LA Times Crossword Answers 30 Nov 12, Friday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Kurt Krauss
THEME: Mimics … each of the theme answers starts with a word meaning “mimic”:

17A. Mimic mackerel? PARROTFISH
24A. Mimic masquerades? MIRROR BALLS
33A. Mimic magazine managers? COPY EDITORS
48A. Mimic masquerades? APE COSTUMES
57A. Mimic miseries? MOCK TRIALS

COMPLETION TIME: 9m 39s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. John and Paul POPES
The last Pope named John was Pope John XXIII, who headed the Roman Catholic Church from 1958 to 1963. Pope John XXIII was succeeded by the last Pope to use the name Paul, Pope Paul VI who passed away while still in office in 1978.

6. Capital on its own gulf RIGA
Riga is the capital city of Latvia. The historical center of Riga is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, declared as such because of the city’s magnificent examples of Art Nouveau architecture.

10. Bar or bel intro DECI-
The unit of pressure known as a bar is about equal to the pressure of the atmosphere at sea level.

In the world of acoustics, one bel is equal to ten decibels.

16. Country on its own gulf OMAN
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. The capital city of Muscat has a strategic location on the Gulf of Oman and has a history of invasion and unrest. Centuries of occupation by the Persians ended in 1507 when the Portuguese took the city in a bloody attack. The Portuguese held Muscat for much of the next one hundred years until finally being ousted by local Omani forces in 1648. A Yemeni tribe invaded the area in 1741 and set up a monarchy that has been in place in Oman ever since.

17. Mimic mackerel? PARROTFISH
A parrotfish is a colorful fish found in tropical waters. The parrotfish takes its name from how its teeth are arranged, forming a parrot-like “beak”.

20. Seed cover ARIL
The casing called the aril, which surrounds many seeds, may be quite fleshy. This fruit-like characteristic makes it desirable as a food and aids in the dispersion of the seeds.

21. Tony winner Roger REES
Roger Rees is a Welsh actor. Rees played the character Robin Colcord on “Cheers”, the posh love interest for Rebecca Howe played by Kirstie Alley.

22. Many an Everly Brothers hit B-SIDE
The Everly Brothers are noted for their steel guitar sound, and their great use of harmony. Their harmony onstage wasn’t reflected off the stage though. In 1973 the brothers decided to pursue separate careers and scheduled a farewell performance attended by many fans, family and stalwarts from the music industry. Don Everly came on stage too drunk to perform, and eventually brother Phil just stormed off into the wings, smashing his guitar as he left. The boys didn’t talk to each other for ten years after that incident.

26. Early Pilgrim family ALDENS
John Alden is said to have been the first person to disembark from the Mayflower and to have set foot on Plymouth Rock in 1620. Alden himself was not a Pilgrim as such, and was a carpenter working on the Mayflower before it sailed. He apparently decided to travel with the ship at the last minute, perhaps in pursuit of the woman who would become his wife, Priscilla Mullens. Alden ended up in a love triangle with Priscilla and Captain Miles Standish, a relationship which is recounted in the Longfellow poem “The Courtship of Miles Standish”. John and Priscilla were the parents of a son, John Alden, who was later to be accused during the Salem witch trials.

29. County bordering Mayo SLIGO
Sligo is a coastal county in the West of Ireland. The county takes its name from the principal town of Sligo. The town’s name in Irish is “Sligeach”, which means “shelly place”, perhaps indicating that lots of shellfish were found in the town’s river.

County Mayo is in the west of Ireland, and is one of my favorite parts of the country. “Mayo” is an anglicized spelling of the county’s name in Irish, “Maigh Eo”, which is pronounced as “Mayo” and means “plain of the yew trees”. One of the most famous spots in Mayo is Croagh Patrick, a 2,500 feet peak that many devout Catholic pilgrims ascend in their bare feet.

38. The gamut A TO Z
In medieval times, the musical scale was denoted by the notes “ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la”. The term “gamma ut”, shortened to “gamut”, was used to describe the whole scale. By the 1620s, “gamut” was being used to mean the entire range of anything, the whole gamut.

42. Key of Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 24 F-SHARP
Ludwig van Beethoven wrote his Piano Sonata No. 24 in 1809, and dedicated it to Countess Teréz Brunszvik de Korompa. The Countess was a student of Beethoven, and because of the dedication the sonata has the nickname “A Thérèse”.

47. European tourists’ rentals VESPAS
Vespa is a brand of motor scooter originally made in Italy (and now all over the world) by Piaggio. “Vespa” is Italian for “wasp”.

54. Pearl Buck heroine O-LAN
Pearl S. Buck’s novel “The Good Earth” won a Pulitzer in 1932, and helped Buck win the Nobel Prize for literature a few years later. The story tells of life in a Chinese village and follows the fortunes of Wang Lung and his wife O-Lan. Although “The Good Earth” has been around for decades, it hit the bestseller list again in 2004 when it was a pick for Oprah’s Book Club.

59. Bread brushed with ghee NAAN
In an Indian restaurant, naan bread is very popular. Naan is traditionally baked in a clay oven known as a tandoor.

Ghee is clarified butter used in South Asian cuisines.

61. Rival of Helena ESTEE
Estée Lauder was quite the successful businesswoman with a reputation as a great salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths, while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

Helena Rubinstein was an American businesswoman born in Poland. She arrived in New York City just after the outbreak of WWI, and there opened up her first cosmetics salon. Within a decade she had built a huge chain of salons, and sold off the business to Lehman Brothers in 1928 for over $7 million. A couple of years later during the Great Depression, Rubinstein bought back her business, for less than one million dollars.

63. “The War of the Worlds” foe MARS
“The War of the Worlds” is a science fiction classic penned by H. G. Wells in 1895-97. This compelling story of Martians invading Earth has been adapted many times into radio dramas, a television series and several movies.

Down
4. Rank below marquis EARL
In the ranking of nobles, an earl comes above a viscount and below a marquess. The rank of earl is used in the British peerage system and is equivalent to the rank of count in other countries. Other British ranks have female forms (e.g. marquess and marchioness, viscount and viscountess), but there isn’t a female word for the rank of earl. A female given the same rank as an earl is known simply as a countess.

5. Capacity-exceeding letters SRO
Standing Room Only (SRO).

6. Gold-medalist decathlete Johnson RAFER
Rafer Johnson is a retired American decathlete, the winner of the gold medal in 1960 at the Rome Olympics. While in training for the Games, his friend Kirk Douglas offered Johnson a part in “Spartacus”, but he had to turn it down as in those days the job would have made him a professional and unable to compete in Rome. Johnson did become a minor actor though, and played a DEA agent in the 1989 Bond movie “Licence to Kill”.

8. Painter’s undercoat GESSO
Gesso is the Italian word for “chalk” and gives its name to the powdered calcium carbonate that is used as a primer coat under artistic panel paintings. The gesso is mixed with a glue and applied to wood so that it acts as an absorbent surface for paint.

9. __ Wednesday ASH
In the Christian tradition, the first day in the season of Lent is called Ash Wednesday. On Ash Wednesday, Palm Crosses from the prior year’s Palm Sunday are burned. The resulting ashes are mixed with sacred oil and then used to anoint worshipers on the forehead with the shape of a cross.

18. Speaker of Cooperstown TRIS
Tris Speaker was a Major League Baseball player, the holder of the record for the most doubles hit in a career. He led the Boston Red Sox to two World Series championships, in 1912 and 1915.

22. Crude meas. BBL
The volume of one oil barrel is equivalent to 42 US gallons. A barrel is correctly abbreviated to “bbl”. Barrels aren’t really used for transporting crude oil anymore. Instead, oil moves in bulk through pipelines and in tankers. “Barrel” is just a quantity these days.

25. Finn floater RAFT
“The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain was first published in 1884, not here in the US but rather in England. The original launch planned for the US had to be delayed until the following year because some rascal had defaced the plate for one of the illustrations, making an obscene joke. Once the problem was spotted a new plate had to be made, and 30,000 copies already printed had to be reworked to cover up the obscenity.

31. Meter opening ODO-
An odometer measures distance traveled. The word derives from the Greek “hodos” meaning “path” and “metron” meaning “measure”.

32. Dick Cheney’s eldest LIZ
Liz Cheney is the eldest daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney. Liz appears on Fox news from time to time as a political analyst.

35. Has a mortgage, say OWES
Our word “mortgage” comes from the Old French “mort gaige” which translated as “dead pledge”. The idea was that a pledge to repay a loan dies when the debt is cleared.

40. End of the slogan that starts “Everybody doesn’t like something” SARA LEE
In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit, and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself who now goes by the name Sara Lee Schupf.

41. African dangers TSETSES
Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name “tsetse” comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as “fly”. Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as “sleeping sickness”. Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

44. Salon dyes HENNAS
Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, not just for leather and wool, but also for the hair and skin. In modern days, henna is also used for temporary tattoos.

45. It starts with thunder and lightning in “Macbeth” ACT ONE
There is a superstition in the theatrical world that uttering the name “Macbeth” in a theater will bring disaster of some sort. To avoid this, the euphemism “the Scottish Play” is used instead.

46. Mr. Rogers ROY
Cowboy actor and singer Roy Rogers’ real name was Leonard Franklin Slye, and his nickname was “King of the Cowboys”. Roy Rogers married Dale Evans in 1947. Evans’ nickname was “Queen of the West”.

49. Irish lullaby start TOO-RA-
The song from Ireland called “Too-Ra-Loo-Ra-Loo-Ral” was written in 1914 by one James Royce Shannon. The song became quite a hit after it was sung by Bing Crosby in the 1944 movie “Going My Way”.

50. Eating may relieve its symptoms ULCER
A peptic ulcer, until fairly recently, was believed to be caused by undue amounts of stress in one’s life. It is now known that 70-90% of all peptic ulcers are in fact associated with a particular bacterium.

55. Frisbee, for one DISC
The Frisbee concept started back in 1938 with a couple who had an upturned cake pan that they were tossing between each other on Santa Monica Beach in California. They were offered 25 cents for the pan on the spot, and as pans could be bought for 5 cents, the pair figured there was a living to be earned.

57. “Lou Grant” production co. MTM
MTM Enterprises was a television production company founded in 1969 by Mary Tyler Moore, originally to produce the “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. The company subsequently produced the likes of “The Bob Newhart Show”, “Rhoda”, “WKRP in Cincinnati”, “Hill Street Blues” and “St. Elsewhere”. That’s a lot of great television …

58. Portugal’s Manuel II, e.g. REI
Manuel II was the last King of Portugal. Manuel lost the throne in 1910 when the Portuguese monarchy was dissolved in a coup d’état and the Portuguese First Republic was established.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. John and Paul POPES
6. Capital on its own gulf RIGA
10. Bar or bel intro DECI-
14. Imminent, old-style ANEAR
15. Shots served neatly? ACES
16. Country on its own gulf OMAN
17. Mimic mackerel? PARROTFISH
19. Tolled RANG
20. Seed cover ARIL
21. Tony winner Roger REES
22. Many an Everly Brothers hit B-SIDE
23. “__-hoo!” YOO-
24. Mimic masquerades? MIRROR BALLS
26. Early Pilgrim family ALDENS
28. Ready ALL SET
29. County bordering Mayo SLIGO
30. Fairy tale threat WOLF
33. Mimic magazine managers? COPY EDITORS
38. The gamut A TO Z
39. Obtain despite resistance WREST
42. Key of Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 24 F-SHARP
47. European tourists’ rentals VESPAS
48. Mimic masquerades? APE COSTUMES
52. “__ we having fun yet?” ARE
53. Like much mouthwash MINTY
54. Pearl Buck heroine O-LAN
55. “Dang!” DRAT
56. __ uncertain terms IN NO
57. Mimic miseries? MOCK TRIALS
59. Bread brushed with ghee NAAN
60. Stationary surgical patient TREE
61. Rival of Helena ESTEE
62. In addition ELSE
63. “The War of the Worlds” foe MARS
64. Slurpee cousins ICEES

Down
1. Tropical fruits PAPAYAS
2. Hot ON A ROLL
3. Regular PERIODIC
4. Rank below marquis EARL
5. Capacity-exceeding letters SRO
6. Gold-medalist decathlete Johnson RAFER
7. Less receptive ICIER
8. Painter’s undercoat GESSO
9. __ Wednesday ASH
10. Back fin DORSAL
11. Sends, in a way EMAILS
12. Taper, e.g. CANDLE
13. Gulp down INGEST
18. Speaker of Cooperstown TRIS
22. Crude meas. BBL
24. Letter run MNOP
25. Finn floater RAFT
27. I problem? EGO
30. Wrong, with “all” WET
31. Meter opening ODO-
32. Dick Cheney’s eldest LIZ
34. Blabs YAPS
35. Has a mortgage, say OWES
36. Tourist’s options: Abbr. RRS
37. Break up SEPARATE
40. End of the slogan that starts “Everybody doesn’t like something” SARA LEE
41. African dangers TSETSES
42. Big food problem FAMINE
43. __ column SPINAL
44. Salon dyes HENNAS
45. It starts with thunder and lightning in “Macbeth” ACT ONE
46. Mr. Rogers ROY
47. Blow off steam VENT
49. Irish lullaby start TOO-RA-
50. Eating may relieve its symptoms ULCER
51. Compels MAKES
55. Frisbee, for one DISC
57. “Lou Grant” production co. MTM
58. Portugal’s Manuel II, e.g. REI

Return to top of page

LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Nov 12, Thursday

CROSSWORD SETTER: James Sajdak
THEME: The Sounds of Camping … each of the theme answers is something often heard at a campground:

16A. Campground sound #1 SIZZLING STEAKS
23A. Campground sound #2 BABBLING BROOK
51A. Campground sound #3 CRACKLING FIRE
60A. Campground sound #4 RUSTLING LEAVES

COMPLETION TIME: 10m 24s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … TALESE (Talase), CESTA (casta)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Early sunscreen ingredient PABA
Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), or now its derivatives, is the “active” ingredient in sunscreens in that it absorbs UV radiation. PABA derivatives are used today as PABA itself fell out of favor due to its tendency to stain clothes and to cause an allergic reaction in some users.

13. Tater SPUD
The word “spud” is used as a slang term for a potato and was first recorded in the mid-1800s, in New Zealand would you believe?

A “tater” is a potato.

19. Devilish toon TAZ
The carnivorous marsupial known as the Tasmanian devil is aptly named, in the sense that the only place the animal is found in the wild is on the island of Tasmania. The “little devils” are about the size of a small dog, and they have the strongest bite for their size of any known mammal.

20. Maine-et-Loire mate AMI
Maine-et-Loire is a department in northwest France. Maine-et-Loire is home to the Loire Valeey and its abundance of beautiful chateaux.

29. Hot time in Maine-et-Loire AOUT
Août is the French for August, and juillet is French for July (note that the name of months aren’t capitalized in French).

30. Renaissance painter __ Angelico FRA
The title “Fra” (brother) is used by Italian monks. Fra Angelico was an Italian Renaissance painter.

31. Like a spot in “Macbeth” DAMNED
Lady Macbeth is an evil and treacherous woman in William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. The most famous line uttered by Lady Macbeth has to be “Out, damned spot! Out, I say!” In this line, Lady Macbeth is frantically rubbing at her hand trying to get rid of an imaginary bloodstain left there after she committed four murders.

33. Pac-12 team UTES
The Runnin’ Utes are the basketball team of the University of Utah. The team was given the nickname the Runnin’ Redskins back when Jack Gardner was the head coach from 1953 to 1971. The “Runnin'” part of the name was chosen because Gardner was famous for playing quick offenses. The “Redskins” name was later dropped in favor of the less controversial “Utes”.

Pac-12 is an abbreviation for the Pacific-12 Conference, a college athletic conference in the western US. The Pac-12 has won more NCAA National Team Championships than any other conference. The Pac-12 was founded in 1915 as the Pacific Coast Conference (PCC). Over time as it grew, the conference went by the names Big Five, Big Six, Pacific-8, Pacific-10 and became the Pacific-12 in 2011.

35. “Pretty Woman” co-songwriter ORBISON
Roy Orbison had to be one the sickliest looking performers I’ve ever seen. Orbison had a very sallow complexion, pock-marked from teenage acne. The yellowish skin tone came from a severe bout of jaundice as a child. Perhaps poor nutrition affected him and his siblings, because all of them had very poor eyesight, with Roy almost blind and wearing very thick lenses from a very young age. He was also very ashamed of his head of hair, which was almost a ghostly white, and so he dyed it jet black even when he was young. Despite all this, he was immensely popular in his heyday with teenage girls, particularly in Canada and Ireland for some reason. On a tour of Ireland in 1963, the Irish police had to stop one of his performances in order to pull a bevy of local lasses off poor Mr. Orbison …

42. Nov. voting time TUES
Election Day was chosen by Congress back in 1845. The month of November was selected as it suited an agricultural society, following the fall harvest and yet not too far into winter, which could make travel difficult. Tuesday was chosen so that people had time to travel to polling stations. Monday elections might have meant that some would have to start out on Sunday, and that could interfere with Christian services.

44. Streaker in a shower METEOR
The two most famous meteor showers are the Perseids and Leonids. The Perseid meteor shower is most visible around August 12th each year, and the Leonid meteor shower is most notable around November 17th. The Perseids appear to emanate from the constellation Perseus, and the Leonids from the constellation Leo (hence the names Perseids and Leonids).

45. Remote power sources AAS
AA batteries might be used to power a remote control.

48. City near Yorba Linda BREA
The city of Brea, California takes its name from “brea”, the Spanish word for “tar”.

Yorba Linda is a city in Orange County, California. It is an affluent community, and is regularly listed as the richest city in the country based on median household income. Yorba Linda is also home to the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum.

55. “Honor Thy Father” author TALESE
Gay Talese is an American author, famous as a journalist in the sixties at “The New York Times”. His 1971 book “Honor Thy Father” is a tale about the Bonanno crime family.

56. Sargasso Sea spawner EEL
The Sargasso Sea is an area within the Atlantic Ocean, and is famous for being home to many species of Sargassum, the algae floating on the surface that gives the area its name. The Sargasso Sea is also where both the European and American eels lay their eggs and hatch their young. The young eels (or “elvers”) then head east or west, depending on the species.

57. Forest’s 2006 Oscar-winning role IDI
“The Last King of Scotland” is a 2006 film adaptation of a 1998 novel of the same name by Giles Foden. The story tells of a Scottish doctor (played by James McAvoy) who was employed by Idi Amin (played by Forest Whitaker). The title of the piece comes from the fact that Idi Amin offered his services as King of Scotland, should he ever be needed.

66. POTUS backup VEEP
The Vice-President (Veep) is a backup for the President of the United States (POTUS).

69. West Point team ARMY
West Point is a military reservation in New York State, located north of New York City. West Point was first occupied by the Continental Army way back in 1778, making it the longest, continually-occupied military post in the country. Cadet training has taken place at the garrison since 1794, although Congress funding for a US Military Academy didn’t start until 1802.

Down
2. Polynesian capital APIA
Apia is the capital city, and in fact the only city, of the Pacific island-nation of Samoa. The harbor of Apia is famous for a very foolish incident in 1889 involving seven naval vessels from Germany, the US and Britain. A typhoon was approaching so the safest thing to do was to head for open water away from land, but no nation would move its ships for fear of losing face in front of the others. Six of the ships were lost in the typhoon as a result and 200 American and German sailors perished. The British cruiser HMS Calliope barely managed to escape from the harbor and rode out the storm safely.

3. WWII German missile nickname BUZZ BOMB
“Buzz Bomb” and “Doodlebug” are nicknames for the V-1 flying bomb used by the Germans to attack England during WWII. The bombs were powered by simple pulse jet engines that made a buzzing sound, giving the V-1 its nickname.

4. Log shaper ADZ
An adze (also adz) is similar to an axe, but different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool’s shaft. An axe’s blade is set in line with the shaft.

6. Capital on the island of Luzon MANILA
Many moons ago I spent a couple of very happy years living in Manila in the Philippines. I had an apartment there, and residing in the apartment building next door was Imelda Marcos, along with all of her shoes I assume …

7. Texter’s “Holy cow!” OMG
OMG is text-speak for Oh My Gosh! Oh My Goodness! or any other G words you think of …

8. Mario Brothers console NES
The acronym Super NES stands for Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Our kids probably have one somewhere …

“Mario Bros.” started out as an arcade game back in 1983, developed by Nintendo. The more famous of the two brothers, Mario, had already appeared in an earlier arcade game called “Donkey Kong”. Mario was given a brother called Luigi, and the pair have been around ever since. In the game, Mario and Luigi are Italian American plumbers from New York City.

10. Jordin Sparks/Chris Brown song covered on “Glee” NO AIR
The TV show called “Glee” has become very popular. The storyline focuses on a high school glee club in Lima, Ohio.

12. “Iliad” wise man NESTOR
A nestor is a wise old man, named for Nestor, the sage who gives counsel in Homer’s “Iliad”.

17. Blood typing, e.g. LAB TEST
The most important grouping of blood types is the ABO system. Blood is classified as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the type of antigens on the surface of the red blood cells. A secondary designation of blood is the Rh factor, in which other antigens are labelled as either positive or negative. When a patient receives a blood transfusion, ideally the donor blood should be the same type as that of the recipient, as incompatible blood cells can be rejected. However, blood type O-neg can be accepted by recipients with all blood types, A, B, AB or O, and positive or negative. Hence someone with O-neg blood type is called a “universal donor”.

22. Calypso offshoot SKA
Ska originated in Jamaica in the late fifties and was the precursor to reggae music. No one has a really definitive etymology of the term “ska”, but it is likely to be imitative of some sound.

32. British travel feature, in the past? DOUBLE L
The past tense of the word “travel” is “travelled”, at least it is in the UK and Ireland. And “travelled” has a double L.

36. Philip __: 16th-century Italian saint NERI
Philip Neri lived in the 16th century in Rome, an Italian priest who came to be known as “Apostle of Rome”. He was the founder of a group of secular priests called the Congregation of the Oratory.

38. __-Tass ITAR
TASS is the abbreviation used for the former news agency, the Telegraph Association of the Soviet Union (Telegrafnoye Agentstvo Sovetskovo Soyuza). When the Soviet Union dissolved in 1992, the Moscow-based agency’s scope changed, along with its name. It is now known as the Information Telegraph Agency of Russia (ITAR-TASS).

40. Fair-hiring abbr. EOE
An Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE).

41. Many AARP mems. SRS
AARP is now the official name for the interest group that used to be called the American Association of Retired Persons. The name change reflects the current focus of the group on all Americans aged 50 or over, as opposed to just people who have retired.

46. Genesis mountain ARARAT
Mount Ararat is in Turkey. Ararat is a snow-capped dormant volcano with two peaks. The higher of the two, Greater Ararat, is the tallest peak in the country. Ararat takes its name from a legendary Armenian hero called Ara the Beautiful (or Ara the Handsome). According to the Book of Genesis, Noah’s ark landed on Mount Ararat.

52. Jai alai basket CESTA
A cesta is a wicker scoop strapped to the wrist that is used for catching and throwing the ball in jai alai.

53. Pollux or Arcturus, to an astronomer K-STAR
Stars are usually classified based on the color of the light that they emit. These classifications are, from hottest to coolest, O, B, A, F, G, K and M. One way to remember the order of these letters is to use the mnemonic “Oh, be a fine girl, kiss me”. The colors of these stars range from blue (class O) to red (class M). Our sun is class G, a yellow star, but I think we all know that …

59. Cosby/Culp TV series I SPY
The very successful TV show “I Spy” ran from 1965-68. Robert Culp played secret agent Kelly Robinson, opposite Bill Cosby who played Alexander Scott. I saw Bill Cosby perform live in San Jose not too long ago, and what a great evening it was! Sadly, Robert Culp passed away in 2010, pronounced dead after a fall just outside his home. He was 79 years old.

61. www access ISP
An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is just what the name indicates, a company that provides its customers with access to the Internet. One way that ISPs differentiate themselves from each other is in the way in which end users are connected to the ISP’s network. So, there are cable ISPs, DSL ISPs, dial-up ISPs and satellite ISPs. I’d go with cable if I were you, if it’s available in your area …

63. Actress Gardner AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of “Mogambo” (1953), “On the Beach” (1959), “The Night of the Iguana” (1964) and “Earthquake” (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Early sunscreen ingredient PABA
5. “Let’s get goin’!” C’MON!
9. Put __ act ON AN
13. Tater SPUD
14. Hard to believe LAME
15. Wine quality NOSE
16. Campground sound #1 SIZZLING STEAKS
19. Devilish toon TAZ
20. Maine-et-Loire mate AMI
21. In-crowds A-LISTS
23. Campground sound #2 BABBLING BROOK
27. Curt refusal I WON’T
29. Hot time in Maine-et-Loire AOUT
30. Renaissance painter __ Angelico FRA
31. Like a spot in “Macbeth” DAMNED
33. Pac-12 team UTES
35. “Pretty Woman” co-songwriter ORBISON
37. Some comedy sketches SATIRES
42. Nov. voting time TUES
44. Streaker in a shower METEOR
45. Remote power sources AAS
48. City near Yorba Linda BREA
50. Track contests RACES
51. Campground sound #3 CRACKLING FIRE
55. “Honor Thy Father” author TALESE
56. Sargasso Sea spawner EEL
57. Forest’s 2006 Oscar-winning role IDI
60. Campground sound #4 RUSTLING LEAVES
64. “__ baby!” ATTA
65. Swimmer with pups SEAL
66. POTUS backup VEEP
67. Hightail it TEAR
68. Pays (for) POPS
69. West Point team ARMY

Down
1. Subtle “Over here …” PSST
2. Polynesian capital APIA
3. WWII German missile nickname BUZZ BOMB
4. Log shaper ADZ
5. Mount Everest? CLIMB
6. Capital on the island of Luzon MANILA
7. Texter’s “Holy cow!” OMG
8. Mario Brothers console NES
9. 16 oz. ONE LB
10. Jordin Sparks/Chris Brown song covered on “Glee” NO AIR
11. Desires from ASKS OF
12. “Iliad” wise man NESTOR
17. Blood typing, e.g. LAB TEST
18. Wrestling pair TAG TEAM
22. Calypso offshoot SKA
24. Years in old Rome ANNI
25. Chit IOU
26. Crunch source NUTS
27. Promise before a parson I DO
28. Hawk’s cause WAR
32. British travel feature, in the past? DOUBLE L
34. Clean and then some STERILE
36. Philip __: 16th-century Italian saint NERI
38. __-Tass ITAR
39. Pass target RECEIVER
40. Fair-hiring abbr. EOE
41. Many AARP mems. SRS
43. Rep. counterpart SEN
45. Play a part, or play part ACT
46. Genesis mountain ARARAT
47. Heel-click follower SALUTE
49. Dating stumbling block, perhaps AGE GAP
52. Jai alai basket CESTA
53. Pollux or Arcturus, to an astronomer K-STAR
54. Brings down FELLS
58. Judge DEEM
59. Cosby/Culp TV series I SPY
61. www access ISP
62. Revivalist’s prefix NEO-
63. Actress Gardner AVA

Return to top of page