASE

66. Every one : ALL

67. Poetry Muse : ERATO

68. __ Hebrides : INNER

69. Knight who played a newsman : TED

70. Food-growing prefix : AGRO-

71. Checked out before a heist : CASED

Down

1. Quick punches : JABS

2. Currency since 1999 : EURO

3. Cut and paste, e.g. : EDIT

4. Freed (of) : RID

5. Put on, as a play : STAGE

6. Decide not to join : OPT OUT

7. Trivia night locale : BAR

8. The Affordable Care Act became law during it : OBAMA ERA

9. “On the Waterfront” director Kazan : ELIA

10. *Westminster’s top canine : BEST IN SHOW (giving “catch a show”)

11. Take by force : USURP

12. Floor models : DEMOS

15. __ of a kind : ONE

18. P.O. box item : LTR

23. Horse’s hoof protection : SHOE

24. Afternoon rest : NAP

25. Makes use of, as experience : DRAWS ON

27. Bread box? : ATM

28. La __ Tar Pits : BREA

29. *Harsh and wintry : BITTER COLD (giving “catch a cold”)

31. Off-rd. transports : ATVS

32. Pedometer unit : STEP

34. Taxing task : ONUS

35. Reject as false : DENY

37. Luau torch type : TIKI

40. Attended without a partner : WENT STAG

42. Chinese menu abbr. : MSG

44. Heaviest U.S. president : TAFT

46. Extra NBA periods : OTS

48. Joyful shout : WOO-HOO!

50. Mar. 17 figure : ST PAT

51. “Guitar Town” rocker Steve : EARLE

53. Strike gently : TAP

54. Guiding principle : ETHIC

56. Zamboni’s milieu : ICE

57. “Fame”-ous Irene : CARA

59. Harsh reviews : PANS

60. “That makes sense” : I SEE

61. Stereotypical Geek Squad employee : NERD

64. WNBA position : CTR

65. Genetics lab subject : RNA

Return to top of page

10 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 9 Aug 2017, Wednesday”

  1. 16:48. Enjoyed it. I didn’t really pay attention to the theme until after I had finished.

    I was in Europe a lot in 1999 and 2000, but I remember still using francs, pesetas etc. at that time. Were they using euros as well back then? My memory might be failing..

    More pen talk from yesterday. I’ve been a fan of Cross pens for years or actually decades. I’ve lost a bunch of them, but I guess I’ve lost one fewer than I’ve purchased because I still have one. Every other pen I have in my house is one I stole from a hotel somewhere…..no I’m not kidding…

    @Carrie
    I was in Monterrey a couple of weeks ago, but it’s a landlocked industrial city near the Texas border. I haven’t been to Puerta Vallarta since last August. I just go so my tequila knowledge stays fresh… 🙂 BTW – Dodgers finally lost last night…

    Best –

    1. Hi Jeff. I spent sometime in Puerto Vallarta back in the late 70’s when I did a year crewing on sailboats up and down the coast of Mexico out of San Diego (sowing my “wild” oats after leaving my job to do some exploring). I thought it was a really fin place to drop anchor (actually the boat I was on was tied up in a berth at the marina) and the people I was crewing for went back home for a month and left me to care for their boat. Now that was a fun month! One small quibble. I see that you put an “a” on the end of Puerto. Since that is the word for “port” and the name of the city is for a politician whose last name was Vallarta the “o” is right in this case.

      Not much to say about this grid except that it was quick and easy.

      1. @Tony –
        I’d love to spend that much time down there…someday. And yes it’s Puerto Vallarta. “Puerta” means “door” and “Puerto” means “port” and that’s why it’s spelled that way. Too much tequila down there from years past I suppose…mea culpo (that was intentional)… 🙂

        Off tomorrow at 11:30 Central. Hurricane Franklin is supposed to leave us alone and stay over on the Caribbean side. I have my fingers crossed

        Best –

  2. I went to Europe in 2000 – the millenium year, and yes, Italy still had Lire(s) – because it was 2000 L to a USD, and I kept a few of those notes., because they had Maria Montessori – the K.G. teacher/founder on the obverse portrait. I also got ripped/usurped off by a taxi-cab mafia thug out of 50k L or so , but that is just a small unpleasant memory.
    I also think it was about 8.5 french francs to a USD.

    I was reading about mate or mate’ or properly pronounced “matee” – a coffee type beverage, of yerba mate leaves. It has caffiene, is bitter and drunk with a bombilo – a seive filter metal straw. I wonder if they drink it, Jeff, where ever you’re going …. Keep in touch, through the blog, throughout your travels ….

    the puzzle was challenging, but the long answers were predictable, and I had a very good, and enjoyable time. I did not get the theme. Have heard of the Chilean Nobelist poet, but couldn’t spell his name right.

    Great blog, Bill. Have a nice day, all.
    Is yesterday’s, Anonymous really madame Sfingi ? She fills in the crossword lying down, with a flair pen, and has an sicilian husband …..

  3. Talking about T-Notes, I have just read that Greece has just sold Euro 3 Bn. in 5 year notes, in the international bond market, ….. and the issue was over subscribed. !!!! This is Greece’s first foray into the commercial market, in the last 4 years. The notes pay 4.65% ( down from the original coupon for 4.975% – ) .

    However, the cautionary note is —- the country still has > Euro 323 Bn. of outstanding debt, payable at 1.5% (or less – ) though the year 2035 – unless the creditor nations, …. read Germany, ( which is personally owed >82% ) elects to take, yet another, “haircut” …..
    Also the new issue went, primatily, to refund some ‘old’ 5 yr. notes ….. and you had to buy the new issue to roll over your holdings of the old issue.

    So, T-Notes ( of other countries …. ) need not be that secure, at all,
    and as Bill, would say, its all somewhat complicated ….

  4. Fun Wednesday puzzle; about 15 minutes with no errors.

    re Steve Earle – I can’t believe I’ve never heard of the guy. Checked out his bio on Wiki and he sure seems like an interesting guy. I’ll check out his music…

  5. Hiya gang!!! 🍷
    Good puzzle, and to me it was about a true Wednesday level. Didn’t even notice the theme.
    Shout-out to TED Knight!! 😁 THERE’S an awesome vintage sitcom.
    Hey Vidwan! I thought the same thing yesterday…. It’s Sfingi, incognito! 😊
    I have a friend who absolutely swears by yerba mate. She can’t start a day without it. I’ve tried it — it didn’t stick, and I was back on coffee the next day. ☕
    Jeff! Keep in touch and travel safely! Dodgers won today… We’re going all the way!! ⚾
    Be well~~™🍀

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.