LA Times Crossword Answers 15 Aug 2017, Tuesday










Constructed by: C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Mad Dash

Today’s themed answers each contain a string of circled letters. Those letters are D-A-S-H, but rearranged, in a “MAD” order:

  • 37A. Frantic rush, and what’s literally found in each set of puzzle circles : MAD DASH
  • 16A. “Baywatch” star : DAVID HASSELHOFF
  • 22A. Pull-out money holder : CASH DRAWER
  • 49A. Poker table experts : CARD SHARKS
  • 59A. Like football linemen : BROAD-SHOULDERED

Bill’s time: 5m 53s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Arizona site of Sun Devil Stadium : TEMPE

Tempe is a city in the metropolitan area of Phoenix. The city is named for the Vale of Tempe in Greece.

Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

10. College sr.’s test : GRE

Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

16. “Baywatch” star : DAVID HASSELHOFF

Actor and singer David Hasselhoff has appeared on many hit TV shows, including “The Young and the Restless”, “Knight Rider”, “Baywatch”, “Dancing with the Stars” and “America’s Got Talent”. According to “The Guinness Book of Records”, Hasselhoff is the most-watched man on TV, ever. Albeit, not by me …

21. Coastal raptor : ERNE

“Raptor” is a generic term for a bird of prey, one that has talons to grip its victims.

26. Entry in a ledger’s plus column : ASSET

A “ledger” is an account book. The name comes from the Middle English “leggen” meaning “to lay”. The original ledger was a large book “laid” in one particular place permanently, an example being a breviary in a church.

29. Horse opera setting : OLD WEST

“Horse opera” is a slang term for a western movie or show.

33. “La La Land” Best Actress Stone : EMMA

The actress Emma Stone is from Scottsdale, Arizona. Stone really came to prominence with her performance in the 2010 high school movie called “Easy A”. She won the Best Actress Oscar for her performance in the 2016 movie “La La Land”. Now one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood, Stone values her privacy and works hard to maintain a low profile. Good for her, I say …

“La La Land” is a 2016 romantic musical film starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone as a musician and actress who fall in love in “La La Land” (Los Angeles, i.e. “LA”). The film was written and directed by Damien Chazelle, who had found success two years earlier with the musical drama “Whiplash”. “La La Land” won a record-breaking seven Golden Globes and tied for the record number of Oscar nominations at fourteen, winning six.

35. Flat-bottomed boat : SCOW

A scow is a flat-bottomed boat with squared-off ends that’s often used for transportation, usually pushed or pulled by a barge. Often a scow can be seen carrying junk or garbage.

40. Lowest sudoku number : ONE

Number puzzles similar to our modern-day Sudoku first appeared in French newspapers in the late 1800s. The format that we use today was created by Howard Garns, a 74-year-old freelance puzzle constructor from Connersville, Indiana and first published in 1979. The format was introduced in Japan in 1984 and given the title of “Sūji wa dokushin ni kagiru”, which translates to “the digits are limited to one occurrence”. The rather elaborate Japanese title was eventually shortened to Sudoku. No doubt many of you are fans of Sudoku puzzles. I know I am …

44. How pastrami is often ordered : ON RYE

In the US, pastrami was originally called “pastrama”, and was a dish brought to America by Jewish immigrants from Romania in the second half of the the nineteenth century. The original name may have evolved from the Turkish word “pastirma” meaning “pressed”. “Pastrama” likely morphed into “pastrami” influenced by the name of the Italian sausage called salami.

49. Poker table experts : CARD SHARKS

A “card sharp” is someone who is skilled and deceptive with playing cards, particularly when playing gambling games like poker. It seems that the term “card sharp” predates the related “card shark”, both of which have the same meaning.

53. Bit of fish tank growth : ALGA

Algae are similar to terrestrial plants in that they use photosynthesis to create sugars from light and carbon dioxide, but they differ in that they have simpler anatomies, and for example lack roots.

59. Like football linemen : BROAD-SHOULDERED

In American football, linemen specialize in playing in the line of scrimmage. That’s about all I know, and even that I am unsure about …

64. Website with filmographies : IMDB

The website called the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) was launched in 1990, and is now owned by Amazon.com. It’s a great site for answering question one has about movies and actors.

67. Civil rights activist Parks : ROSA

Rosa Parks was one of a few brave women in days gone by who refused to give up their seats on a bus to white women. It was the stand taken by Rosa Parks on December 1, 1955 that sparked the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. President Clinton presented Ms. Parks with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996. When she died in 2005, Rosa Parks became the first ever woman to have her body lie in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda.

Down

2. Wax-coated Dutch cheese : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

3. Relocate : MOVE

4. Charles, William and Harry : PRINCES

The British laws of royal succession changed in 2013. The centuries old law dictated that males in a family were ranked higher than all females, regardless of age. The current line of succession is:

  1. Prince Charles (Elizabeth’s eldest son)
  2. Prince William (Charles’ eldest son)
  3. Prince George (William’s eldest child)
  4. Princess Charlotte (William’s second-oldest child)
  5. Prince Harry (Charles’ second-oldest son)

Under the old system, should Prince William have another son, then that male would have bumped Princess Charlotte down one rung of the ladder. Under the new system, Princess Charlotte gets to “hold her ground”.

15. Mole-like mammals : SHREWS

Shrews are mammals that look like small moles or long-nosed mice. They are the only terrestrial mammals that are known to echolocate, using a series of ultrasonic squeaks to examine their nearby surroundings.

18. More than risqué : LEWD

“Risqué” is a French word, the past participle of the verb “to risk”. So in English we use “risqué” to mean “racy”, but in French it means “risky”.

24. Oblong tomatoes : ROMAS

The Roma tomato isn’t considered an heirloom variety, but it is very popular with home gardeners, especially those gardeners that don’t have a lot of space. It is a bush type (as opposed to vine type) and needs very little room to provide a lot of tomatoes.

26. Smart __: wiseguys : ALECS

Apparently the original “smart Alec” (sometimes “Aleck”) was Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

28. Big name in music streaming : SOUNDCLOUD

Soundcloud is a German company that allows users to upload and share audio files online, with most of the distributed content being music. Based in Berlin, the website was launched in 2008 by two Swedish entrepreneurs.

30. “Mortal Kombat” agent __ Blade : SONYA

Mortal Kombat is a series of video games launched in 1992 by Midway Games. It’s pretty violent stuff, apparently …

31. Short cyber post : TWEET

I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so (but one should never say “never”). Twitter is a microblogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don’t think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters.

34. Summer hrs. in Billings : MDT

Mountain Daylight Time (MDT)

Billings is the only city in Montana with a population greater than 100,000 people. It was founded as a railroad town in 1882 and experienced such rapid growth that it was nicknamed the Magic City. The town’s name was chosen in honor of a former president of the Northern Pacific Railroad, Frederick H. Billings.

42. Steven of “The Patriot” (1998) : SEAGAL

Steven Seagal is known in the US as a martial artist turned actor. Seagal started his career as an Aikido instructor in Japan and was the first foreigner to operate an Aikido dojo in that country.

“The Patriot” is a 1998 action film starring Steven Seagal. The movie is based on a 1974 sci-fi novel by William C. Heine. Haven’t seen it …

47. Actor Pitt : BRAD

Brad Pitt’s first major role was the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston and then to Angelina Jolie.

50. Parka parts : HOODS

A parka is a hooded jacket, often lined with fur, that is worn in cold weather. The original parka was a pullover design, but nowadays it is usually zipped at the front. “Parka” is the Russian name for the garment , absorbed into English in the late 1700s via the Aleut language.

51. Vacation spot near Curaçao : ARUBA

Aruba is one of the so-called ABC Islands located off the northern coast of Venezuela. “ABC Islands” is a name given to the three westernmost islands of the Leeward Antilles in the Caribbean. The nickname comes from the first letters of the island names: Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao. All three of the ABC Islands are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

52. Seminary subj. : REL

Originally, a “seminary” was where plants were raised from seeds, as “semen” is the Latin for “seed”. The first schools labelled as seminaries were established in the late 1500s. Those first schools were more likely to be academies for young ladies back then, rather than for trainee priests.

53. Former Yankee who was the youngest MLB player to hit 600 home runs : A-ROD

Baseball player Alex Rodriguez, nicknamed “A-Rod”, broke a lot of records in his career, albeit under a shroud of controversy due to his use of illegal performance-enhancing drugs. When he signed a 10-year contract with the Texas Rangers for $252 million in 2000, it was the most lucrative contract in sports history. In 2007, Rodriguez signed an even more lucrative 10-year contract with the New York Yankees, worth $275 million. Rodriguez retired in 2016.

59. Youth org. with merit badges : BSA

As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910. And, the Boy Scouts motto is “Be Prepared”.

61. Med. care provider : HMO

Health Maintenance Organization (HMO)

62. __ Moines : DES

The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French “Riviere des Moines” meaning “River of the Monks”. It looks like there isn’t any “monkish” connection to the city’s name per se. “Des Moines” was just the name given by French traders who corrupted “Moingona”, the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Arizona site of Sun Devil Stadium : TEMPE

6. “I beg your pardon?” : WHAT?

10. College sr.’s test : GRE

13. Prettify : ADORN

14. Post-bath wrap : ROBE

15. Window box dirt : SOIL

16. “Baywatch” star : DAVID HASSELHOFF

19. “I couldn’t agree more!” : AMEN!

20. Dined : ATE

21. Coastal raptor : ERNE

22. Pull-out money holder : CASH DRAWER

26. Entry in a ledger’s plus column : ASSET

29. Horse opera setting : OLD WEST

32. On the run : LOOSE

33. “La La Land” Best Actress Stone : EMMA

35. Flat-bottomed boat : SCOW

36. College URL ender : EDU

37. Frantic rush, and what’s literally found in each set of puzzle circles : MAD DASH

40. Lowest sudoku number : ONE

41. Swindles : CONS

43. Funny folks : WITS

44. How pastrami is often ordered : ON RYE

46. Secondary wager : SIDE BET

48. Silently greet : NOD AT

49. Poker table experts : CARD SHARKS

53. Bit of fish tank growth : ALGA

54. Mined metal : ORE

55. Emerged from slumber : WOKE

59. Like football linemen : BROAD-SHOULDERED

63. Motown genre : SOUL

64. Website with filmographies : IMDB

65. Made more tolerable : EASED

66. Total up : ADD

67. Civil rights activist Parks : ROSA

68. Unemotional : STONY

Down

1. “I did it!” : TA-DA!

2. Wax-coated Dutch cheese : EDAM

3. Relocate : MOVE

4. Charles, William and Harry : PRINCES

5. Wrap up : END

6. Extreme anger : WRATH

7. Swindled, slangily : HOSED

8. Core muscles : ABS

9. Casual shirt : TEE

10. Publicly state one’s views : GO ON RECORD

11. Replete (with) : RIFE

12. Pixie : ELF

15. Mole-like mammals : SHREWS

17. Suffers from : HAS

18. More than risqué : LEWD

23. “Up and __!”: “Rise and shine!” : AT ‘EM

24. Oblong tomatoes : ROMAS

25. “Sorry to say … ” : ALAS …

26. Smart __: wiseguys : ALECS

27. “Same here!” : SO DO I!

28. Big name in music streaming : SOUNDCLOUD

30. “Mortal Kombat” agent __ Blade : SONYA

31. Short cyber post : TWEET

33. Touches up, as text : EDITS

34. Summer hrs. in Billings : MDT

38. Wonderstruck : AWED

39. Hit the horn : HONK

42. Steven of “The Patriot” (1998) : SEAGAL

45. “That’s easy!” : NO SWEAT!

47. Actor Pitt : BRAD

50. Parka parts : HOODS

51. Vacation spot near Curaçao : ARUBA

52. Seminary subj. : REL

53. Former Yankee who was the youngest MLB player to hit 600 home runs : A-ROD

56. Guesstimate words : OR SO

57. “Peachy-__!” : KEEN

58. Whirling current : EDDY

59. Youth org. with merit badges : BSA

60. Title of respect : SIR

61. Med. care provider : HMO

62. __ Moines : DES

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LA Times Crossword Answers 9 Aug 2017, Wednesday










Constructed by: Richard Monsaythe & C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Catchphrase

Today’s themed answers might be described as CATCHPHRASES, as each ends with something one might CATCH:

  • 63A. Familiar slogan … or, based on its last word, what each answer to a starred clue is? : CATCHPHRASE
  • 17A. *One may follow the wedding dress : BRIDAL TRAIN (giving “catch a train”)
  • 39A. *Avant-garde : NEW WAVE (giving “catch a wave”)
  • 10D. *Westminster’s top canine : BEST IN SHOW (giving “catch a show”)
  • 29D. *Harsh and wintry : BITTER COLD (giving “catch a cold”)

Bill’s time: 5m 26s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Heckler’s array : JEERS

Originally, the verb “to heckle” meant to question severely, and for many years was associated with the public questioning of parliamentary candidates in Scotland. In more recent times, the meaning has evolved into questioning that is less polite and that is directed at standup comics.

6. Slender woodwind : OBOE

The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name “oboe” comes from the French “hautbois” which means “high wood”. When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance you’ll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an “A”. The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe’s “A”.

10. Crony : BUD

A crony is a friend or companion. The term originated as slang in Cambridge University in England in the 1600s. “Crony” is probably derived from the Greek “khronios” meaning “long-lasting”.

14. With 24-Across, Chilean poet with a Nobel Prize : PABLO …
(24A. See 14-Across : … NERUDA)

Pablo Neruda was the pen name, and eventually the legal name, used by Chilean writer Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Basoalto chose the name as a homage to Czech poet Jan Neruda.

20. Drunk : SOT

Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning “fool”. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

21. Pontiac that was Motor Trend’s 1968 Car of the Year : GTO

The Pontiac GTO was produced by GM from 1964 to 1974, and again by a GM subsidiary in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original GTO’s design is credited to Pontiac chief engineer at the time John DeLorean, who later was found the DeLorean Motor Company.

22. Orchestra overseer : MAESTRO

“Maestro” is often used to address a musical conductor. “Maestro” (plural “maestri”) is the Italian word for “master, teacher”. The plural in English is usually “maestros”.

27. Swedish pop quartet : ABBA

Only three members of the quartet that made up the pop group ABBA were born in Sweden. Anni-Frid Lyngstad was born in Norway just after the end of WWII, the daughter of a Norwegian mother and a father who was German soldier and a member of the German occupying force during the war. The father returned to Germany with the army, and in 1947, Anna-Frid was taken with her family to Sweden. They left fearing reprisals against those who dealt with the German army during the occupation.

30. Arnold’s crime : TREASON

Treason is a serious crime committed against the nation (or the sovereign). One who commits “treason” is called a “traitor”. In the past, the term treason also applied to lesser crimes (like a woman killing her husband) so there was a differentiation between high treason against the king, and “petit treason”, against a more common citizen.

Benedict Arnold was a general in the Continental Army during the American War of Independence, who defected to the British Army. While serving with the Continental Army, Arnold was given command of the fort at West Point. He planned on surrendering the fort to the British, but his plot was discovered before he could do so and he made a narrow escape. Arnold was made a brigadier general in the British Army and he led British forces in several raids against American troops. After the war ended, Arnold moved to London and worked in the merchant business. He died there in 1791.

39. *Avant-garde : NEW WAVE (giving “catch a wave”)

People described as avant-garde are especially innovative. “Avant-garde” is French for “advance guard”.

50. Feudal drudge : SERF

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

52. Low-risk govt. securities : T-NOTES

A Treasury note (T-Note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-Note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A T-Bill is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-Bond matures in 20-30 years.

55. Strategy : TACTICS

The terms “strategy” and “tactic” are often confused. In the original frame of reference, namely war, strategy is decided prior to battle. Tactics are implemented during the battle, and are consistent with the strategy.

58. Granola morsel : OAT

The name “Granola” (and “Granula”) were trademarked back in the late 1800s for whole-grain foods that were crumbled and baked until crisp. Granola was created in Dansville, New York in 1894.

59. 27-Down user’s need : PIN
(27D. Bread box? : ATM)

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then PIN number is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then ATM machine is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

67. Poetry Muse : ERATO

In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry, and is often depicted playing a lyre.

68. __ Hebrides : INNER

The Hebrides is a group of islands just off the west coast of Scotland. The Hebrides are divided into two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides.

69. Knight who played a newsman : TED

Ted Knight was the actor best known for playing the slow-witted news anchor Ted Baxter on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. Knight’s most famous role on the big screen was Judge Elihu Smails in the 1980 comedy “Caddyshack”.

71. Checked out before a heist : CASED

The term “case the joint” is American slang dating back at least to 1915, meaning to examine a location with the intent of robbing it. The origins of the phrase are apparently unknown.

Down

2. Currency since 1999 : EURO

The reverse side of euro coins feature a common design, a design that includes the 12-stars featured on the Flag of Europe. The number of stars is not related to the number of states in the European Union, nor has it ever been. The number of stars in the design was the subject of much debate prior to its adoption in 1955 by the Council of Europe. Twelve was a deliberate choice, as at that time there was no political connotation, and twelve was considered to be a symbol of unity.

7. Trivia night locale : BAR

Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

8. The Affordable Care Act became law during it : OBAMA ERA

The correct name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (ACA).

9. “On the Waterfront” director Kazan : ELIA

Elia Kazan won Oscars for best director in 1948 for “Gentleman’s Agreement” and in 1955 for “On The Waterfront”. In 1999 Kazan was given an Academy Lifetime Achievement Award. He also directed “East of Eden”, which introduced James Dean to movie audiences, and “Splendor in the Grass” that included Warren Beatty in his debut role.

The 1954 drama “On the Waterfront”, starring Marlon Brando, told a story of violence and corruption among longshoremen. The movie was based on a series of 24 articles written by investigative journalist Malcolm Johnston and published in “The New York Sun”. The original news stories uncovered mob infiltration on the New York City Waterfront, but the location for the film was chosen as Hoboken, New Jersey.

10. *Westminster’s top canine : BEST IN SHOW (giving “catch a show”)

The first Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show was held in 1877, which makes it the second oldest sporting event in the country (narrowly beaten out by the Kentucky Derby, first run in 1875). The show was originally limited to gun dogs and was established by a group of hunters who routinely met at the Westminster Hotel in Manhattan, New York.

11. Take by force : USURP

To usurp is to seize and hold by force, say the power or authority of a ruler. The term “usurp” comes to us from Latin via French, from “usus” (a use) and “rapere” (to seize).

18. P.O. box item : LTR

Letter (ltr.)

28. La __ Tar Pits : BREA

The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It’s well worth a visit if you are in town …

29. *Harsh and wintry : BITTER COLD (giving “catch a cold”)

The common cold is caused by a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract. There are over 200 strains of virus that are known to cause the disease.

31. Off-rd. transports : ATVS

All-terrain vehicle (ATV)

32. Pedometer unit : STEP

A pedometer is an instrument worn by a runner or walker that measures the number of steps taken. The name of the device comes from “pes”, the Latin for “foot”.

37. Luau torch type : TIKI

A tiki torch is a bamboo torch that’s very commonly used in Tiki culture. Tiki culture is a relatively modern invention dating from the 20th century, and is the experience created in Polynesian-style restaurants. The word “Tiki” is borrowed from Polynesia.

Nowadays the word “luau” denotes almost any kind of party on the Hawaiian Islands, but to the purist a luau is a feast that always includes a serving of “poi”, the bulbous underground stems of taro baked with coconut milk.

40. Attended without a partner : WENT STAG

Back where I come from, bachelor parties are called stag parties, and bachelorette parties are known as hen parties.

42. Chinese menu abbr. : MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

44. Heaviest U.S. president : TAFT

William Howard Taft may have been the 27th President of the United States, but his lifelong ambition was to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. President Taft was able to realize that dream in 1921, eight years after losing his bid for re-election as president. As Chief Justice, this former US President swore in two new presidents: Calvin Coolidge (in 1925) and Herbert Hoover (in 1929). William Howard Taft is also remembered as the most obese president. In the last year of his presidency, he weighed about 340 pounds (he was 5 feet 11 inches tall). Twelve months after leaving the White House, President Taft had dropped 80 pounds and substantially lowered his blood pressure.

46. Extra NBA periods : OTS

In overtime (in OT)

50. Mar. 17 figure : ST PAT

There is a fair amount known about Saint Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as Saint Patrick’s Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

51. “Guitar Town” rocker Steve : EARLE

Steve Earle is an American songwriter and performer, with a reputation as a man who has lived a hard life. Earle’s brushes with the law and drug addiction problems have earned him the nickname “the hardcore troubadour”.

56. Zamboni’s milieu : ICE

The first ice resurfacing machine was developed in 1949 by one Frank Zamboni. The machine works by simultaneously executing a number of tasks. First, the surface of the ice is scraped off by a sharp blade. Next the ice is “washed” with water sprayed from the front of the Zamboni, and that wash water is vacuumed back up and filtered to remove impurities. Water is then reapplied to the scraped ice by a wet towel dragging behind the machine, forming a new skating surface.

57. “Fame”-ous Irene : CARA

Irene Cara (as well as acting in “Fame”) sang the theme songs to the hit movies “Fame” and “Flashdance”.

61. Stereotypical Geek Squad employee : NERD

Best Buy is a retailer specializing in the supply of consumer electronics. Best Buy services include the famous “Geek Squad”, a band of technical experts that will help solve your computer and other consumer electronic problems.

64. WNBA position : CTR

Center (ctr.)

The Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) was founded in 1996. The WNBA had to compete with the American Basketball League (ABL), a professional women’s basketball league that started playing games the same year the WNBA was founded. The ABL folded in its third season.

65. Genetics lab subject : RNA

Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Heckler’s array : JEERS

6. Slender woodwind : OBOE

10. Crony : BUD

13. Taxpayer’s dread : AUDIT

14. With 24-Across, Chilean poet with a Nobel Prize : PABLO …

16. Suffix with Vietnam : -ESE

17. *One may follow the wedding dress : BRIDAL TRAIN (giving “catch a train”)

19. Total : SUM

20. Drunk : SOT

21. Pontiac that was Motor Trend’s 1968 Car of the Year : GTO

22. Orchestra overseer : MAESTRO

24. See 14-Across : … NERUDA

26. Places for holsters : HIPS

27. Swedish pop quartet : ABBA

30. Arnold’s crime : TREASON

33. Stand for a photo? : TRIPOD

36. Evaluation for a would-be painter : ART TEST

38. Got together : MET

39. *Avant-garde : NEW WAVE (giving “catch a wave”)

41. “The guy over there” : HIM

43. Makes harmonious : ATTUNES

45. Frightens : SPOOKS

47. “Whoa, bro!” : EASY NOW!

49. Tiny branch : TWIG

50. Feudal drudge : SERF

52. Low-risk govt. securities : T-NOTES

55. Strategy : TACTICS

58. Granola morsel : OAT

59. 27-Down user’s need : PIN

62. Master : PRO

63. Familiar slogan … or, based on its last word, what each answer to a starred clue is? : CATCHPHRASE

66. Every one : ALL

67. Poetry Muse : ERATO

68. __ Hebrides : INNER

69. Knight who played a newsman : TED

70. Food-growing prefix : AGRO-

71. Checked out before a heist : CASED

Down

1. Quick punches : JABS

2. Currency since 1999 : EURO

3. Cut and paste, e.g. : EDIT

4. Freed (of) : RID

5. Put on, as a play : STAGE

6. Decide not to join : OPT OUT

7. Trivia night locale : BAR

8. The Affordable Care Act became law during it : OBAMA ERA

9. “On the Waterfront” director Kazan : ELIA

10. *Westminster’s top canine : BEST IN SHOW (giving “catch a show”)

11. Take by force : USURP

12. Floor models : DEMOS

15. __ of a kind : ONE

18. P.O. box item : LTR

23. Horse’s hoof protection : SHOE

24. Afternoon rest : NAP

25. Makes use of, as experience : DRAWS ON

27. Bread box? : ATM

28. La __ Tar Pits : BREA

29. *Harsh and wintry : BITTER COLD (giving “catch a cold”)

31. Off-rd. transports : ATVS

32. Pedometer unit : STEP

34. Taxing task : ONUS

35. Reject as false : DENY

37. Luau torch type : TIKI

40. Attended without a partner : WENT STAG

42. Chinese menu abbr. : MSG

44. Heaviest U.S. president : TAFT

46. Extra NBA periods : OTS

48. Joyful shout : WOO-HOO!

50. Mar. 17 figure : ST PAT

51. “Guitar Town” rocker Steve : EARLE

53. Strike gently : TAP

54. Guiding principle : ETHIC

56. Zamboni’s milieu : ICE

57. “Fame”-ous Irene : CARA

59. Harsh reviews : PANS

60. “That makes sense” : I SEE

61. Stereotypical Geek Squad employee : NERD

64. WNBA position : CTR

65. Genetics lab subject : RNA

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