LA Times Crossword Answers 25 Apr 17, Tuesday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Arty

Today’s themed answers each comprise two words starting with the letters RT, which sounds like ARTY. And, as was pointed out in a comment below, the second letter of each word in the themed answers form a vowel progression:

  • 61D. Pretentiously cultured, and a phonetic hint to the answers to starred clues : ARTY (sounds like “RT”)
  • 18A. *Increases homeowner levies, say : RAISES TAXES
  • 24A. *EMS group : RESCUE TEAM
  • 41A. *Meaty barbecued pork dish : RIB TIPS
  • 50A. *Marinara sauce ingredient : ROMA TOMATO
  • 62A. *Restaurant chain named for a Rolling Stones hit : RUBY TUESDAY

Bill’s time: 6m 07s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Oysters are found in one : BED

A group of oysters is commonly referred to as a “bed”, and oysters can be farmed in man-made beds. The largest body of water producing oysters in the US today is Chesapeake Bay, although the number of beds continues to dwindle due to pollution and overfishing. Back in the 1800s, most of the world’s oysters came from New York Harbor.

9. Bowler’s challenge : SPLIT

In ten pin bowling, a split takes place when the number-one pin (headpin) is a knocked down with the first ball and two or more non-adjacent pins are left standing. The most difficult split to deal with is the infamous 7-10 split, where just the rear pins at the extreme right and left remain standing.

22. Tartan wrap : KILT

The Scottish skirt called a “kilt” takes its name from the Middle English word “kilten” meaning “to tuck up”. The idea is that the kilt can be tucked up around the body to give freedom to the legs.

Tartan is sometimes called “plaid” over here in the US, a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland a “plaid” is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

24. *EMS group : RESCUE TEAM

Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

27. 2015 FedExCup champ Jordan : SPIETH

Jordan Spieth is a young golfer from Dallas who made a name for himself in 2015 by becoming the second-youngest person to win the Masters, with only Tiger Woods being younger.

The FedExCup is a championship trophy that has been awarded since 2007 to golfers on the PGA Tour. Players win points throughout the season, with those earning the most points entering into playoff tournaments at the end of the season.

29. ’80s-’90s legal drama : LA LAW

“L.A. Law” ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network’s most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful “Hill Street Blues” in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, “E.R.” The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

33. Williams in the Country Music Hall of Fame : HANK

Hank Williams was a country singer who was regarded by many as the greatest country singer of all time. Williams topped the charts eleven times between 1948 and 1953. His career was cut short though, as he died at only 29 years of age. Williams suffered from spina bifida and was prescribed strong painkillers for his back pain, including morphine. He abused the drugs and alcohol and in 1952, even though he was at the height of his success, he was fired from the “Grand Ole Opry” and told not to return until he was sober. He died on New Year’s Day 1953 from heart failure exacerbated by alcohol and drugs.

34. “Brokeback Mountain” director : ANG LEE

The very successful 2005 movie “Brokeback Mountain” is an adaptation of a short story written by Annie Proulx. The two romantic lead characters were Ennis del Mar (played by Heath Ledger) and Jack Twist (played by Jake Gyllenhaal).

40. Dutch financial powerhouse : ING

ING is a huge Dutch banking institution created via a merger in 1991. The company headquarters is in a spectacular building in Amsterdam called simply ING House. ING stands for Internationale Nederlanden Groep.

48. Siouan speakers : OSAGES

The Osage Nation originated in the Ohio River valley in what we now call Kentucky. They were forced to migrate west of the Mississippi by the invading Iroquois tribe. Most of the tribe members now live in Osage County, Oklahoma.

50. *Marinara sauce ingredient : ROMA TOMATO

The Roma tomato isn’t considered an heirloom variety, but it is very popular with home gardeners, especially those gardeners that don’t have a lot of space. It is a bush type (as opposed to vine type) and needs very little room to provide a lot of tomatoes.

Italians use the term “marinara” not for a sauce, but in the name of a recipe that includes a tomato-based sauce. For example, “spaghetti alla marinara” would be a spaghetti dish, served “mariner’s style”. The tomato sauce that we call “marinara” is called “salsa di pomodoro” in Italy.

58. San Joaquin Valley problem : SMOG

“Smog” is a portmanteau formed by melding “smoke” and “fog”. The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s. Several cities around the world have a reputation of being particularly smoggy. For example, the most smog-plagued city in Latin America is Mexico City, which is located in a highland “bowl” that traps industrial and vehicle pollution.

The San Joaquin Valley is in the southern part of the Central Valley of California (the northern part is the Sacramento Valley). The San Joaquin Valley is plagued with smog due to the surrounding mountains holding in pollution generated by traffic in built-up areas. The smog is bad that the San Joaquin Valley is one of the three worst areas in the country for pollution, along with Los Angeles and Houston.

59. Prying type : YENTA

Yenta (also “Yente”) is actually a female Yiddish name. In Yiddish theater “yenta” came to mean a busybody, a gossip.

62. *Restaurant chain named for a Rolling Stones hit : RUBY TUESDAY

“Ruby Tuesday” is a 1966 song by the Rolling Stones written by Keith Richards, and is apparently about a groupie that he once knew. The American chain of restaurants with the name Ruby Tuesday is named after the song.

66. “Hello” Grammy winner : ADELE

“Adele” is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older. More recently, her third studio album “25”, released in 2015, broke the first-week sales records in both the UK and the US.

68. Mining supply : TNT

“TNT” is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

71. Pig’s pad : STY

Back in the 16th century a “pad” was a bundle of straw to lie on, and came to mean a “sleeping place” in the early 1700s. The term was revitalized in the hippie era.

Down

2. Fictional governess : EYRE

“Jane Eyre” is a celebrated novel written by Charlotte Brontë, under the pen name Currer Bell. Over the years, I’ve shared here on my blogs that the “Jane Eyre” story line is a little too dark and Gothic for my taste, but a very persuasive blog reader convinced me to look more at the romantic side of the story and give it a second chance. I watched a wonderful 4-hour television adaptation of the novel made by the BBC a while back and I have to say that because I was focused on the relationship between Jane and Rochester, I was able to push past the Gothic influences (that depress me) so I really enjoyed the story. I thoroughly recommend the 2006 BBC adaptation to fans of the novel.

3. Double : DEAD RINGER

A “ringer” was originally a fast horse that was substituted surreptitiously into a race for a slower one. The term was derived from the verb “to ring in”, meaning to substitute. We use the phrase “dead ringer” to describe an exact duplicate.

5. Pirate’s milieu : SEA

We use the French term “milieu” to mean an environment, surroundings. In French, “milieu” is the word for “middle”.

6. Japanese 17-syllable poem : HAIKU

A haiku is a very elegant form of Japanese verse. When writing a haiku in English we tend to impose the rule that the verse must contain 17 syllables. This restriction comes from the rule in Japanese that the verse must contain 17 sound units called “moras”, but moras and syllables aren’t the same thing. What the difference is though, is not so clear to me. Here’s an example of a Haiku:

Haikus are easy
But sometimes they don’t make sense
Refrigerator

7. Borden spokescow : ELSIE

Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World’s Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. She is so famous and respected that she has been awarded the degrees of Doctor of Bovinity, Doctor fo Human Kindness and Doctor of Ecownomics. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer’s Glue.

8. Silvery food fish : SMELT

Smelt is the name given to several types of small silvery fish, examples being Great Lake smelts and whitebait smelts.

10. Blood component : PLASMA

Plasma (sometimes “plasm”) is the clear, yellow-colored liquid component of blood and lymph in which cells are suspended.

11. Very fancy : LUXE

“Luxe” is another word for luxury. The term came into English via French from the Latin “luxus” meaning luxury.

19. Sault __ Marie : STE

Sault Ste. Marie is the name of two cities on either side of the Canada-US border, one in Ontario and the other in Michigan. The two cities were originally one settlement in the 17th century, established by Jesuit Missionaries. The missionaries gave the settlement the name “Sault Sainte Marie”, which can be translated as “Saint Mary’s Falls”. The city was one community until 1817, when a US-UK Joint Boundary Commission set the border along the St. Mary’s River.

21. Adorkable one : GEEK

The original “geek” was a sideshow performer, perhaps at a circus. We use the term today for someone regarded as foolish or clumsy, but also for someone who is technically driven and expert, but socially inept.

I consider “dork” to be pretty offensive slang. It originated in the sixties among American students, and has its roots in another slang term, a term for male genitalia.

26. Tavern drinks : ALES

Our lovely word “tavern” comes into English via Old French, from the Latin “taberna”, the word for a “shop, inn, alehouse”.

30. Chant for D.C.’s baseball club : LET’S GO, NATS!

The Washington Nationals (“The Nats”) baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969, and were the first Major League Baseball team in Canada. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

32. Court orders : WRITS

A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in “written” form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

35. Org. with Warriors and Wizards : NBA

The Golden State Warriors is our local NBA franchise out here in the San Francisco Bay Area and is based in Oakland, California. The team was founded in 1946 as the Philadelphia Warriors, becoming the San Francisco Warriors when they moved to City by the Bay in 1962. They changed named again (to Golden State) when they relocated to Oakland in 1971. The statewide name reflected the fact that the team played some of their 1971-72 season games in San Diego, and as such were “California’s” team.

The Washington Wizards are the professional basketball team based in the nation’s capital. The franchise began playing in Chicago as the Packers, in 1961. One year later, the Chicago team changed its name to the Zephyrs. After one more season, the franchise relocated and became the Baltimore Bullets. In 1973, the team moved to Landover, Maryland to became the Capital Bullets, and then took the Washington Bullets name the following season. The final name change came in 1995, as the owner was uncomfortable with the violent images conjured up by the “Bullets” name. The Wizards name was chosen after a fan contest.

36. Alfa Romeo sports cars : GTS

The “Alfa” in Alfa Romeo is actually an acronym, standing for Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili (“Lombard Automobile Factory, Public Company”). ALFA was an enterprise founded in 1909 and which was taken over by Nicola Romeo in 1915. In 1920 the company name was changed to Alfa Romeo.

38. Surrey town known for salts : EPSOM

The Surrey town of Epsom in England is most famous for its racecourse (Epsom Downs), at which is run the Epsom Derby every year, one of the three races that make up the English Triple Crown. We also come across Epsom salt from time to time. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate, originally prepared by boiling down mineral waters. Epsom was indeed a spa town at one time. The town is also home to Epsom College, an English “public school” (which actually means “private, and expensive”). One of Epsom’s “old boys” was the Hollywood actor Stewart Granger.

41. San __: Riviera resort : REMO

The Italian city of San Remo sits on the Mediterranean, right on the border with France. In Italian the city is named Sanremo, just one word, although the spelling of “San Remo” dates back to ancient times.

“Riviera” is an Italian word meaning “coastline”. The term is often applied to a coastline that is sunny and popular with tourists. The term “the Riviera” is usually reserved for the French Riviera (the Mediterranean coastline in southeastern France), and the Italian Riviera (the Mediterranean coastline centered on Genoa).

45. Hors d’oeuvres spread : PATE

Pâté is a rich spreadable paste made up of a mixture of ground meat and fat, to which various vegetables, herbs and spices may be added. The most famous version of the paste is pâté de foie gras, made from the fattened livers of geese (“foie gras” means “fat liver” in French).

An hors d’oeuvre is the first course in a meal. “Hors d’oeuvre” translates from French as “apart from the work”, really meaning “not the main course”.

47. Diamond-shaped pattern : ARGYLE

The argyle pattern is based on the Campbell tartan. The Campbell clan is based in the Argyll region (note the spelling) in the west of Scotland, giving the Argyle pattern its name.

51. The Spartans of the NCAA : MSU

The sports teams of Michigan State University (MSU) used be called the Aggies, as the school was founded as the State Agricultural College of Michigan. The team name was changed to the Spartans in 1925, reflecting the school’s shift in focus beyond agriculture-centered education. The school mascot Sparty hit the scene in 1989.

53. Puccini premiere of 1900 : TOSCA

Unlike so many operas, Giacomo Puccini’s “Tosca” was a big hit right from day one, when it was first performed in 1900 at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome. “Tosca” is currently the eighth-most performed opera in America.

54. Nash who rhymed “grackle” with “debacle” : OGDEN

The grackle’s voice is less than mellow,
His heart is black, his eye is yellow,
He bullies more attractive birds
With hoodlum deeds and vulgar words,
And should a human interfere,
Attacks that human in the rear.
I cannot help but deem the grackle
An ornithological debacle.

55. Dull : DRAB

We now use the word “drab” to mean “dull, cheerless”. Back in the late 17th century, “drab” was the color of natural, undyed cloth.

57. Popular rideshare app : UBER

Uber is a ridesharing service that was founded in 2009 and is based in San Francisco. The service is somewhat controversial and has been described as an illegal taxicab operation. Central to Uber’s service is the company’s mobile app, which can use the client’s GPS location to help find the nearest available ride. Uber’s main competitor is Lyft. Personally, I love the service and have only had good experiences …

63. Spring Festival : China :: __ : Vietnam : TET

What we refer to as “Chinese New Year” here in North America, is known as “Spring Festival” in mainland China.

The full name for the New Year holiday in Vietnam is “Tet Nguyen Dan” meaning “Feast of the First Morning”, with the reference being to the arrival of the season of spring. Tet usually falls on the same day as Chinese New Year.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Oysters are found in one : BED

4. Campfire leftovers : ASHES

9. Bowler’s challenge : SPLIT

14. Deli loaf : RYE

15. Kingdom : REALM

16. Escape detection by : ELUDE

17. Notable period : ERA

18. *Increases homeowner levies, say : RAISES TAXES

20. “Pitching” or “sand” golf club : WEDGE

22. Tartan wrap : KILT

23. Candidate’s goal : SEAT

24. *EMS group : RESCUE TEAM

27. 2015 FedExCup champ Jordan : SPIETH

29. ’80s-’90s legal drama : LA LAW

33. Williams in the Country Music Hall of Fame : HANK

34. “Brokeback Mountain” director : ANG LEE

39. Go astray : ERR

40. Dutch financial powerhouse : ING

41. *Meaty barbecued pork dish : RIB TIPS

42. You, in Paris : TOI

43. Dessert with a crust : PIE

44. Corrects a pencil mistake : ERASES

45. Soft “Hey!” : PSST!

46. “Buzz off!” : SCRAM!

48. Siouan speakers : OSAGES

50. *Marinara sauce ingredient : ROMA TOMATO

55. Medication : DRUG

58. San Joaquin Valley problem : SMOG

59. Prying type : YENTA

62. *Restaurant chain named for a Rolling Stones hit : RUBY TUESDAY

65. Make public : AIR

66. “Hello” Grammy winner : ADELE

67. Part of an act : SCENE

68. Mining supply : TNT

69. French hat : BERET

70. Smooths in shop class : SANDS

71. Pig’s pad : STY

Down

1. Coffee or tea : BREW

2. Fictional governess : EYRE

3. Double : DEAD RINGER

4. Take into custody : ARREST

5. Pirate’s milieu : SEA

6. Japanese 17-syllable poem : HAIKU

7. Borden spokescow : ELSIE

8. Silvery food fish : SMELT

9. Ready to go : SET

10. Blood component : PLASMA

11. Very fancy : LUXE

12. Creative spark : IDEA

13. Trial run : TEST

19. Sault __ Marie : STE

21. Adorkable one : GEEK

25. Rocker, e.g. : CHAIR

26. Tavern drinks : ALES

27. Ocean crossers : SHIPS

28. __ button : PANIC

30. Chant for D.C.’s baseball club : LET’S GO, NATS!

31. Cropped up : AROSE

32. Court orders : WRITS

35. Org. with Warriors and Wizards : NBA

36. Alfa Romeo sports cars : GTS

37. Tell tall tales : LIE

38. Surrey town known for salts : EPSOM

41. San __: Riviera resort : REMO

45. Hors d’oeuvres spread : PATE

47. Diamond-shaped pattern : ARGYLE

49. Go along : SAY YES

51. The Spartans of the NCAA : MSU

52. “Don’t make __!” : A MESS

53. Puccini premiere of 1900 : TOSCA

54. Nash who rhymed “grackle” with “debacle” : OGDEN

55. Dull : DRAB

56. Lacking manners : RUDE

57. Popular rideshare app : UBER

60. Window shade : TINT

61. Pretentiously cultured, and a phonetic hint to the answers to starred clues : ARTY (sounds like “RT”)

63. Spring Festival : China :: __ : Vietnam : TET

64. “What else?” : AND?

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LA Times Crossword Answers 19 Apr 17, Wednesday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Fish Head

Today’s themed answers are each HEADED with a type of FISH:

  • 40D. Ingredient in some Asian soup, or, literally, what each answer to a starred clue has : FISH HEAD
  • 17A. *Droopy-eared dog : BASSET HOUND (headed by BASS)
  • 25A. *Testimony preceder : SOLEMN OATH (headed by SOLE)
  • 38A. *Garage alternative : CARPORT (headed by CARP)
  • 52A. *Common cause of food poisoning : SALMONELLA (headed by SALMON)
  • 61A. *Garment with a fitted waist and flared bottom : SKATER DRESS (headed by SKATE)

Bill’s time: 7m 43s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Overzealous : RABID

“Rabies” is actually the Latin word for “madness”. The name is a good choice for the viral disease, as once the virus spreads to the brain the infected person or animal exhibits very tortured and bizarre behavior including hydrophobia, a fear of water. The virus is passed on to humans most often through a bite from an infected dog. It is curable if it is caught in time, basically before symptoms develop. Once the virus passes up the peripheral nervous system to the spine and the brain, there isn’t much that can be done. We can also use the derivative term “rabid” figuratively, to mean extremely violent, to have extreme views.

11. Big name in home security : ADT

ADT is a home and small-business security company based in Boca Raton, Florida. The company was founded back in 1874 by Edward Calahan. Calahan had invented the stock ticker several years earlier, and ran the Gold and Stock Telegraph Company. Calahan was awoken one morning by the sound of a burglar in his house, and so he decided to develop a telegraph-based security alarm system. The success of the system led to the founding of American District Telegraph, later known as ADT.

15. Golfer’s birdie, often : THREE

The following terms are routinely used in golf for scores relative to par:

  • Bogey: one over par
  • Par
  • Birdie: one under par
  • Eagle: two under par
  • Albatross (also “double eagle”): three under par
  • Condor: four under par

No one has ever recorded a condor during a professional tournament.

17. *Droopy-eared dog : BASSET HOUND (headed by BASS)

The basset hound wouldn’t be my favorite breed of dog, to be honest. Basset hounds have a great sense of smell with an ability to track a scent that is second only to that of the bloodhound. The name “basset” comes from the French word for “rather low”, a reference to the dog’s short legs.

19. King Kong, e.g. : APE

When RKO released the 1933 movie “King Kong”, the promotional material listed the ape’s height as 50 feet. During filming, a bust was created for a 40-foot ape, as well as a full-size hand that went with a 70-foot Kong.

20. Home buyer’s choice : CONDO

The terms “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the same type of residential property, a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com-” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

25. *Testimony preceder : SOLEMN OATH (headed by SOLE)

The group of flatfish known as soles take their name from “solea”, the Latin word for “sandal”. And, they kind of have that shape.

28. Pan flying : PETER

JM Barrie’s stage play “Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up” premiered in London in 1904. Barrie adapted the play into a 1911 novel titled “Peter and Wendy”. The character Peter Pan actually predated the play, having been introduced by Barrie as baby in his 1902 adult novel called “The Little White Bird”.

30. Present mo. : DEC

December is the twelfth month in our calendar but was the tenth month in the old Roman calendar, hence the name (“decem” is Latin for “ten”). Back then there were only ten months in the year. “Ianuarius” (January) and “Februarius” were then added as the eleventh and twelfth months of the year. Soon after, the year was reset and January and February became the first and second months.

31. Bone, to Botticelli : OSSO

Sandro Botticelli was a painter of the Early Renaissance belonging to the Florentine school. Perhaps his best known work is “The Birth of Venus”, painted about 1486, which can be seen in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence.

37. Pop singer Grande’s fragrance : ARI

Ariana Grande is a singer and actress from Boca Raton, Florida. Grande plays the role of Cat Valentine on the sitcom “Victorious” that aired for four season on Nickelodeon. Grande’s singing career took off with the release of the 2011 album “Victorious: Music from the Hit TV Show”.

43. The Euphrates flows through it : SYRIA

The Euphrates is one of the two rivers that formed the main boundaries of the historical region known as Mesopotamia, the other being the Tigris.

44. Like King Kong : SIMIAN

“Simian” means “pertaining to monkeys or apes”, from the Latin word “simia” meaning “ape”.

46. Shepherd’s dinner, perhaps : ALPO

Alpo is a brand of dog food first produced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

The lovely German shepherd breed of dog isn’t one of the older breeds, only dating back to 1899. German shepherds are the second-most popular breed in the US, after the Labrador retriever.

52. *Common cause of food poisoning : SALMONELLA (headed by SALMON)

The genus of bacteria known as Salmonella isn’t named for the salmon fish. Rather, it was named for veterinary surgeon Daniel Elmer Salmon of the US Department of Agriculture. Salmon’s administered a group that discovered a strain of Salmonella in the 1880s, and so the genus was named in his honor.

56. Perlman of “The Mindy Project” : RHEA

Rhea Perlman’s most famous role has to be “Carla Tortelli”, the irascible waitress in the long-running sitcom “Cheers”. Perlman is also a successful children’s author, and has published a series of six books called “Otto Undercover”. She is married to Hollywood actor Danny DeVito, and has been so since 1982.

“The Mindy Project” is a Fox sitcom that stars and was created by Mindy Kaling. Mindy plays an obstetrician/gynecologist, a role that was inspired by her own mother who is an OB/GYN.

57. Racer’s swimwear brand : SPEEDO

Speedo brand swimwear was first produced in Australia in 1928, by a hosiery company that wanted to diversify. The brand name was chosen after a slogan competition among employees was won by “Speed on in your Speedos”. It was a long time ago, I guess …

60. Country that won the most Olympics medals in Rio : USA

The US topped the medal table at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, winning 46 gold medals:

  1. United States – 46 gold medals (121 medals total)
  2. Great Britain – 27 gold medals (67 medals total)
  3. China – 26 gold medals (70 medals total)

61. *Garment with a fitted waist and flared bottom : SKATER DRESS (headed by SKATE)

Skates (formally “Rajidae”) are a family of fish in the superorder of rays (formally “batoidea”). Skates look very similar to stingrays but they lack stinging spines.

66. Something to chew : CUD

Ruminants are animals that “chew the cud”. Ruminants eat vegetable matter but cannot extract any nutritional value from cellulose without the help of microbes in the gut. Ruminants collect roughage in the first part of the alimentary canal, allowing microbes to work on it. The partially digested material (the cud) is regurgitated into the mouth so that the ruminant can chew the food more completely exposing more surface area for microbes to do their work. We also use the verb “to ruminate” in a figurative sense, to mean “to muse, ponder, chew over”.

69. Officejet printers : HPS

Inkjet is a very accurate and descriptive name for the type of printer. Printing is accomplished by shooting extremely fine jets of ink onto the page.

71. Pearl Jam frontman Vedder : EDDIE

Eddie Vedder is the singer of the alternative rock band named Pearl Jam. As a songwriter, Vedder released a solo album in 2007, which is also used as the soundtrack of the interesting film “Into the Wild”.

Down

2. Santa __ Mountains : ANA

Southern California’s Santa Ana Mountains run southeast of Los Angeles. The range was named by Spanish explorer Gaspar de Portolà. Don Gaspar camped below the mountains in 1769 on July 26, the Feast of Saint Anne.

3. Twice-baked cookies : BISCOTTI

What we know in this country as “biscotti” are more properly called “biscotti di Prato”. A biscotto is a twice-baked, almond-flavored confection that originated in the Italian city of Prato. Modern versions of biscotti often contain anise or cinnamon in addition to the almond flavoring.

5. Celebrity chef Paula : DEEN

Paula Deen is a celebrity chef from Savannah, Georgia who is noted for her Southern cooking. Deen has been criticized for the amount of salt, fat and sugar in her recipes. The criticism became even more intense when Deen disclosed that she herself has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

6. Highest peak in Ore. : MT HOOD

Mount Hood is a volcanic peak in northern Oregon. It is the highest peak in the state, and is located about 50 miles southeast of Portland. There are six ski areas on the mountain, including a resort called Timberline that has North America’s only lift operating year-round for skiing.

8. Christian sch. in Tulsa : ORU

Oral Roberts University (ORU) is a private school in Tulsa, Oklahoma. ORU was founded relatively recently, in 1963 by the late televangelist Oral Roberts. The campus includes a Prayer Tower at its center, a spectacular glass and steel structure designed by architect Frank Wallace. The tower includes an observation deck, and is a popular tourist attraction. The school’s sports teams are known as the Oral Roberts Golden Eagles.

9. Vest fabric : DENIM

Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase “de Nimes” (meaning “from Nimes”) gives us the word “denim”. Also, the French phrase “bleu de Genes” (meaning “blue of Genoa”) gives us our word “jeans”.

10. It often has four doors : SEDAN

The American “sedan” car is the equivalent of the British “saloon” car. By definition, a sedan car has two rows of seating and a separate trunk (boot in the UK), although in some models the engine can be at the rear of the car.

11. Some kitchen appliances : AMANAS

The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa. Today, the Amana name is very much associated with household appliances. The company was founded in 1934 to manufacture commercial walk-in coolers.

12. Bus stations : DEPOTS

Our term “depot”, meaning a station or warehouse, derives from the word “dépôt”, French for “deposit” or “place of deposit”.

13. “Tommy” band : THE WHO

“Tommy” is the fourth album recorded by the British band called the Who. “Tommy” was the original “rock opera” and was adapted for both the stage and screen, with both adaptations becoming huge successes. The title character has an uncanny ability to play pinball, giving rise to the hit song “Pinball Wizard”.

18. Pts. by Vikings : TDS

The Minnesota Vikings joined the NFL as an expansion team in 1960. Founded in Minnesota, the team’s name reflects the location’s reputation as a center of Scandinavian American culture.

22. Irrelevant : MOOT

“To moot” is to bring up as a subject for discussion or debate. So, something that is moot is open to debate. Something that is no longer moot, is no longer worth debating. We don’t seem to be able get that right …

23. Critter rescue org. : SPCA

Unlike in most developed countries, there is no “umbrella” organization in the US with the goal of preventing cruelty to animals. Instead there are independent organizations set up all over the nation using the name SPCA. Having said that, there is an organization called the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that was originally intended to operate across the country, but really it now focuses its efforts in New York City.

24. Big name in business jets : LEAR

Learjet is a company making business jets that was founded in 1960 by William Powell Lear. The original Learjet was a modified Swiss ground-attack fighter aircraft.

26. Electric guitar pioneer : LES PAUL

Les Paul was a guitarist, songwriter and inventor. When he was 33 years old, Paul was involved in a near-fatal car crash that left his right arm and elbow shattered. Surgeons offered him the choice of amputation or a rebuilding of the limb that would leave him unable to bend his elbow. He told them to set his arm at just under 90 degrees so that he could at least hold his guitar and perhaps play it.

29. Like “Fifty Shades of Grey” : RACY

“Fifty Shades of Grey” is an incredibly popular erotic novel by British writer E. L. James. “Fifty Shades of Grey” is the fastest-selling paperback of all time. And there are two other titles to complete the trilogy: “Fifty Shades Darker” and “Fifty Shades Freed”.

35. Hosp. areas : ORS

Surgery (surg.) is usually performed in an operating room (OR).

36. Handle on many elevators : OTIS

Elevators (simple hoists) have been around for a long time. What Elisha Otis did was come up with the “safety elevator”, a design that he showcased at the 1853 World’s Fair in New York. At the Fair, Otis would stand on an elevated platform in front of onlookers and order his assistant to cut the single rope holding up the platform. His safety system kicked in when the platform had only fallen a few inches, amazing the crowd. After this demonstration, the orders came rolling in.

39. Bento box staple : RICE

A bento is a single-person meal that is commonly eaten in Japan. A bento can be purchased as a take-out meal, or it may be packed at home. A bento is usually sold as a “bento box”.

42. “Only Time” songwriter : ENYA

“Only Time” is a song written and recorded by Irish singer Enya. Released in 2000, “Only Time” is the biggest solo hit for Enya in the US.

45. Color named for a planet : MARS RED

The surface of the planet Mars has a very high iron oxide content, so Mars is red because it is rusty!

53. Has too much of, briefly : ODS ON

Overdose (OD)

54. Finnish tech giant : NOKIA

I do enjoy classical guitar music, but there isn’t a huge choice on CD. There is one very special piece called “Gran Vals” by Francisco Tárrega, written in 1902. This piece has a unique reputation as it contains a phrase that was once the most listened-to piece of music in the whole world. Just a few bars into the work one can hear the celebrated Nokia ringtone!

62. Legendary fighter : ALI

Muhammad Ali won 56 professional fights, 37 of which were knockouts. He lost 5 fights, 4 being decisions and one being a technical knockout (TKO). The TKO-loss was Ali’s second-last fight, against Larry Holmes. By the time Ali took on Holmes, he was already showing signs of Parkinson’s Syndrome, although the diagnosis would not come until four years later.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Overzealous : RABID

6. Emotional states : MOODS

11. Big name in home security : ADT

14. Work together : UNITE

15. Golfer’s birdie, often : THREE

16. “I’ve seen better” : MEH

17. *Droopy-eared dog : BASSET HOUND (headed by BASS)

19. King Kong, e.g. : APE

20. Home buyer’s choice : CONDO

21. Annoyed reply to “Are you awake?” : I AM NOW!

23. Hog fare : SLOP

25. *Testimony preceder : SOLEMN OATH (headed by SOLE)

28. Pan flying : PETER

30. Present mo. : DEC

31. Bone, to Botticelli : OSSO

32. Quick snooze : CATNAP

34. “Darn it!” : SHOOT!

37. Pop singer Grande’s fragrance : ARI

38. *Garage alternative : CARPORT (headed by CARP)

40. Price of admission : FEE

43. The Euphrates flows through it : SYRIA

44. Like King Kong : SIMIAN

46. Shepherd’s dinner, perhaps : ALPO

49. Coffee maker unit : CUP

51. Impudent : SASSY

52. *Common cause of food poisoning : SALMONELLA (headed by SALMON)

56. Perlman of “The Mindy Project” : RHEA

57. Racer’s swimwear brand : SPEEDO

58. __ setter : IRISH

60. Country that won the most Olympics medals in Rio : USA

61. *Garment with a fitted waist and flared bottom : SKATER DRESS (headed by SKATE)

66. Something to chew : CUD

67. Ship with liquid cargo : OILER

68. Security breaches : LEAKS

69. Officejet printers : HPS

70. Polishing targets : NAILS

71. Pearl Jam frontman Vedder : EDDIE

Down

1. Barbecue spice mixture : RUB

2. Santa __ Mountains : ANA

3. Twice-baked cookies : BISCOTTI

4. “Come right on in!” : ITS OPEN!

5. Celebrity chef Paula : DEEN

6. Highest peak in Ore. : MT HOOD

7. “Well, looky here!” : OHO!

8. Christian sch. in Tulsa : ORU

9. Vest fabric : DENIM

10. It often has four doors : SEDAN

11. Some kitchen appliances : AMANAS

12. Bus stations : DEPOTS

13. “Tommy” band : THE WHO

18. Pts. by Vikings : TDS

22. Irrelevant : MOOT

23. Critter rescue org. : SPCA

24. Big name in business jets : LEAR

26. Electric guitar pioneer : LES PAUL

27. Cave feedback : ECHO

29. Like “Fifty Shades of Grey” : RACY

33. Golfer’s four, often : PAR

35. Hosp. areas : ORS

36. Handle on many elevators : OTIS

39. Bento box staple : RICE

40. Ingredient in some Asian soup, or, literally, what each answer to a starred clue has : FISH HEAD

41. Facility : EASE

42. “Only Time” songwriter : ENYA

43. A handful : SOME

45. Color named for a planet : MARS RED

46. In itself : AS SUCH

47. Devours eagerly : LAPS UP

48. Responds in court : PLEADS

50. Tool box item : PLIERS

53. Has too much of, briefly : ODS ON

54. Finnish tech giant : NOKIA

55. Flight stat. : ARR

59. On the sidelines : IDLE

62. Legendary fighter : ALI

63. Business card no. : TEL

64. Hit the slopes : SKI

65. Dallas-to-Houston dir. : SSE

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