LA Times Crossword Answers 5 Nov 2017, Sunday

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Constructed by: Mike Peluso
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: Gridiron Glossary

Today’s themed answers are phrases used in American football that have been reinterpreted:

  • 23A. Goose’s medical concern? : LOSS OF DOWN
  • 25A. F? : FALSE START
  • 45A. Ginger cookie factory statistic? : SNAP COUNT
  • 69A. What results from failure to stop at a deer crossing? : DELAY OF GAME
  • 91A. So-so haul in the fishing industry? : FAIR CATCH
  • 110A. Home security system at no cost? : FREE SAFETY
  • 114A. “Hamlet” in progress? : PLAY ACTION
  • 32D. Prohibited courtroom procedure? : ILLEGAL MOTION
  • 35D. Unpleasant singles bar come-on? : OFFENSIVE LINE

Bill’s time: 19m 16s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Museum curators’ degs. : MFAS

Master of Fine Arts (MFA)

The term “curator” is Latin and applies to a manager, guardian or overseer. In English, the original curators were the guardians and overseers of minors and those with mental disease.

14. Hobbyist’s knife : X-ACTO

The X-Acto knife was invented in the thirties by a Polish immigrant, although his intention was to come up with a scalpel for surgeons. The knife couldn’t cut it as a scalpel though (pun!), because it was difficult to clean. The inventor’s brother-in law suggested it be used as a craft knife, and it is still around today.

19. 1814-’15 exile site : ELBA

Napoléon Bonaparte was a military professional from Corsica who rose to prominence after the French Revolution during the French First Republic. He took over the country in 1799 in a coup d’état and installed himself as First Consul. Soon after, he led France in the Napoleonic Wars, conflicts between the growing French Empire and a series of opposing coalitions. He was eventually defeated at the Battle of Leipzig and was forced into exile on the Italian island of Elba off the Tuscan coast. Napoleon escaped in 1815 and regained power, only to be finally defeated a few months later at the Battle of Waterloo. The British dispatched him to the island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic where he lived out the last six years of his life as a prisoner.

20. China’s Zhou __ : ENLAI

Zhou Enlai (also “Chou En-Lai”) was the first government leader of the People’s Republic of China and held the office of Premier from 1949 until he died in 1976. Zhou Enlai ran the government for Communist Party Leader Mao Zedong, often striking a more conciliatory tone with the West than that of his boss. He was instrumental, for example, in setting up President Nixon’s famous visit to China in 1972. Zhou Enlai died just a few months before Mao Zedong, with both deaths leading to unrest and a dramatic change in political direction for the country.

22. Tiger Woods has won a record 21 of them : ESPYS

The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

The golfer Tiger Woods’ real name is Eldrick Tont Woods. “Tont” is a traditional Thai name. Tiger’s father Earl Woods met his second wife Kultida Punsawad in 1966 while on a tour of duty in Thailand.

25. F? : FALSE START

The word “false” starts with a letter F.

27. Basketball Hall of Fame coach Jerry : SLOAN

Jerry Sloan is a former NBA player and head coach. He is the only coach in NBA history to reach 1,000 wins with the same club, and that team was the Utah Jazz.

30. Hastings head : LOO

It has been suggested that the British term “loo” comes from Waterloo (water-closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo”, in which the pot was called the loo!

31. Two-element tubes : DIODES

A diode is component in a circuit, the most notable characteristic of which is that it will conduct electric current in only one direction. Some of those vacuum tubes we used to see in old radios and television were diodes, but nowadays almost all diodes are semiconductor devices.

34. One of Jupiter’s Galilean moons : EUROPA

So far, Jupiter is known to have 67 moons, which is more than any other planet in the Solar System. The four largest moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto) were discovered by Galileo in 1610, making them the first objects found that did not orbit either the Earth or the Sun.

38. Woody’s son : ARLO

Singer Arlo Guthrie is known for his protest songs, just like his father Woody Guthrie. The younger Guthrie only ever had one song in the top 40: a cover version of “City of New Orleans”. He has lived for years in the town of Washington, just outside Pittsfield, Massachusetts. His 1976 song “Massachusetts” has been the official folk song of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts since 1981.

41. Discontinued allergy brand : ACTIFED

Actifed was a medication that combined an antihistamine with a nasal decongestant. Famously, the drug was included in the medical kits used by the Apollo astronauts. Our marketing friends jumped on the opportunity to hire former astronauts to appear in Actifed advertising.

42. Sundae topping item : WALNUT

There’s a lot of speculation about how the dessert called a sundae got its name, but there seems to be agreement that it is an alteration of the word “Sunday”.

45. Ginger cookie factory statistic? : SNAP COUNT

“Ginger snap cookies” are known as “ginger nut biscuits” back in Ireland where I come from …

49. Brut alternative : AFTA

Afta is an aftershave in the Mennen range of products that is owned by Colgate-Palmolive.

Brut is a brand of men’s grooming products made by Fabergé since 1964. The folks marketing Brut use the slogan “the Essence of Man”.

50. What “L” may mean: Abbr. : LGE

Large (lge.)

53. Melodious : ARIOSE

A tune that is “ariose” is song-like, characterized by melody as opposed to harmony.

55. Short albums, for short : EPS

An extended-play record, CD or download (EP) contains more music than a single, but less than an LP.

56. Crystalline rocks : GEODES

A geode is a rock in which there is a cavity lined or filled with crystal formations.

62. Longtime Priceline pitchman : SHATNER

William Shatner is a Canadian actor, one famous for playing Captain James T. Kirk in the original “Star Trek” television series. Shatner was trained as a classical Shakespearean actor, and appeared on stage in many of the Bard’s works early in his career. While playing the Kirk character, he developed a reputation for over-acting, really emphasizing some words in a speech and using an excessive number of pauses. He gave his name to a word “shatneresque”, which describes such a style.

Priceline.com is travel website providing discount prices for airline tickets and hotel stays. Priceline’s most famous spokespeople in advertisements are William Shatner and Kaley Cuoco.

68. Beer ingredient : MALT

Malt is germinated cereal grains that have been dried. The cereal is germinated by soaking it in water, and then germination is halted by drying the grains with hot air.

72. “__ le roi!” : VIVE

“Vive le roi!” is French for “Long live the king!” “À bas le roi!” is French for, “Down with the king!”, which is a phrase often heard during the French Revolution.

75. Male escorts : GIGOLOS

In French, a “gigole” is a “dancing girl, prostitute”. The male form of the word, “gigolo”, came into use in English in the 1920s.

76. Kenny Rogers quartet : EX-WIVES

Singer Kenny Rogers is from Houston, and now lives on his estate in Colbert, Georgia. The list of hit songs recorded by Rogers includes “Lucille”, “Coward of the County”, “We’ve Got Tonight” (with Sheena Easton), and “Islands in the Stream” (with Dolly Parton).

78. Socks : HOSE

The word “hose” meaning a “covering for the leg” has the same roots as the contemporary German word “Hose” meaning “trousers, pants”.

79. Subject for Archimedes : LEVER

Archimedes of Syracuse was a mathematician and scientist in ancient Greece. He contributed in many areas of physics, astronomy and mathematics, but is perhaps best known by us mere mortals for developing Archimedes’ principle. His discovery was that the upward buoyant force that is exerted on a body immersed in a fluid, whether fully or partially submerged, is equal to the weight of the fluid that the body displaces. The story is that Archimedes came up with principle while stepping in or out of a bath, and famously uttered “Eureka!”, meaning “I have found it!”.

81. Window sill item : POT

“Sill plate” or simply “sill” is an architectural term for a bottom horizontal member to which vertical members are attached. A windowsill is a specific sill plate that is found at the bottom of a window opening.

82. Yellow Teletubby : LAA-LAA

“Teletubbies” is a children’s television show produced by the BBC in the UK and shown over here on PBS. The show attracted a lot of attention in 1999 when Jerry Falwell suggested that one of the Teletubbies characters (Tinky Winky) was a homosexual role model for children.

86. Hasty departure : LAM

To be on the lam is to be in flight, to have escaped from prison. “On the lam” is American slang that originated at the end of the 19th century. The word “lam” also means to “beat” or “thrash”, as in “lambaste”. So “on the lam” might derive from the phrase “to beat it, to scram”.

96. “Il Trovatore” heroine : LEONORA

Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Il trovatore” is known in English as “The Troubadour”. It is one of the few operas with more than one version written by the same composer. Verdi wrote a French translation, with some revisions to the score, which goes by the name “Le trouvère”.

101. Verdi title bandit : ERNANI

“Ernani” is an 1844 opera by Giuseppe Verdi that is based on a play called “Hernani” by Victor Hugo. For over a decade, “Ernani” was Verdi’s most popular opera, and then along came “Il trovatore” in 1853.

102. Invigorate Dry Spray maker : ARRID

Arrid is an antiperspirant deodorant brand introduced in the thirties. Slogans associated with Arrid have been “Don’t be half-safe – use Arrid to be sure”, “Stress stinks! Arrid works!” and “Get a little closer”.

104. Soprano Fleming et al. : RENEES

Renée Fleming is a marvelous soprano from Indiana, Pennsylvania. Famous for her appearances in opera houses and concert halls all over the world, Fleming is also noted for her willingness to bring her craft to the masses. She was a guest on “Sesame Street”, singing “counting lyrics” to an aria from “Rigoletto”, and she has appeared a few times on Garrison Keillor’s “A Prairie Home Companion”.

108. Manila envelope feature : CLASP

Manila folders and envelopes were originally made from manila hemp, hence the name.

109. Infamous fictional motel : BATES

Bates Motel and house were constructed on the backlot of Universal Studios for the 1960 HItchcock movie “Psycho”. They are still standing, and for me are highlights of the backlot tour that is available to visitors.

114. “Hamlet” in progress? : PLAY ACTION

The full title of William Shakespeare’s play that we tend to call “Hamlet” is “The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark”. It is the most performed of all Shakespeare’s plays and it is also his longest, the only one of his works comprising over 4,000 lines. That’s about a 4-hour sitting in a theater …

119. Martini partner : ROSSI

The company that is today known as Martini & Rossi was started in the mid-1800s in Italy, by Alessandro Martini and Luigi Rossi (and a third partner who sold out years later). From day one it was focused on bottling the fortified wine known as vermouth. Nowadays, the company is also famous for its sparkling wines, and its sponsorship of Grand Prix racing teams. And yes, the famous cocktail is probably named for Mr. Martini.

121. Long-legged fisher : EGRET

Egrets are a group of several species of white herons. Many egret species were faced with extinction in the 1800s and early 1900s due to plume hunting, a practice driven by the demand for egret plumes that could be incorporated into hats.

122. Sein, across the Rhine : ETRE

The verb “to be” translates into German as “sein”, and into French as “être”.

124. Swiss capital : BERN

Bern (sometimes “Berne”, especially in French) is the capital city of Switzerland. The official language of the city is German, but the language most spoken in Bern is a dialect known as Bernese German.

125. DEA activity : RAIDS

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

126. Connecticut senator Chris : DODD

Chris Dodd is a Democrat who served as the Senator for the State of Connecticut for 30 years until 2011, when he chose not to run for reelection. Dodd now works as the chief lobbyist for the Motion Picture Association of America. Chris Dodd is the son of Thomas J. Dodd, who also served as a US Senator.

Down

1. 2-Down’s boss : MEL

2. 1-Down’s sitcom employee : FLO

Florence Jean “Flo” Castleberry was a waitress in the sitcom “Alice” which aired on CBS in the 70s and 80s. Flo got her own sitcom (called “Flo”) which had a brief run in the early 80s. I saw a few episodes of “Alice”, but that’s about it. Flo was played by Polly Holliday.

The sitcom “Alice” is set in Mel’s Diner, which is supposedly frequented by locals and truckers on the outskirts of Phoenix. There is a real Mel’s Diner in Phoenix, and the restaurant’s sign is used in the opening credits. The real-world Mel’s was called “Chris’ Diner”, but the owner agreed to a temporary change in name for the purposes of the show. But, “Chris” never came back, and “Mel’s” is still serving customers today.

4. Hairstyling legend : SASSOON

Vidal Sassoon was a hairdresser and businessman from London, England. Sassoon is credited with “liberating” women from the hair salon by popularizing hairstyles that one could “wash and wear”.

5. Friday creator : DEFOE

Daniel Defoe is most famous today as an author, of the novel “Robinson Crusoe” in particular. Defoe was also a trader, and a spy for King William III.

In Daniel Defoe’s 1719 novel “Robinson Crusoe”, the castaway encounters a companion that Crusoe calls “Friday”, because the two first met on that day. Friday soon becomes his willing servant. This character is the source of our terms “Man/Guy Friday” and “Girl/Guy Friday”, which are used to describe a particularly competent and loyal assistant.

6. Hyphen relative : EN DASH

In typography, there are em dashes and en dashes. The em dash is about the width of an “m” character, and an en dash about half that, the width of an “n’ character. An en dash is used, for example, to separate numbers designating a range, as in 5-10 years. The em dash seems to be going out of style, and indeed the application I am using to write this paragraph won’t let me show you one!

“Hyphen” is a Greek word that came into English via Latin, retaining the meaning “mark joining two syllables or words”. It is speculated that the mark was introduced to indicate how a word should be sung. The term comes from the Greek “hypo” and “hen” and translates literally as “under one”.

7. North Carolina university : ELON

Elon is a city in the Piedmont region of North Carolina located close to the city of Burlington. Elon University is a private liberal arts school founded in 1889.

8. Cavernous opening : MAW

“Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. “Maw” is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

9. Rat Pack leader : SINATRA

The original Rat Pack from the fifties was a group of actors that centered on Humphrey Bogart, and included a young Frank Sinatra. Supposedly, Bogart’s wife, Lauren Bacall, christened them the Rat Pack after seeing them all return from one of their nights on the town in Las Vegas. The sixties Rat Pack was a reincarnation of the fifties version, with the core group of actors being Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin (Dino), Sammy Davis Jr., Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford.

11. Chan portrayer : OLAND

Warner Oland was a Swedish actor who is best remembered for his portrayal of Charlie Chan in a series of 16 highly successful Hollywood movies. Before playing Charlie Chan, Oland made a name for himself in another Asian role on screen, playing Dr. Fu Manchu.

13. Daybreak deity : EOS

In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora.

15. Oregon port : ASTORIA

The city of Astoria, Oregon developed around Fort Astoria, which was established in 1810. Fort Astoria was a fur-trading post built by John Jacob Astor’s Pacific Fur Company, hence the “Astoria” name.

16. Auditing pro : CPA

Certified public accountant (CPA)

17. Norse war god : TYR

Týr is the Norse god of single combat, victory and heroic glory. According to legend, Týr showed great courage when he and his fellow gods were attempting to shackle the wolf monster called Fenrir. The wolf was tricked into accepting bindings that were actually magical ribbons of great strength. Fenrir submitted to the bonds because Týr agreed to place his hand in the wolf’s mouth, as a gesture of assurance that the ribbon was harmless. When Fenrir recognized the deceit, he bit off Týr’s hand. As a result, the god Týr is almost always depicted with only one hand.

18. Opposite of west, in Dortmund : OST

Dortmund is a city in the western part of Germany. Dortmund has changed its image in recent decades as it is noted for devoting a lot of space to waterways, woodlands, parks and other green spaces. Historically the city was very industrial, with many steel mills and coal mines.

29. Court defendant: Abbr. : RESP

A respondent (resp.) in a legal proceeding is the defendant.

36. Tardy people, to some : PET PEEVE

The phrase “pet peeve”, meaning “thing that provokes one most”, seems to be somewhat ironic. A “peeve” is a source of irritation, and the adjective “pet” means “especially cherished”.

37. Courtroom figs. : ADAS

Assistant District Attorney (ADA)

40. Those, in Oaxaca : ESOS

Oaxaca (officially “Oaxaca de Juárez”) is the capital city of the Mexican state of Oaxaca, located in the south of the country.

43. Hokkaido noodle : UDON

Udon noodles are made from wheat-flour and are very popular in Japanese cuisines such as tempura.

Hokkaido is the second largest island in Japan, after Honshu. It lies to the north of the country, and its largest city is the capital, Sapporo.

44. Helped through a tough time, with “over” : TIDED

Something is said “to tide one over” if it (often money) will see one through a rough patch. The idea behind the expression is that a swelling tide can carry you over an obstacle without effort on your part, as perhaps a reserve fund might keep the lenders from your door. The use of “tide” in this sense might come from some famous lines spoken by Brutus in “Julius Caesar” by William Shakespeare

There is a Tide in the affairs of men,
Which taken at the Flood, leads on to Fortune

48. Utah range : UINTA

The Uinta Mountains are a subrange of the Rocky Mountains located mainly in northeastern Utah, approximately 100 miles east of Salt Lake City. The highest point in the Uintas is Kings Peak, the highest point in Utah.

57. James and Jones of jazz : ETTAS

Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song “At Last”. Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

Etta Jones was a jazz singer, sometimes known as the “jazz musician’s jazz singer”. Because she has a similar name to Etta James, Jones was often confused with the more popular singer. Jones never really had any huge commercial success though, despite the respect that she engendered within the inner sanctums of the jazz world.

58. Duracell competitor : RAYOVAC

Rayovac was founded in 1906 in Madison, Wisconsin as the French Battery Company. The Ray-O-Vac brand was introduced for the UK market, with the name being simplified to “Rayovac” in 1988.

59. Whac-__ : A-MOLE

The Whac-A-Mole arcade game was invented in 1976. Players use a mallet to force five plastic moles back into their holes. Whacking the moles can be so frustrating that we sometimes use the term “Whac-a-mole” to describe a repetitive and futile task.

62. Wee, in Dundee : SMA

The city of Dundee lies on the north bank of the Firth of Tay in Scotland. The origins of the name “Dundee” are a little obscure, although the omnipresent “dùn” in place names all over Scotland and Ireland is the Celtic word for “fort”.

64. California-based shoe company : LA GEAR

LA Gear is an athletic shoe manufacturer based in Los Angeles.

67. Legal thing : RES

“Res” is the Latin for “thing”. “Res” is used in a lot of phrases in the law, including “res ipsa loquitur”. The literal translation of “res ipsa loquitur” is “the thing speaks for itself”. It refers to situations when there is an injury, and the nature of the injury is such that one can assume that negligence had to have taken place.

70. Actress Palmer : LILLI

Lilli Palmer was an actress who was born Lilli Peiser in Prussia. Palmer fled from Germany after the Nazis took power, ending up in England. She appeared in numerous British films, and married actor Rex Harrison in 1943. She moved to the US with Harrison in 1945, and there established a career in Hollywood. Although Harrison and Palmer divorced in 1957, some of Harrison’s ashes were scattered over Palmer’s grave soon after his passing.

71. Joe Namath, notably : EX-JET

The legendary quarterback Joe Namath played most of his professional football games with the New York Jets. He was dubbed “Broadway Joe” in 1965 by offensive tackle Sherman Plunkett, a reference to Namath’s appearance on the cover of “Sports Illustrated”. Namath had played college football with the University of Alabama but left school without finishing his degree, to play professionally. Many years later he enrolled in Alabama’s External Degree program, and graduated with a BA in December 2007, at 64 years of age. Well done, Joe!

74. Costa __ Sol : DEL

Spain’s Costa del Sol (“Coast of the Sun”) is in Andalusia in the South of Spain. It lies sandwiched between two other “costas”, the Costa de la Luz and the Costa Tropical. The city of Malaga is on the Costa del Sol, as well as the famous European tourist destinations of Torremolinos and Marbella. The Costa del Sol was made up of sleepy little fishing villages until the 1980s when the European sunseekers descended on the region. I wouldn’t recommend it for a holiday quite frankly …

80. Pacific salmon : COHO

The Coho salmon is dark blue with silver along the side of its body, but only during the phase of its life while it is in the ocean. When spawning and heading up into a freshwater river, the Coho has bright red sides.

83. Toto hit that mentions Kilimanjaro : AFRICA

Toto is an American rock band dating back to 1977. As well as their big hit “Rosanna”, Toto also sang another good tune called “Africa”.

84. Routing org. : AAA

The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

87. Santa __: dry winds : ANAS

The Santa Ana winds are the very dry air currents that sweep offshore late in the year in Southern California. Because these air currents are so dry, they are noted for their influence over forest fires in the area, especially in the heat of the fall. The winds arise from a buildup of air pressure in the Great Basin that lies between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Under the right conditions, that air spills over the peaks of the Sierra Nevada and basically “falls” down the side of the Sierra range, heading for the ocean. As the air falls it becomes drier and heats up so that relative humidity can fall to below 10% by the time it hits the coast.

88. Corp. big shots : MGT

Management (mgt.)

92. Loan figs. : APRS

Annual percentage rate (APR)

93. The Beatles’ “Day __” : TRIPPER

The Beatles released the song “Day Tripper” at the end of 1965 for the Christmas market. The flip-side featured the song “We Can Work It Out”, and the record was the first one ever to be described as “double A-side”.

103. Belted tire synthetic : RAYON

Rayon is a little unusual in the textile industry in that it is not truly a synthetic fiber, but nor can it be called a natural fiber. Rayon is produced from naturally occurring cellulose that is dissolved and then reformed into fibers.

105. La Floride et La Virginie : ETATS

In French, “La Floride” (Florida) is a “état” (state), and so is “La Virginie” (Virginia).

106. Japanese chip maker : NEC

“NEC” is the name that the Nippon Electric Company chose for itself outside of Japan after a rebranding exercise in 1983.

109. Adriatic port : BARI

Bari is a major port city on the Adriatic coast of Italy. Bari has the unfortunate distinction of being the only city in Europe to experience chemical warfare during WWII. Allied stores of mustard gas were released during a German bombing raid on Bari in 1943. Fatalities caused by the chemical agent were reported as 69, although other reports list the number as maybe a thousand military personnel and a thousand civilians.

110. Monastery title : FRA

The title “Fra” (brother) is used by Italian monks.

111. Carl’s director son : ROB

The great director and actor Rob Reiner first came to prominence playing “Meathead”, Archie and Edith Bunker’s son-in-law in “All in the Family”. Since then, Reiner has directed a long string of hit movies including, “The Princess Bride”, “Stand by Me”, “This Is Spinal Tap”, “When Harry Met Sally”, “Misery” and “A Few Good Men”.

The multi-talented Carl Reiner is from the Bronx, New York. Reiner was married to singer Estelle Roberts. You might remember Roberts from the film “When Harry Met Sally” that was directed by Carl’s son, Rob Reiner. Estelle was the woman in the deli who said the famous line “ I’ll have what’s she’s having”, on seeing how excited Meg Ryan apparently was with her sandwich.

112. Conductor __-Pekka Salonen : ESA-

Esa-Pekka Salonen is a Finnish conductor and composer.

113. It’s not a bad lie : FIB

To “fib” is to “to tell a lie”. The term likely comes from “fibble-fable” meaning “nonsense”, itself derived from “fable”.

115. JFK alternative : LGA

The three big airports serving New York City (NYC) are John F. Kennedy (JFK), La Guardia (LGA) and Newark (EWR).

116. Simpson trial judge : ITO

Judge Lance Ito came in for a lot of criticism for his handling of the O.J. Simpson murder trial. The lead prosecutor in that trial was Marcia Clark, you might recall. I read the book that’s Clark wrote about the trial called “Without a Doubt”, and she pointed out one trait of Judge Ito that I think is quite telling. Ito would almost always refer to the prosecutor as “Marcia”, while addressing the men on both sides of the case as “Mister”.

118. Actor Beatty : NED

Actor Ned Beatty is probably best remembered for the rather disturbing “squeal like a pig” scene in the movie “Deliverance”. Beatty also earned an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor for his performance in the 1976 movie “Network”.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Museum curators’ degs. : MFAS
5. Considers : DEEMS
10. “Ain’t happening” : NOPE
14. Hobbyist’s knife : X-ACTO
19. 1814-’15 exile site : ELBA
20. China’s Zhou __ : ENLAI
21. Pats on the table : OLEO
22. Tiger Woods has won a record 21 of them : ESPYS
23. Goose’s medical concern? : LOSS OF DOWN
25. F? : FALSE START
27. Basketball Hall of Fame coach Jerry : SLOAN
28. Ain’t right? : AREN’T
30. Hastings head : LOO
31. Two-element tubes : DIODES
33. Energetic mount : STEED
34. One of Jupiter’s Galilean moons : EUROPA
38. Woody’s son : ARLO
39. Ones with will power? : HEIRS
41. Discontinued allergy brand : ACTIFED
42. Sundae topping item : WALNUT
45. Ginger cookie factory statistic? : SNAP COUNT
49. Brut alternative : AFTA
50. What “L” may mean: Abbr. : LGE
51. Fared reasonably well : DID OK
53. Melodious : ARIOSE
55. Short albums, for short : EPS
56. Crystalline rocks : GEODES
58. __ to go: eager : RARIN’
60. Troubling spots : ACNE
62. Longtime Priceline pitchman : SHATNER
64. Cries over : LAMENTS
66. Perp stopper : TASER
68. Beer ingredient : MALT
69. What results from failure to stop at a deer crossing? : DELAY OF GAME
72. “__ le roi!” : VIVE
73. Equally irate : AS MAD
75. Male escorts : GIGOLOS
76. Kenny Rogers quartet : EX-WIVES
78. Socks : HOSE
79. Subject for Archimedes : LEVER
80. Convince using flattery : CAJOLE
81. Window sill item : POT
82. Yellow Teletubby : LAA-LAA
85. Kitchen gadget : CORER
86. Hasty departure : LAM
89. Enthused : AVID
91. So-so haul in the fishing industry? : FAIR CATCH
94. Raising a ball, with “up” : TEEING
96. “Il Trovatore” heroine : LEONORA
98. Stop before surgery : PRE-OP
100. Pesky biter : GNAT
101. Verdi title bandit : ERNANI
102. Invigorate Dry Spray maker : ARRID
104. Soprano Fleming et al. : RENEES
107. Private eye : TEC
108. Manila envelope feature : CLASP
109. Infamous fictional motel : BATES
110. Home security system at no cost? : FREE SAFETY
114. “Hamlet” in progress? : PLAY ACTION
119. Martini partner : ROSSI
120. Logical beginning? : IDEO-
121. Long-legged fisher : EGRET
122. Sein, across the Rhine : ETRE
123. Lessen : ABATE
124. Swiss capital : BERN
125. DEA activity : RAIDS
126. Connecticut senator Chris : DODD

Down

1. 2-Down’s boss : MEL
2. 1-Down’s sitcom employee : FLO
3. Crunch targets : ABS
4. Hairstyling legend : SASSOON
5. Friday creator : DEFOE
6. Hyphen relative : EN DASH
7. North Carolina university : ELON
8. Cavernous opening : MAW
9. Rat Pack leader : SINATRA
10. Like some bank services : NO-FEE
11. Chan portrayer : OLAND
12. Bombard : PELT
13. Daybreak deity : EOS
14. Crosses off : XES OUT
15. Oregon port : ASTORIA
16. Auditing pro : CPA
17. Norse war god : TYR
18. Opposite of west, in Dortmund : OST
24. Stale : OLD
26. Puts into office : ELECTS
29. Court defendant: Abbr. : RESP
31. Bore : DRAG
32. Prohibited courtroom procedure? : ILLEGAL MOTION
33. Go down : SINK
35. Unpleasant singles bar come-on? : OFFENSIVE LINE
36. Tardy people, to some : PET PEEVE
37. Courtroom figs. : ADAS
38. Leatherwork tool : AWL
40. Those, in Oaxaca : ESOS
41. “Is that __?” : A NO
43. Hokkaido noodle : UDON
44. Helped through a tough time, with “over” : TIDED
46. Tend to : CARE FOR
47. Letter-shaped gaskets : O-RINGS
48. Utah range : UINTA
52. Loosening of govt. standards : DEREG
54. Take in : EAT
57. James and Jones of jazz : ETTAS
58. Duracell competitor : RAYOVAC
59. Whac-__ : A-MOLE
61. Nitpick : CAVIL
62. Wee, in Dundee : SMA
63. Discuss in detail : HASH OVER
64. California-based shoe company : LA GEAR
65. Feature of a no-holds-barred campaign : SMEAR
67. Legal thing : RES
70. Actress Palmer : LILLI
71. Joe Namath, notably : EX-JET
74. Costa __ Sol : DEL
77. Eroded : WORE
80. Pacific salmon : COHO
81. Ashen : PALE
83. Toto hit that mentions Kilimanjaro : AFRICA
84. Routing org. : AAA
85. Included in the email loop, briefly : CCED
87. Santa __: dry winds : ANAS
88. Corp. big shots : MGT
90. Proof of paternity, perhaps : DNA TEST
92. Loan figs. : APRS
93. The Beatles’ “Day __” : TRIPPER
95. Spewed : EGESTED
97. Baby’s first garment : ONESIE
99. Implored : PRAYED
102. Not leave as is : ALTER
103. Belted tire synthetic : RAYON
105. La Floride et La Virginie : ETATS
106. Japanese chip maker : NEC
108. Turn over : CEDE
109. Adriatic port : BARI
110. Monastery title : FRA
111. Carl’s director son : ROB
112. Conductor __-Pekka-Salonen : ESA
113. It’s not a bad lie : FIB
115. JFK alternative : LGA
116. Simpson trial judge : ITO
117. Command from a maj. : ORD
118. Actor Beatty : NED

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