LA Times Crossword Answers 16 Feb 17, Thursday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Ticker Symbols

Today’s themed answers come in intersecting pairs. One answer in the pair is the name of a company, and the other ends with the TICKER SYMBOL for that company:

  • 66A. Market representative? : TICKER SYMBOL
  • 49A. Bike whose company 66-Across ends 26-Down : HARLEY (ticker symbol: HOG)
  • 26D. Unreserved way to go : WHOLE HOG
  • 50A. Name on a shuttle, whose company 66-Across ends 24-Down : AVIS (ticker symbol: CAR)
  • 24D. Alternative energy vehicle : SOLAR CAR
  • 8D. Auto with a prancing horse logo, whose company 66-Across ends 18-Across : FERRARI (ticker symbol: RACE)
  • 18A. Fitness challenge : OBSTACLE RACE

Bill’s time: 8m 49s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

12. Bygone space station : MIR

The Russian Mir Space Station was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001.

15. Reaction to a comeback : TOUCHE

“Touché” is a term from fencing, acknowledging a successful “touch” in a duel. The term has been extended to mean that a successful criticism or riposte has hit home in a conversation.

17. Long-necked bird : EMU

The emu has had a tough time in Australia since man settled there. There was even an “Emu War” in Western Australia in 1932 when migrating emus competed with livestock for water and food. Soldiers were sent in and used machine guns in an unsuccessful attempt to drive off the “invading force”. The emus were clever, breaking their usual formations and adopting guerrilla tactics, operating as smaller units. After 50 days of “war”, the military withdrew. Subsequent requests for military help for the farmers were ignored. The emus had emerged victorious …

20. Metz moniker : NOM

In French, one might look up a “nom” (name) in “un annuaire” (a directory).

The city of Metz is in the northeast of France, close to the German border. Given the proximity to Germany, Metz has both a strong German tradition and a strong French tradition. Metz was handed over to the French following WWI, after nearly 50 years of German rule. It quickly fell back into German hands in 1940 during WWII, with many German officers delighted to have back the city of their birth. Perhaps because of this long association with Germany, the US Army under General Patton encountered stiff resistance when liberating Metz in 1944. The cathedral in Metz is home to the largest expanse of stained glass in the world, almost 70,000 square feet in all.

21. Colo. setting : MST

Mountain Standard Time (MST)

25. Scand. land : SWE

The country of Sweden emerged during the Middle Ages, and became one of the great powers of Europe in the days of the Swedish Empire in 17th and early 18th century. Since then Sweden’s influence has waned. What was the eastern part of Sweden was lost to Russia in the early 1800s, and is now modern-day Finland. In the 20th century Sweden has adopted a very non-aggressive stance and was neutral in both World Wars. Sweden is not a member of NATO, but is a member of the European Union, although the country does not use the euro as its currency.

30. Male pal, in slang : BRAH

“Brah” is a slang term used for a male friend, equivalent to “bro, brother”.

32. Cold sore relief product : ORAJEL

Orajel is a brand name for benzocaine, a local anesthetic.

35. Cellist with multiple Grammys : YO-YO MA

Yo-Yo Ma is a marvelous American cellist, born in Paris to Chinese parents. Ma started studying the violin when he was very young, working his way up (in size) to the viola and finally to the cello. He has said that he wanted to play the double bass, but it was just too big for his relatively small frame.

49. Bike whose company 66-Across ends 26-Down : HARLEY (ticker symbol: HOG)

The Harley-Davidson motorcycle company was started up in the very early 1900s by two childhood friends, William Harley and Arthur Davidson, . Their first design was in effect an engine hooked up to a pedal bicycle, but the 116 cc cylinder capacity simply couldn’t generate enough power to get up the hills of their native city of Milwaukee. The pair came up with a redesigned model that had a cylinder capacity of 405 cc, which the partners built in a shed at the back of Davidson’s house. In 1906, the partners built their first factory, located where the company’s headquarters is to this day, on Juneau Avenue in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Famously, Harley motorcycles are nicknamed “hogs”.

50. Name on a shuttle, whose company 66-Across ends 24-Down : AVIS (ticker symbol: CAR)

Avis has been around since 1946, and is the second largest car rental agency after Hertz. Avis has the distinction of being the first car rental company to locate a branch at an airport.

51. Lamb sandwich : GYRO

A gyro is a traditional Greek dish of meat roasted on a tall vertical spit that is sliced from the spit as required. Gyros are usually served inside a lightly grilled piece of pita bread, along with tomato, onion and tzatziki (a yogurt and cucumber sauce).

54. Pamplona kudos : OLES

Pamplona, Spain is famous for its San Fermin festival held in July every year, the highlight of which is the Running of the Bulls. Every year, 200-300 people are injured in the bull run, and 15 people have been killed since 1910. If you get to Pamplona two days before the Running of the Bulls, you can see the animal-rights protest event known as the Running of the Nudes. The protesters are as naked as the bulls …

Our word “kudos” means acclaim given for an exceptional achievement. “Kudos” is not a plural, despite a common misapprehension. It is a singular noun derived from the Greek “kyddos” meaning “glory, fame”. That said, the plural of “kudos” is “kudos”.

57. Mountain predator : COUGAR

The mountain lion is found in much of the Americas from the Yukon in Canada right down to the southern Andes in South America. Because the mountain lion is found over such a vast area, it has many different names applied by local peoples, such as cougar and puma. In fact, the mountain lion holds the Guinness record for the animal with the most number of different names, with over 40 in English alone.

60. Trojan War epic : ILIAD

“The Iliad” is an epic poem by the Greek poet Homer, which tells the story of the ten-year siege of Ilium (also known as Troy) during the Trojan war. “The Odyssey”, also attributed to Homer, is sometimes described as a sequel to “The Iliad”.

62. Church based in SLC, Utah : LDS

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, often abbreviated to “LDS”, is known colloquially as the Mormon Church.

66. Market representative? : TICKER SYMBOL

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) can give some quite descriptive ticker symbols to companies, for example:

  • Anheuser-Busch (BUD, for “Budweiser”)
  • Molson Coors Brewing Company (TAP, as in “beer tap”)
  • Steinway Musical Instruments (LVB, for “Ludwig van Beethoven”)
  • Sotheby’s (BID, for the auction house)

69. Foofaraw : ADO

“Foofaraw” is excessive or flashy ornamentation, or a fuss over something that is unimportant.

70. “American Buffalo” playwright : MAMET

David Mamet is best known as a playwright, and indeed won a Pulitzer for his 1984 play “Glengarry Glen Ross”. Mamet is also a successful screenwriter and received Oscar nominations for the films “The Verdict” (1982) and “Wag the Dog” (1997).

71. Erie Canal city : ALBANY

New York’s state capital Albany was founded as a Dutch trading post called Fort Nassau in 1614. The English took over the settlement in 1664 and called it Albany, naming it after the future King of England James II, whose title at the time was the Duke of Albany.

The Erie Canal runs from Albany to Buffalo in the state of New York. What the canal does is allow shipping to proceed from New York Harbor right up the Hudson River, through the canal and into the Great Lakes. When it was opened in 1825, the Erie Canal had immediate impact on the economy of New York City and locations along its route. It was the first means of “cheap” transportation from a port on the Atlantic seaboard into the interior of the United States. Arguably it was the most important factor contributing to the growth of New York City over competing ports such as Baltimore and Philadelphia. It was largely because of the Erie Canal that New York became such an economic powerhouse, earning it the nickname of “the Empire State”. Paradoxically, one of the project’s main proponents was severely criticized. New York Governor DeWitt Clinton received so much ridicule that the canal was nicknamed “Clinton’s Folly” and “Clinton’s Ditch”.

72. Passel : TON

A passel is a large group or quantity. “Passel” is a variant of the word “parcel”.

Down

1. Splitting target : ATOM

By some definitions, New Zealand-born physicist and chemist Ernest Rutherford was the first person to “split the atom”. Rutherford bombarded nitrogen with alpha particles and thereby forced neutrons out of the nucleus of the nitrogen atom. The first intentional nuclear “fission” came decades later in the 1930s, with experiments in which larger nuclei were split into smaller nuclei.

2. Short cuts : BOBS

A “bob cut” is a short hairstyle in which the hair is cut straight around the head, at about the line of the jaw. Back in the 1570s a “bob” was the name given to a horse’s tail that was cut short, and about a century later it was being used to describe short hair on humans. The style became very popular with women in the early 1900s (as worn by actress Clara Bow, for example), with the fashion dying out in the thirties. The style reemerged in the sixties around the time the Beatles introduced their “mop tops”, with Vidal Sassoon leading the way in styling women’s hair in a bob cut again. Personally, I like it …

3. Reagan-era slogan : JUST SAY NO

The slogan “Just Say No” was introduced by First Lady Nancy Reagan for the War on Drugs in the 1980s. The slogan was developed by advertising executives, but the First Lady first used the phrase in response to a schoolgirl asking in 1982 what to do if she was offered drugs.

8. Auto with a prancing horse logo, whose company 66-Across ends 18-Across : FERRARI (ticker symbol: RACE)

The Italian sports car company Ferrari was founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1939. Ferrari built the most expensive car ever sold: a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO that exchanged hands for over $38 million in 2012.

9. Mike Trout’s team, on scoreboards : LAA

Mike Trout plays baseball for the Los Angeles Angels. Trout’s nickname is the “Millville Meteor”, as he grew up in Millville, New Jersey.

11. “Sons of Anarchy” actor Rossi : THEO

Actor Theo Rossi is perhaps best known for playing Juice Ortiz on the TV show “Sons of Anarchy”.

“Sons of Anarchy” is a popular FX crime series about an outlaw motorcycle club in California’s Central Valley. Apparently, it is the most successful FX show ever.

12. Brainy bunch : MENSA

If you ever learned Latin, “mensa” was probably taught to you in lesson one as it’s the word commonly used as an example of a first declension noun. Mensa means “table”. The Mensa organization, for folks with high IQs, was set up in Oxford, England back in 1946. To become a member, you have to have an IQ that is in the top 2% of the population.

28. “Hulk” star Eric : BANA

Eric Bana is an Australian actor who enjoyed a successful career in his home country before breaking into Hollywood playing an American Delta Force sergeant in “Black Hawk Down”. A couple of years later he played the lead in Ang Lee’s 2003 movie “Hulk”, the role of Dr Bruce Banner. More recently he played the Romulan villain Nero, in the 2009 “Star Trek” movie.

31. Juicer’s juice? : ROID

Steroids are found commonly in nature, with familiar examples being cholesterol and testosterone. The controversial class of drugs called anabolic steroids (known informally as “roids” or simply “steroids”) are artificially produced chemicals designed to mimic the effect of the male sex hormone, testosterone. They are termed “anabolic” as they build up cellular tissue (particularly muscle) in a process called anabolism. Taking anabolic steroids can be termed “juicing”, and the aggressive behavior that can be a side-effect is known as “roid rage”.

33. Nonsense : JIVE

“Jive” is a slang term meaning “nonsensical talk”.

34. “__ Holden”: Irving Bacheller novel : EBEN

Irving Bacheller was an American journalist and writer. His novel “Eben Holden” was published in 1900.

36. Cactus League spring training city : MESA

The city of Mesa, Arizona is in effect a suburb of Phoenix. The original settlement of non-Native Americans was founded by Daniel Webster Jones who led a Mormon group from St. George, Utah. The settlement was first called Jonesville, then Fort Utah and eventually Lehi. A second group of Mormons arrived and formed a settlement on top of a nearby mesa. It was this use of a mesa that eventually gave the city its current name.

37. Neil deGrasse Tyson subj. : ASTR

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist who is noted for his ability to communicate science to the masses. Tyson is well known for his appearances on the great PBS show “Nova”.

40. Final Four matchup : SEMI

In the NCAA Division I Basketball Championship, the teams remaining at various stages of the tournament are known as:

  • The “Sweet Sixteen” (the regional semi-finalists)
  • The “Elite Eight” (the regional finalists)
  • The “Final Four” (the national semi-finalists)

42. Rural storehouse : SILO

“Silo” is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English, originally coming from the Greek word “siros” that described a pit in which one kept corn.

44. Plays usually involving the SS : DPS

In baseball, the shortstop (SS) is usually involved in double plays (DPs).

51. IM option : GCHAT

“Gchat” is a common name for the Google Talk instant messaging service. Google Talk offers both text and voice communication as well as a plugin that allows video chat. All of this works seamlessly with Gmail, my personal favorite email client. That said, much of this functionality seems to have been replaced with the Google Hangouts service.

Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties. The “AOL Instant Message” service was known as AIM.

56. Pastoral piece : IDYLL

An “idyll” (also “idyl”) is a short poem with a pastoral theme, usually depicting the scene in romantic and idealized terms. The word comes from the Greek “eidyllion”, which literally translates to “little picture” but was a word describing a short, poem with a rustic theme.

59. Muscat money : RIAL

“Rial” is the name of the currency of Oman (as well as Yemen, Iran , Cambodia and Tunisia).

Muscat is the capital of Oman, and lies on the northeast coast of the state on the Gulf of Oman, a branch of the Persian Gulf.

64. Stallone and Stone : SLYS

If ever there was a movie that defines a career breakthrough for an actor, it would have to be “Rocky” for Sylvester Stallone. Stallone was a struggling actor in 1975 when a Muhammad Ali fight inspired Stallone to write a screenplay for a boxing movie, which he did in just three days. His efforts to sell the script went well but for the fact that the interested studios wanted a big name for the lead role, and Stallone was determined to be the star himself. Stallone persevered and “Rocky” was eventually made with him playing title role of Rocky Balboa. The movie won three Oscars, and “Sly” Stallone had arrived …

Sly and the Family Stone are a rock, funk and soul band from San Francisco that’s still performing today, although their heyday was from 1966 to 1983. They were one of the first rock bands to have a racially-integrated lineup, as well as representatives of both sexes.

67. Nashville awards gp. : CMA

Country Music Association (CMA)

68. Mgmt. degree : MBA

Master of Business Administration (MBA)

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Truly wretched : ABJECT

7. E equivalent, on scores : F-FLAT

12. Bygone space station : MIR

15. Reaction to a comeback : TOUCHE

16. Contact : REACH

17. Long-necked bird : EMU

18. Fitness challenge : OBSTACLE RACE

20. Metz moniker : NOM

21. Colo. setting : MST

22. See-through : SHEER

23. Even-odds situation : TOSS-UP

25. Scand. land : SWE

27. Not much : A DAB

29. Nosebag fill : OATS

30. Male pal, in slang : BRAH

32. Cold sore relief product : ORAJEL

35. Cellist with multiple Grammys : YO-YO MA

38. Baseball collectibles : MINIBATS

41. Pure : SINLESS

43. Stated as fact : AVERRED

45. Sits in a cell : DOES TIME

48. Set up in a glade, say : ENCAMP

49. Bike whose company 66-Across ends 26-Down : HARLEY (ticker symbol: HOG)

50. Name on a shuttle, whose company 66-Across ends 24-Down : AVIS (ticker symbol: CAR)

51. Lamb sandwich : GYRO

54. Pamplona kudos : OLES

56. Outrage : IRE

57. Mountain predator : COUGAR

60. Trojan War epic : ILIAD

62. Church based in SLC, Utah : LDS

65. Center : HUB

66. Market representative? : TICKER SYMBOL

69. Foofaraw : ADO

70. “American Buffalo” playwright : MAMET

71. Erie Canal city : ALBANY

72. Passel : TON

73. More than amuses : SLAYS

74. Greenery : PLANTS

Down

1. Splitting target : ATOM

2. Short cuts : BOBS

3. Reagan-era slogan : JUST SAY NO

4. Outer: Pref. : ECT-

5. Run after : CHASE

6. __ support : TECH

7. Liberty : FREEDOM

8. Auto with a prancing horse logo, whose company 66-Across ends 18-Across : FERRARI (ticker symbol: RACE)

9. Mike Trout’s team, on scoreboards : LAA

10. Check no. : ACCT

11. “Sons of Anarchy” actor Rossi : THEO

12. Brainy bunch : MENSA

13. Passing remark? : I’M OUT

14. Beef cuts : RUMPS

19. Field : LEA

24. Alternative energy vehicle : SOLAR CAR

26. Unreserved way to go : WHOLE HOG

28. “Hulk” star Eric : BANA

30. Fly-__: air passes : BYS

31. Juicer’s juice? : ROID

33. Nonsense : JIVE

34. “__ Holden”: Irving Bacheller novel : EBEN

36. Cactus League spring training city : MESA

37. Neil deGrasse Tyson subj. : ASTR

39. Blizzard restriction, perhaps : TRAVEL BAN

40. Final Four matchup : SEMI

42. Rural storehouse : SILO

44. Plays usually involving the SS : DPS

46. “I’m a fan!” : ME LIKEY!

47. Shoelace holders : EYELETS

51. IM option : GCHAT

52. “Seriously?” : YOU DO?

53. Apply, as sunscreen : RUB ON

55. Respectful word : SIR

56. Pastoral piece : IDYLL

58. Stop-offs before big dates, maybe : ATMS

59. Muscat money : RIAL

61. Rush job letters : ASAP

63. “Knock it off!” : DON’T!

64. Stallone and Stone : SLYS

67. Nashville awards gp. : CMA

68. Mgmt. degree : MBA

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LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Feb 17, Saturday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: None

Bill’s time: 12m 24s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

11. They’re sometimes black : OPS

“Black ops” is the name given to covert operations, activities that are usually outside of standard military protocol and may even be against the law. Funding for black ops is usually provided by a secret “black budget”.

14. Question at an alumni gathering : REMEMBER ME?

An “alumnus” (plural … alumni) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural … alumnae). The term comes into English from Latin, in which alumnus means foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or an alumnus.

19. Tijuana addr. : SRA

The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame), in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora) and in Portuguese is also “Sra.” (Senhora).

Tijuana is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California, and lies just across the US-Mexico border from San Diego. Tijuana is also the most westerly of all Mexican cities. A lot of Tijuana’s growth took place in the twenties as tourists flocked south of the border during the days of prohibition in the US. One of the many casinos and hotels that flourished at that time was Hotel Caesar’s in the Avenida Revolución area. Hotel Caesar’s claims to be the birthplace of the now ubiquitous Caesar Salad.

20. Nada : Nogales :: __ : Reims : RIEN

The word “nothing” translates to “nada” in Spanish, and to “rien” in French.

23. County in Ulster : TYRONE

County Tyrone is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland, that part of the island of Ireland that is included in the United Kingdom. The name “Tyrone” comes from the Irish “Tír Eoghain” meaning “land of Eoghan”. Eoghan (equivalent to the English “Owen”) was the son of one of the Irish kings.

25. Some broken pegs, or where they’re found : TEES

In the game of golf, a “tee” is the wooden or plastic peg on which one can place a ball when “teeing off”. Also, the “teeing ground” (sometimes “tee” or “tee box”) is the area at the beginning of the hole from which the first stroke is taken, from where one tees off.

27. Multi-purpose shortening : ETC

The Latin phrase “et cetera” translates as “and other things”. The term is usually abbreviated to “etc.”

28. Cooler tenant : CON

The cooler, the pen, the slammer … prison.

30. 4-Down in France : THE
(4D. 30-Across in America : TEA)

In French, a “tasse” (cup) might contain perhaps “thé” (tea) or “café” (coffee).

34. Pot addition : ANTE

That might be a game of poker.

35. Patriot target : SCUD

Scud missiles were developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The Soviets called them R-11 missiles at first, with later versions known as R-17 and R-300 Elbrus. The name “Scud” was actually the name NATO used for the missile, a name created by Western intelligence officers. Ballistic missiles haven’t been used a lot in actual warfare, the exception being the German V-2 rocket attacks on England during WWII. After the V-2, the second most-used ballistic missile in warfare is the Scud, which featured in a number of conflicts:

  • used by Egypt against Israel in the Yom Kippur War of 1973
  • used by the USSR in Afghanistan
  • used by Libya against a US Coast Guard station in the Mediterranean in 1986
  • used by Iranians and Iraqis in the Iran-Iraq War of 1980-88
  • used by Iraq in the Gulf War of 1990-91

Patriot is a surface-to-air missile (SAM) system manufactured by Raytheon. The radar component of the system is called the “Phased Array Tracking Radar to Intercept On Target”, known by the acronym PATRIOT.

36. Went berserk : HAD A FIT

Our word “berserk” meaning “deranged” comes from the “Berserkers”, Norse warriors described in Old Norse literature. Berserkers were renowned for going into battle in a fury, and some believe that they consumed drugged food to get themselves worked up for the fighting ahead.

38. Sushi bar appetizer : EDAMAME

Edamame is a simple dish made of immature soybeans still in the pod. The pods are boiled and then salted before serving, usually as a snack or side dish. The name “edamame” translates as “twig bean”.

40. “… crafty seer, with __ wand”: Pope : EBON

“… crafty seer, with ebon wand” is from “The Dunciad”, a satire by Alexander Pope.

Alexander Pope was an English poet, famous for his own compositions as well as for a translation of Homer’s works. One of Pope’s most notable poems is “Ode on Solitude” that opens with:

Happy the man, whose wish and care
A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
In his own ground.
Pope wrote that when he was just twelve years old!

41. “__ Yankees” : DAMN

In the musical show “Damn Yankees”, the title refers to the New York Yankees baseball team that dominated the sport in the fifties. That said, the show tells the story of the a man who sells his soul to help his beloved Washington Senators team beat the Yankees and win the pennant. So, “Damn Yankees” is yet another version of the classic German legend of “Faust”. The show was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross, a production that turned out to be a very successful follow-up to their prior hit, “The Pajama Game”. The future was looking really rosy for Adler and Ross but, sadly, Jerry Ross died of an obstructive lung disease only a few weeks after “Damn Yankees” opened on Broadway in 1955. He was just 29 years old.

43. Feet in a meter? : IAMBS

An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. Robert Frost’s “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening” consists of lines made up of four sequential iambs e.g. “Whose woods / these are / I think / I know”. With a sequence of four iambs, the poem’s structure is described as iambic tetrameter.

44. Title of respect, in Tokyo : SAN

The Japanese honorific “-san” is added to the end of names as a title of respect, and can be translated as “Mr.” or “Ms.” The usage is wider than it is in English, though. Sometimes “-san” is added to the name of a company, for example.

45. Bug zappers? : SERA

Blood serum is the clear, yellowish part of blood i.e. that part which is neither a blood cell or a clotting factor. Included in blood serum are antibodies, the proteins that are central to our immune system. Blood serum from animals that have immunity to some disease can be transferred to another individual, hence providing that second individual with some level of immunity. Blood serum used to pass on immunity can be called “antiserum”.

46. Ed. basics : RRR

The “three Rs” (RRR) are reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic.

47. “Major Crimes” network : TNT

The TV cop show “Major Crimes” is a follow-on spin-off of “The Closer”. The first episode of “Major Crimes” was aired right after the last episode of “The Closer” on August 13, 2012.

57. Old televangelism letters : PTL

“The PTL Club” was a daily television show hosted by televangelists Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker. PTL is short for both “Praise the Lord” and “People that Love”. The show ended its run of over ten years in 1987 when it was revealed that Jim Bakker was involvement in financial and sexual scandals. Bakker served 5 years in jail, part of an 18-year sentence.

58. Second-largest Middle East country : IRAN

The largest country in the Middle East is Saudi Arabia, which covers over 750,000 square miles. The smallest country is Bahrain, covering less than 700 square miles.

62. Scrapple ingredient : PORK

Scrapple is a dish made from pork offal mixed with cornmeal, flour and spices. It appears that the recipe was introduced into America by German colonists who settled near Philadelphia in the 1600s.

Down

2. Edsel’s father : HENRY

The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel, son of Henry Ford. Sadly, the name “Edsel” has become synonymous with “failure”, which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced. When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

3. “Making AIDS History” org. : AMFAR

amfAR is an organization that has been supporting AIDS research since 1983. The acronym amFAR stands for American Foundation for AIDS Research.

5. Brand in many a Moscow mule : SMIRNOFF

The Smirnoff brand of vodka was introduced by Pyotr Smirnov in his Moscow distillery in the late 1800s. Smirnoff was the first vodka to use charcoal filtration in the vodka production process.

A Moscow Mule is a cocktail made from vodka, ginger beer and lime. I like the occasional Moscow Mule, mainly because the ginger beer was my soda of choice as kid. Vodka … not so much …

6. “The Barefoot Contessa” Oscar winner Edmond : O’BRIEN

Edmond O’Brien was a character actor who appeared in many films starting in the 1940s. Although he played in all movie genres, O’Brien is perhaps most associated with his supporting roles in film noir.

“The Barefoot Contessa” is an excellent film released in 1954, with Ava Gardner in the title and also starring Humphrey Bogart and Edmond O’Brien. The movie tells the story of Maria Vargas, a nightclub dancer who eventually weds a count, and who likes to go around in bare feet. Hence, the title …

7. Island goose : NENE

The bird called a nene is a native of Hawaii, and is also known as the Hawaiian goose. The name “nene” is imitative of its call. When Captain Cook landed on the islands in 1778, there were 25,000 nene living there. By 1950, the number was reduced by hunting to just 30 birds. Conservation efforts in recent years have been somewhat successful.

8. 1776 battleground : TRENTON

The city of Trenton, New Jersey was first settled in 1679 by Quakers. The settlement was named Trent-towne in 1719 in honor of William Trent, who was one of the biggest landowners in the area. The name “Trent-towne” was later shortened to Trenton. The city was the site of George Washington’s first military victory in the Revolutionary War, in 1776. Because of the Battle of Trenton, the New Jersey capital is sometimes called the “Turning Point of the Revolution”.

9. Morning hrs. : AMS

The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

11. Like some wills : ORAL

Most wills are written documents. Oral wills are wills that have been delivered orally to witnesses, usually by someone who is close to passing. Not all US states recognize oral wills.

12. Poker telecast equipment : POCKETCAM

Poker tables used in televised poker tournament often feature “pocketcams”, small cameras that are used to view each player’s hole cards, or “pocket” cards.

13. Metaphor for obvious protrusion : SORE THUMB

Someone or something that “sticks out like a sore thumb” is easily noticed.

16. Car in a King title : MERCEDES

“Mr. Mercedes” is a 2014 Stephen King novel, and an unusual one for him, I’d say. It’s a detective novel. No horror …

22. Biblical beast : ASS

The ass or donkey is mentioned several times in the Bible. One of the most-quoted biblical stories involving an ass is the story of Balaam. Balaam was a diviner who appears in the Book of Numbers in. In one account, Balaam is held to task by an angel for particularly cruel treatment of an ass.

31. Busy Las Vegas area : THE STRIP

The stretch of South Las Vegas Boulevard on which most of the big casinos are concentrated is referred to as the “Las Vegas Strip”. The Strip was named for LA’s Sunset Strip by former Los Angeles law enforcement officer Guy McAfee. McAfee was a notoriously corrupt head of the LAPD vice squad in 1920s and 1930s who ran several brothels and gambling saloons. McAfee moved to Las Vegas in 1939 where he opened several casinos, including the Golden Nugget.

32. They’re high on the Scoville scale : HABANEROS

The habanero chili has a very intense flavor. Interestingly, the correct spelling of the chili’s name is “habanero”, although in English we try to be clever and add a tilde making it “habañero”, which isn’t right at all …

The Scoville scale is a measure of the spiciness of chili pepper. The scale was invented by a pharmacist in 1912, Wilbur Scoville. To determine the position of a pepper on Scoville scale, the amount of capsaicin in the chili is measured. Capsaicin is an irritant that causes the sensation of burning when it comes into contact with tissue, particularly the mucous membranes.

34. Arcade giant : ATARI

At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

39. Carrier to Beijing : AIR CHINA

Air China is a flag carrier for the People’s Republic of China, and is based in Beijing. The airline is not to be confused with China Airlines, the flag carrier of the Republic of China (aka “Taiwan”).

The city of Beijing in China was given its name in 1403, with “Beijing” chosen as it translates as “Northern Capital”. The name distinguished it from the city of Nanjing, which name translates as “Southern Capital”. Beijing was written in English as Peking for centuries.

42. Fuchsia cousin : MAGENTA

The colors fuchsia and magenta are identical when used on the Web. In the world of print, there’s a slight difference.

45. Pommes frites seasoning : SEL

In French, one might put “sel” (salt) on “pommes frites” (French fries).

46. Weisz of “The Constant Gardener” : RACHEL

Rachel Weisz is an actress from England. I first remember Weisz playing the female lead in the excellent 2001 WWII movie “Enemy at the Gates”. She also appeared in 2005’s “The Constant Gardener”, winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar. Weisz married fellow actor Daniel Craig in 2011.

“The Constant Gardener” is a 2001 novel by John le Carré (author of “The Spy Who Came in from the Cold”). The story is about a British diplomat called Justin Quayle who investigates the murder of his wife, Tessa. Le Carré’s traditional Cold War setting is replaced by the world of corporate cover-ups. The novel was adapted into a movie of the same name in 2005 starring Ralph Fiennes and Rachel Weisz.

52. Kilt fold : PLEAT

The Scottish skirt called a “kilt” takes its name from the Middle English word “kilten” meaning “to tuck up”. The idea is that the kilt can be tucked up around the body to give freedom to the legs.

54. “My Way” lyricist : ANKA

The song “My Way” has lyrics that were written by Paul Anka in 1969, but the tune itself was composed two years earlier by Claude François and Jacques Revaux. The song had been released with completely different lyrics in France as “Comme d’habitude” (“As Usual”). When Anka heard the song on television in Paris he sought out and obtained the rights to use it himself, for free. Supposedly, “Comme d’habitude” has been recorded in more languages, by more artists, than any other song in the contemporary repertoire.

And now, the end is near
And so I face the final curtain
My friend, I’ll say it clear
I’ll state my case, of which I’m certain
I’ve lived a life that’s full
I traveled each and every highway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

56. Arboreal Amazon monkey : TITI

Titis are monkeys found in much of South America. Totis have tails that are a little bit longer than the length of their heads and bodies.

60. Georges, par exemple : NOM

In French, “Georges” (George) “par exemple” (for example) is a “nom” (name).

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Bar line : WHAT’S ON TAP?

11. They’re sometimes black : OPS

14. Question at an alumni gathering : REMEMBER ME?

15. Word with leg or elbow : -ROOM

17. “Looking at all sides … ” : IN FAIRNESS …

18. Real estate unit : ACRE

19. Tijuana addr. : SRA

20. Nada : Nogales :: __ : Reims : RIEN

21. Phone user : TALKER

23. County in Ulster : TYRONE

25. Some broken pegs, or where they’re found : TEES

27. Multi-purpose shortening : ETC

28. Cooler tenant : CON

29. Crew tools : OARS

30. 4-Down in France : THE

31. Cooler tenant : THIEF

34. Pot addition : ANTE

35. Patriot target : SCUD

36. Went berserk : HAD A FIT

38. Sushi bar appetizer : EDAMAME

40. “… crafty seer, with __ wand”: Pope : EBON

41. “__ Yankees” : DAMN

43. Feet in a meter? : IAMBS

44. Title of respect, in Tokyo : SAN

45. Bug zappers? : SERA

46. Ed. basics : RRR

47. “Major Crimes” network : TNT

48. Green Smoke product : E-CIG

49. Misbehaves : ACTS UP

53. Take back : RECALL

55. Mark for good : ETCH

57. Old televangelism letters : PTL

58. Second-largest Middle East country : IRAN

59. Wipe out : ANNIHILATE

62. Scrapple ingredient : PORK

63. “That’ll never work!” : ROTTEN IDEA!

64. Waves home : SEA

65. Cell notice : EMAIL ALERT

Down

1. Slap spot : WRIST

2. Edsel’s father : HENRY

3. “Making AIDS History” org. : AMFAR

4. 30-Across in America : TEA

5. Brand in many a Moscow mule : SMIRNOFF

6. “The Barefoot Contessa” Oscar winner Edmond : O’BRIEN

7. Island goose : NENE

8. 1776 battleground : TRENTON

9. Morning hrs. : AMS

10. Bugged : PESTERED

11. Like some wills : ORAL

12. Poker telecast equipment : POCKETCAM

13. Metaphor for obvious protrusion : SORE THUMB

16. Car in a King title : MERCEDES

22. Biblical beast : ASS

24. Waves home : OCEAN

26. All gone : EATEN

31. Busy Las Vegas area : THE STRIP

32. They’re high on the Scoville scale : HABANEROS

33. “Whatever” : I DON’T CARE

34. Arcade giant : ATARI

35. Sting : SMART

37. “Well, well!” : I DECLARE!

39. Carrier to Beijing : AIR CHINA

42. Fuchsia cousin : MAGENTA

45. Pommes frites seasoning : SEL

46. Weisz of “The Constant Gardener” : RACHEL

50. Soil mover : SPADE

51. Absolute : UTTER

52. Kilt fold : PLEAT

54. “My Way” lyricist : ANKA

56. Arboreal Amazon monkey : TITI

60. Georges, par exemple : NOM

61. Tiny, in a tiny way : LI’L

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