LA Times Crossword Answers 8 Jun 17, Thursday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Tilt at Windmills

The circled letters running “atilt”, diagonally, through today’s grid spell out the idiomatic phrase “TILT AT WINDMILLS”. Said phrase comes from an event in the novel “Don Quixote” by Miguel de Cervantes:

  • 60A. Classic character whose exploits inspired the phrase in this puzzle’s circles : DON QUIXOTE
  • 17A. 60-Across’ noble status : KNIGHTHOOD
  • 24A. 60-Across’ home : LA MANCHA
  • 49A. 60-Across’ beloved : DULCINEA

Bill’s time: 9m 01s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

5. Wingding : BASH

A wingding is a wild and enthusiastic celebration. This meaning of the term started to be used in the late 1940s. Back in the twenties, “wingding” was hobo slang, a word describing a fake seizure designed to attract attention and sympathy.

9. Word often improperly punctuated : ITS

The word “it’s” is a contraction for “it is”, as in “it’s a fun crossword”. The spelling “its”, without an apostrophe, is used in all other cases, most commonly as the possessive form of the pronoun “it”. In that sense, “its” is akin to the pronouns his, hers, ours, etc., as in “the newspaper is known for its great crosswords”.

12. Small stream : RILL

The word “rill”, meaning a small brook or rivulet, has German roots. It has the same roots as “Rhine”, the name of the major European river.

13. Satellite radio giant : SIRIUS

XM Satellite Radio used to be in competition with Sirius Satellite Radio but the FCC allowed the two companies to merge in 2008 forming SiriusXM Satellite Radio.

16. Jackie Robinson Stadium sch. team : UCLA

Jackie Robinson Stadium is the baseball stadium owned by UCLA that is home field for the UCLA Bruins. Located off-campus, the stadium was constructed using funds donated by Hoyt Pardee. Pardee and Jackie Robinson were classmates who graduated from UCLA in 1941.

19. “Bother someone else!” : SCAT!

Our word “scat”, meaning “get lost!” comes from a 19th-century expression “quicker than s’cat”, which meant “in a great hurry”. The original phrase probably came from the words “hiss” and “cat”.

20. Footnote term : IDEM

“Idem” is usually abbreviated as “id.” and is the Latin word for “the same”. In research papers, “idem” is used in a list of references, in place of citations “already mentioned above”.

21. Collagist’s supply : PASTE

A collage is a piece of artwork that is made by assembling pieces of paper and objects that are glued onto paper or canvas. The term “collage” comes from the French “coller” meaning “to glue”.

24. 60-Across’ home : LA MANCHA
(60A. Classic character whose exploits inspired the phrase in this puzzle’s circles : DON QUIXOTE)

La Mancha is a region in Spain, a plateau lying south of Madrid. The area became famous after publication of the novel “Don Quixote de La Mancha” by Miguel de Cervantes.

27. “O god of battles! __ my soldiers’ hearts”: Henry V : STEEL

“O God of battles! steel my soldiers’ hearts” is a line spoken by the title character in William Shakespeare’s play “Henry V”.

Shakespeare’s play “Henry V” is more correctly called “The Life of Henry the Fifth”. The story mainly focuses on his life before and immediately after the king’s celebrated victory over the French at the Battle of Agincourt. “Henry V” includes one of Shakespeare’s most celebrated speeches, an address by the king to his troops at the siege of Harfleur, with the opening lines:

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;
Or close the wall up with our English dead …

31. White House section : WING

The White House was designed by an Irishman, I am proud to say. James Hoban from County Kilkenny emigrated to the US in his twenties, and won the design competition for the White House in 1792.

41. ESPN’s Hershiser : OREL

Orel Hershiser is big into poker now that he has retired from Major League Baseball. Hershiser lives in Las Vegas and when he isn’t working for ESPN, apparently he is at the poker tables, playing professionally. When Hershiser is eliminated in a poker tournament, he is in the habit of presenting the person who ousts him with an autographed baseball.

43. Johnny who was the last pitcher to face Babe Ruth : SAIN

Johnny Sain was a baseball pitcher for whom most success came playing with the Boston Braves just after WWII. He faced two great players at important times in their careers. He was the last person to pitch against Babe Ruth in a game, and the first to pitch in the Majors against Jackie Robinson.

44. Catcher on the ranch : LASSO

Our English word “lasso” comes from the Spanish “lazo”, and ultimately from the Latin “laqueum” meaning “noose, snare”.

56. Hunter on high : ORION

The very recognizable constellation of Orion is named for the Greek God Orion, the Hunter. If you take a look at the star in Orion’s “right shoulder”, the second brightest star in the constellation, you might notice that it is quite red in color. This is the famous star called Betelgeuse, a red supergiant, a huge star that is on its way out. Betelgeuse is expected to explode into a supernova within the next thousand years or so. You don’t want to miss that …

57. Wolverine, for one : X-MAN

In the Marvel Comics universe, Wolverine is a mutant with keen animal-like senses and an ability to regenerate body parts after injury. He usually appears as a member of the X-Men superhero team. On the big screen, Wolverine is regularly played by Australian actor Hugh Jackman.

59. Hipbone prefix : ILIO-

The ilium is the upper portion of the hipbone.

60. Classic character whose exploits inspired the phrase in this puzzle’s circles : DON QUIXOTE

The full name of Cervantes’s novel is “The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha”. In the story, Don Quixote is a retired country gentleman who heads out as a knight-errant and who renames himself Don Quixote of la Mancha. In his mind he designates a neighboring farm girl called Aldonza Lorenzo as his lady love, and renames her Dulcinea del Toboso.

63. Santana’s “__ Como Va” : OYE

“Oye Como Va” is a song written by Tito Puente in 1963. The best-known recording is the cover version by Santana released in 1970.

Santana is a Latin rock band from by guitarist Carlos Santana in San Francisco in 1967. Santana’s big break came with a well-received performance at Woodstock in 1969, when the band was completely unknown.

65. Khartoum waterway : NILE

Depending on definition, the Nile is generally regarded as the longest river on the planet. The Nile forms from two major tributaries, the White Nile and the Blue Nile, which join together near Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. From Khartoum the Nile flows north, traveling almost entirely through desert making it central to life for the peoples living along its length.

66. Sautéing sound : SSS

“Sauté” is a French word. The literal translation from the French is “jumped” or “bounced”, a reference to the tossing of food while cooking it in a frying pan.

67. Top 500? : INDY

The Indianapolis 500 race is held annually at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. The race is run around a 2.5 mile oval, hence requiring 200 laps for completion. The first Indy 500 race was held on Memorial Day in 1911. The winner that day was one Ray Harroun. Harroun had seen someone using a rear view mirror on a horse-drawn vehicle, and decided to fit one on his Marmon “Wasp” motor car. Supposedly that was the first ever use of a rear view mirror on a motor vehicle.

68. Hole starters : TEES

That would be in golf.

Down

2. “The Addams Family” film actress : RICCI

Christina Ricci is an American actress who found fame on the big screen at an early age, playing the very young Wednesday Addams in the 1991 movie version of “The Addams Family”.

3. Macabre fiction middle name : ALLAN

Edgar Allan Poe lived a life of many firsts. Poe is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn’t really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious from either drugs or alcohol. Poe died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

4. Almost all of Tibet : PLATEAU

Tibet is a plateau region that is part of China, and is located northeast of the Himalayas. Tibet declared its independence from China in 1913, but fell back under Chinese control after the Invasion of Tibet in 1951. The Tibetan leader, the 14th Dalai Lama, fled the country during the 1959 Tibetan Rebellion. Since then, he has led the Tibetan government-in-exile in Dharamsala, India.

6. Disney mermaid : ARIEL

“The Little Mermaid” is a 1989 animated feature from Disney that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale of the same name. It tells the story of a mermaid princess named Ariel who falls in love with the human Prince Eric. Ariel’s father is chief merman King Triton.

7. Summation symbol in math : SIGMA

Sigma is the eighteenth letter of the Greek alphabet, and is the one used for an “ess” sound, equivalent to our letter S. Sigma is used in mathematics to represent a summation, the adding together of a sequence of numbers.

9. Like some triangles : ISOSCELES

An isosceles triangle is one that has two sides of equal length, and two equal internal angles.

In geometry, there are several classes of angles:

  • acute (< 90 degrees) 
  • right (= 90 degrees) 
  • obtuse (> 90 degrees and < 180 degrees) 
  • straight (180 degrees) 
  • reflex (> 180 degrees)

13. Part of a Girl Scout uniform : SKIRT

The Girl Guides of America organization was founded in 1912 in Savannah, Georgia. That first meeting formed a troop consisting of eighteen girls. There are now almost 4 million girl scouts. Just one year after its formation, the group changed its name to the Girl Scouts of the United States and moved its headquarters to Washington, D.C.

14. Mar. honoree : ST PAT

There is a fair amount known about Saint Patrick, some of which comes from two letters written in his own hand. St. Patrick lived in the fifth century, but was not born in Ireland. He was first brought to Ireland at about 16 years of age from his native Britain, by Irish raiders who made him a slave for six years. Patrick managed to escape and returned to his homeland where he studied and entered the Church. He went back to Ireland as a bishop and a missionary and there lived out the rest of his life. There seems to be good evidence that he died on March 17th (now celebrated annually as Saint Patrick’s Day), although the year is less clear. The stories about shamrock and snakes, I am afraid they are the stuff of legend.

18. Playtex sister brand : HANES

The Hanes brand of apparel was founded in 1901. A related brand was introduced in 1986 called Hanes Her Way.

Playtex Apparel makes bras and other lingerie. The most popular Playtex bras are iconic names such as “the Living Bra”, “the Cross Your Heart Bra” and “the Eighteen Hour Bra”. The famous slogan “it lifts and separates” is associated with the Cross Your Heart Bra and dates back to 1954.

25. Catholic title: Abbr. : MSGR

Monsignor (Msgr.) is a form of address used when speaking to some high ranking members of the Roman Catholic Church. The word “monsignor” comes from the Italian “monsignore” which in turn comes from the French “mon seigneur” meaning “my lord”.

29. Pants with texture : CORDUROYS

There’s a myth that the name of textile known as “corduroy” comes from the French “corde du roi” (the cord of the king). It’s more likely that “corduroy” comes from a melding of “cord” and “duroy” (a coarse fabric that used to be made in England).

31. One of two states formed during the U.S. Civil War : WVA

The state of West Virginia was formed during the civil war when the western counties in the old state of Virginia voted to secede from the Confederate state.

42. With 36-Across, French title of a Rimsky-Korsakov opera that translates to “The Golden Rooster” : LE COQ …
(36A. See 42-Down : … D’OR)

“The Golden Cockerel” (“Le coq d’or”) is a an opera by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov that was premiered in 1909 in Moscow. Sadly, that premiere was a year after the composer died.

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov was one of the great Russian composers from the Romantic Era. His most famous works are probably “Capriccio Espagnol” and “Scheherazade”. While he was composing, Rimsky-Korsakov spent much of his working life as an officer in the Imperial Russian Navy.

49. Extinct birds : DODOS

The dodo was a direct relative of the pigeon and dove, although the fully-grown dodo was usually three feet tall. One of the reasons the dodo comes to mind when we think of extinction of a species, is that it disappeared not too long ago (last recorded alive in 1681) and humans were the reason for its demise. The dodo lived exclusively on the island of Mauritius and when man arrived, we cut back the forests that were its home. We also introduced domestic animals, such as dogs and pigs, that ransacked the dodo’s nests. The dodo was deemed to be an awkward flightless bird and so the term “dodo” has come to mean a dull-witted person.

50. Half a 1999 gas merger : EXXON

The Exxon Corporation was a descendant of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company. Exxon merged with Mobil (yet another descendant of Standard Oil) in 1999 to form ExxonMobil.

53. Stan’s partner : OLLIE

Oliver Hardy was born Norvell Hardy in 1892 in Harlem, Georgia. Hardy used the stage name “Oliver” as a tribute to his father Oliver Hardy. His early performances were credited as “Oliver Norvell Hardy”, and off camera his nickname was “Babe Hardy”. Hardy appeared in several films that also featured the young British actor Stan Laurel, but it wasn’t until 1927 that they teamed up to make perhaps the most famous double act in the history of movies. The Laurel and Hardy act came to an end in 1955. That year, Laurel suffered a stroke, and then later the same year Hardy had a heart attack and stroke from which he never really recovered.

Stan Laurel was an English comic actor (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson), who made a great career for himself in Hollywood. Laurel ended up at the Hal Roach studio directing films, intent on pursuing a career in writing and directing. However, he was a sometime actor and was asked to step in when another comic actor, Oliver Hardy, was injured and couldn’t perform. Laurel and Hardy started to share a stage together during that time and when it was clear they worked so well together, their partnership was born. Oh, and the oft-quoted story that Clint Eastwood is the son of Stan Laurel … that’s just an urban myth.

54. De Gaulle’s birthplace : LILLE

Lille is a large city in the very north of France sitting right on the border with Belgium. The name “Lille” is a derivation of the term “l’isle” meaning “the island”. The name “L’Isle” dates back to 1066, and is a reference to a castle that once stood on an island in the Deûle river that runs through the city. The city grew around the island and the castle.

Charles de Gaulle was a colonel in the French army at the outbreak of WWII. He was promoted to brigadier general after a successful attack on German tank forces in 1940, one of the few successes enjoyed by the French at the start of the war. Some months later, he was appointed junior minister in the French government, at which time he strenuously argued against surrender to Germany, advocating removal of the government to the French territory of Algeria. He was unsuccessful in his arguments and so flew to England where he set about building the Free French Forces from soldiers who had also fled the country. De Gaulle made several important radio addresses to the French from London that helped rally the resistance movement. Despite a shaky relationship with Winston Churchill and Dwight D. Eisenhower, De Gaulle managed to maintain a working relationship with the rest of the Allies and was accepted as leader of the new French government when Paris was liberated in 1944.

58. DOJ employee : ATTY

The US Department of Justice (DOJ) was created in 1870 by the administration of President Ulysses S. Grant, although the office of the Attorney General had been operating since 1789. The DOJ Building in Washington, D.C. was completed in 1935, and was named the Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in 2001.

61. Here, in Le Havre : ICI

Le Havre is a city on the mouth of the river Seine on the northwest coast of France. The city’s name translates as “the haven”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Sting, essentially : TRAP

5. Wingding : BASH

9. Word often improperly punctuated : ITS

12. Small stream : RILL

13. Satellite radio giant : SIRIUS

15. “__ lied” : SO I

16. Jackie Robinson Stadium sch. team : UCLA

17. 60-Across’ noble status : KNIGHTHOOD

19. “Bother someone else!” : SCAT!

20. Footnote term : IDEM

21. Collagist’s supply : PASTE

22. Musical impediment : TIN EAR

24. 60-Across’ home : LA MANCHA

26. Well-suited : APT

27. “O god of battles! __ my soldiers’ hearts”: Henry V : STEEL

28. Be obstreperous : ACT UP

31. White House section : WING

34. Bunch : SLEW

36. See 42-Down : … D’OR

37. Bringers of great relief : SAVIORS

40. Spanish pronoun : ESO

41. ESPN’s Hershiser : OREL

43. Johnny who was the last pitcher to face Babe Ruth : SAIN

44. Catcher on the ranch : LASSO

46. Thinks : DEEMS

48. Racket : DIN

49. 60-Across’ beloved : DULCINEA

52. “Turn up the thermostat!” : I’M COLD!

56. Hunter on high : ORION

57. Wolverine, for one : X-MAN

59. Hipbone prefix : ILIO-

60. Classic character whose exploits inspired the phrase in this puzzle’s circles : DON QUIXOTE

62. Some annexes : ELLS

63. Santana’s “__ Como Va” : OYE

64. Hurries : SCOOTS

65. Khartoum waterway : NILE

66. Sautéing sound : SSS

67. Top 500? : INDY

68. Hole starters : TEES

Down

1. Many a charitable organization : TRUST

2. “The Addams Family” film actress : RICCI

3. Macabre fiction middle name : ALLAN

4. Almost all of Tibet : PLATEAU

5. Tight spot : BIND

6. Disney mermaid : ARIEL

7. Summation symbol in math : SIGMA

8. “Come again?” : HUH?

9. Like some triangles : ISOSCELES

10. Ineffective : TOOTHLESS

11. Record half : SIDE A

13. Part of a Girl Scout uniform : SKIRT

14. Mar. honoree : ST PAT

18. Playtex sister brand : HANES

23. They run on cells : APPS

25. Catholic title: Abbr. : MSGR

28. Fuss : ADO

29. Pants with texture : CORDUROYS

30. Natural boundaries : TREE LINES

31. One of two states formed during the U.S. Civil War : WVA

32. Sundial marking : III

33. Payment beginning? : NON-

35. Try to win : WOO

38. Gp. with common interests : ASSN

39. Long, as odds : SLIM

42. With 36-Across, French title of a Rimsky-Korsakov opera that translates to “The Golden Rooster” : LE COQ …

45. __ history : ANCIENT

47. Without : MINUS

48. Eats well : DINES

49. Extinct birds : DODOS

50. Half a 1999 gas merger : EXXON

51. In __: sullen : A MOOD

53. Stan’s partner : OLLIE

54. De Gaulle’s birthplace : LILLE

55. Prescription indications : DOSES

58. DOJ employee : ATTY

61. Here, in Le Havre : ICI

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LA Times Crossword Answers 19 May 17, Friday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: RA to AR

Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase in which the 2nd and 3rd letters are AR, except that those letters are switched around:

  • 17A. Aging hero Jones, in his latest film? : GRAY INDIANA (from “Gary, Indiana”)
  • 24A. Pitt portraying Shakespeare? : BRAD OF AVON (from “Bard of Avon”)
  • 33A. Skill displayed at the gift counter? : WRAP SPEED (from “warp speed”)
  • 45A. Times when hokey humor prevailed? : ERAS OF CORN (from “ears of corn”)
  • 54A. Early stage of muffin production? : BRAN RAISING (from “barn raising”)

Bill’s time: 10m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. 1987 Michael Jackson album : BAD

The song “Bad” was written and sung by Michael Jackson, and released in 1987. The song is about being tough on the streets, being “bad”.

16. “Bambi” doe : ENA

Ena is Bambi’s aunt in the 1942 Disney film “Bambi”. The movie is based on the novel “Bambi, A Life in the Woods” written by Austrian author Felix Salten and first published in 1923. There is a documented phenomenon known as the Bambi Effect, whereby people become more interested in animal rights after having watched the scene where Bambi’s mother is shot by hunters.

17. Aging hero Jones, in his latest film? : GRAY INDIANA (from “Gary, Indiana”)

George Lucas created a lead character named Indiana Smith for what was to be his “Indiana Jones” series of films. Lucas asked Steven Spielberg to direct the first film, and Spielberg wasn’t too fond of the name “Smith”. Lucas then suggested Jones as an alternative, and Indiana Jones was born.

The city of Gary, Indiana is located just 25 miles from downtown Chicago and falls within the Chicago metropolitan area (also known as “Chicagoland”). Gary was founded by US Steel in 1906, as the company selected it as the site for a new steel plant. The name “Gary” was chosen in honor of Elbert H. Gary, who was the key player in setting up US Steel in 1901.

20. “… let __ put asunder”: Matthew : NO MAN

The Christian marriage ceremony usually includes the words, “What God has joined together let no man put asunder”. This line comes from the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament.

22. Island band The __ Men : BAHA

The Baha Men are so called because they hail from the Bahamas. Their big hit was “Who Let the Dogs Out?” That song ranked as third in a list of the world’s most annoying songs!

23. Shakespeare’s jet? : EBON

Ebony is another word for the color black (often shortened to “ebon” in poetry). Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned …

The color “jet black” takes its name from the minor gemstone known as jet. The gemstone and the material it is made of takes its English name from the French name: “jaiet”.

24. Pitt portraying Shakespeare? : BRAD OF AVON (from “Bard of Avon”)

The original “bards” were storytellers, poets and composers of music in medieval Britain and Ireland, with the term coming from the Old Celtic word “bardos” that described a poet or singer. I guess the most famous bard was William Shakespeare, the “Bard of Avon”.

Brad Pitt’s first major role was the cowboy hitchhiker in the 1991’s “Thelma and Louise”. Pitt’s life offscreen garners as much attention as his work onscreen, it seems. The tabloids revel in the series of high-profile relationships in which he has been involved. He was engaged to Gwyneth Paltrow for a while, married to Jennifer Aniston and then to Angelina Jolie.

28. Undefeated Ali : LAILA

Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali and is a very capable boxer in her own right. Laila’s professional record is an impressive 24 wins, including 21 knockouts. Now retired, she never lost a fight, and nor did she ever draw. One of those victories was against Jackie Frazier-Lyde, daughter of her father’s nemesis Joe Frazier. Laila is not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of “Dancing with the Stars”.

32. “John Wick” star : REEVES

Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989), a cop in “Speed” (1994) and the protagonist Neo in “The Matrix” series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name “Keanu” is Hawaiian for “the coldness”.

“John Wick” is a 2014 action movie starring Keanu Reeves in the title role. Reeves plays a retired hitman who goes on a killing spree to avenge the murder of his dog.

33. Skill displayed at the gift counter? : WRAP SPEED (from “warp speed”)

In the “Star Trek” universe, the warp speed achieved by the warp drive engines is very much like our real-world Mach number. Just as a plane traveling at Mach 1 is moving at the speed of sound, a starship traveling at warp factor 1 is moving at the speed of light. Mach 2 is twice the speed of sound, and warp factor 2 is twice the speed of light. Cool, huh …?

35. Fish-eating raptor : OSPREY

The osprey is also known as the sea hawk or fish eagle.

39. Boorish sort : CAD

Our word “cad”, meaning “a person lacking in finer feelings”, is a shortening of the word “cadet”. “Cad” was first used for a servant, and then students at British universities used “cad” as a term for a boy from the local town. “Cad” took on its current meaning in the 1830s.

43. Where Mozart was born : AUSTRIA

Salzburg is a city in Austria with a great musical tradition. Salzburg was the birthplace of composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was also the setting for much of “The Sound of Music”.

45. Times when hokey humor prevailed? : ERAS OF CORN (from “ears of corn”)

“Hokum” was originally theater slang, meaning “melodramatic, exaggerated acting”. Now the term just means “empty talk”. It is also the root for our word “hokey” meaning “silly, old-fashioned”.

52. Beatle ending : -MANIA

The phenomenon known as “Beatlemania” originated in the early sixties, with the term describing the frenzy exhibited particularly by female fans of the group. The term is perhaps imitative of the much older “Lisztomania”, a term coined in 1844 for the similar fan frenzy directed towards pianist and composer Franz Liszt during an eight-year tour of Europe starting in 1939. Hysterical fans of Liszt would try to get locks of his hair, fight over his handkerchiefs and even carry glass vials containing the dregs from his coffee cup.

53. Cakes go-with : ALE

The phrase “cakes and ale” makes a number of appearances in literature. Aesop uses the phrase in his fable “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse”, to symbolize the good life. Shakespeare included the line “Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?” in his play “Twelfth Night”. W. Somerset Maugham used the Shakespearean line as inspiration for the title of his 1930 play “Cakes and Ale, or, The Skeleton in the Cupboard”.

57. Off one’s rocker : BONKERS

The word “bonkers” meaning “crazy” originated in the fifties. The term might come from navy slang meaning “slightly drunk”, behaving as though one received a “bonk” on the head.

59. Paul with guitars : LES

Les Paul was a guitarist, songwriter and inventor. When he was 33 years old, Paul was involved in a near-fatal car crash that left his right arm and elbow shattered. Surgeons offered him the choice of amputation or a rebuilding of the limb that would leave him unable to bend his elbow. He told them to set his arm at just under 90 degrees so that he could at least hold his guitar and perhaps play it.

61. Ergotamine derivative popular in the ’60s : LSD

LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

Ergotamine is a chemical that was first isolated from the ergot fungus at the beginning of the 20th century. It is a vasoconstrictor, and has been used historically to treat post-partum bleeding. Nowadays, ergotamine is more commonly used to treat acute migraine attacks.

Down

5. Lading measure : TON

Here in the US, a ton is equivalent to 2,000 pounds. Over in the UK, a ton is 2,240 pounds. The UK unit is sometimes referred to as an Imperial ton or sometimes a “long ton”. Folks over there refer to the US ton then as a “short ton”. To further complicate matters, there is also a “metric ton” or “tonne”, which is equivalent to 2,204 pounds. I wish we’d just stick to kilograms …

The verb “lade” meaning “to load” comes from an Old English word “hladan”. Lade also used to mean “to draw water” and indeed gave us our word “ladle”. So “lade” and “ladle” are close cousins.

6. Kentucky Derby call : RIDERS UP!

The first Kentucky Derby took place in 1875, and is a race modelled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, the Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles, although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles. The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses, and so the Derby is nicknamed “Run for the Roses”. The race is held on the first Saturday in May each year, and is limited to 3-year-old horses.

7. Jungian concept : ANIMA

The concepts of anima and animus is found in the Carl Jung school of analytical psychology. The idea is that within each male there resides a feminine inner personality called the anima, and within each female there is a male inner personality known as the animus.

Carl Jung was a Swiss psychiatrist, the founder of analytical psychology. Jung was very much associated with the analysis of dreams, and also introduced us to the psychological concepts of introversion and extroversion.

9. Introduction to Domingo? : SANTO …

Santo Domingo de Guzmán (often just “Santo Domingo”) is the capital city of the Dominican Republic. Christopher Columbus was the first European to visit what is now the Dominican Republic, in 1492. Four years later Christopher’s younger brother, Bartholomew Columbus arrived, and founded Santo Domingo, making the city the oldest, continuously-inhabited European settlement in the Americas.

10. Greek letter : ETA

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

11. Mediterranean metropolis : TEL AVIV

The full name of Israel’s second largest city is Tel Aviv-Yafo. Tel Aviv translates into “Spring Mound”, a name chosen in 1910.

18. Half a philosophical duality : YANG

The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

27. City on the Rio Grande : LAREDO

Laredo is a border city in Texas that is situated on the banks of the Rio Grande, across the border from Nuevo Laredo in Mexico.

31. Net neutrality beneficiary: Abbr. : ISP

An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP’s network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs.

The principle of Net neutrality holds that those entities managing the Internet should treat all data passing through equally. The term “Net neutrality” was coined in 2003 by Tim Wu, a media law professor at Columbia University. Net neutrality is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the US.

32. Any “Twilight Zone” episode, now : RERUN

The iconic television series called “The Twilight Zone” first aired in 1959 and then ran for 156 episodes before being pulled in 1964. “The Twilight Zone” was revived for four years in the late eighties, and was also spun-off into a movie by Steven Spielberg in 1983.

33. Omega holder : WRIST

Omega is a manufacturer of high-end watches based in Switzerland. An Omega watch was the first portable timepiece to make it to the moon.

34. Part of a traditional holiday gift : PEAR TREE

The fabulous Christmas Carol called “The Twelve Days of Christmas” dates back at least to 1780 when it was first published in England, though it may be French in origin. The concept of twelve days of Christmas comes from the tradition that the three kings came to visit the Christ Child twelve days after he was born. This same tradition is the origin of the title to Shakespeare’s play “Twelfth Night”.

36. Frozen dessert brand : SARA LEE

In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself who now goes by the name Sara Lee Schupf.

37. Seven-movement Holst work that omits Earth, with “The” : PLANETS

Despite the Scandinavian-sounding name, Gustav Holst was born in Britain and was the most English of classical composers. His most famous work is the orchestral suite known as ‘The Planets”. The suite has seven movements, one for each of the planets known at the time (1914-1916) except Earth. Pluto was discovered during Holst’s lifetime, but decades after he had completed his masterpiece. Anyway, Pluto was relegated from the league of planets …

39. Like the olfactory nerve, e.g. : CRANIAL

The adjective “olfactory” means “relating to the sense of smell”. The term comes from the Latin verb “olfacere” meaning “to get the smell of”.

44. “__ brillig … ” : ‘TWAS

Here are the first two verses of “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll, probably the one poem that we all just loved learning to recite at school

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!

46. Denmark’s __ Islands : FAROE

The Faroe Islands (also “Faeroe Islands”) are a group of islands lying halfway between Scotland and Iceland. The Faroe Islands are part of the Kingdom of Denmark and were granted the power of self-governance in 1948.

54. OPEC unit : BBL

The volume of one oil barrel is equivalent to 42 US gallons. A barrel is correctly abbreviated to “bbl”. Barrels aren’t really used for transporting crude oil anymore. Instead, oil moves in bulk through pipelines and in tankers. “Barrel” is just used as a unit of volume these days.

Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC)

55. “… such stuff / As dreams __ made on”: Prospero : ARE

Here is a line that is oft quoted from William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”, spoken by Prospero:

… We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep …

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. 1987 Michael Jackson album : BAD

4. Road where Mozart was born : STRASSE

11. Recurrent behavior : TIC

14. Henri’s here : ICI

15. Identify : POINT AT

16. “Bambi” doe : ENA

17. Aging hero Jones, in his latest film? : GRAY INDIANA (from “Gary, Indiana”)

19. Sci-fi setting : LAB

20. “… let __ put asunder”: Matthew : NO MAN

21. Send out : EMIT

22. Island band The __ Men : BAHA

23. Shakespeare’s jet? : EBON

24. Pitt portraying Shakespeare? : BRAD OF AVON (from “Bard of Avon”)

26. Acquires through cunning : WANGLES

28. Undefeated Ali : LAILA

29. Norm: Abbr. : STD

30. His, to Henri : A LUI

32. “John Wick” star : REEVES

33. Skill displayed at the gift counter? : WRAP SPEED (from “warp speed”)

35. Fish-eating raptor : OSPREY

38. Sassy : PERT

39. Boorish sort : CAD

42. Sound : VALID

43. Where Mozart was born : AUSTRIA

45. Times when hokey humor prevailed? : ERAS OF CORN (from “ears of corn”)

49. Loosen (up) : WARM

50. Storm : RANT

51. Settled on a branch : ALIT

52. Beatle ending : -MANIA

53. Cakes go-with : ALE

54. Early stage of muffin production? : BRAN RAISING (from “barn raising”)

56. Decide not to stop : LET

57. Off one’s rocker : BONKERS

58. Vital statistic : AGE

59. Paul with guitars : LES

60. Landlord’s customers : LESSEES

61. Ergotamine derivative popular in the ’60s : LSD

Down

1. Front page material : BIG NEWS

2. One seen in a ring : ACROBAT

3. One seen in a ring : DIAMOND

4. Short drive : SPIN

5. Lading measure : TON

6. Kentucky Derby call : RIDERS UP!

7. Jungian concept : ANIMA

8. Solemn : STAID

9. Introduction to Domingo? : SANTO …

10. Greek letter : ETA

11. Mediterranean metropolis : TEL AVIV

12. Saddled with debt : IN A HOLE

13. Seaside resort array : CABANAS

18. Half a philosophical duality : YANG

22. Called from the field : BAAED

24. Fasten, at sea : BELAY

25. Groups at sea : FLEETS

27. City on the Rio Grande : LAREDO

31. Net neutrality beneficiary: Abbr. : ISP

32. Any “Twilight Zone” episode, now : RERUN

33. Omega holder : WRIST

34. Part of a traditional holiday gift : PEAR TREE

35. From one extreme to the other : OVERALL

36. Frozen dessert brand : SARA LEE

37. Seven-movement Holst work that omits Earth, with “The” : PLANETS

39. Like the olfactory nerve, e.g. : CRANIAL

40. Television fare : AIRINGS

41. Flawed : DAMAGED

44. “__ brillig … ” : ‘TWAS

46. Denmark’s __ Islands : FAROE

47. Highland groups : CLANS

48. Sounds from pens : OINKS

52. Pine for : MISS

54. OPEC unit : BBL

55. “… such stuff / As dreams __ made on”: Prospero : ARE

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