LA Times Crossword Answers 4 Aug 2017, Friday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Breaking News

Today’s themed answers sound like common phrases with an “a” sound changed to a short “o” sound:

  • 17A. Why St. Peter owns darning needles? : FOR HEAVEN’S SOCKS (from “for heaven’s sakes”)
  • 31A. Museum of Home Security exhibits? : THE GREAT LOCKS (from “the Great Lakes”)
  • 37A. What a shepherd sees after a snowstorm? : FROSTED FLOCKS (from “Frosted Flakes”)
  • 57A. Consumer reactions to big price hikes for brownies? : CHOCOLATE SHOCKS (from “chocolate shakes”)

Bill’s time: 14m 51s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Verne voyager : NEMO

In the 1954 movie version of “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”, Captain Nemo goes down with his ship. In the novel by Jules Verne the fate of Nemo and his crew isn’t quite so cut and dry, although the inference is perhaps that they did indeed head for Davy Jones’ Locker.

Jules Verne really was a groundbreaking author. Verne pioneered the science fiction genre, writing about space, air and underwater travel, long before they were practical and proved feasible. Verne is the second-most translated author of all time, with only Agatha Christie beating him out.

10. Campus hangout : QUAD

A university often features a central quadrangle (quad).

14. “Things are never quite as scary when you’ve got __ friend”: Bill Watterson : A BEST

Cartoonist Bill Watterson is best known for the widely syndicated comic strip “Calvin and Hobbes”. He drew that strip from 1985 until 1995, at which point Watterston effectively withdrew into private life. He now values his privacy, and spends a lot of time painting.

15. Old Roman poet : OVID

The Roman poet Publius Ovidius Naso is today known simply as Ovid. Ovid is usually listed alongside the two other great Roman poets: Horace and Virgil. Although he was immensely popular during his own lifetime, he spent the last ten years of his life in exile. He fell foul of Emperor Augustus, although what led to this disfavor isn’t truly understood.

16. “Once more __ the breach”: Shak. : UNTO

Shakespeare’s play “Henry V” is more correctly called “The Life of Henry the Fifth”. The story mainly focuses on his life before and immediately after the king’s celebrated victory over the French at the Battle of Agincourt. “Henry V” includes one of Shakespeare’s most celebrated speeches, an address by the king to his troops at the siege of Harfleur, with the opening lines:

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead …

17. Why St. Peter owns darning needles? : FOR HEAVEN’S SOCKS (from “for heaven’s sakes”)

In the Christian tradition, Saint Peter is often depicted as the keeper of the gates of heaven. This depiction arises from a passage in the Gospel of Matthew:

I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hell will not overcome it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.

20. Actor Idris __ : ELBA

The English actor Idris Elba is probably best known in North America for playing the drug lord Stringer Bell in the marvelous HBO drama series “The Wire”, and the title character in the 2013 film “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom”. Off the screen, Elba occasionally works as a disk jockey using the name DJ Big Driis.

22. Naturally lit indoor spaces : ATRIA

In modern architecture an atrium (plural “atria” or “atriums”) is a large open space usually in the center of a building and extending upwards to the roof. The original atrium was an open court in the center of an Ancient Roman house. One could access most of the enclosed rooms of the house from the atrium.

23. CV inclusion : BIO

A curriculum vitae (CV) is a listing of someone’s work experience and qualifications, and is used mainly in making a job application. The term “curriculum vitae” can be translated from Latin as “course of life”.

26. “Ah, Wilderness!” mother : ESSIE

“Ah, Wilderness!” is a comedy play by Eugene O’Neill that was first stage in 1933, on Broadway. “Ah, Wilderness!” was adapted into the musical film called “Summer Holiday” that was released in 1948.

28. Future D.A.’s hurdle : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

30. Fresno-to-L.A. dir. : SSE

Fresno is the largest inland city in the state of California. The city was named for the many ash trees that lined the San Joaquin River, as “fresno” is the Spanish for “ash tree”.

The California city of Los Angeles (L.A.) is the second most populous city in the country, after New York. L.A. was established in 1781 as a pueblo named “El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula”, which translates as “The Town of Our Lady the Queen of Angels of the Porciúncula River”. This name evolved into “Los Angeles”, and the Porciúncula River is now called the Los Angeles River.

31. Museum of Home Security exhibits? : THE GREAT LOCKS (from “the Great Lakes”)

A well-known mnemonic for remembering the names of the Great Lakes is HOMES: standing for Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie and Superior.

35. Peanut product : OIL

I have to say it, but it drives me crazy. Peanuts aren’t nuts, they’re legumes, a plant in the bean and pea family. The flowers of the peanut plant last only one day and then wither. The fertilized ovary develops an elongated “peg” that grows downwards, pushing the ovary down into the soil. The ovary develops underground into a mature peanut pod containing between one and four seeds, which we call “nuts”. But they aren’t nuts. Did I say that already …?

36. Fraser or Douglas : FIR

The Fraser fir is a species of fir tree that is related to the balsam fir. The tree was named for Scottish botanist John Fraser. The Fraser fir is a popular Christmas tree, and has been used as the official tree in the White House more than any other variety of tree.

Various species of Douglas fir are native to North and Central America, and to Asia. The tree gets its name from the Scottish botanist David Douglas, who introduced the species into Europe.

37. What a shepherd sees after a snowstorm? : FROSTED FLOCKS (from “Frosted Flakes”)

Tony the Tiger has been the mascot of Frosted Flakes cereal since the product’s introduction in 1951. As Tony would say, “They’re Gr-r-reat!” Well, I thought they were when I was a lot younger …

46. Sol preceder : AERO-

Strictly speaking, the term “aerosol” defines a suspension of either liquid droplets or solid particles in a gas. A good example of an aerosol is smoke. We tend to use the “aerosol” to describe what comes out of a spray can, even though the liquid droplets usually fall out of the gas and don’t stay suspended.

48. Frigga portrayer in “Thor” : RUSSO

The lovely and very talented actress Rene Russo is a native of Burbank, California. Russo went to highschool (with actor/director Ron Howard), but dropped out in tenth grade. At seventeen, she was given the opportunity to train as a model and within a very short time appeared on the cover of “Vogue”. As her modelling jobs slowed down in her early thirties, Russo made a career change and studied theater and acting. I am so glad she did, as Rene Russo is one of my favorite actresses …

The 2011 movie “Thor” is yet another film based on a comic book hero. Even though I won’t be seeing it (I don’t do comics), I must admit it does have an impressive cast. Chris Hemsworth plays Thor, supported by Natalie Portman, Rene Russo and Anthony Hopkins. And to crown it all, Kenneth Branagh is the director.

54. Perfumer’s ingredient : ATTAR

Attar is a fragrant essential oil obtained from flowers, and the term often particularly refers to attar of roses.

55. Red-coated security force: Abbr. : RCMP

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (the Mounties, RCMP) is an unusual police force in that it provides all policing for the whole country. The RCMP works on the national level, and right down to the municipal level. The force’s distinctive uniform of red serge tunic, blue pants with a yellow stripe, stetson hat etc. is known internally as “Review Order”. The red uniform dates back to the days of the North-West Mounted Police, which was one of the existing forces that were merged in 1920 to form the RCMP.

57. Consumer reactions to big price hikes for brownies? : CHOCOLATE SHOCKS (from “chocolate shakes”)

Apparently the first brownies were created for the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. The recipe was developed by a pastry chef at the city’s Palmer House Hotel. The idea was to produce a cake-like dessert that was small enough and dainty enough to be eaten by ladies as part of a boxed lunch.

61. O or Jay : ALER

The Baltimore Orioles are one of the eight charter teams of MLB’s American League, so the franchise dates back to 1901. Prior to 1901, the team has roots in the Minor League Milwaukee Brewers, and indeed entered the American League as the Brewers. In 1902 the Brewers moved to St. Louis and became the Browns. The team didn’t fare well in St. Louis, so when it finally relocated to Baltimore in the early fifties the team changed its name completely, to the Baltimore Orioles. The owners so badly wanted a fresh start that they traded 17 old Browns players with the New York Yankees. The trade didn’t help the team’s performance on the field in those early days, but it did help distance the new team from its past.

The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

62. Author Calvino : ITALO

As well as being an author, Italo Calvino was a famous Italian journalist. He was a supporter of communism and so wasn’t very popular in the US nor in Britain.

63. Coastal raptors : ERNS

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also called the white-tailed eagle, or the sea-eagle.

“Raptor” is a generic term for a bird of prey, one that has talons to grip its victims.

64. Cutlass, e.g. : OLDS

Oldsmobile made the Cutlass Ciera from 1982 to 1996. The Ciera was the brand name’s most successful model.

65. City on the Ruhr : ESSEN

Essen is a large industrial city located on the River Ruhr in western Germany.

Down

4. Org. concerned with ladder safety : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

5. GPS datum : RTE

A global positioning system (GPS) might point out a route (rte.).

6. “An ill-defined and disreputable literary banana republic”: Stephen King : NOVELLA

Stephen King referred to the novella as “an ill-defined and disreputable literary banana republic” in the afterword to his work “Different Seasons”. Said work is a collection of four of King’s own novellas.

7. High point of Hillary’s career : EVEREST

Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepalese sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

9. “__ bodkins!”: old oath : ODS

“Odds bodkins!” (sometimes “ods bodkins!”) is a minced oath, a euphemistic version of “God’s body!”.

10. “The Raven” verb : QUOTH

“The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allan Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore” (“quoth the raven, ‘Nevermore’”). As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

12. Diet doctor : ATKINS

The eating of relatively few carbohydrates is central to the diet proposed by Robert Atkins. Atkins first laid out the principles behind the Atkins diet in a research paper published in 1958 in the “Journal of the American Medical Association”. He popularized his diet starting in 1972 with his book “Dr. Atkins’ Diet Revolution”.

24. Dental procedure, for short : PERIO

Periodontics is that branch of dentistry dealing with the gums and the tissue supporting a tooth. The word “periodontal” was coined in the mid-19th century. The term comes from the Greek for “around the tooth”.

27. Composer Stravinsky : IGOR

The composer Igor Stravinsky’s most famous works were completed relatively early in his career, when he was quite young. His three ballets “The Firebird”, “Petrushka” and “The Rite of Spring” were published in 1910-1913, when Stravinsky was in his early thirties.

29. Devonshire dandy : TOFF

A toff is a well-dressed gentleman of the upper class.

Devon (formerly “Devonshire”) is a county in the southwest of England. The county town of Devon is Exeter, and the largest city in the county is Plymouth, the port from which the Mayflower Pilgrims departed.

32. “Born Free” lioness : ELSA

The life story of Elsa the lion was told by game warden Joy Adamson, who had a very close relationship with the lioness from when Elsa was orphaned as a young cub. Adamson wrote the book “Born Free” about Elsa, and then “Living Free” which tells the story of Elsa and her three lion cubs. In the 1966 film based on “Born Free”, Adamson is played by the talented actress Virginia McKenna.

33. Paramecium movers : CILIA

A “paramecium” is a single-celled organism that moves around in water using the tightly-spaced cilia that surrounds its body.

34. McDonald’s founder : KROC

The original McDonald’s restaurant was opened in 1940 by Richard and Maurice McDonald as a barbecue restaurant. The brothers then moved into fast food hamburgers, eventually selling out to one of their franchise agents, Ray Kroc. It was Ray Kroc who really led the company to its worldwide success. He was played by Michael Keaton in the movie about Ray Kroc’s business life called “The Founder”.

38. Controversial political cartoonist : TED RALL

Ted Rall is a political cartoonist whose cartoons are syndicated in many newspapers across North America. Several of Rall’s cartoons have created a lot of controversy.

40. Projecting architectural features : DORMERS

A dormer window is a window in a dormer! A dormer is a roofed structure that protrudes from the slope of the main roof.

41. Capital NE of Bogotá : CARACAS

Caracas is the capital of Venezuela, and is located in the north of the country. The original settlement of Caracas was named by the Spanish using the name of a local indigenous tribe.

Bogotá is the capital city of Colombia. Noted for having many libraries and universities, Bogotá is sometimes referred to as “The Athens of South America”.

43. Big hat : STETSON

Stetson is a brand name of hat, manufactured by the John B. Stetson Company of St. Joseph, Missouri. The so called “cowboy hat” that Stetson pioneered was such a success that the company became the largest hat maker in the world, producing over 3.3 million hats per year.

44. Ancient prophet : ORACLE

In Ancient Greece and Rome, an oracle was someone believed inspired by the gods to give wise counsel. The word “oracle” derives from the Latin “orare” meaning “to speak”, which is the same root for our word “orator”.

45. Comics villain since 1940 : LUTHOR

Lex Luthor is the arch-nemesis of Superman in comics. Luthor has been portrayed in a number of guises in the comic world as well in movies and on the small screen. For example, he appeared as Atom Man in the 1950 film series “Atom Man vs. Superman”, and was played by actor Lyle Talbot, opposite Kirk Alyn’s Superman.

49. Gives the heave-ho : SACKS

The term “to sack” meaning to dismiss someone from a job, used to be phrased as “to give the sack”. The expression probably came from the idea of firing a worker and sending him or her off with tools in a sack.

50. Conquistador’s treasure : ORO

In Spanish, “oro” (gold) is a “metal precioso” (precious metal).

“Conquistador” is the Spanish for “conqueror”.

52. Speed meas. : MPS

Miles per second (mps), perhaps.

56. “Chopped” array : POTS

In the world of poker, a pot might be “chopped”, split among two or more players.

58. Southeast Asian tongue : LAO

Lao is the official language of Laos. Lao is also spoken in the northeast of Thailand, but there the language is known as Isan.

59. Move it, quaintly : HIE

“To hie” is to move quickly, to bolt.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Enjoy deeply : SAVOR

6. Verne voyager : NEMO

10. Campus hangout : QUAD

14. “Things are never quite as scary when you’ve got __ friend”: Bill Watterson : A BEST

15. Old Roman poet : OVID

16. “Once more __ the breach”: Shak. : UNTO

17. Why St. Peter owns darning needles? : FOR HEAVEN’S SOCKS (from “for heaven’s sakes”)

20. Actor Idris __ : ELBA

21. “Take this” : HERE

22. Naturally lit indoor spaces : ATRIA

23. CV inclusion : BIO

24. Not as good-looking? : PALER

25. Minimalist beachwear : THONG

26. “Ah, Wilderness!” mother : ESSIE

28. Future D.A.’s hurdle : LSAT

30. Fresno-to-L.A. dir. : SSE

31. Museum of Home Security exhibits? : THE GREAT LOCKS (from “the Great Lakes”)

35. Peanut product : OIL

36. Fraser or Douglas : FIR

37. What a shepherd sees after a snowstorm? : FROSTED FLOCKS (from “Frosted Flakes”)

44. Appreciative cry : OLE!

46. Sol preceder : AERO-

47. “Not possible” : I CAN’T

48. Frigga portrayer in “Thor” : RUSSO

51. Prefix in makeup product names : DERMA-

53. Feel sorry about : RUE

54. Perfumer’s ingredient : ATTAR

55. Red-coated security force: Abbr. : RCMP

56. Diplomacy result : PACT

57. Consumer reactions to big price hikes for brownies? : CHOCOLATE SHOCKS (from “chocolate shakes”)

60. Pointer’s cry : LOOK!

61. O or Jay : ALER

62. Author Calvino : ITALO

63. Coastal raptors : ERNS

64. Cutlass, e.g. : OLDS

65. City on the Ruhr : ESSEN

Down

1. It’s in the bag : SAFE BET

2. Void : ABOLISH

3. Like a motormouth : VERBOSE

4. Org. concerned with ladder safety : OSHA

5. GPS datum : RTE

6. “An ill-defined and disreputable literary banana republic”: Stephen King : NOVELLA

7. High point of Hillary’s career : EVEREST

8. __ spring : MINERAL

9. “__ bodkins!”: old oath : ODS

10. “The Raven” verb : QUOTH

11. Straighten, as one’s legs : UNCROSS

12. Diet doctor : ATKINS

13. Pharmacist’s concern : DOSAGE

18. “Now it’s clear!” : AHA!

19. Didn’t rise : SAT

24. Dental procedure, for short : PERIO

27. Composer Stravinsky : IGOR

29. Devonshire dandy : TOFF

32. “Born Free” lioness : ELSA

33. Paramecium movers : CILIA

34. McDonald’s founder : KROC

37. Bit of suspended decoration : FESTOON

38. Controversial political cartoonist : TED RALL

39. Put up : ERECTED

40. Projecting architectural features : DORMERS

41. Capital NE of Bogotá : CARACAS

42. Get to work, with “down” : KNUCKLE

43. Big hat : STETSON

44. Ancient prophet : ORACLE

45. Comics villain since 1940 : LUTHOR

49. Gives the heave-ho : SACKS

50. Conquistador’s treasure : ORO

52. Speed meas. : MPS

56. “Chopped” array : POTS

58. Southeast Asian tongue : LAO

59. Move it, quaintly : HIE

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LA Times Crossword Answers 21 Jul 2017, Friday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Let’s Have Some Fun

Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase with the letters FUN inserted:

  • 51A. “It’s party time!” … or a hint to 17-, 24- and 40-Across : LET’S HAVE SOME FUN!
  • 17A. Complain, “Don’t I get anything to do around here?”? : DEMAND A FUNCTION (from “demand action”)
  • 24A. Compensation for an incomplete sundae? : CHERRY REFUND (from “cherry red”)
  • 40A. When a restaurant offers its weekly mushroom specials? : FUNGAL FRIDAY (from “gal Friday”)

Bill’s time: 10m 04s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Asian priests : LAMAS

“Lama” is a Tibetan word meaning “chief” or “high priest”.

6. Miso base : DASHI

Dashi is a style of cooking stock used in Japanese cuisine. Most famously, dashi is the stock that is used as the base for miso soup. Traditional dashi is a fish stock to which is added edible kelp called kombu and shavings of preserved and fermented skipjack tuna called katsuobushi.

11. Zodiac critter : RAM

Aries the Ram is the first astrological sign in the Zodiac, and is named after the constellation. Your birth sign is Aries if you were born between March 21 and April 20, but if you are an Aries you would know that! “Aries” is the Latin word for “ram”.

15. How gourmands enjoy their food : IMMENSELY

A gourmand is someone who takes great pleasure in consuming food and drink, often eating and drinking to excess. The related term “gourmet” refers to someone who has a refined palate.

19. Distressed sort? : DAMSEL

A damsel is a young woman, often referring to a lady of noble birth. The term came into English from the Old French “dameisele”, which had the same meaning. The modern French term is “demoiselle”, which in turn is related to the term of address “mademoiselle”.

20. Medium for much body art : HENNA

Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, not just for leather and wool, but also for the hair and skin. In modern days, henna is also used for temporary tattoos.

24. Compensation for an incomplete sundae? : CHERRY REFUND (from “cherry red”)

There’s a lot of speculation about how the dessert called a sundae got its name, but there seems to be agreement that it is an alteration of the word “Sunday”.

28. European luxury vehicles : AUDIS

The Audi name has an interesting history. The Horch company was founded by August Horch in 1909. Early in the life of the new company, Horch was forced out of his own business. He set up a new enterprise and continued to use his own name as a brand. The old company sued him for using the Horch name so a meeting was held to choose something new. Horch’s young son was studying Latin in the room where the meeting was taking place. He pointed out that “horch” was German for “hear” and he suggested “Audi” as a replacement, the Latin for “listen”.

29. Atari release of 1972 : PONG

Do you remember the arcade video game that was like a game of tennis, with paddles moving up and down to hit what looked like a ball, over what looked like a net? Well, that was Pong. The arcade version of Pong was introduced in 1972, with Atari selling a home version through Sears for the Christmas market in 1975.

30. Twaddle : PAP

One meaning of “pap” is soft or semi-liquid food for babies and small children. “Pap” comes into English via French, from the Latin word used by children for “food”. In the 1500s, “pap” also came to mean “an oversimplified” idea. This gives us a usage that’s common today, describing literature or perhaps TV programming that lacks real value or substance. Hands up those who think there’s a lot of pap out there, especially on television …

“Twaddle” is a trivial talk, and is a word that has been around since the late 1700’s. It probably evolved from the earlier term “twattle” that had the same meaning.

38. Territory east of the Philippines : GUAM

Guam is a US territory in the western Pacific Ocean, the largest of the Mariana Islands. Guam is also the first territory in the United States to see the sun rise on any particular day. As such, the territory has adopted the motto, “Where America’s day begins”. During WWII, the US territory of Guam was occupied by the Japanese for 31 months until it was liberated in the Battle of Guam in July 1944. Of the 18,000 Japanese men holding the island, only 485 surrendered, so almost all perished in the invasion. One Japanese sergeant hid out on the island for an incredible 28 years, finally surrendering in 1972!

When the Spanish explorer Ruy Lopez de Villalobos discovered the islands of Leyte and Samar, he named them Felipinas, after King Philip II of Spain. Eventually, the name was used for the whole archipelago, becoming what we know in English as the Philippines.

39. Dance performed with passion : TANGO

The dramatic dance called the tango originated in the late 1800s in the area along the border between Argentina and Uruguay. Dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires in particular traveled to Europe and beyond in the early twentieth century and brought the tango with them. The tango craze first struck Europe in Paris in the 1910s, and from there spread to London and Berlin, crossing the Atlantic to New York in 1913.

40. When a restaurant offers its weekly mushroom specials? : FUNGAL FRIDAY (from “gal Friday”)

In Daniel Defoe’s 1719 novel “Robinson Crusoe”, the castaway encounters a companion that Crusoe calls “Friday”, because the two first met on that day. Friday soon becomes his willing servant. This character is the source of our terms “Man/Guy Friday” and “Girl/Guy Friday”, which are used to describe a particularly competent and loyal assistant.

43. Witless sorts : MORONS

The unsavory term “moron” was formerly used by the medical community to describe someone with a degree of mental retardation. The term comes from the Greek “moros” meaning “foolish, dull”. Back in the early 1900s, IQ tests were used to classify those suffering from mental retardation into categories:

  • “idiot” … IQ of 0-20
  • “imbecile” … IQ of 21-50
  • “moron” …IQ of 51-70

46. Water nymph : NAIAD

The Naiads of Greek mythology were water nymphs, associated with fountains, wells, springs and streams. The saltwater equivalents of the freshwater Naiads were the Oceanids.

47. Diarist Nin : ANAIS

Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

56. 2003 best-selling nutritional self-help book : EAT TO LIVE

“Eat to Live: The Amazing Nutrient-Rich Program for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss” is a 2003 book written by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. A central premise of the book is the formula “health = nutrients/calories”. I suppose one could infer from that formula that a diet based on nutrient-rich calories promotes health.

57. Raring to go : ANTSY

The word “antsy” embodies the concept of “having ants in one’s pants”, meaning being nervous and fidgety. However, “antsy” has been used in English since the 1830s, whereas “ants in the pants” originated a century later.

Down

1. Any Boy Scout : LAD

As every little boy (of my era) knows, the Scouting movement was founded by Lord Baden Powell, in 1907. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) soon followed, in 1910. And, the Boy Scouts motto is “Be Prepared”.

3. NYC cultural attraction : MOMA

The founding of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City was very much driven by Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, the wife of John D. Rockefeller, son of the oil magnate. Working with two friends, Abby managed to get the museum opened in 1929, just nine days after the Wall Street Crash. The MoMA’s sculpture garden bears the name of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and has done so since 1949.

4. Tracy/Hepburn classic : ADAM’S RIB

And here it is! My favorite movie of all time. “Adam’s Rib” is a classic romantic comedy starring the powerful duo, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn, playing two lawyers married to each other. Inevitably, the married couple have to take opposite sides in a high-profile court case, and hilarity ensues. The film is an interesting exploration of the roles of men and women in 1949 American society.

6. Electronic telemarketing tool : DIALER

Hate, hate, hate …

7. Big initials in bowling : AMF

AMF Bowling Centers, Inc. is an operator of bowling alleys, and is in fact the largest such company in the world.

8. Dallas campus: Abbr. : SMU

Southern Methodist University (SMU) is located in University Park, Texas (part of Dallas), and was founded in 1911. The school’s athletic teams are known as the Mustangs. Also, SMU is home to the George W. Bush Presidential Library.

13. Birds that may babble : MYNAS

Some species of myna (also “mynah”) bird are known for their ability to imitate sounds.

22. One taking things back? : REPO MAN

Repossession (repo)

23. Balderdash : BUNK

The word “bunk” is short for “bunkum”, the phonetic spelling of “Buncombe”, which is a county in North Carolina. Supposedly, a state representative made a dull and irrelevant speech that was directed to his home county of Buncombe, bringing the term “bunkum” into the language with the meaning of “nonsense”. The derivative word “debunk” first appeared in a novel by William Woodward in 1923, when he used it to describe “taking the bunk out of things”.

“Balderdash” means “senseless jumble of words”. The original balderdash (back before the late 1600s) was a jumbled mix of liquids, like maybe beer and wine, or even beer and milk!

25. Netflix competitor : HULU

Hulu.com is a website providing streaming video of full television shows. It is a joint venture of NBC and Disney, and so features a lot of their content. The service is free and is supported by advertising, but you can sign up for a premium subscription and get access to more shows. A lot of younger folks seem to use it a lot …

Netflix was founded in Los Gatos, California in 1997 as a DVD rental company that sent out titles by mail. Netflix no longer focuses on distribution by mail, and instead provides programming on demand. The company is now making a big name for itself producing films and TV programs.

26. Dutch export : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

27. Rock’s __ Fighters : FOO

Foo Fighters are described as an alternative rock band, one formed in 1994 by the drummer from Nirvana, Dave Grohl. The term “Foo fighters” originally applied to unidentified flying objects reported by allied airmen during WWII. Spooky …

30. 31-Down environment : POND

31. Bit of 30-Down life : ALGA

Algae are similar to terrestrial plants in that they use photosynthesis to create sugars from light and carbon dioxide, but they differ in that they have simpler anatomies, and for example lack roots.

40. Pass off (on) : FOIST

The word “foist”, meaning “to pass off as genuine”, comes from the Dutch word meaning “take in hand”. The original concept came from playing dice, in which one die was held surreptitiously in one hand.

42. Baklava dough : FILO

Filo (also “phyllo”) is an extremely thin unleavened dough used in Middle Eastern and Balkan cuisines. The most famous dish made from filo is baklava, a rich and sweet pastry made from layers of filo filled with chopped nuts and held together with syrup.

44. Retired NBA center : O’NEAL

Retired basketball player Shaquille O’Neal now appears regularly as an analyst on the NBA TV show “Inside the NBA”. Shaq has quite a career in the entertainment world. His first rap album, called “Shaq Diesel”, went platinum. He also starred in two of his own reality show: “Shaq’s Big Challenge” and “Shaq Vs.”

49. Mennen lotion : AFTA

Afta is an aftershave in the Mennen range of products that is owned by Colgate-Palmolive.

50. “… prologue to the history of __ and foul thoughts”: Iago : LUST

Iago is the schemer in Shakespeare’s “Othello”. He is a soldier who fought alongside Othello and feels hard done by, missing out on promotion. Iago hatches a plot designed to discredit his rival Cassio by insinuating that Cassio is having an affair with Desdemona, Othello’s wife.

52. Ring legend : ALI

Muhammad Ali won 56 professional fights, 37 of which were knockouts. He lost 5 fights, 4 being decisions and one being a technical knockout (TKO). The TKO-loss was Ali’s second-last fight, against Larry Holmes. By the time Ali took on Holmes, he was already showing signs of Parkinson’s Syndrome, although the diagnosis would not come until four years later.

53. Get-up-and-go : VIM

“Vim” and “pep” are words that both mean “energy, power”.

55. TV’s “Science Guy” : NYE

That would be “Bill Nye the Science Guy”. Bill’s show ran on PBS for four years from 1993-97.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Asian priests : LAMAS

6. Miso base : DASHI

11. Zodiac critter : RAM

14. Town house, e.g. : ABODE

15. How gourmands enjoy their food : IMMENSELY

17. Complain, “Don’t I get anything to do around here?”? : DEMAND A FUNCTION (from “demand action”)

19. Distressed sort? : DAMSEL

20. Medium for much body art : HENNA

21. Crop planter : SOWER

23. Slants : BIASES

24. Compensation for an incomplete sundae? : CHERRY REFUND (from “cherry red”)

28. European luxury vehicles : AUDIS

29. Atari release of 1972 : PONG

30. Twaddle : PAP

33. Rock quarry unit : SLAB

34. River feeder : BROOK

36. It may involve cold calls : POLL

37. Air-conditioning sound : HUM

38. Territory east of the Philippines : GUAM

39. Dance performed with passion : TANGO

40. When a restaurant offers its weekly mushroom specials? : FUNGAL FRIDAY (from “gal Friday”)

43. Witless sorts : MORONS

46. Water nymph : NAIAD

47. Diarist Nin : ANAIS

48. Heads or tails : PLURAL

51. “It’s party time!” … or a hint to 17-, 24- and 40-Across : LET’S HAVE SOME FUN!

56. 2003 best-selling nutritional self-help book : EAT TO LIVE

57. Raring to go : ANTSY

58. Furtive : SLY

59. x, in math : TIMES

60. Condition : STATE

Down

1. Any Boy Scout : LAD

2. Not up : ABED

3. NYC cultural attraction : MOMA

4. Tracy/Hepburn classic : ADAM’S RIB

5. Burglar alarm devices : SENSORS

6. Electronic telemarketing tool : DIALER

7. Big initials in bowling : AMF

8. Dallas campus: Abbr. : SMU

9. Chick magnet? : HEN

10. Making slow progress : INCHING

11. Jockey controls : REINS

12. Isolated : ALONE

13. Birds that may babble : MYNAS

16. Stand (one) in good __: be useful to : STEAD

18. Like a meadow in the morning : DEWY

22. One taking things back? : REPO MAN

23. Balderdash : BUNK

24. Fives and tens, say : CASH

25. Netflix competitor : HULU

26. Dutch export : EDAM

27. Rock’s __ Fighters : FOO

30. 31-Down environment : POND

31. Bit of 30-Down life : ALGA

32. Bit of subterfuge : PLOY

34. Backyard cookout supply : BUNS

35. Car wash item : RAG

36. Leased, with “on” : PAID RENT

38. Crime drama sound effect : GUNSHOT

39. Psychological wounds : TRAUMAS

40. Pass off (on) : FOIST

41. Runs out : LAPSES

42. Baklava dough : FILO

43. Bulls and bucks : MALES

44. Retired NBA center : O’NEAL

45. Like shabby old clothes : RATTY

49. Mennen lotion : AFTA

50. “… prologue to the history of __ and foul thoughts”: Iago : LUST

52. Ring legend : ALI

53. Get-up-and-go : VIM

54. Big night : EVE

55. TV’s “Science Guy” : NYE

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