LA Times Crossword Answers 25 Oct 12, Thursday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth A. Long
THEME: GOODY, TWO SHOES! … each of the theme answers is made up of two types of shoe:

20A. Question cads in their cups? PUMP (&) HIGH HEELS
28A. Burden beasts of burden? SADDLE (&) MULES
47A. Stumble over plumbing gunk? SLIP ON (&) CLOGS
58A. Proper sort … or a cry upon solving each of this puzzle’s theme answers? GOODY TWO SHOES

COMPLETION TIME: 15m 28s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
14. French possessive A TOI
“À toi” is the French term for “yours”, when talking to someone with whom one is familiar. “À toi” literally means “to you”.

16. “The Voice” judge Green CEE LO
Cee Lo Green is the stage name of rapper Thomas DeCarlo Callaway. That’s all I need to know …

“The Voice” is yet another reality talent show. This one originated in the Netherlands in 2012 as “The Voice of Holland”. The US version first aired in 2011. I just heard about the UK version of “The Voice” and was surprised to hear that Tom Jones is a judge/coach. Tom Jones is still going strong in his seventies.

20. Question cads in their cups? PUMP HIGH HEELS
A pump is a woman’s shoe that doesn’t have a strap. Such shoes are probably called “pumps” because of the sound they make while walking in them.

The expression “in one’s cup” meaning “drunk” is used in Ancient Roman literature, and even in the Bible. Stay away from that cup …

24. Gardner of old films AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of “Mogambo” (1953), “On the Beach” (1959), “The Night of the Iguana” (1964) and “Earthquake” (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

28. Burden beasts of burden? SADDLE MULES
Saddle shoes are those two-tones shoes (usually black and white) that were worn particularly by young women with poodle skirts and bobby socks in the fifties. The name comes from the dark (black) “saddle” of leather that goes over the top of the shoe, in which the eyelets for the laces are inserted. Saddle shoes didn’t make it to Ireland, but bell-bottoms certainly did …

A mule is a shoe without a back, usually with a closed toe. The original mule was a shoe worn by the highest magistrates in Ancient Rome.

32. Western landscape feature MESA
“Mesa” is the Spanish for “table” and is of course is how we get the term “mesa” that describes a geographic feature. “What’s the difference between a butte and a mesa?” I hear you cry! Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, taller than it is wide. Now we know …

38. New Testament book ACTS
The Acts of the Apostles is the fifth book of the New Testament. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts of the Apostles”.

39. Variable-yield investment option I-BOND
An ”I-bond” is an inflation-linked savings bond.

43. CBS newswoman O’Donnell NORAH
Norah O’Donnell is the chief Washington correspondent for MSNBC. Along with her husband, restaurateur Geoff Tracy, O’Donnell published what sounds like an interesting cookbook in 2010, namely “Baby Love: Healthy, Easy, Delicious Meals for Your Baby and Toddler”.

45. Summer baby LEO
Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac.

51. Brahms’s A? EIN
Johannes Brahms was a leading German composer from the Romantic period. Brahms is one of the “Three Bs”, often grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven.

52. View from Marseille MER
“Mer” is the French word for “sea”.

Marseille (often written “Marseilles” in English) is the second largest city in France, after Paris. Marseille is also the largest commercial port in the country. I used to live nearby, and it’s a lovely, lovely place.

64. Waikiki’s whereabouts O’AHU
O’ahu has been called “The Gathering Place”, although the word “O’ahu” has no translation in Hawaiian. It seems that O’ahu is simply the name of the island. One story is that it is named after the son of the Polynesian navigator that first found the islands. The island is made up of two volcanoes, Wai’anae and Ko’olau, joined together by a broad valley, the O’ahu Plain.

65. Yankee great, familiarly, with “The” MICK
Mickey Mantle only played professional baseball for the one team, spending 18 years with the New York Yankees. Mickey Mantle memorabilia is highly prized, especially since he retired from the game in 1969, and even more so since he died in 1995. The only other player memorabilia said to command a higher price is Babe Ruth’s.

67. “Exodus” novelist URIS
“Exodus” is a wonderful novel written by American writer Leon Uris, first published in 1947. The book was incredibly well received by the public, and is the second biggest best seller in the US after “Gone with the Wind”. The hero of the piece is Ari Ben Canaan, played by Paul Newman in the 1960 film adaptation directed by Otto Preminger.

68. US Open stadium ASHE
The Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, New York opened in 1997 and is the largest outdoor, tennis-only venue in the world. The stadium is sometimes criticized for not having a retractable dome to protect the playing surface from inclement weather.

69. Post with carvings TOTEM
Totem is the name given to any entity that watches over a group of people. As such, totems are usually the subjects of worship. So, “totem” poles are really misnamed as the poles are not intended to represent figures to be worshiped, but rather are heraldic in nature often celebrating the legends or notable events in the history of a tribe.

Down
2. “__ friend unbosoms freely …”: Penn A TRUE
William Penn was given a huge land grant in America by King Charles II, because the king owed Penn’s father a lot of money. Penn took up residence on this side of the Atlantic and called his new holding “New Wales”. He later changed this name to “Sylvania” (the Latin for “forest”) and finally to “Pennsylvania”.

4. Longstocking of kiddie lit PIPPI
Pippi Longstocking appears as the heroine in a series of books written by Swedish author Astrid Lindgren. Lindgren is quite the activist, very well known in the circles working for children’s and animal rights, In particular, Lindgren has campaigned heavily against corporal punishment.

5. Hawaiian for “very strong” MAHI-MAHI
Mahi-mahi is the Hawaiian name for the dolphin-fish, an ugly looking creature if ever I saw one …

10. Colorful duck TEAL
The beautiful color of teal takes it name from the duck called a “teal”, which has dark greenish-blue (teal) markings on its head and wings.

11. North Pacific sockeye RED SALMON
The sockeye salmon is also known as the red or blueback salmon. The name “sockeye” comes from “suk-kegh”, a word from the native language of an indigenous people in British Columbia. “Suk-kegh” means “red fish”.

12. Woodcutter Baba ALI
There is some controversy about the story “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” in that it has been suggested it was not part of the original collection of Arabic tales called “One Thousand and One Nights”. The suggestion is that the Ali Baba tale was added by one of its European translators.

22. Garden outcast EVE
According to the Book of Genesis, Adam and Eve lived in a garden “in” Eden, with Eden being geographically located by reference to four rivers, including the Tigris and the Euphrates. Some scholars hypothesize that Eden was located in Mesopotamia, which encompasses much of modern-day Iraq.

29. Society honoree DEB
Deb is short for “debutante”, translating from French as “female beginner”.

31. Ubangi tributary UELE
The Uele River is a tributary to the Ubangi River, and is found in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Uele is the 5th longest river in Africa.

32. Minister’s quarters MANSE
A manse is a minister’s home in various Christian traditions. “Manse” derives from “mansus”, the Latin for “dwelling”.

33. Culprit in some food recalls E COLI
Escherichia coli (E. coli) are usually harmless bacteria found in the human gut, working away quite happily. However, there are some strains that can produce lethal toxins. These strains can make their way into the food chain from animal fecal matter that comes into contact with food designated for human consumption.

40. “The Matrix” hero NEO
The 1999 movie sensation “The Matrix” was meant to be set in a nondescript urban environment. It was actually shot in Australia, as one of the co-producers of the film was the Australian company, Village Roadshow Pictures. You can pick up all sorts of clues about the location when watching the film, including a view of Sydney Harbour Bridge in a background shot. Also, traffic drives along on the left and there are signs for the “lift” instead of an “elevator”.

44. Rebus puzzle staple HOMONYM
You’ll see rebus crosswords in the New York Times quite often. A rebus puzzle is one in which some squares are replaced with a symbol or picture (although we often use multiple letters when solving).

48. Outlaw Kelly NED
Ned Kelly was an Irish-Australian outlaw, regarded by many as a symbol of resistance against the British ruling class in Australia in the 19th century. There have been two famous films made of his life story. “The Story of the Kelly Gang” was released in 1906, and is recognized today as the first feature film ever made. We might be more familiar with the film called “Ned Kelly” released in 1970, as it starred Mick Jagger in the title role.

50. Brillo alternative SOS
S.O.S is a brand name of scouring pads made from steel wool impregnated with soap. The product was invented as a giveaway by an aluminum pot salesman in San Francisco called Ed Cox. His wife gave it the name “S.O.S” as an acronym for “Save Our Saucepans”. Note the punctuation! There is no period after the last S, and that is deliberate. When Cox went to register the trademark, he found that “S.O.S.” could not be a trademark because it was used as an international distress signal. So he dropped the period after the last S, and I hope made a lot of money for himself and his wife.

56. Nourishment for un bebé LECHE
In Spanish, “un bebé” (a baby) might drink “leche” (milk).

59. Department of northern France OISE
The department in northern France known as Oise is named for the River Oise.

The River Oise rises in Belgium and joins up with the River Seine just outside Paris.

60. Lipinski with a gold medal TARA
When American skater Tara Lipinski won the figure skating gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics, she was only 15 years old. To this day, Lipinski is the youngest person to win an individual gold at the Winter Games.

63. Confucian path TAO
The Chinese character “tao” translates as “path”, but the concept of Tao signifies the true nature of the world.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. The grand concert one has 47 strings HARP
5. Teen hangout MALL
9. __ poll STRAW
14. French possessive A TOI
15. Chills and fever AGUE
16. “The Voice” judge Green CEE LO
17. Holdup device? PROP
18. Party person HOST
19. Communications device RADIO
20. Question cads in their cups? PUMP HIGH HEELS
23. Response to “Are you serious?” YES I AM
24. Gardner of old films AVA
25. Wow AWE
28. Burden beasts of burden? SADDLE MULES
32. Western landscape feature MESA
36. Vessel designation HER
37. Weigh station visitors SEMIS
38. New Testament book ACTS
39. Variable-yield investment option I-BOND
42. Passed-down tales LORE
43. CBS newswoman O’Donnell NORAH
45. Summer baby LEO
46. Termini ENDS
47. Stumble over plumbing gunk? SLIP ON CLOGS
51. Brahms’s A? EIN
52. View from Marseille MER
53. To-do HOOPLA
58. Proper sort … or a cry upon solving each of this puzzle’s theme answers? GOODY TWO SHOES
62. Canceled a reservation, maybe ATE IN
64. Waikiki’s whereabouts O’AHU
65. Yankee great, familiarly, with “The” MICK
66. Window box bloom PANSY
67. “Exodus” novelist URIS
68. US Open stadium ASHE
69. Post with carvings TOTEM
70. Passé demo item TAPE
71. Scholarship factor NEED

Down
1. “Satisfied now?” HAPPY?
2. “__ friend unbosoms freely …”: Penn A TRUE
3. Innkeeper’s offerings ROOMS
4. Longstocking of kiddie lit PIPPI
5. Hawaiian for “very strong” MAHI-MAHI
6. All atwitter AGOG
7. Thick with vegetation LUSH
8. Super-harmful LETHAL
9. Serious argument components SCREAMS
10. Colorful duck TEAL
11. North Pacific sockeye RED SALMON
12. Woodcutter Baba ALI
13. Seek favor with WOO
21. Feasts on HAS
22. Garden outcast EVE
26. Strange and then some WEIRD
27. Pluralizers ESSES
29. Society honoree DEB
30. Waggish DROLL
31. Ubangi tributary UELE
32. Minister’s quarters MANSE
33. Culprit in some food recalls E COLI
34. Severe STRINGENT
35. “Without delay!” ASAP
40. “The Matrix” hero NEO
41. Spot for one in disfavor DOGHOUSE
44. Rebus puzzle staple HOMONYM
48. Outlaw Kelly NED
49. Shriek CRY OUT
50. Brillo alternative SOS
54. “You’ve got to be kidding” OH, MAN
55. Grace POISE
56. Nourishment for un bebé LECHE
57. Put in a request ASKED
59. Department of northern France OISE
60. Lipinski with a gold medal TARA
61. Beat WHIP
62. Well-put APT
63. Confucian path TAO

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LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Oct 12, Wednesday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Gareth Bain
THEME: AAA-Rated … each of the theme answers has three letter As, and only three:

17A. *”Ditto!” BACK AT YA!
19A. *1955 Communist defense treaty WARSAW PACT
37A. *”I can answer your questions” ASK AWAY
58A. *Momentarily forget DRAW A BLANK
60A. Like the best bonds, and a hint to the answers to starred clues AAA-RATED10D. *”Wheel of Fortune” host PAT SAJAK
36D. *Space cadet’s home? LALA LAND

COMPLETION TIME: 10m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
7. Like many a reply env. PPD
Prepaid (PPD).

13. New Age physician HOLIST
A holistic approach to medicine emphasises not only physical symptoms but also social considerations and the environment.

14. Zeno’s home ELEA
Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his “paradoxes”, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as Achilles and the Tortoise, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

15. Namibia neighbor: Abbr. ANG
Angola is a country in south-central Africa, on the west coast. Angola is the fourth largest diamond exporter in Africa, after Botswana, the Congo and South Africa. Such a valuable export hasn’t really helped the living standard of the country’s citizens as life expectancy and infant mortality rates are among the poorest on the continent.

19. *1955 Communist defense treaty WARSAW PACT
The full title of the Warsaw pact was the Warsaw Treaty Organization of Friendship, Cooperation, and Mutual Assistance. The Soviet Union was behind the signing of the treaty in 1955 and the signatories were:

– Bulgaria
– Czechoslovakia
– East Germany
– Hungary
– Poland
– Romania
– Soviet Union
– Albania

21. Old Russian dynast TSAR
The term czar (also tsar) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. “Czar” is derived from the word “Caesar”, which at that time was synonymous with “emperor”.

22. Pulitzer playwright Rice ELMER
Elmer Rice was a playwright from New York City. Rice’s most famous play is “Street Scene”, a work that won the 1929 Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

23. The tiniest bit ONE IOTA
Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

25. __ Moines DES
The city of Des Moines, the capital of Iowa, takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French “Riviere des Moines” meaning “River of the Monks”. It looks like there isn’t any “monkish” connection to the city’s name per se. “Des Moines” was just the name given by French traders who corrupted “Moingona”, the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

26. Sink, as a snooker ball POT
Snooker is a fabulous game, played on what looks like a large pool table (12′ x 6′ if full size). Snooker is a derivative of the older game of billiards and is believed to have been developed by British Army officers who were stationed in India in the latter half of the 1800s. “Snooker” was a word used in the British military for a first-year cadet or an inexperienced soldier. Somehow that usage morphed into the name of the game.

33. Marsupial sometimes called a bear KOALA
The koala really does look like a little bear, but it’s not even closely related. The koala is an arboreal marsupial and a herbivore, native to the east and south coasts of Australia. Like so many of the cute and cuddly species on our planet, the koala was hunted nearly to extinction for its fur. It’s making a comeback now due to conservation measures taken by the Australian government.

41. Firefighter Red ADAIR
Red Adair was a famous fighter of fires in oil fields, and was a native of Houston, Texas. Adair’s exploits were the inspiration for a 1968 movie called “Hellfighters” starring John Wayne.

43. Gaming console with a fitness component WII
The Wii is the biggest-selling game console in the world. Two distinguishing features are the impressive wireless remote control and its WiiConnect24 system which allows the console to get messages and updates wirelessly in standby mode. I have my kids unplug the darn thing when they aren’t using it, as even in standby mode it sucks up bandwidth on my wireless network here at the house.

44. County in eastern Ireland KILDARE
County Kildare is in the East of Ireland, located to the southwest of County Dublin. Kildare was home to the famous and powerful Fitzgerald clan.

47. R&B’s __ Hill DRU
Dru Hill is an R&B singing group from Baltimore, Maryland. Dru Hill was formed in 1992, and is still going strong today. The name “Dru Hill” comes from Druid Hill Park which is found on the west side of Baltimore.

49. Peoria hrs. CST
Peoria is the oldest European settlement in the state of Illinois, having been settled by the French in 1680. The city is famous for being cited as “the average American city”.

The phrase, “Will it play in Peoria?” is used to mean, “Will it appeal to the mainstream?” It is believed that the expression originated as a corruption of, “We shall play in Peoria”, a line used by characters in the 1890 novel “Five Hundred Dollars” by Horatio Alger, Jr.

52. Score tempo ALLEGRO
The tempo of a piece of music is usually designated with an Italian word on the score. For example, “grave” is slow and solemn, “andante” is at a walking pace, and “allegro” is fast, quickly and bright.

54. Opposite of neo- PALEO-
The prefix “paleo-” means “prehistoric, primitive”. It comes from the Greek word “palaios” which means “old, ancient”.

67. __ de deux PAS
The the world of ballet, a “pas de deux” is a duet in which the dancers dance together. A classic pas de deux has a particular structure. It starts with a short entree followed by an adagio and two variations, one for each dancer, and ends with a short coda. The term “pas de deux” is French for “step for two”, or I suppose “dance for two”.

Down
5. Title writer in a John Irving novel TS GARP
John Irvine’s 1978 novel “The World According to Garp” is somewhat biographical. In fact, Irvine’s mother found parts of the novel difficult to read, recognizing elements of herself in Garp’s mother.

6. Hasenpfeffer, for one STEW
“Hasenpfeffer” is a rabbit or hare stew from Germany. The meat in the stew is braised with wine and the sauce thickened with the animal’s blood. The name “Hasenpfeffer” comes from the German “Hase” meaning “hare” and “Pfeffer” meaning “pepper”.

8. Jam thickener PECTIN
Pectin is a starch-like material found in the cell walls of plants. Pectin can be extracted from plants (usually citrus fruit) and then used in cooking as a gelling agent.

9. Black Hills terr. DAK
The Black Hills are a mountain range in South Dakota and Wyoming. The Black Hills are home to some celebrated locations including Mount Rushmore, Wind Cave National Park, the Crazy Horse Memorial and the historic city of Deadwood.

10. *”Wheel of Fortune” host PAT SAJAK
Pat Sajak took over the hosting of “Wheel of Fortune” back in 1983, and has been doing the job ever since. He had a short run as a talk show host in 1989/1990, and used to sub quite often for Larry King and Regis Philbin.

11. “A Day Without Rain” New Ager ENYA
Enya’s real name is Eithne Patricia Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career. She sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

12. Culture medium AGAR
Agar is a jelly extracted from seaweed that has many uses. Agar is found in Japanese desserts, and can also be used as a food thickener or even as a laxative. In the world of science it is the most common medium used for growing bacteria in Petri dishes.

14. Israeli diplomat Abba EBAN
Abba Eban was an Israeli diplomat and politician, born Aubrey Solomon Meir Eban in Cape Town, South Africa. While working at the United Nations after WWII, he changed his name to “Abba”, the Hebrew word for “father”. He made this change as reportedly as he could see himself as the father of the nation of Israel.

20. “The Chosen” novelist Chaim POTOK
Chaim Potok was a Jewish American author. Potok’s most famous novel is “The Chosen”, which recounts the life of a Jewish youth in New York City during WWII.

24. “The Addams Family” adjective OOKY
“They’re altogether ooky— the Addams Family”

29. Flamenco shout OLE
Flamenco is a style of Spanish music and dance. The origin of the word “flamenco” isn’t clearly understood, but the explanation that seems most credible to me is that it comes from Flanders in Northern Europe. Given that “flamenco” is the Spanish word for “Flemish” and Flanders is home to the Flemish people it makes perfect sense, doesn’t it?

35. Dictator Amin IDI
Idi Amin received most of his military training in the British armed forces, eventually achieving the highest rank possible for a Black African in the British Colonial Army in 1959, that of Warrant Officer. On his return to Uganda Amin joined his country’s military and quickly rose to the rank of Deputy Commander of the Army. During that time he was quite the athlete. He was a noted rugby player and swimmer, and for nine years held the Ugandan national light-heavyweight boxing title. By the early seventies, Amin was commander of all the armed forces of Uganda and in 1971 seized power in a military coup, displacing the country’s president Milton Obote. There followed seven years of brutal rule by Amin during which it is estimated that between 100,000 and 500,000 people were murdered. Amin was ousted from power in 1979 after a war with Tanzania, and fled to Libya where he stayed for a year. He then moved to Saudi Arabia, where he was financially supported by the Saudi Royal Family for the remainder of his life. Amin died in 2003.

37. Inland Asian sea ARAL
The Aral Sea is a great example of how man can have a devastating effect on his environment. In the early sixties the Aral Sea covered 68,000 square miles of Central Asia. Soviet Union irrigation projects drained the lake to such an extent that today the total area is less than 7,000 square miles, with 90% of the lake now completely dry. Sad …

38. Lehár operetta “The Merry __” WIDOW
“The Merry Widow” is an operetta composed by Franz Lehar. It was first performed in 1905 and has been popular ever since. Franz Lehar was a Hungarian who had a difficult relationship with the Nazi regime after it took control of his country. His wife was born Jewish, but converted to Catholicism. Fortunately, Hitler enjoyed Lehar’s music and as a result Goebbels intervened and made Sophie Lehar “an honorary Aryan by marriage”.

39. Breathable gases AIR
Air is mainly composed of nitrogen (78%), oxygen (21%) and argon (1%). We hear a lot about carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It makes up (or should make up!) just 0.04% of air.

42. Car at a long light, say IDLER
Not if you have a hybrid … the engine shuts down at a light.

46. Everglades birds EGRETS
At one time the egret species was in danger of extinction due to excessive hunting driven by the demand for plumes for women’s hats.

49. Painter Monet CLAUDE
Claude Monet painted the harbor of Le Havre in the north of France in 1872, giving it the title “Impression, Sunrise”. The painting is not a “realistic” representation of the scene in front of him, hence the name “impression”. It was this very painting that gave rise to the name of the Impressionist movement.

55. 2004 remake starring Jude Law ALFIE
There have been two versions of the movie “Alfie”. The original, and for my money the best, was made in 1966 with Michael Caine. The remake came out in 2004 and stars Jude Law in the title role. The theme song was performed by Cher in the 1966 movie, but it was Dionne Warwick’s cover version from 1967 that was the most successful in the charts.

59. Venus de Milo’s lack ARMS
The famous “Venus de Milo” is so named as she was discovered in the ruins of the ancient city of Milos, on the Aegean island of the same name. I’ve been lucky enough to see the statue, in the Louvre in Paris, and was surprised at how large it is (6 ft 8 in tall).

61. Egyptian snake ASP
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Brains SMARTS
7. Like many a reply env. PPD
10. Low-tech missile PEA
13. New Age physician HOLIST
14. Zeno’s home ELEA
15. Namibia neighbor: Abbr. ANG
16. Florida export ORANGE
17. *”Ditto!” BACK AT YA!
19. *1955 Communist defense treaty WARSAW PACT
21. Old Russian dynast TSAR
22. Pulitzer playwright Rice ELMER
23. The tiniest bit ONE IOTA
25. __ Moines DES
26. Sink, as a snooker ball POT
28. Flattering deception SNOW JOB
31. Daddy-o POP
33. Marsupial sometimes called a bear KOALA
34. Friction reducer OIL
37. *”I can answer your questions” ASK AWAY
40. Map reader’s aid KEY
41. Firefighter Red ADAIR
43. Gaming console with a fitness component WII
44. County in eastern Ireland KILDARE
47. R&B’s __ Hill DRU
49. Peoria hrs. CST
52. Score tempo ALLEGRO
54. Opposite of neo- PALEO-
56. Fr. miss MLLE
58. *Momentarily forget DRAW A BLANK
60. Like the best bonds, and a hint to the answers to starred clues AAA-RATED
62. Dumpster fill REFUSE
63. Reunion attendees KIN
64. Goes down in the west SETS
65. Done for the first time MAIDEN
66. Sew up END
67. __ de deux PAS
68. Trusty mounts STEEDS

Down
1. Made an appearance SHOWED
2. Team captain’s concern MORALE
3. Morning janglers ALARMS
4. Teeth-cleaning step RINSE
5. Title writer in a John Irving novel TS GARP
6. Hasenpfeffer, for one STEW
7. Director’s cry PLACES
8. Jam thickener PECTIN
9. Black Hills terr. DAK
10. *”Wheel of Fortune” host PAT SAJAK
11. “A Day Without Rain” New Ager ENYA
12. Culture medium AGAR
14. Israeli diplomat Abba EBAN
18. When one might have a late lunch AT TWO
20. “The Chosen” novelist Chaim POTOK
24. “The Addams Family” adjective OOKY
27. Special __: military force OPS
29. Flamenco shout OLE
30. Shoreline indentation BAY
32. Print maker PAW
34. Wine barrel wood OAK
35. Dictator Amin IDI
36. *Space cadet’s home? LALA LAND
37. Inland Asian sea ARAL
38. Lehár operetta “The Merry __” WIDOW
39. Breathable gases AIR
42. Car at a long light, say IDLER
45. Herbal brew RED TEA
46. Everglades birds EGRETS
48. Cheerful UPBEAT
49. Painter Monet CLAUDE
50. Had an inkling SENSED
51. Small gifts TOKENS
53. Extremists, for short RADS
55. 2004 remake starring Jude Law ALFIE
56. Fabricate MAKE
57. Rested LAIN
59. Venus de Milo’s lack ARMS
61. Egyptian snake ASP

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