LA Times Crossword Answers 22 Mar 17, Wednesday










Constructed by: Don Gagliardo & C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Triple Play

The first word in each of today’s themed answers includes just one vowel appearing three times, a TRIPLE PLAY of sorts. And, we progress through the vowels alphabetically going through the grid from top to bottom:

  • 55A. Baseball rarity, and a hint to the vowels in the first words of 16-, 22-, 29-, 37- and 44-Across : TRIPLE PLAY
  • 16A. Monkey cage discard : BANANA PEEL
  • 22A. Reason for totaling, as an insured car : SEVERE DAMAGE
  • 29A. Cause of some tan lines : BIKINI TOP
  • 37A. Ornate 18th-century genre : ROCOCO ART
  • 44A. Fluffy sun blocker : CUMULUS CLOUD

Bill’s time: 7m 17s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Addams family nickname : TISH

Gomez and Morticia (“Tish”) Addams were the parents in “The Addams Family”, a creation of the cartoonist Charles Addams. In the sixties television show, Gomez was played by John Astin and Morticia was played by Carolyn Jones.

10. Festoons with Charmin, for short : TP’S

TP’ing (toilet papering) is a prank involving the covering of some object or location with rolls and rolls of toilet paper. If you live in Texas or Minnesota, that little “prank” is legal, but if you live here in California it is classed as mischief or vandalism.

Charmin is a brand of toilet paper made by Procter & Gamble.

13. Chicago airport : O’HARE

O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII.

14. Barak of Israel : EHUD

Ehud Barak served as Prime Minister of Israel from 1999 to 2001, taking over from Benjamin Netanyahu. Barak left office after he called a special election for Prime Minister and lost the vote to Ariel Sharon. Barak resigned from the Knesset and took an advisory job with the US company Electronic Data Systems (EDS), and did some security-related work with a private equity company. In 2007, Barak took over leadership of Israel’s Labor Party.

15. __ butter : SHEA

“Shea butter” is a common moisturizer or lotion used as a cosmetic. It is a fat that is extracted from the nut of the African shea tree. There is evidence that shea butter was used back in Cleopatra’s Egypt.

19. Govt. agency that supports startups : SBA

The Small Business Administration (SBA) is a government agency with the mission of assisting small businesses. The SBA doesn’t give loans itself, but it does act as a guarantor under the right circumstances. The SBA was set up in 1953, and isn’t a favorite with fiscal conservatives.

21. Ride in the desert : CAMEL

The dromedary, also known as the Arabian Camel or Indian Camel, is the camel that has only one hump. The other species of camel is the Bactrian, which has two humps. The hump of a dromedary contains up to 80 pounds of fat, which can be broken down into water and energy if no food or water is available.

28. Coral component : POLYP

Polyps are tiny sea creatures that are found attached to underwater structures or to other polyps. Polyps have a mouth at one end of a cylindrical “body” that is surrounded by tentacles. Some polyps cluster into groups called stony corals, with stony corals being the building blocks of coral reefs. The structure of the reef is provided by calcium carbonate exoskeletons secreted by the coral polyps.

29. Cause of some tan lines : BIKINI TOP

The origin of the word “bikini”, a type of bathing suit, seems very uncertain. My favorite story is that it is named after the Bikini Atoll, site of American A-bomb tests in the forties and fifties. The name “bikini” was chosen for the swim-wear because of the “explosive” effect it had on men who saw a woman wearing the garment!

34. “All Things Considered” co-host Shapiro : ARI

Ari Shapiro was the very able White House correspondent for National Public Radio (NPR) for several years. He became a co-host of network’s drive-time program “All Things Considered” in 2015.

“All Things Considered” is the flagship news broadcast by NPR, aired for two hours every evening.

35. Day of song : DORIS

The actress and singer Doris Day was born Doris Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio. Day made more than 650 recordings as a singer with Columbia Records, and also appeared in 39 movies. Outside the world of entertainment, she has been an ardent supporter of animal rights. She now lives in Carmel-by-the-Sea in California, along with her many pets and stray animals that she has adopted over the years.

37. Ornate 18th-century genre : ROCOCO ART

The Rococo style is also known as “Late Baroque”. Rococo is a very floral and playful style, very ornate.

40. Thyme piece : SPRIG

In Ancient Greece, thyme was burned as incense and used in baths as it was believed to be a source of courage.

44. Fluffy sun blocker : CUMULUS CLOUD

Cumulus clouds are low-level clouds that look very “puffy”, with clearly defined edges and flat bases. “Cumulus” is Latin for “heap, pile”.

51. Unit of resistance : OHM

The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every schoolkid knows as Ohm’s Law.

54. Poker at the table? : TINE

At a poker table, a croupier might use a rake to pull in the chips, and that rake has tines, projecting points.

59. Meditation teachers : YOGIS

A yogi is a practitioner of yoga.

In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

60. “The Affair” network, briefly : SHO

“The Affair” is a drama series on Showtime about a novelist and a waitress having an extramarital affair in a Long Island resort town. Stars of the show are the marvelous Dominic West and Ruth Wilson. I haven’t seen this one, but hear good things …

Down

2. Starbuck’s boss : AHAB

The most famous whale-hunting ship in fiction has to be Herman Melville’s Pequod, featured in his novel “Moby Dick”. The Pequod is a skippered by the maniacal Captain Ahab, and the young chief mate is the thoughtful and intellectual Starbuck. Starbuck’s name was lifted and used by a Seattle-based coffee company.

4. Tax-deferred plan, briefly : IRA

Individual retirement account (IRA)

6. Prairie home : TEPEE

A tepee (also written as “tipi” and “teepee”) is a cone-shaped tent traditionally made from animal hides that is used by the Great Plains Native Americans. A wigwam is a completely different structure and is often a misnomer for a tepee. A wigwam is a domed structure built by Native Americans in the West and Southwest, intended to be a more permanent dwelling. The wigwam can also be covered with hides but more often was covered with grass, reeds, brush or cloth.

7. The Supremes’ “__ a Symphony” : I HEAR

“I Hear a Symphony” is a 1965 hit song recorded by the Supremes, the trio’s sixth number-one in the US.

The Supremes were the most successful vocal group in US history, based on number-one hits. The group started out in 1959 as a four-member lineup called the Primettes. The name was changed to the Supremes in 1961. One member dropped out in 1962, leaving the Supremes as a trio. Lead singer Diana Ross began to garner much of the attention, which eventually led to a further name change, to Diana Ross & the Supremes.

9. Cholesterol letters : HDL

HDL (high-density lipoprotein) is a compound that is used to transport fats around the body. When HDL is combined with (i.e. is transporting) cholesterol, it is often called “good cholesterol”. This is because HDL seems to remove cholesterol from where it should not be, say on the walls of arteries, and transports it to the liver for reuse or disposal. Important stuff …

10. Annual Augusta National event : THE MASTERS

Golf’s Masters Tournament is the first of the four major championships in the annual calendar, taking place in the first week of April each year. It is played at Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, and has a number of traditions. One is that the winner is awarded the famous “green jacket”, but he only gets to keep it for a year and must return it to the club after twelve months.

The Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia was founded in 1933 by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Famously, Augusta hosts the Masters Tournament each year. Augusta is very much a private club, and some of its policies have drawn criticism over the years. Prior to 1959, the club had a bylaw requiring that all caddies be African American. There were no African-American club members admitted until 1990, and no women until 2012.

11. “Pequod” co-owner : PELEG

The Pequod is the ship that figures in Herman Melville’s classic novel “Moby Dick”. The ship is owned by a consortium of the citizens of Nantucket Island, including Captains Ahab, Bildad and Peleg.

12. Room in a maison : SALLE

In French, there are several “salles” (rooms) in a “maison” (house).

15. Shrimp dish : SCAMPI

The Italian dish known as “scampi” is a serving of shrimp in garlic butter and dry white wine.

17. Off-roaders, for short : ATVS

All-terrain vehicle (ATV)

23. Place of honor : DAIS

Ultimately our word “dais”, meaning “raised platform for a speaker”, comes from the Latin “discus” meaning a “disk-shaped object”. I guess that the original daises had such a shape.

25. Big name in riding mowers : TORO

Toro is a manufacturer of mainly lawn mowers and snow removal equipment based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was started in 1914 to build tractor engines.

26. Canadian short story writer awarded a Nobel Prize in 2013 : ALICE MUNRO

Alice Munro is a writer from southwestern Ontario in Canada. Munro won the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature.

30. Discount rack abbr. : IRR

Irregular (“irr.” or “irreg.”)

33. Cribbage markers : PEGS

Cribbage is a great card game that originated in 17th-century England, a creation of the poet Sir John Suckling. One of the unique features of the game is that a cribbage board with pegs is used to keep score. Here in the US, cribbage is very much associated with the submarine service, as it is a favorite game of submariners of all ranks.

39. NASCAR’s Yarborough : CALE

Cale Yarborough is a former NASCAR driver and owner. Yarborough was the first NASCAR driver to appear on the cover of “Sports Illustrated”.

45. Hater of David, in Dickens : URIAH

Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel “David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens. The character is such a “yes man” that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a “Uriah Heep”.

46. Rx : SCRIP

“Scrip” is an informal term for a prescription.

There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol “Rx” that’s used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter’s blessing to help a patient recover.

48. Aggressive cat lover of cartoons : LE PEW

Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidently painted down her back.

51. Gymnast Korbut : OLGA

Olga Korbut is from modern-day Belarus, but was born during the days of the Soviet Union. Korbut competed for the USSR team in the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Games. She was 17 when she appeared in the 1972 Munich Games, and had been training in a sports school since she was 8-years-old. The world fell in love with her as she was a very emotional young lady, readily expressing joy and disappointment, something that we weren’t used to seeing in athletes from behind the Iron Curtain. Korbut immigrated to the US in 1991 and now lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

53. Classic PC adventure game : MYST

In the days when I played the occasional video game, the best of the bunch was undoubtedly “Myst”. It is a game full of puzzles with the player wandering through a beautifully-designed (for its day) interactive world.

55. Some univ. proctors : TAS

Teaching Assistants (TAs)

A “proctor” is a supervisor, especially of an examination in a school, or perhaps of a dormitory. The word “proctor” originated in the late 1500s, a contraction of the word “procurator”, the name given to an official agent of a church.

56. Curse : POX

A “pock” is an eruptive mark on the skin, usually caused by an infectious disease. The Middle English plural form “pokkes” gave rise to our term “pox”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. “That’s enough out of you” : CAN IT

6. Addams family nickname : TISH

10. Festoons with Charmin, for short : TP’S

13. Chicago airport : O’HARE

14. Barak of Israel : EHUD

15. __ butter : SHEA

16. Monkey cage discard : BANANA PEEL

18. Phone using a tower : CELL

19. Govt. agency that supports startups : SBA

20. Kettle output : STEAM

21. Ride in the desert : CAMEL

22. Reason for totaling, as an insured car : SEVERE DAMAGE

24. Social ranking : STATUS

27. Many mobile downloads : APPS

28. Coral component : POLYP

29. Cause of some tan lines : BIKINI TOP

34. “All Things Considered” co-host Shapiro : ARI

35. Day of song : DORIS

36. Fleece source : EWE

37. Ornate 18th-century genre : ROCOCO ART

40. Thyme piece : SPRIG

42. Pre-hurricane emergency op : EVAC

43. Runs after : CHASES

44. Fluffy sun blocker : CUMULUS CLOUD

49. “No one can beat me” : I RULE

50. Poker game concern : CHEAT

51. Unit of resistance : OHM

54. Poker at the table? : TINE

55. Baseball rarity, and a hint to the vowels in the first words of 16-, 22-, 29-, 37- and 44-Across : TRIPLE PLAY

57. Where buds may go : EARS

58. Right hand : AIDE

59. Meditation teachers : YOGIS

60. “The Affair” network, briefly : SHO

61. Flow with force : SPEW

62. Place on a pedestal : EXALT

Down

1. Corny leftovers : COBS

2. Starbuck’s boss : AHAB

3. Child tender : NANA

4. Tax-deferred plan, briefly : IRA

5. Stiffen in fear : TENSE UP

6. Prairie home : TEPEE

7. The Supremes’ “__ a Symphony” : I HEAR

8. “See if I care!” : SUE ME!

9. Cholesterol letters : HDL

10. Annual Augusta National event : THE MASTERS

11. “Pequod” co-owner : PELEG

12. Room in a maison : SALLE

15. Shrimp dish : SCAMPI

17. Off-roaders, for short : ATVS

21. 2-Down’s title, informally : CAP’N

22. Dirty digs : STY

23. Place of honor : DAIS

24. Prep for a bout : SPAR

25. Big name in riding mowers : TORO

26. Canadian short story writer awarded a Nobel Prize in 2013 : ALICE MUNRO

29. Lavish wrap : BOA

30. Discount rack abbr. : IRR

31. First-aid gear : KIT

32. Boo-boo : OWIE

33. Cribbage markers : PEGS

35. Prefix with drama : DOCU-

38. Small eggs : OVULES

39. NASCAR’s Yarborough : CALE

40. Z’s : SHUT-EYE

41. Elbow protector : PAD

43. Mine extraction : COAL

44. Names as a reference : CITES

45. Hater of David, in Dickens : URIAH

46. Rx : SCRIP

47. Reprimand : CHIDE

48. Aggressive cat lover of cartoons : LE PEW

51. Gymnast Korbut : OLGA

52. Flag down : HAIL

53. Classic PC adventure game : MYST

55. Some univ. proctors : TAS

56. Curse : POX

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LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Mar 17, Monday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Service Break

Today’s themed answers in the grid each include circled letters. Those circled letters spell out the word “mass” (which is a religious SERVICE). In each case, the word “mass” is BROKEN, split into two parts:

  • 54A. Turning point in tennis, and a hint to this puzzle’s circled letters : SERVICE BREAK
  • 20A. Postgraduate degree : MASTER OF ARTS
  • 36A. Mob kingpin : MAFIA BOSS
  • 41A. Vase material named for its white color : MILK GLASS

Bill’s time: 4m 53s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

9. Expressive chat image : EMOJI

An emoji is a character found on many cell phones now that is much like an emoticon, but more elaborate.

16. Cars sold at auctions : REPOS

Repossession (repo)

17. Nabisco chocolate-creme cookie : OREO

The Oreo was the best-selling cookie in the 20th century, and almost 500 billion of them have been sold since they were introduced in 1912 by Nabisco. In those early days the creme filling was made with pork fat, but today vegetable oils are used instead. If you take a bite out of an Oreo sold outside of America you might notice a difference from the homegrown cookie, as coconut oil is added in the overseas version to give a different taste.

18. Vermeer or van Gogh : OIL PAINTER

Johannes (also “Jan”) Vermeer was born in the city of Delft in 1632, and died there some 43 years later. I just love Vermeer’s paintings, and his wonderful use of light. A great example of such a work is his “Girl with a Pearl Earring”. If you haven’t seen it, I thoroughly recommend the 2003 movie “Girl with a Pearl Earring” starring Scarlett Johansson as the girl in the painting, and Colin Firth as Vermeer. The movie is based on a novel of the same name by Tracy Chevalier, so it’s all just a great story as opposed to a documentary. The way the movie is shot really reflects the qualities of a Vermeer work of art. And, my wife and i are planning on taking a peek at the original painting “Girl with a Pearl Earring” in a couple of weeks as it is visiting one of our galleries here in San Francisco.

Vincent Van Gogh was a Dutch post-impressionist painter who seems to have had a very tortured existence. Van Gogh only painted for the last ten years of his life, and enjoyed very little celebrity while alive. Today many of his works are easily recognized, and fetch staggering sums in auction houses. Van Gogh suffered from severe depression for many of his final years. When he was only 37, he walked into a field with a revolver and shot himself in the chest. He managed to drag himself back to the inn where he was staying but died there two days later.

23. Sailor : TAR

A Jack Tar, or just “tar”, was a seaman in the days of the British Empire. The term probably arose due to a sailor’s various uses of tar back then, including waterproofing his clothes and using tar in his hair to slick down his ponytail.

24. Tanning lotion letters : SPF

In theory, the sun protection factor (SPF) is a calibrated measure of the effectiveness of a sunscreen in protecting the skin from harmful UV rays. The idea is that if you wear a lotion with say SPF 20, then it takes 20 times as much UV radiation to cause the skin to burn than it would take without protection. I say just stay out of the sun …

29. Snacked (on) to excess, briefly : ODED

Overdose (OD)

32. Pinup queen Page : BETTIE

As a model, Bettie Page was famous for her fetish modelling pictures from the fifties, depicting images of bondage. After her successful career as a pinup she changed her lifestyle completely by converting to Christianity and taking a job with evangelist Billy Graham.

34. __ buco: veal dish : OSSO

“Osso” is the Italian word for bone, as in the name of the dish called osso buco, which features braised veal shanks.

36. Mob kingpin : MAFIA BOSS

The word “kingpin” is mainly used figuratively these days, to describe the most prominent member of a group. Back at the start of the 19th century, a “kingpin” was the largest pin in a bowling game called “kayles”. As such, the term is also used sometimes in ten-pin bowling to describe the 5-pin, the pin in the center of the triangular array.

38. PG-13 issuing org. : MPAA

The Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) film-rating system (PG-13, R, etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

39. __ vincit amor : OMNIA

“Omnia vincit amor” is a line from Eclogue X, one of the major works of the Latin poet Virgil. We know the phrase in English as “love conquers all”.

40. Restful resorts : SPAS

The word “spa” migrated into English from Belgium, as Spa is the name of a municipality in the east of the country that is famous for its healing hot springs. The name “Spa” comes from the Walloon word “espa” meaning “spring, fountain”.

41. Vase material named for its white color : MILK GLASS

Milk glass is an opaque, milky-white glass that is also called “opal glass”. The white color of the glass is the result of adding a material such as bone ash, which makes the glass opaque.

45. Genghis __ : KHAN

Genghis Khan was the founder of the Mongol Empire, destined to be the largest contiguous empire in the history of the world. He first built his empire by uniting nomadic tribes of northeast Asia, but once Genghis Khan had consolidated his position, he initiated Mongol invasions throughout Eurasia. At it’s height, the Mongol Empire stretched from the River Danube to the Sea of Japan.

48. ’60s tripping drug : LSD

LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

50. “Morning Edition” airer : NPR

NPR’s flagship news program is “Morning Edition”, a 2-hour show broadcast from Monday through Friday. The sister show “Weekend Edition” is broadcast on Saturday and Sunday.

63. Sleep lab study : APNEA

Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

64. Where Norway’s Royal Family resides : OSLO

Oslo, the capital of Norway, is an ancient city that was founded around 1048. The medieval city was destroyed by fire in 1624 and was rebuilt by the Danish-Norwegian king Christian IV and renamed to Christiana. In 1877 there was an official change of the spelling of the city’s name to “Kristiana”, and then more recently in 1925 the name was restored to the original Oslo. Things have almost gone full circle and now the center of Oslo, the area that would have been contained by the original medieval walls, has apparently been renamed to Christiana.

66. L.A.’s region : SOCAL

Southern California (SoCal)

67. Pics on ankles : TATS

The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”. Tattoos are also sometimes referred to as “ink”.

Down

2. Cajun veggie : OKRA

The plant known as okra is mainly grown for it edible green pods. The pods are said to resemble “ladies’ fingers”, which is an alternative name for the plant. Okra is known as “ngombo” in Bantu, a name that might give us the word “gumbo”, the name for the name of the southern Louisiana stew that includes okra as a key ingredient.

The great explorer Verrazano gave the name “Arcadia” to the coastal land that stretched from north of present day Virginia right up the North American continent to Nova Scotia. The name Arcadia was chosen as it was also the name for a part of Greece that had been viewed as idyllic from the days of classical antiquity. The “Arcadia” name quickly evolved into the word “Acadia” that was used locally here in North America. Much of Acadia was settled by the French in the 1600s, and then in 1710 Acadia was conquered by the British. There followed the French and Indian War after which there was a mass migration of French Acadians, often via the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) to the French colony of Louisiana. The local dialectic pronunciation of the word “Acadian” was “Cajun”, giving the name to the ethnic group for which Louisiana has been home for about 300 years.

3. Course including romaine and croutons : CAESAR SALAD

The Caesar salad was created by restaurateur Caesar Cardini at the Hotel Caesar’s in Tijuana, Mexico. The original recipe called for whole lettuce leaves that were to be lifted up by the stem and eaten with the fingers.

4. Greenhouse gas protocol city : KYOTO

The Kyoto Protocol is designed to fight global warming and was adopted on 11 December 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Almost 200 states have since signed the protocol and have committed to achieving the year 2012 targets laid down in the document. The most notable signature absent on the document is one representing the United States, as we are responsible for over one third of the greenhouse gases emitted across the world. The other significant polluters that have not ratified the agreement are China, India and Brazil.

6. Get-up-and-go : BRIO

“Brio” is borrowed from Italian, in which language it means vigor and vivacity. “Con brio” is a musical direction often found on a score, instructing the musicians to play “with energy, vigor”.

8. Mar. 17th honoree : ST PAT

There is a fair amount known about Saint Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as Saint Patrick’s Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

9. Horn of Africa nation : ERITREA

Eritrea is a country located in the Horn of Africa, surrounded by Sudan, Ethiopia, Djibouti and the Red Sea. Some scientists believe that the area now known as Eritrea was the departure point for the anatomically modern humans who first left Africa to populate the rest of the world.

The Horn of Africa is that horn-shaped peninsula at the easternmost tip of the continent, containing the countries Eritrea, Djibouti, Ethiopia as well as Somalia. The Horn of Africa is also known as the Somali Peninsula.

12. G.I. doll : JOE

G.I. Joe was the original “action figure”, the first toy to carry that description. G.I. Joe first hit the shelves in 1964. There have been a few movies based on the G.I. Joe figure, but, more famous than all of them I would say is the 1997 movie “G.I. Jane” starring Demi Moore in the title role. I thought that “G.I. Jane” had some potential, to be honest, but it really did not deliver in the end.

13. Dead Sea country: Abbr. : ISR

The Dead Sea is a salt lake that lies over 1,000 feet below sea level in the Middle East. It is one of the saltiest bodies of water in the world, with a salt content that is almost ten times that of most oceans.

19. Lawrence’s land : ARABIA

British Army officer T. E. Lawrence acted as a liaison during the Arab Revolt against the Ottoman Turks during WWI. Lawrence’s own writings of his adventures, as well reports in the news media, led to him gaining a reputation as a dashing figure and earned him the moniker “Lawrence of Arabia”.

21. U2’s “The Joshua Tree” co-producer Brian : ENO

“The Joshua Tree” is a 1987 album by Irish band U2 that really propelled the band into the realm of superstars. The album spawned three hit singles: “With or Without You”, “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” and “Where the Streets Have No Name”.

25. Residents around the Leaning Tower : PISANS

The city of Pisa is right on the Italian coast, sitting at the mouth of the River Arno, and is famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

26. __ up: came clean : FESSED

The term “fess” is most often seen as part of the phrasal verb “to fess up” meaning “to admit to something”. “Fess” is simply a shortened form of “confess”.

27. Saddle knob : POMMEL

A “pommel” is a decorative (usually) knob, perhaps on the hilt of a sword or on the front of a saddle. The term ultimately comes from the Latin “pomum” meaning “apple”, a reference the a pommel’s roundness.

30. Madame Bovary : EMMA

“Madame Bovary” is the most famous novel written by Gustave Flaubert. The title character is a doctor’s wife named Emma Bovary, who lives a luxurious life beyond her means and has many adulterous affairs. The novel had a rousing reception, first being attacked by public prosecutors as obscenity, which I am sure later helped it to become a bestseller.

31. Language of Copenhagen, in Copenhagen : DANSK

The Danish language (“Dansk” in Danish) is not only spoken in Denmark, but also in the Southern Schleswig region of northern Germany. One of the distinctive characteristics of Dansk is that it has 27 phonetically distinctive vowels.

Copenhagen is the largest city and the capital of Denmark. I haven’t had the privilege of visiting Copenhagen, but I hear it is a wonderful metropolis with a marvelous quality of life. The city is also very environmentally friendly, with over a third of its population commuting to work by bicycle.

33. Culinary meas. : TBSP

Our word “culinary” means “of the kitchen, of food”. The term derives from the Latin “culina” meaning “kitchen, food”. As an aside, “culina” is also the source of our word “kiln”.

46. Last Olds models : ALEROS

The Oldsmobile Alero was the last car made under the Oldsmobile brand. The Alero was produced from 1999 to 2004.

51. Place to keep a camper, for short : RV LOT

One using a “recreational vehicle” (RV) might be called an “RVer”.

54. Mets’ old stadium : SHEA

Shea Stadium in Flushing Meadows, New York was named after William A. Shea, the man credited with bringing National League baseball back to the city in the form of the New York Mets. Shea Stadium was dismantled in 2008-2009, and the site now provides additional parking for the new stadium nearby called Citi Field.

55. “Casablanca” woman : ILSA

Ilsa Lund was played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie “Casablanca”. I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: “She paints his face with her eyes”. Wow …

56. Boston NBAer : CELT

The Boston Celtics NBA basketball team were founded just after WWII in 1946. The Celtics won eight league championships in a row from 1958 to 1966. That’s the longest consecutive championship winning streak of any professional sports team in North America.

57. Protected from the wind : ALEE

“Alee” is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing “aweather”.

58. Some male dolls : KENS

Barbie’s male counterpart doll is Ken, and Ken’s family name is Carson. Barbie’s full name is Barbie Millicent Roberts. When Ken was introduced in 1959, it was as Barbie’s boyfriend. In 2004 it was announced that Ken and Barbie were splitting up, and needed to spend quality time apart. Soon after the split, Barbie “met” Blaine, a boogie boarder from Australia.

60. NASDAQ debut : IPO

An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

The NASDAQ trading system created in 1971 is the successor to the over-the-counter (OTC) trading system that was common at the time. OTC trading is done directly between two parties without being facilitated by an exchange.

61. Health supplements co. : GNC

General Nutrition Centers (GNC) is a retailer of health and nutrition supplements based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The company was founded in 1935 as a small health food store in downtown Pittsburgh. There are now about 5,000 stores in the US. The GNC slogan is “Live Well”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Tie up at the pier : DOCK

5. Basics : ABCS

9. Expressive chat image : EMOJI

14. “That works for me” : OKAY

15. “Dang!” : DRAT!

16. Cars sold at auctions : REPOS

17. Nabisco chocolate-creme cookie : OREO

18. Vermeer or van Gogh : OIL PAINTER

20. Postgraduate degree : MASTER OF ARTS

22. First-class : A-ONE

23. Sailor : TAR

24. Tanning lotion letters : SPF

27. Golf hole benchmark : PAR

29. Snacked (on) to excess, briefly : ODED

32. Pinup queen Page : BETTIE

34. __ buco: veal dish : OSSO

36. Mob kingpin : MAFIA BOSS

38. PG-13 issuing org. : MPAA

39. __ vincit amor : OMNIA

40. Restful resorts : SPAS

41. Vase material named for its white color : MILK GLASS

43. Window insert : PANE

44. Wiped off the board : ERASED

45. Genghis __ : KHAN

48. ’60s tripping drug : LSD

49. Took command of : LED

50. “Morning Edition” airer : NPR

52. Lion’s den : LAIR

54. Turning point in tennis, and a hint to this puzzle’s circled letters : SERVICE BREAK

59. Casino big spender : HIGH ROLLER

62. Veggie in a green smoothie : KALE

63. Sleep lab study : APNEA

64. Where Norway’s Royal Family resides : OSLO

65. Biblical paradise : EDEN

66. L.A.’s region : SOCAL

67. Pics on ankles : TATS

68. Hair-coloring agents : DYES

Down

1. Gloom partner : DOOM

2. Cajun veggie : OKRA

3. Course including romaine and croutons : CAESAR SALAD

4. Greenhouse gas protocol city : KYOTO

5. Loved to death : ADORED

6. Get-up-and-go : BRIO

7. New cow : CALF

8. Mar. 17th honoree : ST PAT

9. Horn of Africa nation : ERITREA

10. Clothing store department : MEN’S

11. Withdraw, with “out” : OPT

12. G.I. doll : JOE

13. Dead Sea country: Abbr. : ISR

19. Lawrence’s land : ARABIA

21. U2’s “The Joshua Tree” co-producer Brian : ENO

24. “Enough!” : STOP ALREADY!

25. Residents around the Leaning Tower : PISANS

26. __ up: came clean : FESSED

27. Saddle knob : POMMEL

28. Aim high : ASPIRE

30. Madame Bovary : EMMA

31. Language of Copenhagen, in Copenhagen : DANSK

33. Culinary meas. : TBSP

35. Acorn droppers : OAKS

37. Pike or trout : FISH

39. Seasoned expert : OLD PRO

42. Army leader : GENERAL

46. Last Olds models : ALEROS

47. Catch red-handed : NAB

51. Place to keep a camper, for short : RV LOT

53. Irritated : IRKED

54. Mets’ old stadium : SHEA

55. “Casablanca” woman : ILSA

56. Boston NBAer : CELT

57. Protected from the wind : ALEE

58. Some male dolls : KENS

59. Owns : HAS

60. NASDAQ debut : IPO

61. Health supplements co. : GNC

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