LA Times Crossword Answers 23 Mar 17, Thursday










Constructed by: Matthew Sewell

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Pump Up the Volume

We’ve PUMPED UP THE VOLUME of three things to give us today’s themed answers:

  • 59A. What a deejay might do to create energy … or a request that may lead to 17-, 25- and 46-Across : PUMP UP THE VOLUME
  • 17A. 7-Eleven’s Big Gulp, for one : SUPERSIZED DRINK
  • 25A. It makes for easier reading : LARGE-PRINT BOOK
  • 46A. Teased style : BOUFFANT HAIRDO

Bill’s time: 11m 09s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Munro pen name : SAKI

Hector Hugh Munro was a British writer, who actually was born in Burma. He was most famous for his short stories, which he published using the pen name “Saki”. “The Square Egg and Other Sketches” was a collection of short stories published in 1924, nine years after his death.

5. Fix, as faulty code : DEBUG

Back in 1947, the famed computer programmer Grace Hopper noticed some colleagues fixing a piece of equipment by removing a dead moth from a relay. She remarked that they were “debugging” the system, and so Hopper has been given credit for popularizing the term.

14. Scoundrel of “Tess of the D’Urbervilles” : ALEC

The full name of Thomas Hardy’s 1891 novel is “Tess of the d’Urbervilles” A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented”. When it was originally published, “Tess …” received very mixed reviews, largely because it addressed some difficult sexual themes including rape, and sexual double standards (attitudes towards men vs women). I suppose the most celebrated screen adaptation is Roman Polanski’s “Tess” released in 1979. Polanski apparently made “Tess” because his wife, Sharon Tate, gave him Hardy’s novel as her last act before she was murdered by the Manson family. There is a dedication at the beginning of the movie that just says “To Sharon”.

15. One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” : IRINA

Olga, Masha and Irina were the “Three Sisters” in the play by Anton Chekhov. The three title characters were inspired by the three Brontë sisters, the English authors.

Anton Chekhov was a Russian writer of short stories and a playwright, as well as a physician. He wrote four classic plays that are often performed all around the world, namely “The Seagull”, “Uncle Vanya”, “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard”. All the time Chekhov was writing, he continued to practice medicine. He is quoted as saying “Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.”

16. Sharpen : HONE

“To hone” is to sharpen, a verb derived from the noun “hone” A “hone” is a whetstone used in sharpening.

17. 7-Eleven’s Big Gulp, for one : SUPERSIZED DRINK

The Big Gulp is a 32-ounce oversized soft drink available from 7-Eleven. You can also get a 64-ounce Double Gulp, and a 128-ounce Team Gulp.

21. “__ Pointe Blank”: 1997 film : GROSSE

“Grosse Pointe Blank” is an excellent 1997 comedy-crime movie starring John Cusack and Minnie Driver. The film has a fresh storyline and great acting, with a 1980s-themed soundtrack as an added bonus. The title refers to Grosse Pointe, a suburb of Detroit where the movie is set.

22. Shipping nickname : ARI

Aristotle Onassis was born to a successful Greek shipping entrepreneur in Smyrna in modern-day Turkey. However, his family lost its fortune during WWI and so Aristotle worked with his father to build up a new business empire centered on the importation of tobacco. In 1957, Aristotle founded the Greek national airline, what is today called Olympic Air, and he also got into the business of shipping oil around the world. He married Athina Livanos in 1946, the daughter of a wealthy shipping magnate. They couple had two children together, with one being the famous Christina Onassis. Livanos divorced Onassis on discovering him in bed with the opera singer Maria Callas. Onassis ended his affair with Callas in order to marry Jackie Kennedy in 1968.

31. McKinley’s first lady : IDA

Ida Saxton met Bill McKinley at a picnic in 1867, just before she headed off to Europe on a “grand tour”. So, the two had to wait until 1869 before they started courting. The couple married in 1871 in Canton, Ohio, Ida’s hometown. Ida McKinley developed epilepsy before her husband was elected to President of the US and became very dependent on him to provide physical and moral support. She always sat by his side at public functions, breaking with the tradition of the President hosting some of the guests, and the First Lady others. After her husband was assassinated, Mrs. McKinley could not bring herself to attend her husband’s funeral, and then withdrew from public view to her home in Canton. She passed away six years after her husband, in 1907.

35. PC’s spacebar neighbor : ALT

The Alt (alternate) key is found on either side of the space bar on US PC keyboards. The Alt key evolved from what was called a Meta key on old MIT keyboards, although the function has changed somewhat over the years. Alt is equivalent in many ways to the Option key on a Mac keyboard, and indeed the letters “Alt” have been printed on most Mac keyboards starting in the nineties.

36. Mayor pro __ : TEM

Pro tempore can be abbreviated to “pro tem” or “p.t.” “Pro tempore” is a Latin phrase that best translates as “for the time being”. It is used to describe a person who is acting for another, usually a superior. The President pro tempore of the US Senate is the person who presides over the Senate in the absence of the Vice President of the US. It has been tradition since 1890 that the president pro tem is the most senior senator in the majority party. The president pro tem ranks highly in the line of succession to the presidency, falling third in line after the Vice President and the Speaker of the House.

40. Replayed service : LET

That would be tennis.

43. “The Haywain Triptych” painter : BOSCH

Hieronymus Bosch was a Dutch painter who worked late 15th and early 16th centuries. Perhaps his most recognized work is his triptych titled “The Garden of Earthly Delights”.

46. Teased style : BOUFFANT HAIRDO

“Bouffant” is a French word meaning “puffed out” that we’ve imported into English. Apparently, the first use of “bouffant” with reference to a hairstyle dates back to 1955.

50. Many a “Call the Midwife” character : NURSE

“Call the Midwife” is a BBC drama about midwives working in the East End of London in the late fifties and early sixties. I must admit, one of the reasons I am intrigued by this show is that I can well remember the midwife coming to our house in the East End of London in 1959 for the delivery of my younger brother. I am sure the attending nurse was a wonderful person, but I remember being scared every time she pulled up outside our flat on her bicycle!

51. Part of FWIW : IT’S

For what it’s worth (FWIW)

52. Yak-like : SHAGGY

The English word “yak” is an Anglicized version of the Tibetan name for the male of the species. Yak milk is much prized in the Tibetan culture. It is made into cheese and butter, and the butter is used to make a tea that is consumed in great volume by Tibetans. The butter is also used as a fuel in lamps, and during festivals the butter is even sculpted into religious icons.

55. Honeymoon spots : RESORTS

The concept of a honeymoon vacation only started in the early 1800s. In Britain, wealthy couples would take a “bridal tour” together after wedding, visiting those friends and relatives who could not attend the ceremony. The etymology of “honeymoon” isn’t very clear, and may even have a negative derivation as it might suggest that the sweetness (honey) of love is doomed to wane like a passing phase of the moon. The equivalent terms in some other languages are “moon of honey” (French), “honey month” (Welsh) and “tinsel week” (German).

62. Digital imaging brand : AGFA

Agfa was founded in Germany in 1867, a company focused on the manufacture of dyes. The full name of the enterprise was Aktiengesellschaft für Anilinfabrikation, shortened to Agfa, and translating as “Corporation for Aniline (a dye) Production”. Agfa merged with the Belgian company Gevaert in 1894, getting them into the photographic business. Agfa 35mm film hasn’t been produced for a few years now, but there is still inventory out there and purists are buying it when they can.

66. iPods since 2005 : NANOS

The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been seven versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, has a pedometer and can connect with external devices (like a heart monitor, maybe) using Bluetooth technology.

67. “The Facts of Life” mentor Garrett : EDNA

Charlotte Rae is an American actress, best known for playing the character Edna Garrett on two sitcoms from the seventies and eighties: “Diff’rent Strokes” and “The Facts of Life”. Towards the end of the series, the Edna Garrett character operated her own gourmet food shop called “Edna’s Edibles”.

The sitcom “The Facts of Life” originally aired from 1979 until 1988. It was a spin-off of the equally successful show “Diff’rent Strokes”. Charlotte Rae was the main actress common to both shows. Rae played Edna Garrett, who was a housekeeper on “Diff’rent Strokes” and a dormitory housemother on “The Facts of Life”.

Down

2. His, in Le Havre : A LUI

The French for “his, belonging to him” is “à lui”, and for “hers, belonging to her” is “à elle”

Le Havre is a city on the mouth of the river Seine on the northwest coast of France. The city’s name translates as “the haven”.

6. He played Frank on “CHiPs” : ERIK

Actor Erik Estrada’s big break came with the movie “Airport 1975”, in which he played the doomed flight engineer of a Boeing 747. A couple of years later, Estrada began a six-year gig, co-starring on the television show “CHiPs” as motorcycle police officer Poncherello.

The TV cop show “CHiPs” ran from 1977 until 1983. Stars of the show were Larry Wilcox and Erik Estrada, who played two California HIghway Patrol (CHP) motorcycle officers. I find it interesting that the storylines never once called for the officers to draw their firearms over the six seasons (how shows have changed!). Erik Estrada had to learn how to ride a motorcycle for the show, but wasn’t licensed to drive one during the whole of production. He eventually qualified, but only after three attempts to pass the test.

10. Greek personification of time : CHRONOS

“Chronos” is the Greek word for time, with the name applying in Ancient Greece to a personification of time. He was not a Greek god, although Chronos has often been confused with the Titan Cronus of Greek mythology. The Titan Cronus was often depicted with a scythe, as this was the tool he used to castrate his father Uranus. The confusion of Chronos and Cronus led to the traditional depiction of “Old Father Time” with a scythe.

11. Lane often in distress : LOIS

Lois Lane has been the love interest of Superman/Clark Kent since the comic series was first published in 1938. Lois and Clark both work for the big newspaper in the city of Metropolis called “The Daily Planet”. The couple finally got hitched in the comics (and on television’s “Lois and Clark”) in 1996. But never mind all that … one has to wonder how challenging the crossword is in “The Daily Planet” …

13. Long-haired lap dog, familiarly : PEKE

The pekingese breed originated in China, as one might suspect from the name. Breeding practices have resulted in the the dog having many health problems, including breathing issues related to the “desirable” flat face. Standards have been changed in recent years, demanding an “evident muzzle” in an attempt to breed healthier dogs.

19. Minute amount : DRIB

A “drib” is a negligible amount, as in “dribs and drabs”.

23. Element in pewter : TIN

Pewter is a relatively soft alloy that is made up mostly of tin, with some copper, antimony, bismuth and lead.

26. Impulsive line : AD LIB

“Ad libitum” is a Latin phrase meaning “at one’s pleasure”. In common usage the phrase is usually shortened to “ad lib”. On the stage the concept of an “ad lib” is very familiar.

27. “I’m walkin’ here!” speaker of 1969 : RATSO

Enrico Salvatore “Ratso” Rizzo is one of the characters in the groundbreaking 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy”. Rizzo is a down-and-out con man, played by Dustin Hoffman.

The 1969 movie “Midnight Cowboy” is a Hollywood adaptation of a novel of the same name by James Leo Herlihy. It’s a pretty depressing story about a young Texan named Joe Buck (played by Jon Voight) who heads to New York City to make money as a hustler, hiring himself out to women for sex. Pretty soon the young man ends up selling his body for sex with males as well. Prior to release the MPAA gave the movie an R-rating, but the United Artists studio took advice and decided to release it with an X-rating. When “Midnight Cowboy” won the Best Picture Academy Award in 1969, it became the only X-rated film to be so honored.

28. “Dancing With the Stars” dances : RUMBAS

The rumba (sometimes “rhumba”) is a Cuban dance, with influences brought by African slaves and Spanish colonists. The name “rumba” comes from “rumbo”, the Spanish word for “party, spree”.

When I was growing up in the British Isles, there was a surprisingly popular BBC television show featuring professional ballroom dancing called “Come Dancing”. It ran almost every year from 1949 to 1998, and in 2004 the BBC resurrected it with a new twist, adding celebrities to dance with the professionals. The new show, called “Strictly Come Dancing”, is a huge success and has become a worldwide franchise. Over here we watch the American version called “Dancing with the Stars”. It really is fun television …

29. Persian Gulf sight : OILER

An “oiler” is an oil tanker, an ocean-going vessel used to transport crude oil.

34. Texas ALer : ‘STRO

The Houston baseball team changed its name to the Astros (sometimes “’Stros”) from the Colt .45s in 1965 when they started playing in the Astrodome. The Astrodome was so called in recognition of the city’s long association with the US space program. The Astros moved from the National League to the American League starting in the 2013 season.

42. Spicy Chinese dish : KUNG PAO

Kung Pao chicken is a Sichuan stir-fry dish that includes chicken, peanuts, vegetables and chili peppers. The name “Kung Pao” is thought to come from a governor of the Sichuan province whose title was “Gongbao”, meaning “Palace Guardian”.

47. Fish whose preparation is strictly regulated in Japan : FUGU

Fugu is the Japanese name for pufferfish. Fugu is a notorious dish on a Japanese menu as it can be extremely poisonous. The liver, ovaries and eyes of the pufferfish contain lethal amounts of the poison tetrodotoxin, which paralyses muscles causing death by asphyxiation.

49. Lover of Tristan : ISOLDE

According to Arthurian legend, Iseult (also “Isolde”) was the adulterous lover of Sir Tristan, one of the Knights of the Round Table. Iseult was an Irish Princess who fell in love with Tristan who had been sent to win Iseult’s hand in marriage for King Mark of Cornwall. The tale was used as the basis for Richard Wagner’s celebrated opera “Tristan und Isolde”.

52. Virtually bombard : SPAM

Apparently the term “spam”, used for unwanted email, is taken from a “Monty Python” sketch. In the sketch (which I’ve seen) the dialog is taken over by the word Spam, a play on the glut of canned meat in the markets of Britain after WWII. So “spam” is used for the glut of emails that takes over online communication. I can just imagine nerdy Internet types (like me) adopting something from a “Monty Python” sketch to describe an online phenomenon …

57. IRS agent : T-MAN

A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (T is for Treasury).

58. Vaccines : SERA

A vaccine is a modified virus that causes a particular disease, which is administered to an individual to stimulate the immune system into developing immunity. British physician Edward Jenner came up with the first vaccine, injecting people with the cowpox virus in order to prevent smallpox. The term “vaccination” comes from the Latin “vaccinus” meaning “from cows”, with “vacca” translating as “cow”.

60. Placeholder abbr. : TBA

Something not yet on the schedule (“sked” or “sched.”) is to be advised (TBA).

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Munro pen name : SAKI

5. Fix, as faulty code : DEBUG

10. Shorten : CLIP

14. Scoundrel of “Tess of the D’Urbervilles” : ALEC

15. One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” : IRINA

16. Sharpen : HONE

17. 7-Eleven’s Big Gulp, for one : SUPERSIZED DRINK

20. Prepare to relax : SIT BACK

21. “__ Pointe Blank”: 1997 film : GROSSE

22. Shipping nickname : ARI

23. Marketing gimmick : TIE-IN

25. It makes for easier reading : LARGE-PRINT BOOK

31. McKinley’s first lady : IDA

32. Like mud in election season : SLUNG

33. Serious violations : SINS

35. PC’s spacebar neighbor : ALT

36. Mayor pro __ : TEM

37. Swallow : EAT

40. Replayed service : LET

41. Lay on the line : RISK

43. “The Haywain Triptych” painter : BOSCH

45. Keen perception : EAR

46. Teased style : BOUFFANT HAIRDO

50. Many a “Call the Midwife” character : NURSE

51. Part of FWIW : IT’S

52. Yak-like : SHAGGY

55. Honeymoon spots : RESORTS

59. What a deejay might do to create energy … or a request that may lead to 17-, 25- and 46-Across : PUMP UP THE VOLUME

62. Digital imaging brand : AGFA

63. Lodging : ABODE

64. Highly prized : DEAR

65. Exec’s dispatch : MEMO

66. iPods since 2005 : NANOS

67. “The Facts of Life” mentor Garrett : EDNA

Down

1. Get fresh with : SASS

2. His, in Le Havre : A LUI

3. Didn’t surrender : KEPT

4. Old-style hangover relief : ICE BAG

5. Devoted follower : DISCIPLE

6. He played Frank on “CHiPs” : ERIK

7. Commercial URL suffix : BIZ

8. French article : UNE

9. Many an infomercial offering : GADGET

10. Greek personification of time : CHRONOS

11. Lane often in distress : LOIS

12. Honeymoon options : INNS

13. Long-haired lap dog, familiarly : PEKE

18. Most interesting to a collector : RAREST

19. Minute amount : DRIB

23. Element in pewter : TIN

24. Swallow : INGEST

25. Accusatory retort : LIAR!

26. Impulsive line : AD LIB

27. “I’m walkin’ here!” speaker of 1969 : RATSO

28. “Dancing With the Stars” dances : RUMBAS

29. Persian Gulf sight : OILER

30. Massage : KNEAD

34. Texas ALer : ‘STRO

38. Pulls off : ACHIEVES

39. “Oh yeah?” : THAT SO?

42. Spicy Chinese dish : KUNG PAO

44. A : ONE

47. Fish whose preparation is strictly regulated in Japan : FUGU

48. Griddle alternative : FRYPAN

49. Lover of Tristan : ISOLDE

52. Virtually bombard : SPAM

53. Voluminous : HUGE

54. Switch on a radio : AM/FM

55. Modernize : REDO

56. Kicked oneself about : RUED

57. IRS agent : T-MAN

58. Vaccines : SERA

60. Placeholder abbr. : TBA

61. Sweetheart : HON

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LA Times Crossword Answers 22 Mar 17, Wednesday










Constructed by: Don Gagliardo & C.C. Burnikel

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Triple Play

The first word in each of today’s themed answers includes just one vowel appearing three times, a TRIPLE PLAY of sorts. And, we progress through the vowels alphabetically going through the grid from top to bottom:

  • 55A. Baseball rarity, and a hint to the vowels in the first words of 16-, 22-, 29-, 37- and 44-Across : TRIPLE PLAY
  • 16A. Monkey cage discard : BANANA PEEL
  • 22A. Reason for totaling, as an insured car : SEVERE DAMAGE
  • 29A. Cause of some tan lines : BIKINI TOP
  • 37A. Ornate 18th-century genre : ROCOCO ART
  • 44A. Fluffy sun blocker : CUMULUS CLOUD

Bill’s time: 7m 17s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Addams family nickname : TISH

Gomez and Morticia (“Tish”) Addams were the parents in “The Addams Family”, a creation of the cartoonist Charles Addams. In the sixties television show, Gomez was played by John Astin and Morticia was played by Carolyn Jones.

10. Festoons with Charmin, for short : TP’S

TP’ing (toilet papering) is a prank involving the covering of some object or location with rolls and rolls of toilet paper. If you live in Texas or Minnesota, that little “prank” is legal, but if you live here in California it is classed as mischief or vandalism.

Charmin is a brand of toilet paper made by Procter & Gamble.

13. Chicago airport : O’HARE

O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII.

14. Barak of Israel : EHUD

Ehud Barak served as Prime Minister of Israel from 1999 to 2001, taking over from Benjamin Netanyahu. Barak left office after he called a special election for Prime Minister and lost the vote to Ariel Sharon. Barak resigned from the Knesset and took an advisory job with the US company Electronic Data Systems (EDS), and did some security-related work with a private equity company. In 2007, Barak took over leadership of Israel’s Labor Party.

15. __ butter : SHEA

“Shea butter” is a common moisturizer or lotion used as a cosmetic. It is a fat that is extracted from the nut of the African shea tree. There is evidence that shea butter was used back in Cleopatra’s Egypt.

19. Govt. agency that supports startups : SBA

The Small Business Administration (SBA) is a government agency with the mission of assisting small businesses. The SBA doesn’t give loans itself, but it does act as a guarantor under the right circumstances. The SBA was set up in 1953, and isn’t a favorite with fiscal conservatives.

21. Ride in the desert : CAMEL

The dromedary, also known as the Arabian Camel or Indian Camel, is the camel that has only one hump. The other species of camel is the Bactrian, which has two humps. The hump of a dromedary contains up to 80 pounds of fat, which can be broken down into water and energy if no food or water is available.

28. Coral component : POLYP

Polyps are tiny sea creatures that are found attached to underwater structures or to other polyps. Polyps have a mouth at one end of a cylindrical “body” that is surrounded by tentacles. Some polyps cluster into groups called stony corals, with stony corals being the building blocks of coral reefs. The structure of the reef is provided by calcium carbonate exoskeletons secreted by the coral polyps.

29. Cause of some tan lines : BIKINI TOP

The origin of the word “bikini”, a type of bathing suit, seems very uncertain. My favorite story is that it is named after the Bikini Atoll, site of American A-bomb tests in the forties and fifties. The name “bikini” was chosen for the swim-wear because of the “explosive” effect it had on men who saw a woman wearing the garment!

34. “All Things Considered” co-host Shapiro : ARI

Ari Shapiro was the very able White House correspondent for National Public Radio (NPR) for several years. He became a co-host of network’s drive-time program “All Things Considered” in 2015.

“All Things Considered” is the flagship news broadcast by NPR, aired for two hours every evening.

35. Day of song : DORIS

The actress and singer Doris Day was born Doris Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio. Day made more than 650 recordings as a singer with Columbia Records, and also appeared in 39 movies. Outside the world of entertainment, she has been an ardent supporter of animal rights. She now lives in Carmel-by-the-Sea in California, along with her many pets and stray animals that she has adopted over the years.

37. Ornate 18th-century genre : ROCOCO ART

The Rococo style is also known as “Late Baroque”. Rococo is a very floral and playful style, very ornate.

40. Thyme piece : SPRIG

In Ancient Greece, thyme was burned as incense and used in baths as it was believed to be a source of courage.

44. Fluffy sun blocker : CUMULUS CLOUD

Cumulus clouds are low-level clouds that look very “puffy”, with clearly defined edges and flat bases. “Cumulus” is Latin for “heap, pile”.

51. Unit of resistance : OHM

The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every schoolkid knows as Ohm’s Law.

54. Poker at the table? : TINE

At a poker table, a croupier might use a rake to pull in the chips, and that rake has tines, projecting points.

59. Meditation teachers : YOGIS

A yogi is a practitioner of yoga.

In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

60. “The Affair” network, briefly : SHO

“The Affair” is a drama series on Showtime about a novelist and a waitress having an extramarital affair in a Long Island resort town. Stars of the show are the marvelous Dominic West and Ruth Wilson. I haven’t seen this one, but hear good things …

Down

2. Starbuck’s boss : AHAB

The most famous whale-hunting ship in fiction has to be Herman Melville’s Pequod, featured in his novel “Moby Dick”. The Pequod is a skippered by the maniacal Captain Ahab, and the young chief mate is the thoughtful and intellectual Starbuck. Starbuck’s name was lifted and used by a Seattle-based coffee company.

4. Tax-deferred plan, briefly : IRA

Individual retirement account (IRA)

6. Prairie home : TEPEE

A tepee (also written as “tipi” and “teepee”) is a cone-shaped tent traditionally made from animal hides that is used by the Great Plains Native Americans. A wigwam is a completely different structure and is often a misnomer for a tepee. A wigwam is a domed structure built by Native Americans in the West and Southwest, intended to be a more permanent dwelling. The wigwam can also be covered with hides but more often was covered with grass, reeds, brush or cloth.

7. The Supremes’ “__ a Symphony” : I HEAR

“I Hear a Symphony” is a 1965 hit song recorded by the Supremes, the trio’s sixth number-one in the US.

The Supremes were the most successful vocal group in US history, based on number-one hits. The group started out in 1959 as a four-member lineup called the Primettes. The name was changed to the Supremes in 1961. One member dropped out in 1962, leaving the Supremes as a trio. Lead singer Diana Ross began to garner much of the attention, which eventually led to a further name change, to Diana Ross & the Supremes.

9. Cholesterol letters : HDL

HDL (high-density lipoprotein) is a compound that is used to transport fats around the body. When HDL is combined with (i.e. is transporting) cholesterol, it is often called “good cholesterol”. This is because HDL seems to remove cholesterol from where it should not be, say on the walls of arteries, and transports it to the liver for reuse or disposal. Important stuff …

10. Annual Augusta National event : THE MASTERS

Golf’s Masters Tournament is the first of the four major championships in the annual calendar, taking place in the first week of April each year. It is played at Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, and has a number of traditions. One is that the winner is awarded the famous “green jacket”, but he only gets to keep it for a year and must return it to the club after twelve months.

The Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia was founded in 1933 by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Famously, Augusta hosts the Masters Tournament each year. Augusta is very much a private club, and some of its policies have drawn criticism over the years. Prior to 1959, the club had a bylaw requiring that all caddies be African American. There were no African-American club members admitted until 1990, and no women until 2012.

11. “Pequod” co-owner : PELEG

The Pequod is the ship that figures in Herman Melville’s classic novel “Moby Dick”. The ship is owned by a consortium of the citizens of Nantucket Island, including Captains Ahab, Bildad and Peleg.

12. Room in a maison : SALLE

In French, there are several “salles” (rooms) in a “maison” (house).

15. Shrimp dish : SCAMPI

The Italian dish known as “scampi” is a serving of shrimp in garlic butter and dry white wine.

17. Off-roaders, for short : ATVS

All-terrain vehicle (ATV)

23. Place of honor : DAIS

Ultimately our word “dais”, meaning “raised platform for a speaker”, comes from the Latin “discus” meaning a “disk-shaped object”. I guess that the original daises had such a shape.

25. Big name in riding mowers : TORO

Toro is a manufacturer of mainly lawn mowers and snow removal equipment based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was started in 1914 to build tractor engines.

26. Canadian short story writer awarded a Nobel Prize in 2013 : ALICE MUNRO

Alice Munro is a writer from southwestern Ontario in Canada. Munro won the 2013 Nobel Prize for Literature.

30. Discount rack abbr. : IRR

Irregular (“irr.” or “irreg.”)

33. Cribbage markers : PEGS

Cribbage is a great card game that originated in 17th-century England, a creation of the poet Sir John Suckling. One of the unique features of the game is that a cribbage board with pegs is used to keep score. Here in the US, cribbage is very much associated with the submarine service, as it is a favorite game of submariners of all ranks.

39. NASCAR’s Yarborough : CALE

Cale Yarborough is a former NASCAR driver and owner. Yarborough was the first NASCAR driver to appear on the cover of “Sports Illustrated”.

45. Hater of David, in Dickens : URIAH

Uriah Heep is a sniveling insincere character in the novel “David Copperfield” by Charles Dickens. The character is such a “yes man” that today, if we know someone who behaves the same way, then we might call that person a “Uriah Heep”.

46. Rx : SCRIP

“Scrip” is an informal term for a prescription.

There seems to some uncertainty about the origin of the symbol “Rx” that’s used for a medical prescription. One explanation is that it comes from the astrological sign for Jupiter, a symbol put on prescriptions in days of old to invoke Jupiter’s blessing to help a patient recover.

48. Aggressive cat lover of cartoons : LE PEW

Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidently painted down her back.

51. Gymnast Korbut : OLGA

Olga Korbut is from modern-day Belarus, but was born during the days of the Soviet Union. Korbut competed for the USSR team in the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Games. She was 17 when she appeared in the 1972 Munich Games, and had been training in a sports school since she was 8-years-old. The world fell in love with her as she was a very emotional young lady, readily expressing joy and disappointment, something that we weren’t used to seeing in athletes from behind the Iron Curtain. Korbut immigrated to the US in 1991 and now lives in Scottsdale, Arizona.

53. Classic PC adventure game : MYST

In the days when I played the occasional video game, the best of the bunch was undoubtedly “Myst”. It is a game full of puzzles with the player wandering through a beautifully-designed (for its day) interactive world.

55. Some univ. proctors : TAS

Teaching Assistants (TAs)

A “proctor” is a supervisor, especially of an examination in a school, or perhaps of a dormitory. The word “proctor” originated in the late 1500s, a contraction of the word “procurator”, the name given to an official agent of a church.

56. Curse : POX

A “pock” is an eruptive mark on the skin, usually caused by an infectious disease. The Middle English plural form “pokkes” gave rise to our term “pox”.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. “That’s enough out of you” : CAN IT

6. Addams family nickname : TISH

10. Festoons with Charmin, for short : TP’S

13. Chicago airport : O’HARE

14. Barak of Israel : EHUD

15. __ butter : SHEA

16. Monkey cage discard : BANANA PEEL

18. Phone using a tower : CELL

19. Govt. agency that supports startups : SBA

20. Kettle output : STEAM

21. Ride in the desert : CAMEL

22. Reason for totaling, as an insured car : SEVERE DAMAGE

24. Social ranking : STATUS

27. Many mobile downloads : APPS

28. Coral component : POLYP

29. Cause of some tan lines : BIKINI TOP

34. “All Things Considered” co-host Shapiro : ARI

35. Day of song : DORIS

36. Fleece source : EWE

37. Ornate 18th-century genre : ROCOCO ART

40. Thyme piece : SPRIG

42. Pre-hurricane emergency op : EVAC

43. Runs after : CHASES

44. Fluffy sun blocker : CUMULUS CLOUD

49. “No one can beat me” : I RULE

50. Poker game concern : CHEAT

51. Unit of resistance : OHM

54. Poker at the table? : TINE

55. Baseball rarity, and a hint to the vowels in the first words of 16-, 22-, 29-, 37- and 44-Across : TRIPLE PLAY

57. Where buds may go : EARS

58. Right hand : AIDE

59. Meditation teachers : YOGIS

60. “The Affair” network, briefly : SHO

61. Flow with force : SPEW

62. Place on a pedestal : EXALT

Down

1. Corny leftovers : COBS

2. Starbuck’s boss : AHAB

3. Child tender : NANA

4. Tax-deferred plan, briefly : IRA

5. Stiffen in fear : TENSE UP

6. Prairie home : TEPEE

7. The Supremes’ “__ a Symphony” : I HEAR

8. “See if I care!” : SUE ME!

9. Cholesterol letters : HDL

10. Annual Augusta National event : THE MASTERS

11. “Pequod” co-owner : PELEG

12. Room in a maison : SALLE

15. Shrimp dish : SCAMPI

17. Off-roaders, for short : ATVS

21. 2-Down’s title, informally : CAP’N

22. Dirty digs : STY

23. Place of honor : DAIS

24. Prep for a bout : SPAR

25. Big name in riding mowers : TORO

26. Canadian short story writer awarded a Nobel Prize in 2013 : ALICE MUNRO

29. Lavish wrap : BOA

30. Discount rack abbr. : IRR

31. First-aid gear : KIT

32. Boo-boo : OWIE

33. Cribbage markers : PEGS

35. Prefix with drama : DOCU-

38. Small eggs : OVULES

39. NASCAR’s Yarborough : CALE

40. Z’s : SHUT-EYE

41. Elbow protector : PAD

43. Mine extraction : COAL

44. Names as a reference : CITES

45. Hater of David, in Dickens : URIAH

46. Rx : SCRIP

47. Reprimand : CHIDE

48. Aggressive cat lover of cartoons : LE PEW

51. Gymnast Korbut : OLGA

52. Flag down : HAIL

53. Classic PC adventure game : MYST

55. Some univ. proctors : TAS

56. Curse : POX

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