LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Nov 2017, Saturday

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Constructed by: Kristian House
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 8m 08s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. It sold its mobile phone business to Microsoft in 2014 : NOKIA

I do enjoy classical guitar music, but there isn’t a huge choice on CD. There is one very special piece called “Gran Vals” by Francisco Tárrega, written in 1902. This piece has a unique reputation as it contains a phrase that was once the most listened-to piece of music in the whole world. Just a few bars into the work one can hear the celebrated Nokia ringtone!

6. Econ. numbers : GDPS

A country’s Gross National Product (GNP) is the value of all services and products produced by its residents in a particular year. GNP includes all production wherever it is in the world, as long as the business is owned by residents of the country concerned. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is different, although related, and is the value of all services and goods produced within the borders of the country for that year.

10. Beverage sometimes boxed : WINE

The process of packaging wine in boxes was patented in Australia in 1935. Distribution of premium wines in boxes has been accepted by the Australian market for some time now. Here in the US, box wines tend to be associated more with cheap jug wines, although I am delighted to see that attitude changing. I’m a big fan of some boxed malbecs and zinfandels …

16. Title type: Abbr. : ITAL

Italic type leans to the right, and is often used to provide emphasis in text. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

17. Serf of Sparta : HELOT

The helots were a population of poorly-treated slaves who served the citizens of Sparta.

22. Kylo’s mom in “The Force Awakens” : LEIA

Kylo Ren is the son of Han Solo and Princess Leia Organa in the “Star Wars” universe. The character’s birth name was Ben Solo. He was trained as a Jedi knight by his uncle, Luke Skywalker. However, Ben came to embrace the Dark Side, and changed his name to Kylo Ren. Ren is played by actor Adam Driver.

23. Hairdos made popular by Marie Antoinette : POUFS

Queen of France Marie Antoinette is credited with popularizing the elaborate hairstyle known as the pouf. The hair was styled using a pomade made from wholesome ingredients such as beef marrow and bear grease. Because of the complexity of the hairstyle, ladies wore it for a week or two, during which time the animal fat would become rancid. It was reported that vermin would be attracted to the hair while sleeping, which apparently led to the phrase “her hair is a rat’s nest”.

24. Home to the National Gandhi Museum : NEW DELHI

The National Gandhi Museum in New Delhi celebrates the life and showcases the principles of civil rights leader Mahatma Gandhi. The museum was founded soon after Gandhi’s assassination in 1948, and was initially located in Mumbai. That’s a museum I’d love to visit one day …

31. Jesus on a diamond : ALOU

Jesus Alou played Major League Baseball, as did his brothers Matty and Felipe, and as does Felipe’s son Moises.

32. __ Linda, Calif. : LOMA

Loma Linda is a city in California located not far from Los Angeles. The name Loma Linda translates from Spanish as “Beautiful Hill”.

34. Metal giant : ALCOA

The Aluminum Corporation of America (ALCOA) is the largest producer of aluminum in the United States. The company was founded in 1888 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where its headquarters are to this day.

35. Kia subcompacts : RIOS

Kia have been making the subcompact model called a Rio since 2000.

38. “Divergent” heroine __ Prior : TRIS

Tris Prior is the protagonist in the “Divergent” series of movies, and is played by actress Shailene Woodley.

The “Divergent” series of movies is based on the “Divergent” novels written by Veronica Roth. The movies and novels are set in a post-apocalyptic version of Chicago called the Divergent Universe. The story is about a citizenry that is divided into five different factions based on personality traits. The critics weren’t crazy about the first movie in the series, but I really enjoyed it …

43. John Williams quintet : OSCARS

The great composer John Williams has won five Academy Awards for his work on film scores, for:

  • “Fiddler on the Roof”
  • “Jaws”
  • “Star Wars”
  • “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”
  • “Schindler’s List”

45. Ones eating on the house? : TERMITES

Termites are insects that are somewhat unique in that they can digest cellulose (as can ruminants such as cattle). Because of this diet, they cause a lot of trouble for human populations by feeding on wood in man-made structures.

49. Novelist Hunter : EVAN

Evan Hunter was the adopted name of Salvatore Albert Lombino, an author and screenwriter from New York City. Hunter had a pen name that was perhaps more famous, namely Ed McBain. As McBain he wrote a successful string of crime novels starting in 1956. As Evan Hunter, he is perhaps most famous for his 1954 novel “The Blackboard Jungle”, which was made into a successful film the following year.

50. Litmus test for fun? : BARREL OF MONKEYS

To have more fun than a barrel of monkeys is to have a great time, lots of fun. Apparently, the expression dates back at least to 1840, when it took the form “cage of monkeys”. There was a “wagonload of monkeys” by the end of the 19th century, and somehow a subsequent relocation into a “barrel”.

57. “But wait! There’s more!” knife : GINSU

Ginsu knives are more famous for their hard-sell television ads than they are for their efficacy in the kitchen. The Ginsu phenomenon took off in the seventies when two brothers found a set of knives called “Eversharp” that were being manufactured in Ohio. The brothers changed the brand name to something more exotic, and Japanese in particular (Ginsu), and then produced ads that made references to Japanese martial arts. I think they made a fortune …

58. Property attachment : LIEN

A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone’s property until a debt is paid. When an individual takes out a car loan, for example, the lending bank is usually a lien holder. The bank releases the lien on the car when the loan is paid in full.

60. Tatted up : INKED

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

62. USMC rank : SSGT

Staff sergeant (SSgt)

63. New __ : AGERS

New-Age music is created to provide a relaxing and stress-free atmosphere. The New Age movement is often said to have begun with the release of an album called “Spectrum Suite” by Steven Halpern in 1975.

Down

1. Radar’s pop : NEHI

Nehi Corporation was the nickname for the Chero-Cola/Union Bottle Works that introduced the Nehi drink in 1924. Years later the company developed a new brand, Royal Crown Cola (also known as RC Cola). By 1955, RC Cola was the company’s flagship product, so the “Nehi Corporation” became the “Royal Crown Company”. In 1954, RC Cola became the first company to sell soft drinks in cans.

Corporal Radar O’Reilly is a character in the “M*A*S*H” television series and film. The role was played by Gary Burghoff in both the film and on television.

2. Where Utah’s minor league Owlz play : OREM

The Orem Owlz minor league baseball team is affiliated with the Los Angeles Angels. The Owlz mascot is a red owl named Hootz. Hoots married the love of his life Holly in an on-field ceremony in 2009.

3. Wet forest growth : KELP

Kelps are large seaweeds that grow in kelp forests underwater. Kelps can grow to over 250 feet in length, and do so very quickly. Some kelps can grow at the rate of 1-2 feet per day.

4. Statement after an ordeal : I COULD USE A DRINK

… after struggling with that crossword.

5. Churchill’s 1945 successor : ATTLEE

Clement Attlee served as leader of Britain’s Labour Party and as Deputy Prime Minister in the coalition government during the war years under the leadership of Winston Churchill, a Conservative. Attlee swept into power right after WWII in a landslide victory over Churchill and was responsible for major changes not only in Britain but around the waning British Empire. It was under Attlee that former British colonies like India, Pakistan, Burma, Sri Lanka and Jordan became independent. Also, the Palestine Mandate was terminated in 1948, while he was in office, with the state of Israel being declared the very next day.

12. Scottish resistance : NAES

“Nae” is the Scottish vernacular for “no”.

19. Legend maker : ACURA

The Acura Legend model of car was sold as the Honda Legend over in Japan.

21. Spots for flowers : SILLS

“Sill plate” or simply “sill” is an architectural term for a bottom horizontal member to which vertical members are attached. A windowsill is a specific sill plate that is found at the bottom of a window opening.

25. Literature Nobelist Canetti : ELIAS

Novelist Elias Canetti didn’t actually settle in England until he was in his thirties. He was a native of Bulgaria, and as a child also lived in England, Austria, Switzerland and Germany. He wrote in German, even though he spent much of his working life in England, eventually adopting British citizenship. Even then, he spent the last twenty years of his life in Switzerland. His book “Crowds and Power” deals with the behavior of people in crowds and mobs, and the effect of vocal leaders on “packs”. Scary stuff, I would say …

26. Geppetto, for one : WOODCARVER

“The Adventures of Pinocchio” is an 1883 children’s novel by Carlo Collodi, which is all about an animated puppet called Pinocchio, and Geppetto, his poor woodcarver father. In one of his adventures, Pinocchio encounters “the Terrible Dogfish”, a huge sea monster that is given the nickname “the Attila of fish and fishermen”. The sea monster features in the 1940 film “Pinocchio”, but in Walt Disney’s version it is given the name “Monstro” (the Portuguese word for “monster”).

29. Decorative curtain fabric : TOILE

Toile fabric can be used as upholstery, or as a wallpaper, or even as a fabric for clothing.

30. Source of relief : OASIS

An isolated area of vegetation in a desert is called an oasis (plural “oases”). As water is needed for plant growth, an oasis might also include a spring, pond or small lake.

37. Electronic control mechanism : SERVO

A servomechanism (also “servo”) is a control system in which usually a hydraulic or pneumatic arm or plunger is actuated by a low-energy signal received from a sensor. An example is the device operating the cruise control on a car. The servo pushes the gas pedal to accelerate and lets off to slow down. The signal to the servo comes from the speedometer.

44. Menu heading : SALADS

Our word “salad” comes from the Latin “salare” meaning “to salt”. The Latin “herba salata” translates as “salted vegetables”, which I guess could be a salad …

46. Italian “Eat!” : MANGIA!

“Mangia!” is Italian for “Eat!” and is often used in the names of Italian restaurants or in brand names of Italian foods.

48. Frontal and temporal : LOBES

The temporal lobe is one of the four main lobes of the brain, the others being the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and the occipital lobe. The temporal lobes (there is one on each side of the brain) are associated with visual memories, understanding language, and emotions. The “temporal” name comes from the fact that the lobes are located behind the temporal bones, the bones beneath the head’s temples. The temples are named from the Latin “tempus” meaning “time”. The idea is that a person’s age shows with greying of the hair at the temples.

51. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit : ADIA

Sarah McLachlan is singer/songwriter from Halifax, Nova Scotia who lives in Vancouver. In 1997, McLachlan married Ashwin Sood, the drummer in her band. The 1998 hit song “Adia”, which she co-wrote and recorded, was intended as an apology to her best friend … for stealing her ex-boyfriend and then marrying him!

53. Three-time speed skating gold medalist Karin : ENKE

Karin Enke is a former speed skater who represented East Germany in competition in the seventies and eighties.

54. 1914 battle river : YSER

The Yser is a river that originates in northern France and flows through Belgium into the North Sea. The Yser is often associated with WWI as it figured in a major battle early in the conflict. In the first three months of the war, the German Army pushed almost completely through Belgium, inflicting heavy losses on the Belgian Army as the defenders were forced to fight a fast-moving rearguard action. The Germans were intent on pushing right through Belgium and across France in a “race to the sea”. But the Belgians, with the help of their Allies, decided to make a final stand at the Yser Canal in an effort to prevent the Germans reaching the French ports of Calais and Dunkirk. The 22-mile long defensive line was chosen at the Yser because the river and canal system could be flooded to create a barrier that might be defended. The plan was successful and the front was “stabilized”. As we now know, millions of lives were lost over the coming years with very little movement of that battle line.

55. Kegger quaff : SUDS

Keg party (kegger)

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. It sold its mobile phone business to Microsoft in 2014 : NOKIA
6. Econ. numbers : GDPS
10. Beverage sometimes boxed : WINE
14. Build : ERECT
15. Square calculation : AREA
16. Title type: Abbr. : ITAL
17. Serf of Sparta : HELOT
18. Backstage accesses : VIP PASSES
20. Unplanned acquisition : IMPULSE PURCHASE
22. Kylo’s mom in “The Force Awakens” : LEIA
23. Hairdos made popular by Marie Antoinette : POUFS
24. Home to the National Gandhi Museum : NEW DELHI
28. Showing faith in : TRUE TO
31. Jesus on a diamond : ALOU
32. __ Linda, Calif. : LOMA
34. Metal giant : ALCOA
35. Kia subcompacts : RIOS
36. Smartphone downloads : SONGS
38. “Divergent” heroine __ Prior : TRIS
39. Trainee : CADET
41. Zoomed : TORE
42. Prefix with ski or pad : HELI-
43. John Williams quintet : OSCARS
45. Ones eating on the house? : TERMITES
47. “You’ve got __” : A DEAL
49. Novelist Hunter : EVAN
50. Litmus test for fun? : BARREL OF MONKEYS
56. Judicious : ADVISABLE
57. “But wait! There’s more!” knife : GINSU
58. Property attachment : LIEN
59. Campus official : DEAN
60. Tatted up : INKED
61. Sting target : MARK
62. USMC rank : SSGT
63. New __ : AGERS

Down

1. Radar’s pop : NEHI
2. Where Utah’s minor league Owlz play : OREM
3. Wet forest growth : KELP
4. Statement after an ordeal : I COULD USE A DRINK
5. Churchill’s 1945 successor : ATTLEE
6. Cared : GAVE A HOOT
7. Worn-out washer result : DRIP
8. Invigorate : PEP UP
9. Fungal disease affecting 40-Down : SAP ROT
10. Dreaming, at times : WISHFUL THINKING
11. “Shh! Don’t tell anyone!” : IT’S A SECRET!
12. Scottish resistance : NAES
13. Otherwise : ELSE
19. Legend maker : ACURA
21. Spots for flowers : SILLS
24. DEA employee : NARCO
25. Literature Nobelist Canetti : ELIAS
26. Geppetto, for one : WOODCARVER
27. “__ kidding!” : I’M NOT
29. Decorative curtain fabric : TOILE
30. Source of relief : OASIS
33. Accord : AGREEMENT
37. Electronic control mechanism : SERVO
40. Pines, say : TREES
44. Menu heading : SALADS
46. Italian “Eat!” : MANGIA!
48. Frontal and temporal : LOBES
50. Lip application : BALM
51. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit : ADIA
52. Mark for attention : FLAG
53. Three-time speed skating gold medalist Karin : ENKE
54. 1914 battle river : YSER
55. Kegger quaff : SUDS

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11 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Nov 2017, Saturday”

  1. What’s the connection between (50A) Litmus test for fun?
    and BARREL OF MONKEYS ?

    BTW, why isn’t the plural for MONKEY; MONKIES ?.

    1. The phrase “more fun than a barrel of monkeys”.

      The plural of words ending in “y” is only “-ies” if the letter before the “y” is a consonant; “penny” becomes “pennies”. If it’s a vowel, like in “monkey” or “chimney”, it’s just “-s”.

  2. On M*A*S*H, Radar almost always ordered a grape Nehi at Rosie’s bar. This is the crucial part of 1-down and it’s totally missing in the explanation.

    An additional piece of trivia – Advertisements for Nehi, which featured a pair of legs (“knee-high”), were the inspiration for the famous leg lamp from the movie “A Christmas Story”.

  3. 14:12 after changing ELEAS/REOS to ELIAS/RIOS. Don’t know what I was thinking … (or if I even was thinking) …

    Running late and error-prone today, with nothing but cotton between the ears … 😳

  4. LAT: 40 minutes, no errors. Had 85% of this 19 minutes in, but had a struggle with the rest. About how most of these goes. WSJ: DNF after 69 minutes, 50% filled in. The kind of puzzle I really get frustrated after doing for how far I haven’t come in doing these.

    @Carrie
    You’re welcome. If it’s the tablet app, it’s probably pointed to whatever place your downloaded files go, so I’m sure it’s reading them from there. So sounds like all you might need to do to see things in ACL is simply download the PUZ files.

  5. 17:03. Pretty easy Saturday offering. Just as well. I wasn’t in the mood for a fight today. That’s why I’m afraid of looking at the NYT today. It might kill my good feelings……

    Interesting history about the YSER…

    Best –

  6. Today’s WSJ took almost 45 minutes – a real slog. After finishing it, I did Tim Croce’s latest (from Friday), with no errors, but a fair level of angst, and then, after a nap, I tackled today’s Saturday Stumper, from Newsday, and finished, after even more angst, with a rather stupid one-square error at the intersection on 1D and 17A. (I was going through the alphabet to get that last letter and stopped one letter too soon!) (There were two or three really odd clues in the Stumper; in particular, I’d appreciate an explanation of the clue for 24D, if anyone has such.)

    Still no clue about the meta on Friday’s WSJ, but I haven’t had much time to look at it. And I just realized that I haven’t read the papers yet. It’s been a weird day … 😜

    1. [Do like a bit] = ROTATE (one of them I actually got somehow). More or less something that you can do “just a bit”. Oh, DNF about half filled in, though I’ll probably try to get more of it later once I get the Sunday LAT done.

  7. Fairly easy Saturday for me; took about 30 minutes with no errors. I had to noodle around a bit and wait for crosses, but had no write-overs.

    Wow, two Saturdays in a row after two or three fails…kinda like it.

  8. Hi every buddy!!! 😊
    Yay! No errors. The long answers were kinda whimsical. Didn’t know some of the proper names: TRIS, EVAN, ENKE. Generally not too difficult for a Saturday.
    Thanks Glenn! I shall keep trying!
    FWIW– Something seemed askew in that list of John Williams’ Oscar winning scores, so I looked it up. He didn’t write those songs from Fiddler on the Roof, tho he did arrange and conduct the score. Now that makes sense! Didn’t think he wrote a musical — taking nothing away from his accomplishments, of course. 🎻
    Be well~~™🌸

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