LA Times Crossword Answers 6 Oct 2017, Friday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Added Debts

Debts may take the form of IOUs. Today’s themed answers are common two-word phrases with the suffix -IOUS added to the first word:

  • 67A. They traditionally appear in red … and in another form in 20-, 32-, 40- and 53-Across : DEBTS
  • 20A. Agricultural college facility? : STUDIOUS FARM (from “stud farm”)
  • 32A. One who got in before a crash? : FURIOUS TRADER (from “fur trader”)
  • 40A. Lancelot bragging about his exploits? : TEDIOUS KNIGHT (from “Ted Knight”)
  • 53A. What theater districts offer? : COPIOUS SHOWS (from “cop shows”)

Bill’s time: 9m 26s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Best-selling book generally not on best-seller lists : BIBLE

The Bible is the best-selling book of all time, with annual sales running at about 100 million copies.

9. Early automaker : OLDS

Ransom Eli Olds was a pioneer in the automotive industry, and the founder of the Oldsmobile and REO brands. Olds introduced the first modern stationary assembly line (Henry Ford’s famous innovation was the moving assembly line).

16. Heist haul : LOOT

“Loot” is the name given to anything taken by dishonesty or force, particularly during war. The term came into English from the Hindi “lut” meaning “goods taken from an enemy”.

17. Magoo’s malady : MYOPIA

A myope is someone suffering from myopia, short-sightedness. Far-sightedness or long-sightedness is known as hypermetropia or hyperopia .

Mr. Quincy Magoo is a wonderful cartoon character voiced by Jim Backus. Backus is probably equally well-known for playing Mr. Magoo as well as Thurston Howell, III on “Gilligan’s Island”. Mr. Magoo first appeared on the screen in a short called “The Ragtime Bear” in 1949. His persona was at least in part based on the antics of W. C. Fields. Backus originally used a fake rubber nose that pinched his nostrils in order to create the distinctive voice, although in time he learned to do the voice without the prop. My absolute favorite appearance by Mr. Magoo is in “Mr Magoo’s Christmas Carol”, a true classic from the sixties. There was a movie adaptation of “Mr Magoo” released in 1997, with Leslie Nielsen playing the title role.

20. Agricultural college facility? : STUDIOUS FARM (from “stud farm”)

The word “stud”, meaning “a male horse kept for breeding”, is derived from the Old English word “stod”, which described a whole herd of horses. The term “stud” can be used figuratively for a “ladies’ man”.

30. Madrid-to-Paris dir. : NNE

Madrid is the largest city in Spain and the capital. Madrid is located very close to the geographical center of the country. It is the third-largest city in the European Union (after London and Paris). People from Madrid called themselves Madrileños.

The French capital of Paris is named for the Parisii, a Celtic Iron Age people that lived in the area on the banks of the River Seine.

31. Rose in a field : PETE

Pete Rose was a talented baseball player who holds the record for all-time Major League hits. Rose’s nickname was “Charlie Hustle”. In recent years of course his reputation has been tarnished by admissions that he bet on games in which he played and managed.

36. Achilles __ : TENDON

The Achilles tendon is located at the back of the leg, above the heel. The name is a reference to Achilles, the hero of Greek myth who was invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel.

40. Lancelot bragging about his exploits? : TEDIOUS KNIGHT (from “Ted Knight”)

Sir Lancelot was one of the knights in the legend of King Arthur and the Round Table. Lancelot was the most trusted of Arthur’s knights when it came to battle, but off the field he had a poorer reputation. Famously, Lancelot had an affair with Guinevere, Arthur’s wife.

Ted Knight was the actor best known for playing the slow-witted news anchor Ted Baxter on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. Knight’s most famous role on the big screen was Judge Elihu Smails in the 1980 comedy “Caddyshack”.

44. “The BFG” author : DAHL

“The BFG” is a 1982 children’s book by Welsh author Roald Dahl. The initialism in the title stands for “Big Friendly Giant”. Dahl dedicated “The BFG” to his daughter Olivia, who had passed away at the age of 7 in 1962.

46. Intelligence org. : NSA

National Security Agency (NSA)

47. Dutch genre painter : STEEN

Jan Steen was a painter from the Netherlands who was active in the Dutch Golden Age, the 17th century. Steen’s most famous work is probably “The Feast of Saint Nicholas”, which we can see at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

48. Juillet’s season : ETE

In French, “juillet” (July) is a month in the “été” (summer).

49. KFC option : BREAST

Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC)

52. Red __ : SEA

There are four seas named for colors in English:

  • the Yellow Sea
  • the Black Sea
  • the Red Sea
  • the White Sea.

62. Gospel travelers : MAGI

“Magi” is the plural of the Latin word “magus”, a term applied to someone who was able to read the stars. Hence, magi is commonly used with reference to the “wise men from the East” who followed the star and visited Jesus soon after he was born. In Western Christianity, the three Biblical Magi are:

  • Melchior: a scholar from Persia
  • Caspar: a scholar from India
  • Balthazar: a scholar from Arabia

Down

2. Columbia, e.g. : IVY

Columbia University is an Ivy League school in New York City. Columbia’s athletic teams are called the Lions, thought to be a reference to the lion on the English coat of arms. Prior to the American Revolution, Columbia was called King’s College as it was chartered by King George II in 1754.

4. Enlarged Revlon ad image : LIPS

Revlon was founded in the depths of the Great Depression in 1932, by Charles and Joseph Revson. The “S” in the Revson name was replaced by the “L” from Charles “Lachman”, a chemist who partnered with the two brothers.

6. MLBer at AT&T Park : SF GIANT

AT&T Park is a baseball stadium located on San Francisco Bay that is home to the San Francisco Giants. It opened for business in 2000, replacing Candlestick Park as the Giants’ home stadium.

9. “Frozen” snowman : OLAF

In the 2013 animated film “Frozen”, Olaf is a happy-go-lucky snowman who provides a lot of comic relief in the movie. Olaf is voiced by actor and comedian Josh Gad.

11. “Little” Dickens title character : DORRIT

“Little Dorrit” is a novel by Charles Dickens, a satirical work that takes potshots at the government and society of the day.

12. Obstruct : STYMIE

The word “stymie” comes from golf, and is a situation in which one’s approach to the hole is blocked by an opponent’s ball. We use the term more broadly for a distressing situation.

14. Author Bellow : SAUL

Saul Bellow was the only writer to have won the National Book Award three times. He also won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1976. Bellow was a Canadian-born American writer, and among his most famous works were “Herzog” and “Humboldt’s Gift”.

28. Revolutionary first name : FIDEL

Fidel Castro studied law at the University of Havana and there became a follower of left-wing ideals. He launched his first rebellion against Cuban president Fulgencio Batista in 1953, which landed him in jail for a year. He later led rebels in a guerrilla war against the Cuban government, which led to the Cuban Revolution and the overthrow of Batista in 1959. Castro took control of the country, and immediately formed a strong relationship with the Soviet Union. Concern over the alliance in the US led to the botched Bay of Pigs Invasion of 1961. There followed the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. Fidel Castro started to transfer power to his brother Raúl in 2008, and passed away in 2016.

29. Child subject : FOOD

Julia Child was an American chef who is recognized for bringing French cuisine to the American public. During WWII, Julia Child joined the OSS (Office of Strategic Services), the predecessor to the CIA. She worked for the OSS in Washington, Ceylon and China. While in the OSS, she met her husband Paul Child who was also an OSS employee. Paul joined the Foreign Service after the war, and it was his posting to France that created the opportunity for Julie to learn about French cuisine. If you haven’t seen it, I highly, highly recommend the movie “Julie & Julia”, one of the best films of 2009. Meryl Streep does a fabulous job playing the larger-than-life Julia Child.

34. Prize for Indy : ARK

“Raiders of the Lost Ark” is, in my humble opinion, the best of the Indiana Jones franchise of movies. This first Indiana Jones film was released in 1981, produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. Harrison Ford was Spielberg’s first choice to play the lead, but Lucas resisted as he was concerned that he would be too closely associated with the actor (as Ford played Han Solo in “Star Wars”, and also appeared in Lucas’s “American Graffiti”). Tom Selleck was offered the role but he couldn’t get out of his commitments to “Magnum, P.I.” Eventually Spielberg got his way and Ford was hired, a good thing I say …

35. Oxford figures : DONS

A don is tutor or fellow at a university, especially at Oxford and Cambridge in England.

The University of Oxford is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. The exact date of the school’s founding is uncertain, although teaching was recorded there as early as 1096. Back in the early 1200s, the authorities from the town of Oxford hanged two Oxford University scholars following the death of a woman. There followed a dispute between the townsfolk and the university that resulted in many academics leaving Oxford. Many ended up in Cambridge, leading to the founding of the University of Cambridge in 1209. The two universities a similar status today, and are often referred to jointly as “Oxbridge”.

39. Italian peak : ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts.

42. Toyota’s Ky. plant, e.g. : US ASSET

Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky (TMMK) is an automobile manufacturing facility located in Georgetown, Kentucky. The factory opened in 1986, when it was Toyota’s first car manufacturing plant in the US.

45. Like some Alban Berg works : ATONAL

Alban Berg was a composer from Austria. He was one of the members of what is called the Second Viennese School, along with Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Weber. This group embraced the concept of atonality, something which frankly is beyond me …

49. Tiny Tim, for one : BOY

Tiny Tim is the nickname of Timothy Cratchit, the little disabled boy in the Charles Dickens novella “A Christmas Carol”.

50. Rene of “Thor” : RUSSO

The very talented actress Rene Russo is a native of Burbank, California. Russo went to highschool (with actor/director Ron Howard), but dropped out in tenth grade. At seventeen, she was given the opportunity to train as a model and within a very short time appeared on the cover of “Vogue”. As her modelling jobs slowed down in her early thirties, Russo made a career change and studied theater and acting. I am so glad she did, as Rene Russo is one of my favorite actresses …

51. Vegan staple : TOFU

Tofu is another name for bean curd, and is a Japanese word meaning just that … bean that has curdled. Tofu is produced by coagulating soy milk, using either salt or something acidic. Once the protein has coagulated, the curds are pressed into the familiar blocks. Personally I love tofu, but my wife, she absolutely hates it …

54. Hipbones : ILIA

The sacrum and the two ilia are three bones in the human pelvis.

56. Ginza quaff : SAKE

We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as “sake”. We’ve gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. “Sake” is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as rice wine. Also, the starch in the rice is first converted to sugars that are then fermented into alcohol. This is more akin to a beer-brewing process than wine production, so the end product is really a rice “beer” rather than a rice “wine”.

Ginza is a district in Tokyo that is noted for its western shops, and especially the leading fashion stores.

“Quaff” is both a verb and a noun. One quaffs (takes a hearty drink) of a quaff (a hearty drink).

60. Sinus doc : ENT

Ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT)

61. Driller’s deg. : DDS

Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS)

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Best-selling book generally not on best-seller lists : BIBLE

6. Benchmark: Abbr. : STD

9. Early automaker : OLDS

13. Won’t go near : AVOIDS

15. Back again : FRO

16. Heist haul : LOOT

17. Magoo’s malady : MYOPIA

18. Ended up off the mark : GONE AWRY

20. Agricultural college facility? : STUDIOUS FARM (from “stud farm”)

22. Polling abbr. : PCT

25. Arrive at hastily, as a conclusion : LEAP TO

26. Sundial marking : VII

27. Content of little substance : FLUFF

30. Madrid-to-Paris dir. : NNE

31. Rose in a field : PETE

32. One who got in before a crash? : FURIOUS TRADER (from “fur trader”)

36. Achilles __ : TENDON

37. Take turns : ROTATE

40. Lancelot bragging about his exploits? : TEDIOUS KNIGHT (from “Ted Knight”)

44. “The BFG” author : DAHL

46. Intelligence org. : NSA

47. Dutch genre painter : STEEN

48. Juillet’s season : ETE

49. KFC option : BREAST

52. Red __ : SEA

53. What theater districts offer? : COPIOUS SHOWS (from “cop shows”)

57. Financial workers : ANALYSTS

58. Like merciless opponents : FEARED

62. Gospel travelers : MAGI

63. Get : SEE

64. Not nice at all : UNKIND

65. Urgent request : PLEA

66. Decline, with “out” : OPT

67. They traditionally appear in red … and in another form in 20-, 32-, 40- and 53-Across : DEBTS

Down

1. Loud sound : BAM!

2. Columbia, e.g. : IVY

3. “That’s lousy!” : BOO!

4. Enlarged Revlon ad image : LIPS

5. Reduce a sentence, say : EDIT

6. MLBer at AT&T Park : SF GIANT

7. Highway pursuer : TROOPER

8. Bakery item with some shortening? : DONUT

9. “Frozen” snowman : OLAF

10. What most pitchers have, as batters : LOW AVERAGES

11. “Little” Dickens title character : DORRIT

12. Obstruct : STYMIE

14. Author Bellow : SAUL

19. What that is in Spain : ESO

21. Scout groups : DENS

22. [It just vanished!] : PFFT!

23. Answer guide? : CLUE

24. Get on with one’s life : TURN THE PAGE

28. Revolutionary first name : FIDEL

29. Child subject : FOOD

31. It’s not big in France : PETIT

33. Verse lead-in : UNI-

34. Prize for Indy : ARK

35. Oxford figures : DONS

38. Fare-well link : THEE

39. Italian peak : ETNA

41. Like the simplest process : ONE-STEP

42. Toyota’s Ky. plant, e.g. : US ASSET

43. Old-school diplomatic accessory : SASH

44. Pack up the tents and supplies : DECAMP

45. Like some Alban Berg works : ATONAL

49. Tiny Tim, for one : BOY

50. Rene of “Thor” : RUSSO

51. Vegan staple : TOFU

54. Hipbones : ILIA

55. Direct (one’s way) : WEND

56. Ginza quaff : SAKE

59. Barbecue morsel : RIB

60. Sinus doc : ENT

61. Driller’s deg. : DDS

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LA Times Crossword Answers 22 Sep 2017, Friday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Noisy Dogs

Each of today’s themed answer includes a sound made by a dog, but that same answer sounds like a common phrase:

  • 21A. Hogwarts chronicler imitating noisy dogs? : JK GROWLING (sounds like “JK ROWLING”)
  • 26A. Devices that record data on noisy dogs? : BARKING METERS (sounds like “parking meters”)
  • 47A. Photographer of noisy dogs? : YIPPER SNAPPER (sounds like “whippersnapper”)
  • 52A. Paintings depicting noisy dogs? : WORKS OF ARF (sounds like “works of art”)

Bill’s time: 7m 45s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

5. Thompson of “Westworld” : TESSA

Tessa Thompson is an actress from Los Angeles who is known for playing the supporting role of Jackie Cook on the TV show “Veronica Mars”, and for playing student leader Diane Nash in the 2014 film “Selma”.

“Westworld” is an HBO series that is based on a 1973 movie of the same name, which was written and directed by novelist Michael Crichton. Westworld is a high-tech theme park populated by androids that interact with the guests.

14. Stephen Hawking subject : TIME

Stephen Hawking is a theoretical physicist from Oxford, England. Hawking owes much of his fame in the world of popular science to his incredibly successful book called “A Brief History of Time”. “A Brief History of Time” has sold over 10 million copies and was on London’s “Sunday Times” bestseller list for over four years. Hawking does a wonderful job of explaining many aspects of cosmology without losing the average reader. There is only one equation in the whole book, and that equation is “E = mc2”. Hawking’s life story is recounted in the excellent 2014 film “The Theory of Everything”.

17. Princess Royal of Britain : ANNE

Anne, Princess Royal was born in 1950 and is the only daughter of British Queen Elizabeth II. Princess Anne has been in the public spotlight for many things, including her success as an equestrian. Princess Anne was the first member of the British Royal Family to have competed in an Olympic Games. Her daughter Zara Phillips continued the tradition and competed as a member of the British equestrian team in the 2012 Olympic Games. Zara’s medal was presented to her by her own mother, Princess Anne.

“Princess Royal” is the title given to the eldest daughter of a British monarch.

20. Setup provider’s abbr. : BYOB

Bring Your Own Beer/Bottle/Booze (BYOB)

21. Hogwarts chronicler imitating noisy dogs? : JK GROWLING (sounds like “JK ROWLING”)

Joanne Rowling changed her name to J. K. Rowling at the request of her publisher, who believed that young boys might have shied away from reading the first “Harry Potter” book if they believed the story was written by a woman (this was 1997!). “Jo” Rowling chose J for Joanne, and K for Kathleen after her grandmother (Jo has no middle name to use).

23. Like many deli orders : TO GO

The word “delicatessen” (or “deli” for short) came into English from the German “Delikatessen”. The Germans borrowed the word from French, in which language “délicatesse” means “delicious things (to eat)”. The term’s ultimate root is “delicatus”, the Latin for “giving pleasure, delightful”.

25. Western peer of Tex and Gene : ROY

Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers’ real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans’ nickname was “Queen of the West”.

Tex Ritter was a country singer and actor from Murvaul, Texas. On the big screen, Ritter was known as a “singing cowboy”, and appeared in around 40 westerns in which he belted out a tune or two. Tex’s son was actor John Ritter, who played Jack Tripper so well in the sitcom “Three’s Company”.

Gene Autry was a so-called singing cowboy who had an incredibly successful career on radio, television and in films starting in the thirties. Autry’s signature song was “Back in the Saddle Again”, and his biggest hit was “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”. He also had a hit with his own Christmas song called “Here Comes Santa Claus”. There’s even a town in Oklahoma called Gene Autry, named in his honor. Famously, Autry owned the Los Angeles Angels (now the Anaheim Angels) for many years, from 1961 to 1997.

26. Devices that record data on noisy dogs? : BARKING METERS (sounds like “parking meters”)

An early patent for a parking meter, dated 1928, was for a device that required the driver of the parked car to connect the battery of his or her car to the meter in order for it to operate!

32. Part of XL: Abbr. : LGE

Extra-large (XL)

33. Toon cat since the silent era : FELIX

Felix the Cat is a cartoon character who dates back to the era of silent movies. A papier-mâché model of Felix was used in one of the first ever broadcasts of a television image, in 1928. At that time, RCA was using a Felix doll in experimental transmissions in New York.

37. War-torn land : IRAQ

Iraq is often called the “Cradle of Civilization” as it was home to Sumer, which was the earliest known civilization on the planet. By 5000 BC the Sumerian people were practicing year-round agriculture and had a specialized labor force. For the first time, a whole race were able to settle in one place by storing food, instead of having to migrate in a pattern dictated by crops and grazing land.

42. St. Anthony’s home : PADUA

The city of Padua is in northern Italy, and not far from Venice. Padua has many claims to fame. For example, Galileo was one of the lecturers at the University of Padua, and William Shakespeare chose the city as the setting for his play “The Taming of the Shrew”.

44. It’s not exactly a pick-me-up : DECAF

The first successful process for removing caffeine from coffee involved steaming the beans in salt water, and then extracting the caffeine using benzene (a potent carcinogen) as a solvent. Coffee processed this way was sold as Sanka here in the US. There are other processes used these days, and let’s hope they are safer …

50. Disney Store collectible : CEL

In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

51. Semi bar : AXLE

A “semi” is a “semi-trailer truck”. The vehicle is so called because it consists of a tractor and a half-trailer. The half-trailer is so called because it only has wheels on the back end, with the front supported by the tractor.

58. First name in folk : ARLO

Arlo Guthrie is the son of Woody Guthrie. Both father and son are renowned for their singing of protest songs about social injustice. Arlo is most famous for his epic “Alice’s Restaurant Massacree”, a song that lasts a full 18m 34s. In the song Guthrie tells how, after being drafted, he was rejected for service in the Vietnam War based on his criminal record. He had only one incident on his public record, a Thanksgiving Day arrest for littering and being a public nuisance when he was 18-years-old.

64. News article intro : LEDE

The opening paragraph in any work of literature is often just called “the lead”. In the world of journalism, this is usually referred to as “the lede”.

69. Bellicose god : ARES

The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). Ares was the son of Zeus and Hera, and the Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

Someone described as bellicose is inclined to favor strife or war. The term comes from “bellum”, the Latin word for “war”.

Down

2. Like a mite : TINY

Mites are tiny arthropods in the arachnid (spider) class. Mites are (annoyingly!) very successful creatures that have adapted to all sorts of habitats, and being so small, they generally pass unnoticed. Ick …

4. Adidas subsidiary : REEBOK

The brand name Reebok was adopted as the new company name for Foster Shoes of the UK in 1960. The name Reebok (more commonly “Rhebok”) is an Afrikaans word for an antelope, and comes from the term “roe buck”.

5. He beat out Sonny & Cher and Herman’s Hermits, among others, for the Best New Artist Grammy : TOM JONES

Tom Jones … now he has a real voice and is a great showman. I saw him in Las Vegas many, many moons ago, and it was one of the best Vegas shows I’ve ever attended. Although “Tom Jones” is a carefully selected stage name (he was born Thomas Woodward) the name isn’t too far from reality as Jones is his mother’s maiden name. The stage name was chosen by his manager to capitalize on the appeal of “Tom Jones”, a filmed version of the Henry Fielding novel that was having a successful run at the time. The name also emphasized Tom’s Welsh roots, as Jones is a very common name in Wales.

The famous duo Sonny & Cher started out in the mid-1960s as backing singer working with Phil Spector. The couple married in 1964, and the next year released their breakthrough numbers “Baby Don’t Go” and “I Got You Babe”. Sonny and Cher divorced in 1975, and dissolved their act that same year. Cher moved onto a successful solo career that continues to this day. Sonny Bono was elected as a US Congressman for California in 1995. Sadly, he didn’t finish his term in the House as he died from injuries sustained in a skiing accident in 1998.

Herman’s Hermits are a band from the north of England that formed in 1964 as “Herman & the Hermits. The band’s list of hits includes “I’m into Something Good” (1964), “Mrs. Brown, You’ve Got a Lovely Daughter” (1965), “I’m Henry VIII, I Am” (1965) and my personal favorite “There’s a Kind of Hush” (1967).

6. Christine’s phantom admirer : ERIK

In Gaston Leroux’s novel “The Phantom of the Opera”, the young Christine Daaé is obsessively admired by Erik, the “phantom” who lives below the Paris Opera House.

11. Nutritious berry : ACAI

Açaí is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

13. Giant film primate : KONG

When RKO released the 1933 movie “King Kong”, the promotional material listed the ape’s height as 50 feet. During filming, a bust was created for a 40-foot ape, as well as a full-size hand that went with a 70-foot Kong.

24. Desktop animation image suffix : GIF

A bitmap is an image file format used to store digital images. Basically, each pixel in a bitmap file is stored as a “bit” of information, hence the name “bitmap”. In 1987, CompuServe introduced a new type of image file called the Graphics Interchange Format (GIF). A GIF image takes the same information as a bitmap and then compresses it, resulting in a smaller file size. However, during compression the image may lose some resolution. The GIF format also handles short video clips, usually animations.

26. Control tower signal : BLIP

Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called Radio Detection And Ranging, which was shortened to the acronym RADAR.

27. Indian shrine site : AGRA

Agra is a medieval city on the banks of the river Yamuna in India. Agra was also the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1556 to 1658. The city is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

  • The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
  • Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
  • Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal architecture.

30. CFOs, e.g. : EXECS

Chief Financial Officer (CFO)

31. Orient Express feature : SLEEPER CAR

The Orient Express was a celebrated luxury passenger train service that operated from 1883 until 2009. The cities served by the Orient Express varied over the decades, but most famously ran between Paris and Constantinople (Istanbul).

35. Shakespeare’s shrew : KATE

William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew” is about a courting couple. The male in the couple is Petruchio, a gentleman of Verona, and the female is Katharina/Kate, the so-called “shrew”. As the play progresses, the “shrew” is “tamed” and becomes an “obedient” bride … a controversial storyline in the contemporary world, to say the least. Regardless, modern adaptations have been made, including 1948’s Broadway musical “Kiss Me Kate” and the 1999 romantic comedy “10 Things I Hate About You”.

36. Vega, for one : STAR

Vega is the brightest star in the constellation Lyra. Vega (along with Altair and Deneb from other constellations) is also part of the group of three stars that is called the Summer Triangle. Vega is the star at the right-angle of this triangle.

43. Homo sapiens relatives : APES

The hominids are the great apes, and belong to the family of primates called Hominidae. Extant genera that make up the family Hominidae are:

  • chimpanzees
  • gorillas
  • humans
  • orangutans

The literal translation of “Homo sapiens” from Latin is “wise or knowing man”. The Homo genus includes the species Homo sapiens (modern humans), but we’re the only species left in that genus. The last known species related to humans was Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthal Man) which died off about 24,000 years ago. However, another species was discovered in Indonesia in 2003 that has been dubbed Homo floresiensis (Flores Man … sometimes called “hobbit”), and it may possibly have lived as recently as 12,000 years ago. Watch this space …

48. Small wading bird : PLOVER

Plovers are small wading birds with relatively short bills. Many of the 60-70 species of plovers are referred to as dotterels.

49. State of matter : PLASMA

When I was a schoolkid, I was taught that there were three fundamental states of matter: solid, liquid and gas. I think it is now generally accepted that there is a fourth fundamental state matter, namely plasma. Plasma is a state without a definite shape or volume, and in that sense is similar to a gas. In a plasma, electrons have been ripped away from their nuclei, forming a conductive electron “sea”. Plasmas are created from gases by applying a massive voltage difference or an extremely high temperature.

55. Gift from Prometheus : FIRE

In Greek mythology, Prometheus was one of the Titans. He was said to have created man from clay as well as giving fire to humanity, hence allowing the human race to prosper.

57. Play polo, say : RIDE

The sport of polo originated in Iran, possibly before the 5th century BC. Polo was used back them primarily as a training exercise for cavalry units.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Hubbub : STIR

5. Thompson of “Westworld” : TESSA

10. One way to lean : BACK

14. Stephen Hawking subject : TIME

15. Tough tests of knowledge : ORALS

16. Offer the same opinion as : ECHO

17. Princess Royal of Britain : ANNE

18. -, at times : MINUS

19. Reclined : LAIN

20. Setup provider’s abbr. : BYOB

21. Hogwarts chronicler imitating noisy dogs? : JK GROWLING (sounds like “JK ROWLING”)

23. Like many deli orders : TO GO

25. Western peer of Tex and Gene : ROY

26. Devices that record data on noisy dogs? : BARKING METERS (sounds like “parking meters”)

32. Part of XL: Abbr. : LGE

33. Toon cat since the silent era : FELIX

34. Reacts to bad news, perhaps : SULKS

37. War-torn land : IRAQ

39. More rational : SANER

41. All in : BEAT

42. St. Anthony’s home : PADUA

44. It’s not exactly a pick-me-up : DECAF

46. Airport approx. : ETA

47. Photographer of noisy dogs? : YIPPER SNAPPER (sounds like “whippersnapper”)

50. Disney Store collectible : CEL

51. Semi bar : AXLE

52. Paintings depicting noisy dogs? : WORKS OF ARF (sounds like “works of art”)

58. First name in folk : ARLO

61. Choppers : AXES

62. Stop by : VISIT

63. Printer function : SCAN

64. News article intro : LEDE

65. Gradually weaken : ERODE

66. It can be hard to get out of : MAZE

67. It can be hard to get out : KNOT

68. Call attention (to) : REFER

69. Bellicose god : ARES

Down

1. Attempt : STAB

2. Like a mite : TINY

3. “Give me a few minutes” : I’M NOT READY

4. Adidas subsidiary : REEBOK

5. He beat out Sonny & Cher and Herman’s Hermits, among others, for the Best New Artist Grammy : TOM JONES

6. Christine’s phantom admirer : ERIK

7. Emulated 5-Down : SANG

8. Nasty comment : SLUR

9. Categorize : ASSORT

10. Source of much canine delight : BELLY RUB

11. Nutritious berry : ACAI

12. Gym exercise : CHIN

13. Giant film primate : KONG

22. Burdens : WOES

24. Desktop animation image suffix : GIF

26. Control tower signal : BLIP

27. Indian shrine site : AGRA

28. Forest clearing : GLADE

29. Member of the underground economy? : MINER

30. CFOs, e.g. : EXECS

31. Orient Express feature : SLEEPER CAR

35. Shakespeare’s shrew : KATE

36. Vega, for one : STAR

38. Cement type for home repairs : QUICKSET

40. Pursued vigorously : RAN AFTER

43. Homo sapiens relatives : APES

45. 63-Across alternative : FAX

48. Small wading bird : PLOVER

49. State of matter : PLASMA

52. Constitutional : WALK

53. Strong farm team : OXEN

54. Overhaul : REDO

55. Gift from Prometheus : FIRE

56. Beginning : AS OF

57. Play polo, say : RIDE

59. Relax : LAZE

60. Word that can replace “your” : ONE’S

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