LA Times Crossword Answers 23 Jun 17, Friday










Constructed by: John Lampkin

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: RV Trade-In

Each of today’s themed answer is a well-known phrase, but with a letter R at the beginning that has been swapped with a letter V:

  • 61A. Camper upgrade, literally seen in four puzzle answers : RV TRADE-IN
  • 16A. Vermicelli for the greedy or lustful? : VICE-A-RONI (from “Rice-A-Roni”)
  • 38A. Energy drink? : VIMSHOT (from “rimshot”)
  • 10D. Practical approach to preparing saltimbocca? : VEALPOLITIK (from “realpolitik”)
  • 24D. Pamplona preeners, with “the”? : VAIN IN SPAIN (from “rain in Spain”)

Bill’s time: 16m 47s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Wall Street Journal co-founder Charles : DOW

Charles Dow was a journalist who moved to New York City (from Providence, Rhode Island) in 1880 as he was developing an interest in reporting financial and business news. He teamed up with statistician Edward David Jones, and in 1882, the pair formed the Dow, Jones & Company news agency. The following year, the fledgling company started to publish the “Customers’ Afternoon Letter”, a two-page summary of the day’s financial news. Included in the newsletter was the now celebrated Dow Jones stock average. The two-page “Customers’ Afternoon Letter” evolved into the newspaper that we now call “The Wall Street Journal”, which first appeared in 1889.

9. 2013 Zipcar acquirer : AVIS

Zipcar is a carsharing company. Carsharing differs from car rental in that cars are available only to members, but 24 hours a day as opposed to office hours. There are other differences, including the fact that members are usually responsible for leaving cars gassed up and clean for the next user. Zipcar was founded in 2000, and was acquired by Avis in 2013.

13. Word on mail from Madrid : AEREO

The words “Correo Aereo” can be found on some stamps. The phrase translates from Spanish as “Air Mail”.

16. Vermicelli for the greedy or lustful? : VICE-A-RONI (from “Rice-A-Roni”)

Rice-A-Roni was introduced in 1958 by the Golden Grain Macaroni Company of San Francisco. The company was run by an Italian immigrant and his four sons. The wife of one of the sons created a pilaf dish for the family diner they owned. It was a big hit, so her brother-in-law created a commercial version by blending dry chicken soup mix with rice and macaroni. Sounds like “a San Francisco treat” to me …

Vermicelli is a pasta that is similar to spaghetti, except that it is thicker. “Vermicelli” translates from Italian as “little worms”.

20. Threat in old Westerns : RATTLER

The scales covering the tip of a rattlesnake’s tail are made of keratin, the same structural protein that makes up the outer layer of human skin, as well as our hair and nails. The rattlesnake shakes its tail vigorously to warn off potential predators, causing the hollow scales to vibrate against one another and resulting in that scary “rattle” sound. The rattler’s tail muscles “fire” an incredible fifty times a second to achieve that effect, demonstrating one of the fastest muscular movements in the whole animal kingdom.

22. Knuckle under : GIVE

The verb “to knuckle” was coined in the 18th century to describe the motion of kneeling down with a knuckle on the ground to play the game of marbles. The derivative phrasal verb “to knuckle down” came to mean “to apply oneself earnestly”, as in the game. The related verbal phrase “to knuckle under”, meaning “to submit, give in”, seems also to refer back to game, and refers to the action of kneeling.

30. Slam __ : DUNK

In basketball, a player makes “slam dunk” by jumping up and powering the ball downward into the basket with his or her hands over the rim. The term “slam dunk” was coined by Chick Hearn, an announcer for the L.A. Lakers. The NBA even holds an annual Slam Dunk Contest.

32. Clever comment : MOT

“Bon mot” translates from French as “good word”. We use “bon mot” (and sometimes just “mot”) to mean a quip, a witticism.

35. Sandra’s Supreme Court successor : SAMUEL

Associate Justice Samuel Alito was nominated to the US Supreme Court by President George W. Bush. Alito is the second Italian-American to serve on the Supreme Court (Antonin Scalia was the first). Alito studied law at Yale and while in his final year he left the country for the first time in his life, heading to Italy to work on his thesis about the Italian legal system.

Sandra Day O’Connor is a former Associate justice on the US Supreme Court. O’Connor was the first woman appointed to the court, and was in office from 1981 after being appointed by President Reagan. As the court became more conservative she was viewed as the swing vote in many decisions. As a result, O’Connor was known as one of the most powerful women in the world. She retired in 2006 (replaced by Samuel Alito), and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama in 2009.

37. What’s big in London? : BEN

Big Ben is the name commonly used for the large bell in the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster (aka the Houses of Parliament). Big Ben’s official name is the Great Bell, and there is some debate about the origins of the nickname. It may be named after Sir Benjamin Hall who oversaw the bell’s installation, or perhaps the English heavyweight champion of the day Benjamin Caunt.

38. Energy drink? : VIMSHOT (from “rimshot”)

A rimshot is a sound made when a drummer hits the head of a drum and the rim at the same time. It’s a sound often used by comics to help punctuate a gag.

40. Texting qualifier : IMO

In my opinion (IMO)

43. Glacial mass : ICECAP

The polar icecap at the north of our planet is floating pack ice in the Arctic Ocean. The southern polar icecap is an ice sheet that covers the land mass known as Antarctica. About 70% of all the freshwater on Earth is held in the southern polar icecap.

45. __ milk : MALTED

Walgreens claims to have introduced the malted milkshake, back in 1922.

47. Dedicatee of Lennon’s “Woman” : ONO

“Woman” is a lovely song written by John Lennon that was recorded in 1980. The song was released in 1981, just a month or so after Lennon was murdered outside his New York apartment building. Lennon wrote the song as an ode to his wife Yoko Ono, and to women in general. He also stated that “Woman” was a grown-up version of “Girl”, a song that he wrote for the Beatles in 1965.

50. 1937 Shirley Temple title role : HEIDI

“Heidi” is a Swiss children’s book written by Johanna Spyri and published in two parts. The first is “Heidi’s years of learning and travel”, and the second “Heidi makes use of what she has learned”. The books tell the story of a young girl in the care of her grandfather in the Swiss Alps. The most famous film adaptation of the story is the 1937 movie of the same name starring Shirley Temple in the title role.

The child star Shirley Temple made her first movie in 1932 at the age of three, then became a star 1934 in the film “Bright Eyes”. Temple retired from show business at the age of 22, but made a brief attempt to resume her career in the late fifties and early sixties. She served as a board member for several organizations, including the Walt Disney Company. She also ran unsuccessfully for the US Congress in 1874, but was appointed as US Ambassador to Ghana in 1974, and then to Czechoslovakia in 1989.

60. With 12-Down, Carnegie Hall icon : ISAAC …
(12D. See 60-Across : … STERN)

Isaac Stern was Ukrainian-born, but moved with his family to San Francisco at a very young age. He was a wonderful violin virtuoso who passed away in 2001.

The prestigious Carnegie Hall in midtown Manhattan opened for business in 1891. The magnificent edifice was named after the philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, who provided the funds for construction.

61. Camper upgrade, literally seen in four puzzle answers : RV TRADE-IN

Recreational vehicle (RV)

66. Skeptical sound at Belmont? : NEIGH

“Neigh” sounds like “nay”.

The Belmont Stakes is a horse race held in June each year, at Belmont Park racetrack in Elmont, New York. The Belmont Stakes is the last of the US Triple Crown races, following the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes.

68. Dry Italian white : SOAVE

Soave is a dry white wine produced in the area around the city of Verona in northeast Italy. “Soave” is a small town located near Verona.

69. Sebaceous gland issue : ACNE

Tiny sebaceous glands are found on most of the skin. Their function is to produce an oily substance called sebum, which lubricates and waterproofs the skin and hair.

71. Graceful wader : EGRET

Egrets are a group of several species of white herons. Many egret species were faced with extinction in the 1800s and early 1900s due to plume hunting, a practice driven by the demand for egret plumes that could be incorporated into hats.

Down

1. James, for one, briefly : CAV

The Cleveland Cavaliers are the professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Cavs joined the NBA as an expansion team in 1970.

Basketball player LeBron James (nicknamed “King James”) seems to be in demand for the covers of magazines. James became the first African American man to adorn the front cover of “Vogue” in March 2008. That made him only the third male to make the “Vogue” cover, following Richard Gere and George Clooney.

2. Hilo hello accompaniment : LEI

Hilo is the largest settlement on the big island of Hawai’i, with a population of over 43,000 (that’s not very many!). I love the Big Island …

3. Hobbit hunter : ORC

Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction and in fantasy games.

“The Hobbit, or There and Back Again” is a children’s fantasy novel by J. R. R. Tolkien that was popular from the time of its first publication in 1937. Included in the early awards for “The Hobbit” was a prize for best juvenile fiction from “The New York Herald Tribune”. Tolkien adapted his succeeding novel “The Lord of the Rings” to incorporate elements in “The Hobbit”, so that the two tales are very much related.

10. Practical approach to preparing saltimbocca? : VEALPOLITIK (from “realpolitik”)

The term “realpolitik” translates from German as “practical politics” and is used to describe diplomacy that is rooted in practical factors and consideration rather ideological premises.

Saltimbocca is a dish from southern Europe made of veal topped with prosciutto and sage, and then marinated in perhaps wine. The name “saltimbocca” is Italian for “jump in the mouth”.

15. Kiss classic : BETH

KISS is a hard rock band from New York City. KISS is the group whose band members use all that scary face paint and wear wacky outfits on stage.

17. Milne marsupial : ROO

Like most of the characters in A. A. Milne’s “Winnie the Pooh”, the kangaroo named Roo was inspired by on a stuffed toy belonging to Milne’s son Christopher Robin.

22. The “Gee” in Bee Gees : GIBB

The Brothers Gibb (hence, the name “The Bee Gees”) were born in England but grew up and started their musical careers in Australia. They moved back to Manchester in the north of England as youths, and there hit the big time.

23. About : IN RE

The term “in re” is Latin, and is derived from “in” (in) and “res” (thing, matter). “In re” literally means “in the matter”, and is used to mean “in regard to” or “in the matter of”.

24. Pamplona preeners, with “the”? : VAIN IN SPAIN (from “rain in Spain”)

Pamplona, Spain is famous for its San Fermin festival held in July every year, the highlight of which is the Running of the Bulls. Every year, 200-300 people are injured in the bull run, and 15 people have been killed since 1910. If you get to Pamplona two days before the Running of the Bulls, you can see the animal-rights protest event known as the Running of the Nudes. The protesters are as naked as the bulls …

“The Rain in Spain” is a song from the 1956 Lerner & Loewe musical “My Fair Lady”. The famous lyric “The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain” appears in the 1938 film “Pygmalion” and not in the original 1913 George Bernard Shaw play “Pygmalion”, on which all the derivative works are based.

29. Igloo’s lack : EAVE

The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar, namely “igdlo”. The walls of igloos are tremendous insulators, due to the air pockets in the blocks of snow.

34. Fungus/alga symbiosis : LICHEN

Lichens are interesting organisms, as they are made up of a partnership of a fungus and either an alga or a bacterium existing in a symbiotic relationship. The algae or bacteria are capable of photosynthesis, and so manufacture simple sugars using light and carbon dioxide from the air. The fungus uses the manufactured sugars, and in return provides a stable environment for the algae or bacteria to thrive.

36. Bryce Canyon locale : UTAH

Bryce Canyon National Park is truly a beautiful part of America. The strange thing is that Bryce isn’t a canyon at all, but rather is a natural amphitheater created by erosion of sedimentary rocks that are part of the Paunsaugunt Plateau.

39. Red Guard leader : MAO

Red Guards were young paramilitaries who were mobilized by Chairman Mao during the Cultural Revolution in China in the mid-sixties.

41. Prefix with -terranean : MEDI-

The Mediterranean Sea is almost completely enclosed by land, and is connected to the Atlantic Ocean by the narrow Strait of Gibraltar. The sea takes its name from the Latin “mediterraneus”, which means “in the middle of land”.

42. Master of the Valkyries : ODIN

In Norse mythology, the valkyries are beautiful female attendants of Odin who choose those who must die in battle and those who must live. Half of those who die go to Fólkvangr, the “army field” ruled over by the goddess Freyja. The other half of those who perish go to Valhalla, the hall of the slain that is ruled over by the god Odin. The etymology of “valkyrie” is Old Norse for “chooser of the slain”.

46. It’s never a poodle in the Iditarod : LEAD DOG

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race covers an incredible 1,161 miles, from Anchorage to Nome in Alaska. The race starts every year on the first Saturday in March, with the first race having been held in 1973. The fastest finishing time was set in 2002 at just under 9 days. The first few races only used a northern route, but then a southern route was added to the roster every second year. It’s kind of a good thing, because when the racers take the northern route they don’t even pass through the town of Iditarod!

The standard poodle breed of dog is considered to be the second most intelligent breed, after the border collie. The name “poodle” comes from a Low German word meaning “to splash about”, reflecting the original use of the breed as a water retriever.

49. Chef’s crusher : PESTLE

I’ve always loved the sound of the words “mortar” and “pestle”, ever since I was first introduced to them in the chemistry lab. The Romans called a receptacle for pounding or grinding things a “mortarium”, giving us “mortar”. Mortarium was also the word for the product of pounding and grinding, which gives us our “mortar” that’s used with bricks to build a wall. And further, short stubby cannons used in the 16th century resembled a grinding bowl and so were called “mortars”, which evolved into our contemporary weapon of the same name. As far as the pestle is concerned, it is also derived from its Latin name “pistillum”, which comes from the word for “crush”.

51. “The Three Sisters” sister : IRINA

Olga, Masha and Irina were the “Three Sisters” in the play by Anton Chekhov. The three title characters were inspired by the three Brontë sisters, the English authors.

54. Busy time for CPAs : APR

April 15th wasn’t always Tax Day in the US. The deadline for returns was March 1st from 1913-18, when it was moved to March 15th. Tax Day has been April 15th since 1955.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Clumps or chumps : CLODS

6. Wall Street Journal co-founder Charles : DOW

9. 2013 Zipcar acquirer : AVIS

13. Word on mail from Madrid : AEREO

14. Have to shell out : OWE

15. Break the silence of the lamb? : BLEAT

16. Vermicelli for the greedy or lustful? : VICE-A-RONI (from “Rice-A-Roni”)

18. Get high : ELATE

19. Get going : PROD

20. Threat in old Westerns : RATTLER

22. Knuckle under : GIVE

25. Bungler : OAF

27. Import : SHIP IN

28. Nutty : INANE

30. Slam __ : DUNK

32. Clever comment : MOT

33. Word with gown or wreath : BRIDAL

35. Sandra’s Supreme Court successor : SAMUEL

37. What’s big in London? : BEN

38. Energy drink? : VIMSHOT (from “rimshot”)

40. Texting qualifier : IMO

43. Glacial mass : ICECAP

45. __ milk : MALTED

47. Dedicatee of Lennon’s “Woman” : ONO

48. Barrel band : HOOP

50. 1937 Shirley Temple title role : HEIDI

51. Cover, in a way : INSURE

53. Pot leaves : TEA

55. Comparable : AKIN

56. Subsequent edition with no changes : REPRINT

58. Flew : SPED

60. With 12-Down, Carnegie Hall icon : ISAAC …

61. Camper upgrade, literally seen in four puzzle answers : RV TRADE-IN

66. Skeptical sound at Belmont? : NEIGH

67. Crude stuff : OIL

68. Dry Italian white : SOAVE

69. Sebaceous gland issue : ACNE

70. One of several found in a golf cart : TEE

71. Graceful wader : EGRET

Down

1. James, for one, briefly : CAV

2. Hilo hello accompaniment : LEI

3. Hobbit hunter : ORC

4. Where it’s not good to go off? : DEEP END

5. Birds do it : SOAR

6. Thingy : DOODAD

7. Routinely trounce : OWN

8. Small dam : WEIR

9. Never surpassed : ALL-TIME

10. Practical approach to preparing saltimbocca? : VEALPOLITIK (from “realpolitik”)

11. Unwelcome response to “Where’s the leftover pizza?” : I ATE IT

12. See 60-Across : … STERN

15. Kiss classic : BETH

17. Milne marsupial : ROO

21. Referral from dad? : ASK MOM

22. The “Gee” in Bee Gees : GIBB

23. About : IN RE

24. Pamplona preeners, with “the”? : VAIN IN SPAIN (from “rain in Spain”)

26. Fuddy-duddy : FUSSPOT

29. Igloo’s lack : EAVE

31. “Nope” : NAH

34. Fungus/alga symbiosis : LICHEN

36. Bryce Canyon locale : UTAH

39. Red Guard leader : MAO

41. Prefix with -terranean : MEDI-

42. Master of the Valkyries : ODIN

44. Grit, but not grits : COURAGE

46. It’s never a poodle in the Iditarod : LEAD DOG

47. “Be right there!” : ONE SEC!

49. Chef’s crusher : PESTLE

51. “The Three Sisters” sister : IRINA

52. Loaded : RICH

54. Busy time for CPAs : APR

57. Relaxed pace : TROT

59. Relaxation : EASE

62. Strive : VIE

63. Temple neighbor : EAR

64. Mass ending? : -IVE

65. A daredevil might eschew it : NET

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LA Times Crossword Answers 22 Jun 17, Thursday










Constructed by: Peter A. Collins

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Corner Office

Today’s grid includes four sets of circled letters in each of the CORNERS. Those circled letters spell out types of OFFICE when read in a clockwise direction starting at the top left:

  • 38A. With 41-Across, corporate status symbol … and a hint to the circled letters : CORNER …
  • 41A. See 38-Across : … OFFICE

The four offices defined are:

  • OVAL (office)
  • HOME (office)
  • TICKET (office)
  • POST (office)

Bill’s time: 6m 12s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Sheepish? : OVINE

The Latin word for “sheep” is “ovis”, giving us the adjective “ovine”, meaning “like a sheep”.

15. Eliza Doolittle’s creator : SHAW

George Bernard Shaw was a very successful Irish playwright. Shaw is the only person to have been awarded both a Nobel Prize for Literature, and an Oscar. He won his Oscar for adapting his own play “Pygmalion” for the 1938 film of the same name starring Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller. Most people are more likely to have seen the musical adaptation of “Pygmalion” that goes by the title “My Fair Lady”.

Eliza Doolittle is Professor Henry Higgins’ speech student in George Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion”. “Pygmalion” was adapted by Lerner and Loewe to become the Broadway musical “My Fair Lady”. The musical spun off the wonderful 1964 film of the same name starring Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison. To cockney Eliza Doolittle, Professor Henry Higgins was “‘Enry ‘Iggins”.

16. Noah’s firstborn : SHEM

According to the Book of Genesis, Noah lived to a ripe old age. Noah fathered his three sons Shem, Ham and Japheth when he was 500 years old, and the Great Flood took place when he was 600.

18. Big East hoopster : HOYA

The athletic teams of Georgetown University are known as the Hoyas. The name is derived from “Hoya Saxa”, a traditional cheer yelled out at Georgetown games as far back as 1893. The term is a mixture of Greek and Latin, with the Greek word “hoya” meaning “such” or “what”, and “saxa” translating from Latin as “rocks” or “small stones”. The cheer is usually rendered in English as “what rocks!”.

21. Rapper-turned-actor in “NCIS: Los Angeles” : LL COOL J

Rap star LL Cool J was born James Todd Smith. Smith’s stage name stands for “Ladies Love Cool James”. When not rapping, LL Cool J plays Special Agent Sam Hanna on TV show “NCIS: Los Angeles”.

24. Tiny, made tinier : LIL’

Lil’ is a short form of the word “little”.

28. Decadent : EFFETE

Something effete is degenerate, infertile, no longer productive. “Effete” comes from the Latin “ex-fetus”, literally “out of offspring”.

33. Gold standard : KARAT

A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

34. Univ. aides : TAS

Teaching assistant (TA)

35. Luau fare : POI

Nowadays the word “luau” denotes almost any kind of party on the Hawaiian Islands, but to the purist a luau is a feast that always includes a serving of “poi”, the bulbous underground stems of taro baked with coconut milk.

37. Joyful dances : JIGS

The dance known as a “jig” is most associated with Ireland and Scotland. In traditional Irish dancing, the jig is second in popularity only to the reel. The most famous Irish jig is probably “The Irish Washerwoman”. I may not dance a jig, but I sure do know the tune of “The Irish Washerwoman” …

43. Hindu title : RANI

A ranee (also spelled “rani”) is a queen or a princess, the female equivalent of a raja in India.

47. Tennyson’s “__ Arden” : ENOCH

Alfred, Lord Tennyson published his poem “Enoch Arden” in 1864. It tells the tale of Enoch Arden who went to sea in order to support his wife and children. He gets shipwrecked, and is lost for ten years, presumed drowned. When Enoch returns, he finds his wife happily married to another man, a man who had been his lifelong rival. Sad stuff …

49. Character who debuted in “First Blood” : JOHN RAMBO

“First Blood” was the original of the four “Rambo” films starring Sylvester Stallone as John Rambo, a troubled Vietnam War veteran. I thought “First Blood” was a pretty good film actually, but the sequels were terrible, and way too violent for me. But action all the way …

54. With 46-Across, quit working : CONKED …
(46A. See 54-Across : … OUT)

The phrase “conk out” was coined by airmen during WWI, and was used to describe the stalling of an engine.

59. Genuine, for real : SYNONYM

The word “genuine” is a synonym for “real”.

62. Bloke : LAD

“Bloke” is British slang for “fellow”. The etymology of “bloke” seems to have been lost in the mists of time.

63. “Rich men sin, and __ root”: “Timon of Athens” : I EAT

Timon of Athens was noted for renouncing society, for being someone who despised mankind. Timon started out life as a wealthy man, but he lost all his money by pandering to the needs of his friends. Without money, Timon’s friends deserted him. Timon became rich again when he found a pot of gold, and so his friends sought him out once more. Timon was very embittered and so drove everyone away and lived the rest of his life as a hermit. Centuries after he died, Timon of Athens was to become the title character in “Timon of Athens”, a play by William Shakespeare

68. __ stick : POGO

What we know today as a pogo stick was invented in Germany by Max Pohlig and Ernst Gottschall. The name “pogo” comes from the first two letters in each of the inventors’ family names: Po-hlig and Go-ttschall.

69. “Beetle Bailey” pooch : OTTO

Sgt. Snorkel (“Sarge”) is Beetle Bailey’s nemesis in the cartoon strip that bears his name. Snorkel has a dog called Otto that he dresses up to look just like himself. Otto started off as a regular dog, but artist Mort Walker decide to draw him more like his owner, and soon Otto became a big hit.

70. Slice-and-dice product suffix : -MATIC

Like the Veg-O-Matic, perhaps.

71. Crimean War leader : TSAR

The Crimean War of 1855-1856 was fought between Russia and an alliance of France, Britain, the Ottoman Empire and Sardinia. One of the most famous engagements of the Crimean War was the 1854 Battle of Balaclava, which involved the disastrous Charge of the Light Brigade.

72. Lamp gas : NEON

The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

73. Walter White’s Pontiac model in “Breaking Bad” : AZTEK

The Pontiac Aztek is a mid-size crossover SUV that was made by GM from 2001 to 2005. The vehicle was also sold as the Buick Rendezvous. The Aztek was a commercial flop, although it has been getting a bit of a following in recent years as it featured in the hit TV series “Breaking Bad”.

Down

1. Hardly a neophyte : OLD PRO

A neophyte is a recent convert to a particular doctrine or practice.

3. Emetic drug : IPECAC

Syrup of ipecac is a preparation made from the dried roots and rhizomes of the ipecacuanha plant. The syrup is used as an emetic, a substance that induces vomiting. Ipecac accomplishes this by irritating the lining of the stomach.

5. Airline since 1948 : EL AL

El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. The term “el al” translates from Hebrew as “to the skies”. The company started operations in 1948, with a flight from Geneva to Tel Aviv.

8. Drop to the canvas : KAYO

A “kayo” is a knock-out (KO).

9. Marshy hollow : SWALE

A swale is a narrow tract of low-lying land that is usually wet or marshy. A swale can be naturally occurring or man-made. One might create a swale to help manage drainage of adjacent land.

10. Mentalist’s gift : ESP

Extrasensory perception (ESP)

11. Ill-tempered : CHOLERIC

“Choler” is “anger, irritability”. Choler (also “cholera”) was one of the body’s four basic substances of medieval science, the so-called four humors. All diseases were caused by these four substances getting out of balance. The four humors were:

  • Black bile (melancholia)
  • Yellow bile (cholera)
  • Phlegm (phlegma)
  • Blood (sanguis)

23. 35th pres. : JFK

John Fitzgerald Kennedy (JFK) was the son of Joe Kennedy and Rose Fitzgerald, hence the president’s double-barreled name.

26. Indy racer Danica or sportscaster Dan : PATRICK

Danica Patrick is a very successful auto racing driver. She won the 2008 Indy Japan 300. making her the only woman to win an IndyCar Series race. Patrick also finished third in the 2009 Indy 500, the highest finish for a woman in that race.

Dan Patrick is a sportscaster and radio personality. He is host of “The Dan Patrick Show” on the radio and is co-host of “Football Night in America” on NBC television.

29. Sizzling Tex-Mex dish : FAJITAS

“Fajita” is a Tex-Mex term that refers to grilled meat served on a tortilla. The original Mexican-Spanish term “fajita” is used to describe a small strip of chicken or beef. Nowadays, fajitas are often served on a sizzling platter with the tortillas and condiments on the side.

38. Camera named for a goddess : CANON EOS

I’ve been using Canon EOS cameras for decades now, and have nothing but good things to say about both the cameras and the lenses. The EOS name stands for Electro-Optical System, and was chosen because it evokes the name of Eos, the Titan goddess of dawn from Greek mythology.

39. Five Nations tribe : ONONDAGA

The Iroquois Confederacy was also known as the Five Nations and was comprised of the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca nations.

40. “The Big Bang Theory” astrophysicist : RAJ

Raj Koothrappali is a character on the sitcom “The Big Bang Theory” who is played by British-Indian actor Kunal Nayyar. Nayyar is married to Neha Kapur, a former Miss India.

42. Pelt : FUR

A pelt is the skin of a furry animal.

45. Home city of Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper : TORONTO

“The Globe and Mail” is a Canadian newspaper based in Toronto and distributed nationwide. The paper is a descendant of “The Globe”, a Toronto publication founded in 1844. “The Globe and Mail” had a significant redesign and relaunch in 2010, a step made necessary I suppose by the global migration to online news reporting.

50. Muppet master : HENSON

Jim Henson was a puppeteer, and most famously the creator the Muppets characters. Henson produced his first puppets for a local television station in Hyattsville, Maryland while he was still in high school. As well as the famous Muppet characters, Henson created, operated and voiced the character Yoda in most of the “Star Wars” movies. Henson died from a streptococcal infection in 1990, on the same day that Sammy Davis, Jr. passed away.

51. Giant in Cooperstown : MEL OTT

At 5′ 9″, baseball legend Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don’t think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old.

Cooperstown is a village in New York that is famous as the home to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The village was named for Judge William Cooper, Cooperstown’s founder, and the father of the noted writer James Fenimore Cooper.

52. Small cap : BEANIE

A beanie is a knitted, close-fitting hat with no brim. The name probably comes from the slang term “bean” meaning “head”.

55. Bagless vacuum pioneer : DYSON

Dyson vacuum cleaners do not use a bag to collect dust. James Dyson invented the first vacuum cleaner to use cyclonic separation in 1979, frustrated at the poor performance of his regular vacuum cleaner. As Dyson cleaners do not use bags, they don’t have to deal with collection bags that are blocked with fine dust particles, even after emptying. Cyclonic separation uses high speed spinning of the dust-containing air so that the dust particles are thrown out of the airflow into a collection bin. We have a Dyson now, and should have bought it years ago …

60. Staff member? : NOTE

The set of five horizontal line and four spaces used in Western musical notation can be called a staff or stave. Either way, the plural form is “staves”.

64. Craggy peak : TOR

A tor is a high rocky hill. “Tor” comes from the Old English “torr”, the word for a tower or rock, which in turn comes from the Old Welsh “twrr” meaning a heap or a pile.

67. Tornadic Looney Tunes spinner : TAZ

The “Looney Tunes” character known as the Tasmanian Devil, or “Taz”, first appeared in a cartoon short with Bugs Bunny called “Devil May Care” in 1954.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Sheepish? : OVINE

6. Seeks information : ASKS

10. Wave back? : ECHO

14. Fashion flap : LAPEL

15. Eliza Doolittle’s creator : SHAW

16. Noah’s firstborn : SHEM

17. __ blank (was stumped) : DREW A

18. Big East hoopster : HOYA

19. One of many on a sweater? : PORE

20. Headshot, e.g. : PIC

21. Rapper-turned-actor in “NCIS: Los Angeles” : LL COOL J

24. Tiny, made tinier : LIL’

25. Collect : REAP

27. Cake grain : OAT

28. Decadent : EFFETE

30. Perceived Hollywood oversight : OSCAR SNUB

33. Gold standard : KARAT

34. Univ. aides : TAS

35. Luau fare : POI

37. Joyful dances : JIGS

38. With 41-Across, corporate status symbol … and a hint to the circled letters : CORNER …

41. See 38-Across : … OFFICE

43. Hindu title : RANI

44. Modeled for a portrait : SAT

46. See 54-Across : … OUT

47. Tennyson’s “__ Arden” : ENOCH

49. Character who debuted in “First Blood” : JOHN RAMBO

54. With 46-Across, quit working : CONKED …

56. Fam. member : REL

57. Spotted : SEEN

58. Terminate : END

59. Genuine, for real : SYNONYM

62. Bloke : LAD

63. “Rich men sin, and __ root”: “Timon of Athens” : I EAT

65. Princes, but not princesses : SONS

66. Advice to sinners : ATONE

68. __ stick : POGO

69. “Beetle Bailey” pooch : OTTO

70. Slice-and-dice product suffix : -MATIC

71. Crimean War leader : TSAR

72. Lamp gas : NEON

73. Walter White’s Pontiac model in “Breaking Bad” : AZTEK

Down

1. Hardly a neophyte : OLD PRO

2. Fluctuates : VARIES

3. Emetic drug : IPECAC

4. Never used : NEW

5. Airline since 1948 : EL AL

6. Rubbish bin : ASHCAN

7. Have a growth spurt : SHOOT UP

8. Drop to the canvas : KAYO

9. Marshy hollow : SWALE

10. Mentalist’s gift : ESP

11. Ill-tempered : CHOLERIC

12. Ancestry : HERITAGE

13. Morning orders : OMELETS

22. Setbacks : LOSSES

23. 35th pres. : JFK

26. Indy racer Danica or sportscaster Dan : PATRICK

29. Sizzling Tex-Mex dish : FAJITAS

31. Conducted : RAN

32. Didn’t say __: had no comment : BOO

36. Words of regret : IF ONLY

38. Camera named for a goddess : CANON EOS

39. Five Nations tribe : ONONDAGA

40. “The Big Bang Theory” astrophysicist : RAJ

42. Pelt : FUR

43. Register printout : RECEIPT

45. Home city of Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper : TORONTO

48. Cock and bull : HES

50. Muppet master : HENSON

51. Giant in Cooperstown : MEL OTT

52. Small cap : BEANIE

53. Next up : ON DECK

55. Bagless vacuum pioneer : DYSON

60. Staff member? : NOTE

61. Crib cry : MAMA!

64. Craggy peak : TOR

67. Tornadic Looney Tunes spinner : TAZ

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