LA Times Crossword Answers 11 Aug 2017, Friday










Constructed by: Roger & Kathy Wienberg

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Side Arm

Today’s themed answers are all in the down-direction. To read the complete answer, we have to use the letters ARM that are to one side of that answer in the grid:

  • 65A. Like some baseball pitches … and a hint to locating the second part of four three-part puzzle answers : SIDEARM
  • 8D. The Eagle, for one : LUN(AR M)ODULE
  • 15D. McDonald’s offering for tight budgets : DOLL(AR M)ENU
  • 35D. Post office standard : REGUL(AR M)AIL
  • 37D. Syrup source : SUG(AR M)APLE

Bill’s time: 8m 44s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

17. Shutterbug : SHOOTER

A shutterbug is an enthusiastic amateur photographer, someone who likes to hear the click of that shutter, someone like me …

18. Fireplace fixture : ANDIRON

Andirons (also “firedogs”) are those horizontal bars on which you rest logs to burn in an open fireplace. They usually come in pairs and can be quite decorative, and are often made out of wrought iron.

19. Like a vertebral region : LUMBAR

The human spine comprises five regions of vertebrae, which are (starting at the neck):

  • Cervical (C1 – C7)
  • Thoracic (T1 – T12)
  • Lumbar (L1 – L5)
  • Sacral (S1 – S5)
  • Coccyx (also known as the tailbone)

22. Biblical songs : PSALMS

The Greek word “psalmoi” originally meant “songs sung to a harp”, and gave us the word “psalms”. In the Jewish and Western Christian traditions, the Book of Psalms contains 150 individual psalms, divided into five sections.

25. Splotchy garment : SMOCK

A smock is an outer garment that is often worn as protection for one’s clothing. Today, the term often applies to the protective garment worn by a painter.

28. Calendar abbr. : APR

The exact etymology of “April”, the fourth month of our year, seems to be uncertain. The ancient Romans called it “mensis Aprilis”, which roughly translated as “opening month. The suggestion is that April is the month in which fruits, flowers and animals “open” their life cycles.

35. U.K. fliers : RAF

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the oldest independent air force in the world (i.e. the first air force to become independent of army or navy forces). The RAF was formed during WWI on 1 April 1918, a composite of two earlier forces, the Royal Flying Corps (part of the Army) and the Royal Naval Air Service. The RAF’s “finest hour” has to be the Battle of Britain when the vastly outnumbered British fighters fought off the might of the Luftwaffe causing Hitler to delay his plan to cross the English Channel. This outcome prompted Winston Churchill to utter the memorable words

Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

47. Singer/songwriter Carly __ Jepsen : RAE

Carly Rae Jepsen is a singer/songwriter from Mission, British Columbia. Jepsen got her start on TV’s “Canadian Idol” when she placed third in the show’s fifth season.

52. Hook’s right hand : SMEE

In J. M. Barrie’s play and novel about Peter Pan, Smee is one of Captain Hook’s pirates and is Hook’s right-hand man. Smee is described by Barrie as being “Irish” and “a man who stabbed without offence”. Nice guy! Captain Hook and Smee sail on the pirate ship called the Jolly Roger.

Captain Hook is the bad guy in “Peter Pan”, the famous play by J. M. Barrie. Hook is Peter Pan’s sworn enemy, as Pan cut off Hook’s hand causing it to be replaced by a “hook”. It is implied in the play that Hook attended Eton College, just outside London. Hook’s last words are “Floreat Etona”, which is Eton College’s motto. Barrie openly acknowledged that the Hook character was based on Herman Melville’s Captain Ahab from the novel “Moby Dick”.

57. Seven-piece Chinese puzzle : TANGRAM

A tangram is a flat puzzle consisting of seven different shapes that must be arranged to form specific shapes. The game was invented in China, and the name for the puzzle in Chinese translates as “seven boards of skill”. The seven shapes are called “tans” hence the “tangram” name used in English.

64. Shakespearean merchant : ANTONIO

In William Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice”, Portia is the formidable heroine who takes on the guise of a male lawyer and calls herself “Balthasar”. Portia does this to save the life of Antonio, the play’s title character. Portia makes a famous speech that gives us the oft-quoted phrase, “the quality of mercy” …

The quality of mercy is not strain’d,
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest;
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes…

66. Unified whole : GESTALT

Gestalt is a German word meaning “shape”. The principles of gestaltism were developed in Germany in the early 1900s. One of the main tenets is that “the whole is greater than the sum of the parts”.

68. Upsilon preceder : TAU

Upsilon is the 20th letter in the Greek alphabet, and the character that gives rise to the letter Y that we use in English.

Tau is the 19th letter of the Greek alphabet, the letter which gave rise to our Roman “T”. Both the letters tau (T) and chi (X) have long been symbolically associated with the cross.

Down

1. Dash or Doubtfire : MRS

Mrs. Dash is a brand name of seasoning mixes. Just before the product first went to market in 1981, brand owner B&G Foods also considered the name “Mrs. Pinch”.

The 1993 comedy “Mrs. Doubtfire” is based on a 1987 novel called “Madame Doubtfire” by Anne Fine. The movie is set and was filmed in San Francisco. The title role is played by Robin Williams, who spent most of the movie dressed as the female Mrs. Doubtfire. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the movie won the Oscar for Best Makeup.

3. Number missing, in a way, from “4 = 16” : TWO

42 = 16

4. Ryan’s daughter : TATUM

Tatum O’Neal is the youngest actress to win a “competitive” Oscar. She won the Best Supporting Actress Award in 1974 when she was just 10 years old, for her role as Addie in “Paper Moon”. The youngest person to win an honorary Academy Award was Shirley Temple, who was only 5 years old when she was presented with an Oscar in 1934.

Actor Ryan O’Neal got his big break in the sixties on television. He appeared in the prime-time soap opera “Peyton Place”, opposite fellow newcomer Mia Farrow. Then in 1970 he landed a starring role in the hit movie “Love Story”, which established him in Hollywood. O’Neal was an amateur boxer before he turned to acting, and established a respectable record Golden Gloves competitions. These days, O’Neal has a recurring role on the TV show “Bones”, playing the title character’s father.

6. Energy food component : CARB

Only relatively small amounts of carbohydrate can be stored by the human body, but those stores are important. The actual storage molecule is a starch-like polysaccharide called glycogen, which is found mainly in the liver and muscles. Glycogen is a quick source of energy when required by the body. Most of the body’s energy is stored in the form of fat, a more compact substance that is mobilized less rapidly. Endurance athletes often eat meals high in carbohydrate (carbo-loading) a few hours before an event, so that their body’s glycogen is at optimum levels.

8. The Eagle, for one : LUN(AR M)ODULE

In the Apollo program, the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) was the vehicle that actually landed on the moon and returned the astronauts to the command module that was orbiting overhead. The third LEM built was named “Spider”, and it participated in the Apollo 9 mission which tested the functionality of the LEM design in space. The fourth LEM was called “Snoopy” and it flew around the moon in the Apollo 10 mission, the dress rehearsal for the upcoming moon landing. Apollo 11’s LEM was called “Eagle” and it brought Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to and from the moon’s surface. Another famous LEM was Apollo 13’s Aquarius. Although Aquarius never landed on the moon, it did serve as a “lifeboat” for the three astronauts after the explosive rupture of an oxygen canister in the Service Module.

9. PC screen type : LCD

Liquid Crystal Displays (LCDs) are the screens that are found in most laptops today, and in flat panel computer screens and some televisions. LCD monitors basically replaced Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) screens, the old television technology.

10. Lizard that can shed its tail : SKINK

Skinks are lizards with relatively small legs and without a pronounced neck. Most skink species have long tails that they can shed if it is grabbed by a predator. The tail can then be regenerated.

11. Pro’s opposite : TYRO

A tyro (also “tiro”) is a beginner or a novice. “Tyro” comes into English from Latin, in which “tiro” means “a recruit”.

12. Book after Joel : AMOS

Amos is one of the twelve minor prophets in the Hebrew Bible.

13. Actor Auberjonois : RENE

René Auberjonois is an American actor. Auberjonois’ most famous role on the big screen was Father Mulcahy in the movie “M*A*S*H”.

23. Athens rival : SPARTA

Sparta was a city-state in ancient Greece that was famous for her military might. Spartan children had a tough upbringing, and newborn babies were bathed in wine to see if the child was strong enough to survive. Every child was presented to a council of elders that decided if the baby was suitable for rearing. Those children deemed too puny were executed by tossing them into a chasm. We’ve been using the term “spartan” to describe something self-disciplined or austere since the 1600s.

27. “Downton Abbey” countess : CORA

In the incredibly successful period drama “Downton Abbey”, the patriarch of the family living at Downton is Robert Crawley, the Earl of Grantham or Lord Grantham. The character is played by Hugh Bonneville. Lord Grantham married American Cora Levinson (played by Elizabeth McGovern. Lord and Lady Grantham had three daughters, and no son. The lack of a male heir implied that the Grantham estate would pass to a male cousin, and out of the immediate family. The Grantham daughters are Lady Mary (played by Michelle Dockery), Lady Edith (played by Laura Carmichael) and Lady Sybil (played by Jessica Brown Findlay). Lady Sybil had the audacity to marry the family chauffeur, an Irish nationalist. The shame of it all …

37. Syrup source : SUG(AR M)APLE

The sugar maple is the state tree of New York, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin. It is also the primary source of maple syrup.

42. Georgetown cager : HOYA

The athletic teams of Georgetown University are known as the Hoyas. The name is derived from “Hoya Saxa”, a traditional cheer yelled out at Georgetown games as far back as 1893. The term is a mixture of Greek and Latin, with the Greek word “hoya” meaning “such” or “what”, and “saxa” translating from Latin as “rocks” or “small stones”. The cheer is usually rendered in English as “what rocks!”.

46. Critter in the same family as chipmunks and squirrels : MARMOT

Marmots are large ground squirrels. Included in the genus is the famous groundhog, but not the prairie dog.

50. Like Miss Muffet’s fare : CURDY

“Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet eating her curds and whey”, in the popular nursery rhyme. A tuffet is a low seat or a footstool, another word for a pouffe or a hassock. When milk curdles it separates into two parts, the solid curds and the liquid whey. Then “along came a spider and sat down beside her”.

54. Tolkien race : ENTS

Ents are those tree-like creatures that live in J. R. R. Tolkien’s Middle-earth in his series of books “The Lord of the Rings”. “Ent” is an Old English word for “giant”.

56. Tableland : MESA

“What’s the difference between a butte and a mesa?” Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, taller than it is wide.

58. Genetic messenger : RNA

Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

62. Top at the shore : BRA

The origin of the word “bikini”, a type of bathing suit, seems very uncertain. My favorite story is that it is named after the Bikini Atoll, site of American A-bomb tests in the forties and fifties. The name “bikini” was chosen for the swim-wear because of the “explosive” effect it had on men who saw a woman wearing the garment!

63. Outback runner : EMU

In Australia, the land outside of urban area is referred to as the outback or the bush. That said, I think that the term “outback” can also be used for the more remote parts of the bush.

Return to top of page

Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Welcome site : MAT

4. One may be nervous : TIC

7. Best of the best : ALL-STAR

14. It hasn’t been analyzed yet : RAW DATA

16. Lottery winner’s comment : LUCKY ME!

17. Shutterbug : SHOOTER

18. Fireplace fixture : ANDIRON

19. Like a vertebral region : LUMBAR

21. Meddle, with “around” : NOSE

22. Biblical songs : PSALMS

25. Splotchy garment : SMOCK

28. Calendar abbr. : APR

29. Blow : MISDO

30. Suffix with star or tsar : -DOM

33. Flimsy : LAME

35. U.K. fliers : RAF

36. Bearish? : URSINE

38. Twists : IRONIES

40. Couple in the news each December : CLAUSES

41. Like tennis rackets : STRUNG

42. Color property : HUE

43. They go with guys : GALS

44. Stable diet : HAY

45. Item from a mill? : RUMOR

47. Singer/songwriter Carly __ Jepsen : RAE

48. Secure, as a ship’s line : BELAY

49. Rascals : SCAMPS

52. Hook’s right hand : SMEE

55. Intensify : RAMP UP

57. Seven-piece Chinese puzzle : TANGRAM

60. Stud location : EARLOBE

64. Shakespearean merchant : ANTONIO

65. Like some baseball pitches … and a hint to locating the second part of four three-part puzzle answers : SIDEARM

66. Unified whole : GESTALT

67. To some degree : ANY

68. Upsilon preceder : TAU

Down

1. Dash or Doubtfire : MRS

2. Sound of relief : AAH!

3. Number missing, in a way, from “4 = 16” : TWO

4. Ryan’s daughter : TATUM

5. Chairperson’s list : ITEMS

6. Energy food component : CARB

7. Snooze buttons stop them : ALARMS

8. The Eagle, for one : LUN(AR M)ODULE

9. PC screen type : LCD

10. Lizard that can shed its tail : SKINK

11. Pro’s opposite : TYRO

12. Book after Joel : AMOS

13. Actor Auberjonois : RENE

15. McDonald’s offering for tight budgets : DOLL(AR M)ENU

20. “Dream on!” : AS IF!

22. Lacking color : PALISH

23. Athens rival : SPARTA

24. Weapons source : ARMORY

27. “Downton Abbey” countess : CORA

29. Uno __: Juan’s “one more” : MAS

30. Captivate : DISARM

31. A quarter mile, maybe : ONE LAP

32. Cans of worms : MESSES

35. Post office standard : REGUL(AR M)AIL

37. Syrup source : SUG(AR M)APLE

39. Memo opener : IN RE

40. Lowlife : CUR

42. Georgetown cager : HOYA

46. Critter in the same family as chipmunks and squirrels : MARMOT

48. Conceived : BEGOT

49. New World colonizer : SPAIN

50. Like Miss Muffet’s fare : CURDY

52. Guys-only : STAG

53. Locks in a barn : MANE

54. Tolkien race : ENTS

56. Tableland : MESA

58. Genetic messenger : RNA

61. Muffin choice : OAT

62. Top at the shore : BRA

63. Outback runner : EMU

Return to top of page

LA Times Crossword Answers 20 Jun 17, Tuesday










Constructed by: Roger & Kathy Wienberg

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Widespread

Each of today’s themed answers includes the letters W-I-D-E, in that order, and SPREAD out among the other letters in that answer:

  • 60A. Extensive … and what’s literally seen in this puzzle’s circles : WIDESPREAD
  • 17A. Caribbean island group : WEST INDIES
  • 23A. Independence Day colors : RED, WHITE AND BLUE
  • 37A. Auto visibility aid with intermittent settings : WINDSHIELD WIPER
  • 48A. “How about that!” : WELL, I‘LL BE DARNED!

Bill’s time: 5m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Fancy tie : ASCOT

An Ascot tie is a horrible-looking (I think!), wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

6. Facts and figures : DATA

Our word “data” (singular “datum”) comes from the Latin “datum” meaning “given”. The idea is that data are “things given”.

10. Herring family fish : SHAD

The shad is also known as the river herring. The eggs (roe) of the female shad are prized as a delicacy in the Eastern US.

14. Pageant topper : TIARA

“The oldest beauty pageant still operating in the US is the Miss America contest. The Miss America beauty pageant started out as a marketing ploy in the early twenties to attract tourists to the Atlantic City boardwalk after Labor Day. Today, contestants must be between 17 and 24 years of age. Before those limits were introduced, Marian Bergeron won the 1933 title at only 15 years of age.

17. Caribbean island group : WEST INDIES

The region of the Caribbean known as the West Indies was given the name after the first expedition taken by Christopher Columbus to the Americas. Really a misnomer, the West Indies were the territories claimed by Columbus for Spain in the Americas, with the name distinguishing the region from “the Indies” (today’s South Asia and Southeast Asia). When other nations started to claim territories in the area, the name proliferated, as in the British West Indies, the Danish West Indies and the Netherlands Antilles (Dutch West Indies).

21. “Give all thou __”: Wordsworth : CANST

Here are some lines from the William Wordsworth poem “Inside of King’s College Chapel”

Give all thou canst; high Heaven rejects the lore
Of nicely-calculated less or more;

23. Independence Day colors : RED, WHITE AND BLUE

On 11 June 1776, the Continental Congress appointed a committee of five people to draft a declaration of independence. Included in the five were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Adams persuaded the other committee members to give Jefferson the task of writing the first draft. A resolution of independence was passed by the Congress on 2 Jul 1776. The final draft of the declaration was approved by the Congress two days later, on July 4th. John Adams wrote a letter to his wife that included an assertion that July 2nd (the date of the resolution of independence) would become a great American holiday. Of course Adams was wrong, and it was actually the date the Declaration of Independence was finalized that came to be celebrated annually.

27. Vicinity : AREA

A “vicinity” is an area surrounding a place, ultimately deriving from the Latin “vicus” meaning “group of houses, village”.

31. __ apso: dog : LHASA

The Lhasa apso breed of dog originated in Tibet and is named after “Lhasa” (the capital city) and “apso” (a Tibetan word meaning “bearded”). The Lhasa apso has been around since 800 BC and is one of the oldest breeds in the world, one very closely related to the ancestral wolf.

37. Auto visibility aid with intermittent settings : WINDSHIELD WIPER

You may have seen the 2008 movie “Flash of Genius”, which outlined the troubles Robert Kearns (played by Greg Kinnear) had in making money from his invention of the intermittent windshield wiper. Well, Mary Anderson developed the original wiper and received a patent in 1903. She didn’t make any money either …

42. Ballplayer with “SD” on his cap : PADRE

The San Diego Padres were founded in 1969. The Padres took their name from a Minor League team that had been in the the city since 1936. The name is Spanish for “fathers” and is a reference to the Franciscan Friars from Spain who founded San Diego in 1769.

43. Quartet that covered “Woodstock,” initially : CSNY

The supergroup Crosby, Stills & Nash (CSN) is made up of David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Graham Nash. The band can grow to “CSNY” when the trio is joined by Neil Young. Fans have been known to call the act “C, S, N and sometimes Y”, a play on the expression that names all the vowels, “A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y”.

“Woodstock” is a song that was written and recorded by Joni Mitchell about the the 1969 Woodstock Festival. Joni Mitchell opted not to attend the festival, and instead wrote the song in a New York City hotel room while watching coverage of the event on television. Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young recorded a cover version of “Woodstock” in 1970 that has proved to be even more successful that Mitchell’s original.

44. Jamaican fruit : UGLI

The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine, first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

46. Royal flush card : ACE

The poker hand called a royal flush is the highest-ranking hand possible. It consists of a run of 10, jack, queen, king and ace, with all in the same suit.

56. Cereal grass disease : ERGOT

Ergot is a fungus, or actually a group of fungi, that cause disease in rye and related plants. If human eat ergot-contaminated grain, a condition called ergotism can result. Ergotism is the result of consumption of alkaloids produced by the fungi, alkaloids that can cause seizures and manic behavior. It has even been suggested that the hysteria exhibited by the Salem “witches” was perhaps caused by the ingestion of ergot-contaminated rye.

58. “Don’t Bring Me Down” rock gp. : ELO

“Don’t Bring Me Down” is the biggest hit the Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) had in the US. The song was dedicated to NASA’s Skylab, which reentered the earth’s orbit in 1979, the same year the song was released.

62. “The __ of the Ancient Mariner” : RIME

“The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is an epic poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge first published in 1798. The publication of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period of British literature. Perhaps the lines most often quoted from the poem are:

Water, water, every where,
And all the boards did shrink;
Water, water, every where
Nor any drop to drink

63. Actor Guinness : ALEC

Sir Alec Guinness played many great roles over a long and distinguished career, but nowadays is best remembered (sadly, I think) for playing the original Obi-Wan Kenobi in “Star Wars”.

66. Playbill listing : CAST

I get quite a kick out of reading the bios in “Playbill” as some of them can be really goofy and entertaining. “Playbill” started off in 1884 in New York as an in-house publication for just one theater on 21st St. You can’t see any decent-sized production these days anywhere in the United States without being handed a copy of “Playbill”.

Down

2. Prolonged battle : SIEGE

Our word “siege” comes from a 13th century word for a “seat”. The military usage derives from the concept of a besieging force “sitting down” outside a fortress until it falls.

4. Table scrap : ORT

Orts are small scraps of food left after a meal. “Ort” comes from Middle English, and originally described scraps left by animals.

5. Meditative Chinese exercise : TAI CHI

More correctly called tai chi chuan, tai chi is a martial art that is mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

7. Ouzo flavoring : ANISE

Ouzo is an aperitif from Greece that is colorless and flavored with anise. Ouzo is similar to pastis from France and also has a flavor like sambuca from Italy.

8. Consonant before iota : THETA

The Greek letter theta is the one that looks like a number zero with a horizontal line across the middle.

12. Farewell : ADIEU

“Adieu” is the French for “goodbye” or “farewell”, from “à Dieu” meaning “to God”. The plural of “adieu” is “adieux”.

25. Former OTC watchdog : NASD

The National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) no longer exists per se. Since 2007, it’s functions are carried out by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). These functions include regulation of trading in equities, bonds, futures and options. In 1971, the NASD set up a new computerized trading system called the NASD Automated Quotations stock market, a system we know better by the acronym NASDAQ.

Over-the-counter (OTC) trading of stocks is a way of trading directly between two parties, as opposed to exchange trading in which trading occurs in an exchange.

33. Malt brew : ALE

Malt is germinated cereal grains that have been dried. The cereal is germinated by soaking it in water, and then germination is halted by drying the grains with hot air.

36. “These are the times that __ men’s souls”: Paine : TRY

Thomas Paine’s series of pamphlets called “The American Crisis” starts with the famous words:

These are the times that try men’s souls.

38. Bowler’s challenge : SPLIT

In ten pin bowling, a split takes place when the number-one pin (headpin) is a knocked down with the first ball and two or more non-adjacent pins are left standing. The most difficult split to deal with is the infamous 7-10 split, where just the rear pins at the extreme right and left remain standing.

47. __ tunnel syndrome : CARPAL

The carpal tunnel is a passageway connecting the palm of the hand to the forearm through the wrist. The passageway contains bones, tendons and nerves. It is a narrow canal and so any swelling of the tendons can place pressure on the main nerve in the passageway. This compression of the medial nerve is known as carpal tunnel syndrome.

49. Orange Muppet : ERNIE

For many years, I believed that the “Sesame Street” characters Bert and Ernie were named after two roles played in the Christmas classic “It’s a Wonderful Life”. In the movie, the policeman’s name is Bert and his taxi-driving buddy is named Ernie. However, the “Sesame Street” folks have stated that the use of the same names is just a coincidence. Aww, I don’t wanna believe that’s a coincidence …

50. Muhammad’s boxing daughter : LAILA

Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali and is a very capable boxer in her own right. Laila’s professional record is an impressive 24 wins, including 21 knockouts. Now retired, she never lost a fight, and nor did she ever draw. One of those victories was against Jackie Frazier-Lyde, daughter of her father’s nemesis Joe Frazier. Laila is not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of “Dancing with the Stars”.

55. Extinct birds : DODOS

The dodo was a direct relative of the pigeon and dove, although the fully-grown dodo was usually three feet tall. One of the reasons the dodo comes to mind when we think of extinction of a species, is that it disappeared not too long ago (last recorded alive in 1681) and humans were the reason for its demise. The dodo lived exclusively on the island of Mauritius and when man arrived, we cut back the forests that were its home. We also introduced domestic animals, such as dogs and pigs, that ransacked the dodo’s nests. The dodo was deemed to be an awkward flightless bird and so the term “dodo” has come to mean a dull-witted person.

60. WWII GI Jane : WAC

The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was formed in 1942, and the unit was converted to full status the following year to become the Women’s Army Corps (WAC). Famously, General Douglas MacArthur referred to the WACs as his “best soldiers”, saying they worked harder, complained less and were better disciplined than men. The WACs were disbanded in 1978 and the serving members were integrated into the rest of the army.

61. Dietary guideline letters : RDA

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

Return to top of page

Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Fancy tie : ASCOT

6. Facts and figures : DATA

10. Herring family fish : SHAD

14. Pageant topper : TIARA

15. Broadcast with greater image resolution, as TV shows : IN HD

16. Sign over : CEDE

17. Caribbean island group : WEST INDIES

19. Golf outing spoiler : RAIN

20. Mature : AGE

21. “Give all thou __”: Wordsworth : CANST

22. Helping hands : AIDES

23. Independence Day colors : RED, WHITE AND BLUE

26. Olive product : OIL

27. Vicinity : AREA

28. Piano-bass-drums jazz group, e.g. : TRIO

31. __ apso: dog : LHASA

34. Bumped into : MET

37. Auto visibility aid with intermittent settings : WINDSHIELD WIPER

41. Atypical : ODD

42. Ballplayer with “SD” on his cap : PADRE

43. Quartet that covered “Woodstock,” initially : CSNY

44. Jamaican fruit : UGLI

46. Royal flush card : ACE

48. “How about that!” : WELL, I’LL BE DARNED!

56. Cereal grass disease : ERGOT

57. Broadcaster : AIRER

58. “Don’t Bring Me Down” rock gp. : ELO

59. From the top : ANEW

60. Extensive … and what’s literally seen in this puzzle’s circles : WIDESPREAD

62. “The __ of the Ancient Mariner” : RIME

63. Actor Guinness : ALEC

64. Augment : ADD TO

65. Gardener’s purchase : SEED

66. Playbill listing : CAST

67. Cuts with a light beam : LASES

Down

1. Battling it out : AT WAR

2. Prolonged battle : SIEGE

3. Scoped out with bad intentions : CASED

4. Table scrap : ORT

5. Meditative Chinese exercise : TAI CHI

6. Neglected to : DIDN’T

7. Ouzo flavoring : ANISE

8. Consonant before iota : THETA

9. Promos that interrupt programs : ADS

10. Old manuscript copier : SCRIBE

11. Illumination on helmets : HEADLAMPS

12. Farewell : ADIEU

13. Tightly packed : DENSE

18. Polished body part : NAIL

22. Play to __: tie : A DRAW

24. Lumberyard purchase : WOOD

25. Former OTC watchdog : NASD

28. Couple : TWO

29. Get __ of: discard : RID

30. “I’d like this favor” : INDULGE ME

31. Cookie jar cover : LID

32. Ship’s pronoun : HER

33. Malt brew : ALE

35. Poetic twilight : E’EN

36. “These are the times that __ men’s souls”: Paine : TRY

38. Bowler’s challenge : SPLIT

39. Flag down, as a cab : HAIL

40. Cake decorator : ICER

45. Emitted an aura : GLOWED

46. Orange drinks : ADES

47. __ tunnel syndrome : CARPAL

48. Has on : WEARS

49. Orange Muppet : ERNIE

50. Muhammad’s boxing daughter : LAILA

51. __ one’s time: waits patiently : BIDES

52. Standing straight : ERECT

53. Non-negotiable things : NEEDS

54. Fill with glee : ELATE

55. Extinct birds : DODOS

60. WWII GI Jane : WAC

61. Dietary guideline letters : RDA

Return to top of page