LA Times Crossword Answers 12 Nov 2017, Sunday

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Constructed by: Thomas Takaro
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: Your Eyes Become You

Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase in which a letter I (sounds like “eye”) becomes a letter U (sounds like “you”):

  • 23A. Traffic jam? : MUDDLE OF THE ROAD (from “middle of the road”)
  • 33A. Serve leftover rolls? : RECYCLE BUNS (from “recycle bins”)
  • 42A. Dispute over young flowers? : BUDDING WAR (from “bidding war”)
  • 59A. Last pat? : THE BUTTER END (from “the bitter end”)
  • 68A. Coin-making tool? : PENNY PUNCHER (from “penny pincher”)
  • 84A. Mediocre deli item? : DULL PICKLE (from “dill pickle”)
  • 93A. Mallard’s beard? : DUCK VAN DYKE (from “Dick Van Dyke”)
  • 107A. Pair of vehicles in a plot? : TWO-CAR COLLUSION (from “two-car collision”)
  • 15D. Viking descendant on a rampage? : NORMAN MAULER (from “Norman Mailer”)
  • 59D. “Don’t forget the rubber disk”? : TAKE YOUR PUCK (from “take your pick”)

Bill’s time: 16m 32s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • SACCO (Secco)
  • ARRAO (Arreu)
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    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    1. Ball stars : DEBS

    “Deb” is short for “debutante”, which translates from French as “female beginner”.

    5. Baseball’s Hammerin’ Hank : AARON

    The great Hank Aaron (“Hammerin’ Hank” or “the Hammer”) has many claims to fame. One notable fact is that he is the last major league baseball player to have also played in the Negro League.

    13. Cline portrayer in “Sweet Dreams” : LANGE

    The actress Jessica Lange is also an accomplished and published photographer. She was married for ten years to Spanish photographer Paco Grande. After separating from Grande, Lange was partnered with the great Russian dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov, with whom she had her first child.

    “Sweet Dreams” is a country song written and recorded in 1956 by Don Gibson. Patsy Cline had a very successful cover version that was released in 1963. The song title was then used as the name for a 1985 movie about Patsy Cline’s life, which had Jessica Lange in the starring role.

    19. Bunkum : TRIPE

    “Tripe” is an informal term meaning “rubbish, of little value”. Tripe is actually the rubbery stomach lining of an animal such as a cow. Tripe is a traditional dish in British cuisine that prepared by poaching it with onions in milk.

    The word “bunk” is short for “bunkum”, the phonetic spelling of “Buncombe”, which is a county in North Carolina. Supposedly, a state representative made a dull and irrelevant speech that was directed to his home county of Buncombe, bringing the term “bunkum” into the language with the meaning of “nonsense”. The derivative word “debunk” first appeared in a novel by William Woodward in 1923, when he used it to describe “taking the bunk out of things”.

    26. __ Rossi: Gallo brand : CARLO

    Carlo Rossi is a brand of wine produced by E & J Gallo. The name was chosen in honor of a salesman working for the winery named Charles Rossi, who was also a member of the Gallo family by marriage. Charles Rossi used to appear in TV ads for the wine in seventies.

    27. View from Anchorage : DENALI

    Denali means “the high one” in the native Athabaskan language, and is now the name used for Mount McKinley. Denali’s summit stands at 20,237 feet, making it the highest mountain peak in North America. I was surprised to learn that there is a Denali State Park, as well as the Denali National Park. The two are located adjacent to each other (which makes sense!). The State Park is undeveloped for all practical purposes, with just a few campgrounds and trailheads.

    Anchorage, Alaska is the northernmost city in the US with over 100,000 residents (in fact, it has a population close to 300,000). Anchorage is also the state’s most populous city, and is home to more than 40% of Alaska’s residents.

    28. What may be intended by inadvertent wordplay? : NO PUN

    No pun intended.

    29. Theater giant? : IMAX

    The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

    30. Verdi’s “Un __ in maschera” : BALLO

    “Un ballo in maschera” (“A Masked Ball”) is an 1859 opera by Giuseppe Verdi. It tells the story of the assassination of King Gustav III of Sweden during a masked ball, which is an event that actually took place in 1792. “Un ballo in maschera” includes every crossword constructors favorite aria “Eri tu”.

    38. “It’s Only a Paper Moon” composer : ARLEN

    Harold Arlen is a composer of popular music who will forever be associated with his composition “Over the Rainbow” from the movie “The Wizard of Oz”. Arlen also composed the music to “Come Rain or Come Shine”, “It’s Only a Paper Moon”, “Lydia the Tattooed Lady” and the wonderful “Stormy Weather”.

    “It’s Only a Paper Moon” is 1933 song composed by Harold Arlen for the Broadway play “The Great Magoo”, which was a flop. Arlen recycled the song, so that it turns up in the 1933 movie “Take a Chance”. It was used decades later in the 1973 film “Paper Moon”, which gets it title from the song.

    40. Bay Area county : MARIN

    When you leave the city of San Francisco via the famous Golden Gate Bridge (i.e. heading north), you cross into Marin County.

    51. Rescue squad initials : EMS

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

    55. Goose cooked in its own fat, say : CONFIT

    A confit is a meat that has been cooked and preserved in its own fat. “Confit” is a French word meaning “preserved”.

    58. Night in Nantes : NUIT

    Nantes is a beautiful city located on the delta of the Loire, Erdre and Sèvre rivers. It has the well deserved nickname of “The Venice of the West”. I had the privilege of visiting Nantes a couple of times on business, and I can attest that it really is a charming city …

    63. Hawaiian non-natives : HAOLES

    The Hawaiian term “haole” is used to refer to a foreigner, and in particular a Caucasian.

    64. “__ any drop to drink”: Coleridge : NOR

    “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is an epic poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge that was first published in 1798. The publication of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period of British literature. Perhaps the lines most often quoted from the poem are:

    Water, water, every where,
    And all the boards did shrink;
    Water, water, every where
    Nor any drop to drink

    67. Strong sharks : MAKOS

    The shortfin mako shark can appear on restaurant menus, and as a result the species is dying out in some parts of the world. The mako gets its own back sometimes though, as attacks on humans are not unknown. And the shark in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Old Man and the Sea”, that’s a mako. “Mako” is the Maori word for “shark” or “shark tooth”.

    73. Beaded counters : ABACI

    The abacus (plural “abaci”) was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that abaci are still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

    75. Sealy alternatives : SERTAS

    Serta was founded in 1931 when a group of 13 mattress manufacturers came together, essentially forming a cooperative. Today, the Serta company is owned by eight independent licensees in a similar arrangement. Serta advertisements feature the Serta Counting Sheep. Each numbered sheep has a different personality, such as:

    • #1 The Leader of the Flock
    • #½ The Tweener
    • #13 Mr. Bad Luck
    • #53 The Pessimist
    • #86 Benedict Arnold

    76. Ma playing music : YO-YO

    Yo-Yo Ma is a marvelous American cellist who was born in Paris to Chinese parents. Ma started studying the violin when he was very young, working his way up (in size) to the viola and finally to the cello. He has said that he wanted to play the double bass, but it was just too big for his relatively small frame.

    87. “__ Gold”: Fonda film : ULEE’S

    “Ulee’s Gold” is a highly respected film from 1997 in which Peter Fonda plays the title role of Ulee. Ulee’s “gold” is the honey that Ulee produces. It is a favorite role for Peter Fonda and he has shared that playing Ulee brought to mind his father Henry Fonda, who himself kept a couple of hives. So if you see Peter Fonda in “Ulee’s Gold” you’re witnessing some characteristics that Peter saw in his father.

    88. Green Giant orb : PEA

    The Jolly Green Giant was introduced by Minnesota Valley Canning in 1925 to help sell the company’s peas. He was named after one of the varieties of pea that the company sold, the “Green Giant”. The Jolly Green Giant first appeared in a television commercial in 1953, walking through a valley with young boys running around at his feet. That first commercial proved to be so scary for younger viewers that it was immediately pulled off the air. In 1972, the Jolly Green Giant was given an apprentice called the Little Green Sprout.

    90. Letter-shaped 95-Down opening : F-HOLE
    (95D. Instrument with two 90-Acrosses : VIOLA)

    The hole(s) in the upper sound board of a stringed musical instrument is known as a “sound hole”. Interestingly, the hole itself isn’t the main source of the musical sound, but rather allows for more vibration of the sound board, which provides most of the sound. Sound holes have different shapes. The holes in the instruments from the violin family are F-holes.

    91. Birdie plus one : PAR

    The following terms are routinely used in golf for scores relative to par:

    • Bogey: one over par
    • Par
    • Birdie: one under par
    • Eagle: two under par
    • Albatross (also “double eagle”): three under par
    • Condor: four under par

    No one has ever recorded a condor during a professional tournament.

    93. Mallard’s beard? : DUCK VAN DYKE (from “Dick Van Dyke”)

    Anthony van Dyck was a Flemish artist, although he was noted as a painter in the British royal court. His most famous portraits are of King Charles I of England and members of his family. The men in his paintings often sported a short, pointed beard that was in fashion at the time. When that style of beard became fashionable again centuries later, it was termed a “Van Dyke” in honor of the artist.

    The mallard is perhaps the most recognizable of all ducks and is also known as the Wild Duck. The name “mallard” has the same Latin root as our word “male”, probably reflecting how flamboyant the coloring is of the male of the species relative to the female.

    The iconic comedian, actor, singer and dancer Dick Van Dyke has been in the world of entertainment since the 1940s when he was a radio announcer with the US military. He really made a name for himself on television in his iconic sitcom “The Dick Van Dyke Show”. On the big screen, Van Dyke’s most famous roles were in “Bye Bye Birdie” (1963), “Mary Poppins” (1964) and “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” (1968).

    100. Some dadaist art : ARPS

    Jean Arp was a French artist renowned for his work with torn and pasted paper, although that wasn’t the only medium he used. Arp was the son of a French mother and German father and spoke both languages fluently. When he was speaking German he gave his name as Hans Arp, but when speaking French he called himself Jean Arp. Both “Hans” and “Jean” translate into English as “John”. In WWI Arp moved to Switzerland to avoid being called up to fight, taking advantage of Swiss neutrality. Eventually he was told to report to the German Consulate and fill out paperwork for the draft. In order to get out of fighting, Arp messed up the paperwork by writing the date in every blank space on the forms. Then he took off all of his clothes and walked with his papers over to the officials in charge. Arp was sent home …

    Dadaism thrived during and just after WWI, and was an anti-war, anti-bourgeois and anti-art culture. The movement began in Zurich, Switzerland started by a group of artists and writers who met to discuss art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire, frequently expressing disgust at the war that was raging across Europe.

    112. Vanzetti’s partner : SACCO

    Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were two anarchists accused of committing murder during an armed robbery in 1920. They were arrested the day after the crime. There followed two controversial trials, guilty verdicts and several appeals that went all the way to the US Supreme Court. Despite mounting evidence that the pair was innocent, the guilty verdicts were repeatedly upheld. A lot of the public accepted that Sacco and Vanzetti were not guilty, and many protests were staged. Regardless, the two were executed in the electric chair in 1927.

    115. Island near Corsica : ELBA

    I had a lovely two-week vacation in Tuscany once, including what was supposed to be a two-night stay on the island of Elba. I had envisioned Elba as a place full of history, and maybe it is, but it is also overrun with tourists who use it as a beach getaway. We left after one day and we won’t be going back again …

    Corsica is a large island in the Mediterranean Sea belonging to France. Napoléon Bonaparte was born on Corsica, in the town of Ajaccio.

    116. Westernmost Canadian territory : YUKON

    Canada’s federal territory known as Yukon takes its name from the Yukon River. “Yukon” means “Big Stream” in the local Gwich’in language.

    Down

    4. Like polo ponies : SADDLED

    The sport of polo originated in Iran, possibly before the 5th century BC. Polo was used back them primarily as a training exercise for cavalry units.

    5. Davidson College’s NCAA conference, for most sports : A-TEN

    Davidson College is a private institution of higher learning that was established in 1837 in Davidson, North Carolina. The school was named for Brigadier General William Lee Davidson who fought during the Revolutionary War.

    9. Bk. after Ezra : NEH

    In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Ezra was originally combined with the Book of Nehemiah, with the two being separated in the early days of the Christian Era.

    10. Prisoner’s reward : PAROLE

    The term “parole” is a French word that we use in English, with the French “parole” meaning “word, speech”. Of particular interest is the French phrase “parole d’honneur” which translates as “word of honor”. In the early 1600s we started using “parole” to mean a promise by a prisoner of war not to escape, as in the prisoner giving his “word of honor” not to run off. Over time, parole has come to mean conditional release of a prisoner before he or she has served the full term of a sentence.

    12. Outfielder Rusty who played for four different expansion teams : STAUB

    Rusty Staub had a relatively long career in baseball, having played his first game at the age of 19 and his last at age 41. Staub is one of only three players who hit home runs in the majors before the age of 20 as well as after the age of 40. The others are Gary Sheffield (never heard of him!) and Ty Cobb (heard of him!).

    13. Place to swim, in Paris : LAC

    “Lac” is the French word for “lake”.

    14. Jai __ : ALAI

    Even though jai alai is often said to be the fastest sport in the world because of the speed of the ball, in fact golf balls usually get going at a greater clip. Although, as a blog reader once pointed out to me, you don’t have to catch a golf ball …

    15. Viking descendant on a rampage? : NORMAN MAULER (from “Norman Mailer”)

    The Normans were the people who gave their name to Normandy in the north of France. They were descended from Viking stock, so the name “Norman” derives from a translation of “North Men”.

    16. __ Heights: disputed Mideast region : GOLAN

    Geographically speaking, the Golan Heights is a plateau in the Middle East with the western two-thirds of its area falling within Israel, and the eastern third falling within Syria. The name Golan Heights also applies to the geopolitical region that was captured from Syria during the Six-Day War of 1967 and occupied by Israel.

    21. SSA-issued info : ID NUMBER

    Social Security Administration (SSA)

    24. Actress Téa : LEONI

    Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film “A League of Their Own” (a minor role, Racine at first base). She also played the fiancée of Sam Malone from “Cheers” on the spin-off sitcom “Frasier”. A leading role on the big screen was opposite Adam Sandler in “Spanglish”. My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in “Fun with Dick and Jane”. Leoni is now playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary”, a show that I really enjoy …

    30. 5-Across broke his record, with “The” : BABE
    (5A. Baseball’s Hammerin’ Hank : AARON)

    Jack Dunn was the owner/manager of the Baltimore Orioles back in 1913, when he signed on George Herman Ruth as a pitcher. The other players called Ruth “Jack’s newest babe”, and the name “Babe” stuck.

    31. Lily family member : ARUM

    Arum is a genus of flowering plant that is native to eastern North America. Arums can be nasty plants though, as some contain oxalic acid. Oxalic acid is a compound that can be very painful if ingested and can even cause death if taken in sufficient quantities.

    32. Honorary law degs. : LLDS

    The honorary degree of Legum Doctor (LL.D.) translates from the Latin as Doctor of Laws, a plural. This practice of using the plural originated in Cambridge University in England, as one was awarded an LL.D. after having been taught both Canon Law and Civil Law.

    36. Welcome sign for concert promoters : SRO

    Standing room only (SRO)

    41. Early metalworking period : IRON AGE

    Ancient societies can be classified by the “three-age system”, which depends on the prevalence of materials used to make tools. The three ages are:

    • The Stone Age
    • The Bronze Age
    • The Iron Age

    The actual dates defined by each age depend on the society, as the timing of the transition from the use of one material to another varied around the globe.

    43. Sorrowful mother of legend : NIOBE

    In Greek mythology, Niobe fled to Mount Sipylus when her children were killed. There, she was turned into stone and wept for eternity. There is indeed a Niobe’s Rock on Mount Sipylus (in modern-day Turkey) that resembles a female face, and so is known as “The Weeping Rock”.

    47. WWII firearm : STEN

    The STEN gun is an iconic armament that was used by the British military. The name STEN is an acronym. The S and the T comes from the name of the gun’s designers, Shepherd and Turpin. The EN comes from the Enfield brand name, which in turn comes from the Enfield location where the guns were manufactured for the Royal Small Arms Factory, an enterprise owned by the British government.

    49. Sign of spring : ARIES

    Aries the Ram is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac, and is named after the constellation. Your birth sign is Aries if you were born between March 21 and April 20, but if you are an Aries you would know that! “Aries” is the Latin word for “ram”.

    50. WWII carriers : LSTS

    “LST” stands for Landing Ship, Tank. LSTs are the large vessels used mainly in WWII that have doors at either ends through which tanks and other vehicles can roll off and onto beaches. The design concept persists to this day in the huge fleet of commercial roll-on/roll-off car ferries, all inspired by the LST.

    53. Some printer labels : AVERYS

    Avery Dennison Corporation was founded as Kum Kleen Products in 1935, by R. Stanton Avery. Kum Kleen Products were the first manufacturers of self-adhesive labels.

    55. Cartoon components : CELS

    In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

    61. Mets sports commentator Darling : RON

    Ron Darling is former Major league Baseball pitcher. Darling retired from the game in 1995, adn starting working as a color commentator for TBS in 2007.

    62. Morse code tones : DAHS

    Samuel Morse came up with the forerunner to modern Morse code for use on the electric telegraph, of which he was the co-inventor. Morse code uses a series of dots and dashes to represent letters and numbers. The most common letters are assigned the simplest code elements e.g. E is represented by one dot, and T is represented by one dash. When words are spelled aloud in Morse code, a dot is pronounced as “dit”, and a dash is pronounced as “dah”.

    67. Giant of a Giant : MAYS

    Willie Mays’ nickname was the “Say Hey Kid”, although his friends and teammates were more likely to refer to him as “Buck”. When Mays was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, he was asked who was the best player he’d ever seen in the game. He replied, “I don’t mean to be bashful, but I was.”

    69. Drs.’ orders : ECGS

    An EKG measures electrical activity in the heart. Back in my homeland of Ireland, an EKG is known as an ECG (for electrocardiogram). We use the German name in the US, Elektrokardiogramm, giving us EKG. Apparently the abbreviation EKG is preferred as ECG might be confused (if poorly handwritten, I guess) with EEG, the abbreviation for an electroencephalogram.

    70. Biodiverse South American country : PERU

    Peru’s name comes from the word “Biru”. Back in the early 1500s, Biru was a ruler living near the Bay of San Miguel in Panama. The territory over which Biru ruled was the furthest land south in the Americas known to Europeans at that time. The Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro was the first European to move south of Biru’s empire and the land that he found was designated “Peru”, a derivative of “Biru”.

    71. River to the Caspian : URAL

    The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

    73. “Later, Louis!” : ADIEU

    “Adieu” is the French for “goodbye” or “farewell”, from “à Dieu” meaning “to God”. The plural of “adieu” is “adieux”.

    74. Sour red soups : BORSCHTS

    Borscht is a beetroot soup that originated in Ukraine. Borscht can be served both hot and cold.

    79. Ring outcomes, briefly : TKOS

    Technical knockout (TKO)

    80. Everyone, in Essen : ALLE

    Essen is a large industrial city located on the River Ruhr in western Germany.

    83. “Ideas worth spreading” acronym : TED

    The acronym “TED” stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. TED is a set of conferences held around the world by a non-profit group called the Sapling Foundation. The conference subjects are varied, and the meetings are often led by big names such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Bill Gates and Jane Goodall. The Sapling Foundation then makes recordings of the conferences available for free online with the intent of disseminating the ideas globally. These conferences are known as “TED Talks”.

    85. “Nice Work __ Can Get It”: 2012 Broadway musical : IF YOU

    “Nice Work If You Can Get It” is a 2012 stage musical that features songs by George and Ira Gershwin. The show takes its name from one of the songs, which the Gershwins wrote for the 1937 movie “A Damsel in Distress”.

    86. Handler with a self-named Netflix talk show : CHELSEA

    Chelsea Handler is a comedian who made a name for herself as a late-night talk show host on the E! Network. She moved to a Netflix talk show called “Chelsea” in 2016.

    89. Irish New Ager : ENYA

    Enya’s real name is Eithne Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career, eventually becoming Ireland’s best-selling solo musician. And, she sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

    91. Cline of country : PATSY

    Patsy Cline was a country music singer who managed to cross over into the world of pop music where she enjoyed great success. Cline is one of a long list of musical legends who died in plane crashes. Cline was 30 years old when she was killed in 1963 in a Piper Comanche plane piloted by her manager, Randy Hughes. Hughes and Cline decided to make that last flight despite warnings of inclement weather, and it was a severe storm that brought down the plane in a forest outside Camden, Tennessee.

    92. Pianist Claudio : ARRAU

    Claudio Arrau was a greatly respected Chilean pianist who performed for much of the twentieth century until his death in 1991. Arrau left Chile to study in Germany where he lived for many years, having married a German opera singer. During WWII, Arrau and his family left Germany and settled in New York City.

    94. Japanese piano maker : KAWAI

    Kawai is a Japanese manufacturer of musical instruments that is known in particular for its pianos. The company was founded in 1927, and is headquartered in Hamamatsu on the island of Honshu.

    95. Instrument with two 90-Acrosses : VIOLA
    (90A. Letter-shaped 95-Down opening : F-HOLE)

    The viola looks like and is played like a violin, but is slightly larger. It is referred to as the middle voice in the violin family, between the violin and the cello.

    96. Joshua tree’s 44-Down : YUCCA
    (44D. Group of related species : GENUS)

    Yuccas are a genus of shrubs and trees that live in hot and dry areas of North and South America. One of the more famous species of Yucca is the Joshua tree. Yuccas has a very unique pollination system, with moths transferring pollen from plant to plant.

    98. Showiness : ECLAT

    “Éclat” can mean a brilliant show of success, or the applause or accolade that one receives. The word derives from the French “éclater” meaning “to splinter, burst out”.

    101. Vino __: dry wine : SECO

    In Spain, one might drink “vino seco” (dry wine).

    104. Southwestern pot : OLLA

    An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews. “Olla” was the Latin word used in Ancient Rome to describe a similar type of pot.

    106. Author DeLillo : DON

    Don DeLillo is a novelist and playwright from New York City. DeLillo first came to public attention with his 1985 novel “White Noise”. He followed that with a 1988 novel titled “Libra” that gives a fictional account of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, with a focus on Lee Harvey Oswald.

    108. Hijack, e.g. : ROB

    The verb “to hijack” dates back to the 1920s when it applied to the robbing of a bootlegger or smuggler while he or she was traveling. The term probably comes from “highway” and “jack”, with the latter meaning “to hold up, rob”.

    110. Wrap for Cio-Cio-San : OBI

    Cio-Cio-San is the title character in Puccini’s opera “Madama Butterfly”.

    Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly” is the most-performed opera in the US. The opera that we see today is actually the second version that Puccini produced. The original version was first staged in 1904 at La Scala in Milan where it received a very poor reception. Puccini reworked the piece, breaking the second act into two new acts and making some other significant changes. The opera was relaunched a few months later and it was a resounding success.

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    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1. Ball stars : DEBS
    5. Baseball’s Hammerin’ Hank : AARON
    10. Latin foot : PES
    13. Cline portrayer in “Sweet Dreams” : LANGE
    18. It comes from the head : IDEA
    19. Bunkum : TRIPE
    20. Meter preceder : ALTI-
    22. Thrown for __ : A LOOP
    23. Traffic jam? : MUDDLE OF THE ROAD (from “middle of the road”)
    26. __ Rossi: Gallo brand : CARLO
    27. View from Anchorage : DENALI
    28. What may be intended by inadvertent wordplay? : NO PUN
    29. Theater giant? : IMAX
    30. Verdi’s “Un __ in maschera” : BALLO
    33. Serve leftover rolls? : RECYCLE BUNS (from “recycle bins”)
    37. “__ news?” : ANY
    38. “It’s Only a Paper Moon” composer : ARLEN
    39. Watch : EYE
    40. Bay Area county : MARIN
    42. Dispute over young flowers? : BUDDING WAR (from “bidding war”)
    47. Below average : SUBNORMAL
    51. Rescue squad initials : EMS
    52. “What should __?”: dieter’s quandary : I EAT
    53. Totally lost : AT SEA
    54. Boating implements : OARS
    55. Goose cooked in its own fat, say : CONFIT
    57. Takes another tack : VEERS
    58. Night in Nantes : NUIT
    59. Last pat? : THE BUTTER END (from “the bitter end”)
    62. Low areas : DALES
    63. Hawaiian non-natives : HAOLES
    64. “__ any drop to drink”: Coleridge : NOR
    65. Grammarians’ concerns : USAGES
    67. Strong sharks : MAKOS
    68. Coin-making tool? : PENNY PUNCHER (from “penny pincher”)
    72. Words before “of rules” : A SET …
    73. Beaded counters : ABACI
    75. Sealy alternatives : SERTAS
    76. Ma playing music : YO-YO
    77. Bell sounds : DONGS
    78. Traveler’s option : RAIL
    79. Filing tool : TAB
    82. Some travelers put them on in winter : SNOW TIRES
    84. Mediocre deli item? : DULL PICKLE (from “dill pickle”)
    87. “__ Gold”: Fonda film : ULEE’S
    88. Green Giant orb : PEA
    90. Letter-shaped 95-Down opening : F-HOLE
    91. Birdie plus one : PAR
    93. Mallard’s beard? : DUCK VAN DYKE (from “Dick Van Dyke”)
    99. Agreements : YESES
    100. Some dadaist art : ARPS
    102. Fear-inducing : HAIRY
    103. Not acceptable : UNCOOL
    105. Made level, with “up” : TRUED
    107. Pair of vehicles in a plot? : TWO-CAR COLLUSION (from “two-car collision”)
    112. Vanzetti’s partner : SACCO
    113. Price-slashing event : SALE
    114. Eight-related : OCTAL
    115. Island near Corsica : ELBA
    116. Westernmost Canadian territory : YUKON
    117. Confident ending? : -IAL
    118. Italian’s “That’ll do!” : BASTA!
    119. Similar : AKIN

    Down

    1. Darken : DIM
    2. School URL ending : EDU
    3. Garden area : BED
    4. Like polo ponies : SADDLED
    5. Davidson College’s NCAA conference, for most sports : A-TEN
    6. Like a crowd in full voice : AROAR
    7. Go through hastily, as drawers : RIFLE
    8. Vision-related : OPTIC
    9. Bk. after Ezra : NEH
    10. Prisoner’s reward : PAROLE
    11. Take off to get hitched : ELOPE
    12. Outfielder Rusty who played for four different expansion teams : STAUB
    13. Place to swim, in Paris : LAC
    14. Jai __ : ALAI
    15. Viking descendant on a rampage? : NORMAN MAULER (from “Norman Mailer”)
    16. __ Heights: disputed Mideast region : GOLAN
    17. Powerful adhesive : EPOXY
    21. SSA-issued info : ID NUMBER
    24. Actress Téa : LEONI
    25. Suffix with consist : -ENCY
    30. 5-Across broke his record, with “The” : BABE
    31. Lily family member : ARUM
    32. Honorary law degs. : LLDS
    34. “You bet __ boots!” : YER
    35. Grandmas : NANAS
    36. Welcome sign for concert promoters : SRO
    41. Early metalworking period : IRON AGE
    43. Sorrowful mother of legend : NIOBE
    44. Group of related species : GENUS
    45. Float on the breeze : WAFT
    46. Having a spat : AT IT
    47. WWII firearm : STEN
    48. Broken in : USED
    49. Sign of spring : ARIES
    50. WWII carriers : LSTS
    53. Some printer labels : AVERYS
    55. Cartoon components : CELS
    56. Game with yellow balls : TENNIS
    59. “Don’t forget the rubber disk”? : TAKE YOUR PUCK (from “take your pick”)
    60. Nocturnal hunter with a distinctive call : HOOT OWL
    61. Mets sports commentator Darling : RON
    62. Morse code tones : DAHS
    63. Is attired in : HAS ON
    65. Preposition often shortened to one syllable : UNTIL
    66. Skull covering : SCALP
    67. Giant of a Giant : MAYS
    68. Window __ : PANE
    69. Drs.’ orders : ECGS
    70. Biodiverse South American country : PERU
    71. River to the Caspian : URAL
    73. “Later, Louis!” : ADIEU
    74. Sour red soups : BORSCHTS
    79. Ring outcomes, briefly : TKOS
    80. Everyone, in Essen : ALLE
    81. Fliers with stingers : BEES
    83. “Ideas worth spreading” acronym : TED
    84. Father figure : DAD
    85. “Nice Work __ Can Get It”: 2012 Broadway musical : IF YOU
    86. Handler with a self-named Netflix talk show : CHELSEA
    88. Package : PARCEL
    89. Irish New Ager : ENYA
    91. Cline of country : PATSY
    92. Pianist Claudio : ARRAU
    94. Japanese piano maker : KAWAI
    95. Instrument with two 90-Acrosses : VIOLA
    96. Joshua tree’s 44-Down : YUCCA
    97. Half hitch and bowline : KNOTS
    98. Showiness : ECLAT
    101. Vino __: dry wine : SECO
    104. Southwestern pot : OLLA
    106. Author DeLillo : DON
    108. Hijack, e.g. : ROB
    109. Sort : ILK
    110. Wrap for Cio-Cio-San : OBI
    111. Indian flatbread : NAN

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