LA Times Crossword Answers 19 May 17, Friday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: RA to AR

Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase in which the 2nd and 3rd letters are AR, except that those letters are switched around:

  • 17A. Aging hero Jones, in his latest film? : GRAY INDIANA (from “Gary, Indiana”)
  • 24A. Pitt portraying Shakespeare? : BRAD OF AVON (from “Bard of Avon”)
  • 33A. Skill displayed at the gift counter? : WRAP SPEED (from “warp speed”)
  • 45A. Times when hokey humor prevailed? : ERAS OF CORN (from “ears of corn”)
  • 54A. Early stage of muffin production? : BRAN RAISING (from “barn raising”)

Bill’s time: 10m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. 1987 Michael Jackson album : BAD

The song “Bad” was written and sung by Michael Jackson, and released in 1987. The song is about being tough on the streets, being “bad”.

16. “Bambi” doe : ENA

Ena is Bambi’s aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel “Bambi, A Life in the Woods” written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

17. Aging hero Jones, in his latest film? : GRAY INDIANA (from “Gary, Indiana”)

George Lucas created a lead character named Indiana Smith for what was to be his “Indiana Jones” series of films. Lucas asked Steven Spielberg to direct the first film, and Spielberg wasn’t too fond of the name “Smith”. Lucas then suggested Jones as an alternative, and Indiana Jones was born.

The city of Gary, Indiana is located just 25 miles from downtown Chicago and falls within the Chicago metropolitan area (also known as “Chicagoland”). Gary was founded by US Steel in 1906, as the company selected it as the site for a new steel plant. The name “Gary” was chosen in honor of Elbert H. Gary, who was the key player in setting up US Steel in 1901.

20. “… let __ put asunder”: Matthew : NO MAN

The Christian marriage ceremony usually includes the words, “What God has joined together let no man put asunder”. This line comes from the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament.

22. Island band The __ Men : BAHA

The Baha Men are so called because they hail from the Bahamas. Their big hit was “Who Let the Dogs Out?” That song ranked as third in a list of the world’s most annoying songs!

23. Shakespeare’s jet? : EBON

Ebony is another word for the color black (often shortened to “ebon” in poetry). Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned …

The color “jet black” takes its name from the minor gemstone known as jet. The gemstone and the material it is made of takes its English name from the French name: “jaiet”.

24. Pitt portraying Shakespeare? : BRAD OF AVON (from “Bard of Avon”)

The original “bards” were storytellers, poets and composers of music in medieval Britain and Ireland, with the term coming from the Old Celtic word “bardos” that described a poet or singer. I guess the most famous bard was William Shakespeare, the “Bard of Avon”.

Brad Pitt’s first major role was the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston and then to Angelina Jolie.

28. Undefeated Ali : LAILA

Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali and is a very capable boxer in her own right. Laila’s professional record is an impressive 24 wins, including 21 knockouts. Now retired, she never lost a fight, and nor did she ever draw. One of those victories was against Jackie Frazier-Lyde, daughter of her father’s nemesis Joe Frazier. Laila is not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of “Dancing with the Stars”.

32. “John Wick” star : REEVES

Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989), a cop in “Speed” (1994) and the protagonist Neo in “The Matrix” series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name “Keanu” is Hawaiian for “the coldness”.

“John Wick” is a 2014 action movie starring Keanu Reeves in the title role. Reeves plays a retired hitman who goes on a killing spree to avenge the murder of his dog.

33. Skill displayed at the gift counter? : WRAP SPEED (from “warp speed”)

In the “Star Trek” universe, the warp speed achieved by the warp drive engines is very much like our real-world Mach number. Just as a plane traveling at Mach 1 is moving at the speed of sound, a starship traveling at warp factor 1 is moving at the speed of light. Mach 2 is twice the speed of sound, and warp factor 2 is twice the speed of light. Cool, huh …?

35. Fish-eating raptor : OSPREY

The osprey is also known as the sea hawk or fish eagle.

39. Boorish sort : CAD

Our word “cad”, meaning “a person lacking in finer feelings”, is a shortening of the word “cadet”. “Cad” was first used for a servant, and then students at British universities used “cad” as a term for a boy from the local town. “Cad” took on its current meaning in the 1830s.

43. Where Mozart was born : AUSTRIA

Salzburg is a city in Austria with a great musical tradition. Salzburg was the birthplace of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was also the setting for much of “The Sound of Music”.

45. Times when hokey humor prevailed? : ERAS OF CORN (from “ears of corn”)

“Hokum” was originally theater slang, meaning “melodramatic, exaggerated acting”. Now the term just means “empty talk”. It is also the root for our word “hokey” meaning “silly, old-fashioned”.

52. Beatle ending : -MANIA

The phenomenon known as “Beatlemania” originated in the early sixties, with the term describing the frenzy exhibited particularly by female fans of the group. The term is perhaps imitative of the much older “Lisztomania”, a term coined in 1844 for the similar fan frenzy directed towards pianist and composer Franz Liszt during an eight-year tour of Europe starting in 1939. Hysterical fans of Liszt would try to get locks of his hair, fight over his handkerchiefs and even carry glass vials containing the dregs from his coffee cup.

53. Cakes go-with : ALE

The phrase “cakes and ale” makes a number of appearances in literature. Aesop uses the phrase in his fable “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse”, to symbolize the good life. Shakespeare included the line “Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?” in his play “Twelfth Night”. W. Somerset Maugham used the Shakespearean line as inspiration for the title of his 1930 play “Cakes and Ale, or, The Skeleton in the Cupboard”.

57. Off one’s rocker : BONKERS

The word “bonkers” meaning “crazy” originated in the fifties. The term might come from navy slang meaning “slightly drunk”, behaving as though one received a “bonk” on the head.

59. Paul with guitars : LES

Les Paul was a guitarist, songwriter and inventor. When he was 33 years old, Paul was involved in a near-fatal car crash that left his right arm and elbow shattered. Surgeons offered him the choice of amputation or a rebuilding of the limb that would leave him unable to bend his elbow. He told them to set his arm at just under 90 degrees so that he could at least hold his guitar and perhaps play it.

61. Ergotamine derivative popular in the ’60s : LSD

LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

Ergotamine is a chemical that was first isolated from the ergot fungus at the beginning of the 20th century. It is a vasoconstrictor, and has been used historically to treat post-partum bleeding. Nowadays, ergotamine is more commonly used to treat acute migraine attacks.

Down

5. Lading measure : TON

Here in the US, a ton is equivalent to 2,000 pounds. Over in the UK, a ton is 2,240 pounds. The UK unit is sometimes referred to as an Imperial ton or sometimes a “long ton”. Folks over there refer to the US ton then as a “short ton”. To further complicate matters, there is also a “metric ton” or “tonne”, which is equivalent to 2,204 pounds. I wish we’d just stick to kilograms …

The verb “lade” meaning “to load” comes from an Old English word “hladan”. Lade also used to mean “to draw water” and indeed gave us our word “ladle”. So “lade” and “ladle” are close cousins.

6. Kentucky Derby call : RIDERS UP!

The first Kentucky Derby took place in 1875, and is a race modelled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, the Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles, although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles. The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses, and so the Derby is nicknamed “Run for the Roses”. The race is held on the first Saturday in May each year, and is limited to 3-year-old horses.

7. Jungian concept : ANIMA

The concepts of anima and animus is found in the Carl Jung school of analytical psychology. The idea is that within each male there resides a feminine inner personality called the anima, and within each female there is a male inner personality known as the animus.

Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist, the founder of analytical psychology. Jung was very much associated with the analysis of dreams, and also introduced us to the psychological concepts of introversion and extroversion.

9. Introduction to Domingo? : SANTO …

Santo Domingo de Guzmán (often just “Santo Domingo”) is the capital city of the Dominican Republic. Christopher Columbus was the first European to visit what is now the Dominican Republic, in 1492. Four years later Christopher’s younger brother, Bartholomew Columbus arrived, and founded Santo Domingo, making the city the oldest, continuously-inhabited European settlement in the Americas.

10. Greek letter : ETA

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

11. Mediterranean metropolis : TEL AVIV

The full name of Israel’s second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. Tel Aviv translates into “Spring Mound”, a name chosen in 1910.

18. Half a philosophical duality : YANG

The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

27. City on the Rio Grande : LAREDO

Laredo is a border city in Texas that is situated on the banks of the Rio Grande, across the border from Nuevo Laredo in Mexico.

31. Net neutrality beneficiary: Abbr. : ISP

An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP’s network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs.

The principle of Net neutrality holds that those entities managing the Internet should treat all data passing through equally. The term “Net neutrality” was coined in 2003 by Tim Wu, a media law professor at Columbia University. Net neutrality is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the US.

32. Any “Twilight Zone” episode, now : RERUN

The iconic television series called “The Twilight Zone” first aired in 1959 and then ran for 156 episodes before being pulled in 1964. “The Twilight Zone” was revived for four years in the late eighties, and was also spun-off into a movie by Steven Spielberg in 1983.

33. Omega holder : WRIST

Omega is a manufacturer of high-end watches based in Switzerland. An Omega watch was the first portable timepiece to make it to the moon.

34. Part of a traditional holiday gift : PEAR TREE

The fabulous Christmas Carol called “The Twelve Days of Christmas” dates back at least to 1780 when it was first published in England, though it may be French in origin. The concept of twelve days of Christmas comes from the tradition that the three kings came to visit the Christ Child twelve days after he was born. This same tradition is the origin of the title to Shakespeare’s play “Twelfth Night”.

36. Frozen dessert brand : SARA LEE

In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself who now goes by the name Sara Lee Schupf.

37. Seven-movement Holst work that omits Earth, with “The” : PLANETS

Despite the Scandinavian-sounding name, Gustav Holst was born in Britain and was the most English of classical composers. His most famous work is the orchestral suite known as ‘The Planets”. The suite has seven movements, one for each of the planets known at the time (1914-1916) except Earth. Pluto was discovered during Holst’s lifetime, but decades after he had completed his masterpiece. Anyway, Pluto was relegated from the league of planets …

39. Like the olfactory nerve, e.g. : CRANIAL

The adjective “olfactory” means “relating to the sense of smell”. The term comes from the Latin verb “olfacere” meaning “to get the smell of”.

44. “__ brillig … ” : ‘TWAS

Here are the first two verses of “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll, probably the one poem that we all just loved learning to recite at school

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!

46. Denmark’s __ Islands : FAROE

The Faroe Islands (also “Faeroe Islands”) are a group of islands lying halfway between Scotland and Iceland. The Faroe Islands are part of the Kingdom of Denmark and were granted the power of self-governance in 1948.

54. OPEC unit : BBL

The volume of one oil barrel is equivalent to 42 US gallons. A barrel is correctly abbreviated to “bbl”. Barrels aren’t really used for transporting crude oil anymore. Instead, oil moves in bulk through pipelines and in tankers. “Barrel” is just used as a unit of volume these days.

Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC)

55. “… such stuff / As dreams __ made on”: Prospero : ARE

Here is a line that is oft quoted from William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”, spoken by Prospero:

… We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep …

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. 1987 Michael Jackson album : BAD

4. Road where Mozart was born : STRASSE

11. Recurrent behavior : TIC

14. Henri’s here : ICI

15. Identify : POINT AT

16. “Bambi” doe : ENA

17. Aging hero Jones, in his latest film? : GRAY INDIANA (from “Gary, Indiana”)

19. Sci-fi setting : LAB

20. “… let __ put asunder”: Matthew : NO MAN

21. Send out : EMIT

22. Island band The __ Men : BAHA

23. Shakespeare’s jet? : EBON

24. Pitt portraying Shakespeare? : BRAD OF AVON (from “Bard of Avon”)

26. Acquires through cunning : WANGLES

28. Undefeated Ali : LAILA

29. Norm: Abbr. : STD

30. His, to Henri : A LUI

32. “John Wick” star : REEVES

33. Skill displayed at the gift counter? : WRAP SPEED (from “warp speed”)

35. Fish-eating raptor : OSPREY

38. Sassy : PERT

39. Boorish sort : CAD

42. Sound : VALID

43. Where Mozart was born : AUSTRIA

45. Times when hokey humor prevailed? : ERAS OF CORN (from “ears of corn”)

49. Loosen (up) : WARM

50. Storm : RANT

51. Settled on a branch : ALIT

52. Beatle ending : -MANIA

53. Cakes go-with : ALE

54. Early stage of muffin production? : BRAN RAISING (from “barn raising”)

56. Decide not to stop : LET

57. Off one’s rocker : BONKERS

58. Vital statistic : AGE

59. Paul with guitars : LES

60. Landlord’s customers : LESSEES

61. Ergotamine derivative popular in the ’60s : LSD

Down

1. Front page material : BIG NEWS

2. One seen in a ring : ACROBAT

3. One seen in a ring : DIAMOND

4. Short drive : SPIN

5. Lading measure : TON

6. Kentucky Derby call : RIDERS UP!

7. Jungian concept : ANIMA

8. Solemn : STAID

9. Introduction to Domingo? : SANTO …

10. Greek letter : ETA

11. Mediterranean metropolis : TEL AVIV

12. Saddled with debt : IN A HOLE

13. Seaside resort array : CABANAS

18. Half a philosophical duality : YANG

22. Called from the field : BAAED

24. Fasten, at sea : BELAY

25. Groups at sea : FLEETS

27. City on the Rio Grande : LAREDO

31. Net neutrality beneficiary: Abbr. : ISP

32. Any “Twilight Zone” episode, now : RERUN

33. Omega holder : WRIST

34. Part of a traditional holiday gift : PEAR TREE

35. From one extreme to the other : OVERALL

36. Frozen dessert brand : SARA LEE

37. Seven-movement Holst work that omits Earth, with “The” : PLANETS

39. Like the olfactory nerve, e.g. : CRANIAL

40. Television fare : AIRINGS

41. Flawed : DAMAGED

44. “__ brillig … ” : ‘TWAS

46. Denmark’s __ Islands : FAROE

47. Highland groups : CLANS

48. Sounds from pens : OINKS

52. Pine for : MISS

54. OPEC unit : BBL

55. “… such stuff / As dreams __ made on”: Prospero : ARE

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LA Times Crossword Answers 18 Apr 17, Tuesday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Wee Opening

Today’s themed answers each open with an adjective meaning “wee, diminutive”.

  • 17A. Mom-and-pop stores : SMALL BUSINESSES
  • 29A. Alfalfa, Darla and friends, with “the” : LITTLE RASCALS
  • 39A. “God bless us, every one!” Dickens character : TINY TIM
  • 47A. Game with windmills, ramps and such : MINIATURE GOLF
  • 62A. Waterspout climber of song : ITSY BITSY SPIDER

Bill’s time: 6m 01s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

4. Hamilton and Burr, notably : FOES

Alexander Hamilton was one of America’s Founding Fathers, chief of staff to General George Washington and the first Secretary of the Treasury. It was Hamilton who founded the nation’s first political party, the Federalist Party. He is also famous for fighting a duel with Vice President Aaron Burr, which resulted in Hamilton’s death a few days later.

Aaron Burr was the third vice-president of the US, serving under Thomas Jefferson. In the final year of his term in office, Burr fought an illegal duel and killed his political rival Alexander Hamilton. Burr wasn’t brought to justice, but he did pay the price politically. Thomas Jefferson dropped him from his ticket in the election held the following year.

14. Word for a Latin lover : AMO

Amo, amas, amat … I love, you love, he/she/it loves, in Latin.

15. Cookbook author Rombauer : IRMA

Irma Rombauer was the author of the famous cookbook “The Joy Of Cooking”. Rombauer self-published the book back in 1931 in St. Louis, Missouri. She and her family continued to publish privately as demand was high, and then a commercial printing house picked it up in 1936. “The Joy of Cooking” has been in print continuously ever since.

20. Vietnam’s capital : HANOI

Hanoi was the capital of North Vietnam, and Saigon the capital of South Vietnam. After the Vietnam War, Hanoi was made capital of the reunified state. Saigon, the larger metropolis, was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City. Hanoi is located in the delta of the Red River, and is just over 50 miles from the Gulf of Tonkin in the South China Sea.

21. Part of MST: Abbr. : STD

Mountain Standard Time (MST)

22. FDR’s successor : HST

The letter “S” in the middle of the name Harry S. Truman (HST) doesn’t stand for anything. The future-president was named “Harry” in honor of his mother’s brother Harrison “Harry” Young. The initial “S” was chosen in honor of young Harry’s two grandfathers: Anderson S-hipp Truman and S-olomon Young.

29. Alfalfa, Darla and friends, with “the” : LITTLE RASCALS

Alfalfa was one Hollywood’s “Little Rascals”, also known as “Our Gang”. Alfalfa’s real name was Carl Switzer. He and his brother were quite the young performers around his hometown in Illinois, singing and playing instruments. On a trip to California, the Switzer family were touring the Hal Roach movie studio and were fooling around in the studio cafeteria, basically giving an impromptu performance. Hal Roach happened to be there at the time, and signed both brothers up for roles in “Our Gang”. Carl was to play “Alfalfa”, and brother Harold played “Slim” (aka “Deadpan”).

Alfalfa’s love interest in “Our Gang” was Darla, whose real name was Darla Hood. Hood became quite a successful singer after she grew out of her “Our Gang” role.

38. Blackjack half : ACE

The game of “twenty-one” was first referred to in a book by Cervantes, the author famous for writing “Don Quixote”. He called the game “ventiuna” (Spanish for “twenty-one”). Cervantes wrote his story just after the year 1600, so the game has been around at least since then. Twenty-one came to the US but it wasn’t all that popular so bonus payments were introduced to create more interest. One of the more attractive bonuses was a ten-to-one payout to a player who was dealt an ace of spades and a black jack. This bonus led to the game adopting the moniker “Blackjack”.

39. “God bless us, every one!” Dickens character : TINY TIM

Bob Cratchit is the underpaid clerk who works for Ebeneezer Scrooge in the Charles Dickens story “A Christmas Carol”. Tiny Tim is the nickname of Timothy Cratchit, the little disabled boy in the Charles Dickens novella “A Christmas Carol”.

42. Wedding notice word : NEE

“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”.

46. La Brea __ Pits : TAR

The La Brea Tar Pits are located right in the heart of the city of Los Angeles. At the site there is a constant flow of tar that seeps up to the surface from underground, a phenomenon that has been around for tens of thousands of years. What is significant is that much of the seeping tar is covered by water. Over many, many centuries animals came to the water to drink and became trapped in the tar as they entered the water to quench their thirsts. The tar then preserved the bones of the dead animals. Today a museum is located right by the Tar Pits, recovering bones and displaying specimens of the animals found there. It’s well worth a visit if you are in town …

52. Coiffures : HAIRDOS

“Coiffure” is a French word that we’ve imported into English meaning “hairstyle”. The term comes from the Old French word “coife”, which was used for the inner part of a helmet.

54. Move, in real estate lingo : RELO

Relocate (relo) is a real estate term.

55. Part of MST : ESS

There’s a letter S (ess) in the middle of the initialism MST, which stands for Mountain Standard Time.

56. Tango maneuver : DIP

The dramatic dance called the tango originated in the late 1800s in the area along the border between Argentina and Uruguay. Dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires in particular traveled to Europe and beyond in the early twentieth century and brought the tango with them. The tango craze first struck Europe in Paris in the 1910s, and from there spread to London and Berlin, crossing the Atlantic to New York in 1913.

62. Waterspout climber of song : ITSY BITSY SPIDER

The Itsy Bitsy Spider crawled up the water spout.
Down came the rain, and washed the spider out.
Out came the sun, and dried up all the rain,
And the Itsy Bitsy Spider went up the spout again.

67. California’s San __: Hearst Castle locale : SIMEON

William Randolph Hearst got into publishing when he took over “The San Francisco Examiner” from his father George Hearst. Beyond his work in the newspaper business, William Randolph Hearst was also a politician and represented a district of New York in the US House. His life was the inspiration for the lead role in the 1941 movie “Citizen Kane” with Orson Welles playing the Hearst-like character. If you’re ever driving along the coast between Los Angeles and San Francisco, I’d recommend a stop at Hearst Castle, William Randolph’s magnificent estate located near San Simeon.

69. 401(k) kin : IRA

A 401(k) account is similar to an IRA in that contributions can be made from a paycheck prior to the deduction of income taxes. Additionally, contributions can be fully or partially matched by an employer.

70. Six times cinq : TRENTE

In French, “six” (six) times “cinq” (five) is “trente” (thirty).

72. Gov. Cuomo’s domain : NYS

Andrew Cuomo won the gubernatorial election for the State of New York in 2010. Andrew is the son of former Governor of New York Mario Cuomo. Andrew was also married for 13 years to Kerry Kennedy, a daughter of Robert F. Kennedy.

Down

2. 2016 Best Actress Stone of “La La Land” : EMMA

The actress Emma Stone is from Scottsdale, Arizona. Stone really came to prominence with her performance in the 2010 high school movie called “Easy A”. She won the Best Actress Oscar for her performance in the 2016 movie “La La Land”. Now one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood, Stone values her privacy and works hard to maintain a low profile. Good for her, I say …

“La La Land” is a 2016 romantic musical film starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone as a musician and actress who fall in love in “La La Land” (Los Angeles, i.e. LA). The film was written and directed by Damien Chazelle, who had found success two years earlier with the musical drama “Whiplash”. “La La Land” won a record-breaking seven Golden Globes and tied for the record number of Oscar nominations at fourteen, winning six.

4. Like a child’s love for a parent : FILIAL

Something “filial” is related to a son or daughter. The term comes from Latin, in which language “filius” means “son” and “filia” means “daughter”.

6. Grounded bird : EMU

Emu eggs are very large, with a thick shell that is dark-green in color. One emu egg weighs about the same as a dozen chicken eggs.

8. Pioneering hip-hop trio from Queens : RUN-DMC

Run-DMC was a hip hop group from Queens, New York. The trio took its name from two of the group’s members: Joseph “Run” Simmons and Darryl “DMC” McDaniels.

19. “How sweet __!” : IT IS

“How sweet it is!” was perhaps Jackie Gleason’s most famous catchphrase. Gleason grew up in Brooklyn, and drivers entering the borough today via the Brooklyn Bridge are greeted by a road sign announcing “How Sweet It Is!”

24. Classic grape soda : NEHI

Nehi Corporation was the nickname for the Chero-Cola/Union Bottle Works that introduced the Nehi drink in 1924. Years later the company developed a new brand, Royal Crown Cola (also known as RC Cola). By 1955, RC Cola was the company’s flagship product, so the “Nehi Corporation” became the “Royal Crown Company”. In 1954, RC Cola became the first company to sell soft drinks in cans.

27. Eggplant __: Italian entrée, briefly : PARM

Parmigiana is a dish from southern Italy. The original parmigiana was made with an aubergine (eggplant) filling, with cheese and tomato layers and then baked. Versions originating outside of Italy have replaced the aubergine with breaded cutlets of chicken or veal.

28. L’eau land? : ILE

In French, one might go to an “île” (island) in the middle of “l’eau” (the water).

29. Shakespearean king with three daughters : LEAR

“King Lear” is one of William Shakespeare’s tragedies. Lear’s three daughters figure prominently in the story line. The three are, in order of age:

  • Goneril
  • Regan
  • Cordelia

36. Patricia of “Hud” : NEAL

Patricia Neal won her Best Actress Oscar relatively late in her career, for playing the middle-aged housekeeper in 1963’s “Hud”. A few years’ later she was offered the role of Mrs. Robinson in “The Graduate” but turned it down. Famously, Neal had an affair with Gary Cooper who was married at the time. She became pregnant with his child, but he persuaded her to have an abortion. Not long afterwards Neal married British writer Roald Dahl (of “Willy Wonka” fame) and the couple had five children together before divorcing in 1983.

The modern-day, western movie called “Hud” was released in 1963 and has become a classic. “Hud” stars Paul Newman (in the title role) and Patricia Neal and is an adaptation of a novel by Larry McMurtry called “Horseman, Pass By”. Patricia Neal’s role in the film was relatively small, yet her performance was enough to earn her an Academy Award for Best Actress.

37. Medieval laborer : SERF

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

44. Defunct Soviet space station : MIR

The Russian Mir Space Station was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001.

48. First-aid fluid : IODINE

Tincture of iodine is a disinfectant. A “tincture” is a substance used in dyeing. Since the 1600s, “tincture” has also been used for a solution of medicine in an alcohol mixture.

51. Mongolian desert : GOBI

The large desert in Asia called the Gobi lies in northern China and southern Mongolia. The Gobi desert is growing at an alarming rate, particularly towards the south. This “desertification” is caused by increased human activity. The Chinese government is trying to halt the desert’s progress by planting great swaths of new forest, the so called “Green Wall of China”. The name “Gobi” is Mongolian for “waterless place, semidesert”.

59. Chief Norse god : ODIN

In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin’s wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term “Friday” (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin’s son was Thor, and his name gave us the term “Thursday”. Odin himself gave us our word “Wednesday”, from “Wodin”, the English form of his name.

63. Kyoto cash : YEN

The Korean Won, the Chinese Yuan, and the Japanese Yen (all of which are Asian currencies) take their names from the Chinese written character that represents “round shape”.

The city of Kyoto was once the capital of Japan, and in fact the name “Kyoto” means “capital city” in Japanese. Kyoto is sometimes referred to as the City of Ten Thousand Shrines.

64. Droid : BOT

A bot is computer program that is designed to imitate human behavior. It might crawl around the Web doing searches for example, or it might participate in discussions in chat rooms by giving pre-programmed responses. It might also act as a competitor in a computer game.

66. Gas additive brand : STP

STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name STP comes from “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Valuable stone : GEM

4. Hamilton and Burr, notably : FOES

8. Find incredibly funny : ROAR AT

14. Word for a Latin lover : AMO

15. Cookbook author Rombauer : IRMA

16. Not certain : UNSURE

17. Mom-and-pop stores : SMALL BUSINESSES

20. Vietnam’s capital : HANOI

21. Part of MST: Abbr. : STD

22. FDR’s successor : HST

23. Serpent’s tooth : FANG

26. Irreverence : IMPIETY

29. Alfalfa, Darla and friends, with “the” : LITTLE RASCALS

33. Biblical verb ending : -ETH

34. Quick hellos : HIS

35. Curbs, with “in” : REINS

38. Blackjack half : ACE

39. “God bless us, every one!” Dickens character : TINY TIM

42. Wedding notice word : NEE

43. What hares and mares do : RHYME

45. Long, long time : EON

46. La Brea __ Pits : TAR

47. Game with windmills, ramps and such : MINIATURE GOLF

52. Coiffures : HAIRDOS

54. Move, in real estate lingo : RELO

55. Part of MST : ESS

56. Tango maneuver : DIP

58. Higher than : ABOVE

62. Waterspout climber of song : ITSY BITSY SPIDER

67. California’s San __: Hearst Castle locale : SIMEON

68. Filming locales : SETS

69. 401(k) kin : IRA

70. Six times cinq : TRENTE

71. VCR insert : TAPE

72. Gov. Cuomo’s domain : NYS

Down

1. Deep cut : GASH

2. 2016 Best Actress Stone of “La La Land” : EMMA

3. Pained sound : MOAN

4. Like a child’s love for a parent : FILIAL

5. Heavenly sphere : ORB

6. Grounded bird : EMU

7. Fresh talk : SASS

8. Pioneering hip-hop trio from Queens : RUN-DMC

9. Single : ONE

10. Beast of burden : ASS

11. Does without much thought : RUSHES INTO

12. “Give it __!” : A REST

13. Cantankerous : TESTY

18. Barn storage space : LOFT

19. “How sweet __!” : IT IS

24. Classic grape soda : NEHI

25. Smile that may be silly : GRIN

27. Eggplant __: Italian entrée, briefly : PARM

28. L’eau land? : ILE

29. Shakespearean king with three daughters : LEAR

30. Nagging desire : ITCH

31. College freshman’s comment about why his parents call so often : THEY MISS ME

32. Until now : AS YET

36. Patricia of “Hud” : NEAL

37. Medieval laborer : SERF

39. Take care of : TEND

40. Vacation option : TOUR

41. Memo heading : IN RE

44. Defunct Soviet space station : MIR

48. First-aid fluid : IODINE

49. “__ happens … ” : AS IT

50. Pass, as time : ELAPSE

51. Mongolian desert : GOBI

52. Bank holdup : HEIST

53. No longer sleeping : ASTIR

57. “Hey, get a load of this” : PSST!

59. Chief Norse god : ODIN

60. Quite : VERY

61. Significant periods : ERAS

63. Kyoto cash : YEN

64. Droid : BOT

65. Positive vote : YEA

66. Gas additive brand : STP

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