LA Times Crossword Answers 20 Sep 2017, Wednesday










Constructed by: Roger & Kathy Wienberg

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Scatterbrain

Each of today’s themed answers includes five circled letters SCATTERED throughout. Those letters spell out the word BRAIN:

  • 53A. Forgetful person literally indicated by this puzzle’s circles : SCATTERBRAIN
  • 19A. Bulb that’s more sweet than pungent : BERMUDA ONION
  • 31A. Basic two-element computation : BINARY OPERATION
  • 39A. Concern for a marketing department : PUBLIC RELATIONS

Bill’s time: 5m 48s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. “London Fields” writer Martin : AMIS

I suppose the successful English novelist Martin Amis must have writing in his blood. He is the son of the respected author Kingsley Amis, a Booker Prize winner. Martin Amis’s best-known novels comprise his so-called “London Trilogy” consisting of “Money” (1984), “London Fields” (1989) and “The Information” (1995).

10. Serengeti grazer : GNU

A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. Wildebeest is actually the Dutch word for “wild beast”.

The Serengeti is a region in Africa that is located in northern Tanzania and southwest Kenya. The name “Serengeti” comes from the Maasai language and means “Endless Plains”.

17. Mexican pyramid builder : AZTEC

The Aztec people of Central America dominated the region in the 14th – 16th centuries. Two traits of the Aztec people are oft cited today. They built some magnificent pyramids, and they also engaged in human sacrifice. The two traits were linked in a way … for the consecration of the Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan, 84,400 prisoners were sacrificed over a period of four days.

19. Bulb that’s more sweet than pungent : BERMUDA ONION

Bermuda has been a major producer of onions since the 1880s when seed was brought to the island from the Canary Islands off the coast of Africa. Apparently, Ernest Hemingway was a fan of Bermuda onions. While buying some at a market he met a man called Gregorio Fuentes, who Hemingway ended up hiring as the first mate of his boat. Some say that Fuentes was the inspiration for Santiago, the protagonist in “The Old Man and the Sea”. Well, that’s how the story goes …

22. Quarterback Dawson : LEN

Len Dawson is a retired AFL-NFL quarterback who played for the Kansas City Chiefs (originally known as the Dallas Texans).

23. Renewable fuel made from organic matter : BIOGAS

Biogas is mixture of methane and carbon dioxide resulting from the breakdown of organic matter by anaerobic bacteria. Biogas is used as a renewable energy source, as it is produced from recycled waste.

30. Tokyo, long ago : EDO

Edo is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo Castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today’s Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

31. Basic two-element computation : BINARY OPERATION

We use a base-ten numbering system, with ten digits (0 – 9). The binary system, or base two, uses just two digits (0 & 1). The binary system is used at a fundamental level in computing, because the number 0 and 1 can be represented by microcircuits being switched “on” or “off”.

44. One of the Galápagos, e.g.: Abbr. : ISL

The Galápagos Islands lie over 500 miles west of Ecuador. The Galápagos owe their celebrity to the voyage of HMS Beagle which landed there in 1835, with Charles Darwin on board. It was Darwin’s study of various species on the islands that inspired him to postulate his Theory of Evolution.

46. Cartoon frame : CEL

In the world of animation, a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

49. Justice Dept. division : DEA

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) was set up in 1973 while President Nixon was in office.

50. Car stat with city and hwy. components : MPG

Miles per gallon (mpg)

57. Fundraising portmanteau : WALKATHON

A portmanteau was a large suitcase, one that could be taken apart into two separate pieces. The word “portmanteau” is French for a “travelling bag”, from “porter” (to carry) and “manteau” (a coat, cloak). We also use “portmanteau” to mean a word that has been melded together from two parts (just as the suitcase comprised two parts). This usage was introduced to the world by Humpty Dumpty in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. He explained to Alice that the nonsense words in the “Jabberwocky” poem were actually portmanteau words. For example “slithy” comes from from “slimy” and “lithe”.

60. “You Don’t Join Us, We Join You” insurance company : AETNA

When the healthcare management and insurance company known as Aetna was founded, the name was chosen to evoke images of Mt. Etna, the European volcano.

61. “Monday Night Football” airer before ESPN : ABC SPORTS

“Monday Night Football” aired on ABC from 1970 until 2005, before moving to ESPN in 2006.

Down

2. Chisel’s cutting edge : BEZEL

A bezel is a groove which is designed to hold a beveled edge. An example would be the groove around the face of a watch, which accepts the beveled edge of a watch crystal.

8. “__ See for Miles”: The Who : I CAN

“I Can See for Miles” is the biggest selling single for the Who in the United States, and it’s a song that’s got added exposure when it was adopted as the theme tune for the TV show “CSI: Cyber”.

10. “Today” rival, familiarly : GMA

“Good Morning America” (GMA) is ABC’s morning show, and has been since 1975. There was even a spinoff show called “Good Afternoon America”, although that only lasted for a few months in 2012.

NBC’s “Today” was launched in 1952, becoming the first of the morning news/talk shows on US television. The show’s first host was Dave Garroway, who was at the helm until 1961. Back in those days, “Today” had a mascot who often appeared on air with Garroway: a chimpanzee named J. Fred Muggs.

11. Fish-fowl link : NOR

Something that is “neither fish nor fowl” is not recognizable, is not familiar at all.

15. Beethoven’s Third : EROICA

Beethoven originally dedicated his “Symphony No. 3” to Napoleon Bonaparte. Beethoven admired the principles of the French Revolution and as such respected Bonaparte who was “born” out of the uprising. When Napoleon declared himself Emperor, Beethoven (and much of Europe) saw this as a betrayal to the ideals of the revolution so he changed the name of his new symphony from “Bonaparte” to “Eroica”, meaning “heroic, valiant”.

16. Nevada city near Tahoe : RENO

Reno, Nevada was named in honor of Major General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer killed in the Civil War. The city has a famous “Reno Arch”, a structure that stands over the main street. The arch was erected in 1926 to promote an exposition planned for the following year. After the expo, the city council decided to keep the arch and held a competition to decide what wording should be displayed, and the winner was “The Biggest Little City in the World”.

24. Company with “save you 15%” ads : GEICO

GEICO was founded in 1936 with a very specific mission, to provide auto insurance for employees of the federal government and their families, hence the name Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO). GEICO is a private company, despite the word “government” in its name. The founders’ idea was to focus on government employees as they believed such a group represented a lower risk profile than the rest of the population. Nowadays any qualifying person can take out a policy with GEICO.

26. Loudness units : SONES

In the world of acoustics, the sone was introduced as a unit of perceived loudness in 1936.

27. Astronomer Sagan : CARL

Carl Sagan was a brilliant astrophysicist and a great communicator. Sagan was famous for presenting obscure concepts about the cosmos in such a way that we mere mortals could appreciate. He also wrote the novel “Contact” which was adapted into a fascinating 1997 film of the same name starring Jodie Foster.

31. Hasbro game requiring quick reflexes : BOP IT

Bop It is a line of toys with a speaker that issues commands to activate input devices on the toy, devices such as handles, cranks, wheels and switches. The commands come in a series of increasing length, and at increasing speed. So, I guess Bop It is a test of memory and dexterity.

35. Elongated comet part : TAIL

Comets and asteroids are similar, both being relatively small celestial bodies orbiting the sun. Comets differ from asteroids in that they have a coma or tail, especially when they are close enough to the sun. The coma and tail are temporary fuzzy atmospheres that develop due to the presence of solar radiation. Comets are sometimes referred to as “dirty snowballs”, a reference to their composition: rock, dust, water ice and frozen gases.

40. Arctic covering : ICE CAP

The polar ice cap at the north of our planet is floating pack ice in the Arctic Ocean. The southern polar ice cap is an ice sheet that covers the land mass known as Antarctica. About 70% of all the freshwater on Earth is held in the southern polar ice cap.

41. Museum manager : CURATOR

The term “curator” is Latin and applies to a manager, guardian or overseer. In English, the original curators were the guardians and overseers of minors and those with mental disease.

42. Big name in PCs : ACER

Acer is a Taiwanese company that I used to visit a lot when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, although I have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

43. Lipton pouches : TEA BAGS

Sir Thomas Lipton was a grocer in Glasgow, Scotland. He founded a tea packing company in North America in 1893, in Hoboken, New Jersey. He was very successful as his blends of tea became popular in the US. Despite the Lipton roots in the UK, Lipton black tea isn’t available there, so I’ve always thought of it as an American brand.

50. Passover cracker : MATZO

Matzo is an unleavened bread that is very brittle. The bread is crushed, creating Matzo meal that is then formed into balls using eggs and oil as a binder. The balls are usually served in a chicken stock.

58. Prez in a stovepipe hat : ABE

A stovepipe hat is also known as a top hat.

59. Type of TV display : LCD

Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are the screens that are found in most laptops today, and in flat panel computer screens and some televisions. LCD monitors basically replaced Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) screens, the old television technology.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Helps illegally : ABETS

6. “London Fields” writer Martin : AMIS

10. Serengeti grazer : GNU

13. French name meaning “born again” : RENEE

14. Goal-oriented suburban parent? : SOCCER MOM

17. Mexican pyramid builder : AZTEC

18. Late with one’s payments : IN ARREARS

19. Bulb that’s more sweet than pungent : BERMUDA ONION

21. Scheming : SLY

22. Quarterback Dawson : LEN

23. Renewable fuel made from organic matter : BIOGAS

27. Crow’s cry : CAW!

28. Building guideline : SPEC

30. Tokyo, long ago : EDO

31. Basic two-element computation : BINARY OPERATION

36. “Want the light __ not?” : ON OR

37. “Golly!” : GEE!

38. Good-sized backyard : ACRE

39. Concern for a marketing department : PUBLIC RELATIONS

44. One of the Galápagos, e.g.: Abbr. : ISL

45. Fed a line to : CUED

46. Cartoon frame : CEL

47. Balance precariously : TEETER

49. Justice Dept. division : DEA

50. Car stat with city and hwy. components : MPG

53. Forgetful person literally indicated by this puzzle’s circles : SCATTERBRAIN

57. Fundraising portmanteau : WALKATHON

60. “You Don’t Join Us, We Join You” insurance company : AETNA

61. “Monday Night Football” airer before ESPN : ABC SPORTS

62. Lingering looks : GAZES

63. Deleted, with “out” : XED

64. Scheme : RUSE

65. Wade noisily : SLOSH

Down

1. Many Mideast natives : ARABS

2. Chisel’s cutting edge : BEZEL

3. Contest submission : ENTRY

4. Abound (with) : TEEM

5. Not connected to the church : SECULAR

6. From Thailand, say : ASIAN

7. Like old records : MONO

8. “__ See for Miles”: The Who : I CAN

9. Metal-marking tool : SCRIBER

10. “Today” rival, familiarly : GMA

11. Fish-fowl link : NOR

12. Hesitation sounds : UMS

15. Beethoven’s Third : EROICA

16. Nevada city near Tahoe : RENO

20. Like morning grass : DEWY

24. Company with “save you 15%” ads : GEICO

25. Beautify : ADORN

26. Loudness units : SONES

27. Astronomer Sagan : CARL

28. Ignore the limit : SPEED

29. Spa treatment : PEEL

31. Hasbro game requiring quick reflexes : BOP IT

32. Unavailable : IN USE

33. Duke or duchess : NOBLE

34. Fairy tale brute : OGRE

35. Elongated comet part : TAIL

40. Arctic covering : ICE CAP

41. Museum manager : CURATOR

42. Big name in PCs : ACER

43. Lipton pouches : TEA BAGS

48. Disdainful clicks : TSKS

49. Like thick fog : DENSE

50. Passover cracker : MATZO

51. Needle bearers : PINES

52. Grind, as teeth : GNASH

54. Drive-__ window : THRU

55. Youngsters : TOTS

56. Legitimate : REAL

57. Car wash extra : WAX

58. Prez in a stovepipe hat : ABE

59. Type of TV display : LCD

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LA Times Crossword Answers 21 Aug 2017, Monday










Constructed by: Roger & Kathy Wienberg

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Music Exchange

Today’s CROP of themed answers each start with a word that often follows BUMPER:

  • 53A. Abundant farm yield … and what the first words of the answers to starred clues comprise? : BUMPER CROP
  • 16A. *Feature of gated community entrances : GUARDHOUSE (giving “bumper guard”)
  • 21A. *GEICO product : CAR INSURANCE (giving “bumper car”)
  • 33A. *Plaything for a backyard swimming spot : POOL TOY (giving “bumper pool”)
  • 44A. *Source of showroom shock? : STICKER PRICE (giving “bumper sticker”)

Bill’s time: 5m 16s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. DEA agent : NARC

“Narc” is a slang term for a law enforcement officer who tracks down criminals associated with illegal drugs. “Narc” is short for “narcotics officer”. Narcs might work for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

5. Traveller in London’s Tube : BRIT

The official name “London Underground” is a little deceptive, as over half of the track system-wide is actually “over ground”, with the underground sections reserved for the central areas. It is the oldest subway system in the world, opening in 1863. It was also the first system to use electric rolling stock, in 1890. “The Tube”, as it is known by Londoners, isn’t the longest subway system in the world though. That honor belongs to the Shanghai Metro. My personal favorite part of the Tube is the Tube map! It is a marvel of design …

9. With 15-Across, Apple media player since 2005 : IPOD
15. See 9-Across : NANO

The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

14. Colorado-based brewery : COORS

Adolph Coors founded the Coors brewing company in 1873, in Golden, Colorado. Coors was originally from the Rhine Province in Prussia, and worked in various brewers around what is today Germany before immigrating to the US in 1868. Despite all of his success as a brewer here in America, Coors ended up taking his own life in 1929, by jumping to his death out of a hotel window.

16. *Feature of gated community entrances : GUARDHOUSE (giving “bumper guard”)

Bumper guards are the front and rear bumpers on a car.

19. Like checks, when splitting the tab : SEPARATE

When we “run a tab” at a bar say, we are “running a tabulation”, a listing of what we owe. Such a use of “tab” is American slang that originated in the 1880s.

20. Dungeness and Alaskan king : CRABS

Dungeness crabs are found of the west coast of North America. The species takes its name from the port of Dungeness in Washington state, although the port is named for a headland in the southwest of England called Dungeness.

Fishing for Alaskan king crab is a dangerous occupation, about 80 times more dangerous that the average job. Apparently, about one crab fisherman dies every week during the fishing season, mostly from drowning or hypothermia.

21. *GEICO product : CAR INSURANCE (giving “bumper car”)

GEICO was founded in 1936 with a very specific mission, to provide auto insurance for employees of the federal government and their families, hence the name Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO). GEICO is a private company, despite the word “government” in its name. The founders’ idea was to focus on government employees as they believed such a group represented a lower risk profile than the rest of the population. Nowadays any qualifying person can take out a policy with GEICO.

Bumper cars are a fairground ride comprising electrically-powered cars that are driven with the intent of bumping into each other. Invented in the US, one of the most successful brands of bumper car is the Dodgem. In fact, the term “dodgem” is used generically instead of “bumper car” outside of North America.

28. Adam’s grandson : ENOS

Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

29. “… disguised as Clark Kent, mild-__ reporter” : MANNERED

Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema at the time Superman was created. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

32. Hoopla : ADO

The word “hoopla” means “boisterous excitement”. The term probably comes from “houp-là”, something the French say instead of “upsy-daisy”. Then again, “upsy-daisy” probably isn’t something said very often here in the US …

33. *Plaything for a backyard swimming spot : POOL TOY (giving “bumper pool”)

Bumper pool is a variant of pocket billiards that is played on a special pool table that includes cushioned obstacles (called “bumpers” on the surface. Several of the bumpers guard the pockets, which are actually circular holes in the playing surface.

36. Fifth month : MAY

The month of May was named after Maia, the Greek goddess of fertility.

39. Batman’s hideout : CAVE

Wayne Manor is where Bruce Wayne lives, the alter-ego of Batman. It is a huge manor that lies just outside Gotham City. Looking after the house is the Wayne family servant, Alfred. Beneath the grounds of the manor is an extensive cave system where Bruce Wayne put together his Batcave. Access is to the cave is via a staircase behind a hidden door. The door is opened by moving the hands of a non-functioning grandfather clock to 10:47, the time at which Wayne’s parents were murdered. It is the murder of his parents that sets Bruce off on his journey of crime fighting.

40. Donna Summer’s music : DISCO

Discotheques first appeared during WWII in Occupied France. American-style music (like jazz and jitterbug dances) was banned by the Nazis, so French natives met in underground clubs that they called discotheques where records were often played on just a single turntable. After the war, these clubs came out into the open. One famous Paris discotheque was called “Whiskey a Gogo”. In that Paris disco, non-stop music was played using two turntables next to a dance-floor, and this concept spread around the world.

Donna Summer is known as “The Queen of Disco”, with great hits like “Love to Love You, Baby”, “I Feel Love” and “Hot Stuff”. In the late sixties and early seventies, LaDonna Gaines (her real name) lived and worked in Germany. There she met and married an Austrian actor called Helmuth Sommer. They divorced not long after the marriage, but Donna kept his family name, just changing the “o” to “u” to give her the stage name of “Donna Summer”.

47. The Stones’ “__ Tonk Women” : HONKY

“Honky Tonk Women” is a 1969 song released by the Rolling Stones that topped the charts both in the US and the UK. The term “honky tonk women” refers to dancing girls who worked in a saloon. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards actually wrote the song while on vacation on a ranch in the city of Matão, Brazil.

56. Foreign relief org. created by JFK : USAID

The US Agency for International Development (USAID) was set up by President John F. Kennedy in 1961. The agency’s mission is to end extreme poverty and promote democratic societies, while helping to advance the security and prosperity of the US.

57. Pac-12 sch. : UCLA

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) gets more applications from potential students than any other university in the country. UCLA also has more students enrolled than any other university in the state.

Down

1. Badgers : NAGS

“To badger” is to harass. The term comes from the cruel practice of “badger-baiting”, which dates back to medieval times. Badger-baiting is a blood sport in which a dog is used as “bait” for a badger in its den, to draw him out into the open. The den is an artificial structure built to resemble a natural badgers’ den, complete with a tunnel entrance. The dog is sent down the tunnel causing the badger and dog to lock their jaws on each other. The badger and dog are then removed from the den by pulling on the dog’s tale. I am ashamed to say that badger-baiting is still practiced (illegally) in Ireland, with ten convictions in the courts over the past 20 years.

2. Fever with chills : AGUE

An ague is a fever, one usually associated with malaria.

3. Garner from the fields : REAP

A garner is a granary, a building in which grain is stored. The related verb “to garner” means to gather into a granary. We also use the verb figuratively to mean “accumulate, collect” in general.

6. City where Joan of Arc died : ROUEN

Rouen is the major city in Normandy in northern France. During the days of Norman Britain, Rouen was one of the capitals of the Anglo-Norman dynasties. Rouen was also where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431.

Joan of Arc (also “Jeanne d’Arc”, her birth name) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured, Joan was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. In fact, after the fire died down, the executioner raked the coals to display the charred body, proving Joan had died, and then burned the corpse again, twice, so that relics could not be collected. The remaining ashes were then cast into the Seine River. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

7. Tax form org. : IRS

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) was set up during the Civil War to raise money to cover war expenses. Prior to the introduction of income tax in 1862, the government was funded by levies on trade and property.

8. “The Waste Land” poet’s monogram : TSE

T. S. Eliot wrote his poem called “The Waste Land” in 1922. “The Waste Land” opens with the famous line, “April is the cruellest month …”

10. Like “X-Files” cases : PARANORMAL

“The X-Files” is a very successful science fiction show that aired on the Fox network from 1993 to 2002. The stars of the show are David Duchovny (playing Fox Mulder) and the very talented Gillian Anderson (playing Dana Scully). By the time the series ended, “The X-Files” was the longest running sci-fi show in US broadcast history. An “X-Files” reboot started airing in 2016 with Duchovny and Anderson reprising their starring roles.

11. Year before AD yrs. started : ONE BC

The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

12. Wield a divining rod : DOWSE

Dowsing is the practice of divining, not just for water, but also for buried metals and gemstones. Often a dowser will use a Y-shaped or L-shaped rod as a tool, which can also be called a dowser. Here in the US, the tool used might be referred to as a “witching rod”, as it is usually made from witch-hazel.

17. Low, sturdy cart : DRAY

A dray is a sideless, 4-wheeled cart that is used for hauling goods.

20. Close friend : CRONY

A crony is a friend or companion. The term originated as slang in Cambridge University in England in the 1600s. “Crony” is probably derived from the Greek “khronios” meaning “long-lasting”.

29. Chicago Fire’s org. : MLS

The Chicago Fire is the name of the city’s Major League Soccer (MLS) team. The Fire were founded in 1997, and are named for the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

34. Fairy tale start : ONCE

The stock phrase “Once upon a time” has been used in various forms as the start of a narrative at least since 1380. The stock phrase at the end of stories such as folktales is often “and they all lived happily ever after”. The earlier version of this ending was “happily until their deaths”.

35. Skunk’s defense : ODOR

Skunks have anal scent glands that can be used as defensive weapons. The glands produce sulfur-containing chemicals that have a really awful smell and that can irritate the eyes and skin.

39. Close-cropped hair style : CREW CUT

The term “crew cut” probably originated in Yale in the 1890s. The Yale football players were noted for wearing their hair relatively long, as it helped protect their heads inside the flimsy leather football helmets of the day. In contrast, the rowing team wore their hair relatively short, in a style that came to be known as the “crew cut”.

41. Apprehensive : TREPID

Our word “trepidation”, meaning “fear”. comes from the Latin verb “tridare” meaning “to tremble”.

46. Image maker, briefly : PR MAN

Public relations (PR)

50. 1970 Kinks hit : LOLA

“Lola” is a fabulous song, written by Ray Davies and released by the Kinks back in 1970. Inspired by a real life incident, the lyrics tell of young man who met a young “lady” in a club, danced with her, and then discovered “she” was actually a transvestite. The storyline isn’t very traditional, but the music is superb.

The Kinks were an English band who participated in the British Invasion of America in the sixties, although only briefly. After touring the US in the middle of 1965, the American Federation of Musicians refused permits for the Kinks to book concerts for four years, apparently in response to some rowdy on-stage behavior by the band.

53. Fella : BUB

“Bub” is American slang, a term used to address males. “Bub” is possibly a variation of “bud”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. DEA agent : NARC

5. Traveller in London’s Tube : BRIT

9. With 15-Across, Apple media player since 2005 : IPOD

13. Over the hill : AGED

14. Colorado-based brewery : COORS

15. See 9-Across : NANO

16. *Feature of gated community entrances : GUARDHOUSE (giving “bumper guard”)

18. Sprouted : GREW

19. Like checks, when splitting the tab : SEPARATE

20. Dungeness and Alaskan king : CRABS

21. *GEICO product : CAR INSURANCE (giving “bumper car”)

24. “I got a great break!” : LUCKY ME!

27. ID card picture : PHOTO

28. Adam’s grandson : ENOS

29. “… disguised as Clark Kent, mild-__ reporter” : MANNERED

32. Hoopla : ADO

33. *Plaything for a backyard swimming spot : POOL TOY (giving “bumper pool”)

36. Fifth month : MAY

37. Warns of : PORTENDS

39. Batman’s hideout : CAVE

40. Donna Summer’s music : DISCO

41. Spun, as a baton : TWIRLED

44. *Source of showroom shock? : STICKER PRICE (giving “bumper sticker”)

47. The Stones’ “__ Tonk Women” : HONKY

48. Subscribers’ continuations : RENEWALS

52. And others, in Lat. : ET AL

53. Abundant farm yield … and what the first words of the answers to starred clues comprise? : BUMPER CROP

55. Past the deadline : LATE

56. Foreign relief org. created by JFK : USAID

57. Pac-12 sch. : UCLA

58. Hotfooted it : FLED

59. Curve in a road : BEND

60. Easier said __ done : THAN

Down

1. Badgers : NAGS

2. Fever with chills : AGUE

3. Garner from the fields : REAP

4. Music media holders : CD RACKS

5. Infant foot warmer : BOOTIE

6. City where Joan of Arc died : ROUEN

7. Tax form org. : IRS

8. “The Waste Land” poet’s monogram : TSE

9. Thankless sort : INGRATE

10. Like “X-Files” cases : PARANORMAL

11. Year before AD yrs. started : ONE BC

12. Wield a divining rod : DOWSE

14. Captivate : CHARM

17. Low, sturdy cart : DRAY

20. Close friend : CRONY

22. Quarrel : SPAT

23. “Sorry, that’s not happening” : UH, NO

24. Jump : LEAP

25. “Go back” computer command : UNDO

26. Match, as clothing colors : COORDINATE

29. Chicago Fire’s org. : MLS

30. Roof projection : EAVE

31. Colored like Easter eggs : DYED

33. Bothersome : PESKY

34. Fairy tale start : ONCE

35. Skunk’s defense : ODOR

38. Got giggles out of : TICKLED

39. Close-cropped hair style : CREW CUT

41. Apprehensive : TREPID

42. __ and dined : WINED

43. Cake decorator : ICER

44. Bookcase unit : SHELF

45. Sum : TOTAL

46. Image maker, briefly : PR MAN

49. Curved foot part : ARCH

50. 1970 Kinks hit : LOLA

51. Stretch across : SPAN

53. Fella : BUB

54. Employ : USE

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