LA Times Crossword Answers 22 Sep 12, Saturday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Doug Peterson & Brad Wilber
THEME: None
COMPLETION TIME: 21m 40s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 4 … HOSTA (hossa), CLOT (clos), STOLTZ (Staltz), CARO (cara)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Florida city with an I Dream of Jeannie Lane COCOA BEACH
In the TV show “I Dream of Jeannie”, the astronaut (Larry Hagman) and the genie (Barbara Eden) lived in Cocoa Beach, Florida. Cocoa Beach is a real city that is located close to Cape Canaveral.

Back in 1964, the second most watched show on American television was ABC’s “Bewitched”. Sidney Sheldon was tasked with the job of creating a rival sitcom and he came up with “I Dream of Jeannie”, which first aired in 1965. The censors had a big say in how the story developed. For starters, Jeannie’s skimpy costume was permitted provided Barbara Eden didn’t show off her navel. And Jeannie was only allowed to live with an unmarried man as long as the story made it clear that she slept in a bottle.

16. Skid row denizen WINO
The term “skid row” is used to describe a run-down urban neighborhood. “Skid row” appears to have originated in the Pacific Northwest where a “skid road” was a wooden pathway used for “skidding” logs through forests and over bogs. The terms “skid road” and “skid row” came to be used for logging camps and mills, and then somehow was applied to run-down areas in cities up and down the west coast of North America.

18. Matadors of the ’70s AMCS
The AMC Matador was a car produced from 1971 to 1978. The mid-size automobile came to be popular with police departments. The Los Angeles Police Department was the largest user of Matador patrol cars.

19. Alien-hunting org. SETI
SETI is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

20. Shade-loving plant HOSTA
The Hosta genus of plant was once classified as a lily, but is now in a family of its own and is described as “lily-like”. The plant was given the name “Hosta” in honor of the Austrian botanist Nicholas Thomas Host.

21. Pope before Hilarius LEO I
The first pope named Leo is now known as Pope Saint Leo the Great. He is famous for meeting with the feared Attila the Hun and persuading him to turn back his invading force that was threatening to overrun Western Europe.

Pope Saint Hilarius (also Hilary) was head of the Roman Catholic Church from 461 to 468.

23. “The Sorrows of Young Werther” author GOETHE
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was a German writer (among other things!). His most famous work is probably his play “Faust”. This epic work was published in parts, starting in 1808. The work was only published in toto after his death in 1832.

“The Sorrows of Young Werther” is a novel by Johann Wolfgang von Geothe, first published in 1774. The piece is described as being loosely autobiographical, and it brought fame and success to Goethe as a writer within his own lifetime.

25. “Birdman of Alcatraz” Robert __ STROUD
Robert Stroud was a convicted murderer who earned the nickname of “Birdman of Alcatraz”. The “birdman” moniker was merited by Stroud’s penchant for rearing birds in his cell, and the “Alcatraz” name reflected his stay in the prison from 1942 to 1959. However, Stroud actually kept his birds while he was in Leavenworth early in his period of incarceration, and was never permitted to have pets in Alcatraz.

29. Diamond family name ALOU
Jesus Alou played major league baseball, as did his brothers Matty and Felipe, and as did Felipe’s son, Moises.

31. One curl, say REP
One leg curl, say, at the gym is a “rep”, a repetition.

38. WWII propaganda nickname AXIS SALLY
Axis Sally was a nickname given to two propaganda broadcasters during WWII. One was Mildred Gillars, a German-American from Portland, Maine who broadcast to Allied troops from Nazi Germany. The other was Rita Zucca, an Italian-American who did the same thing from Fascist Italy.

40. Castle on Broadway IRENE
Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-wife team of ballroom dancers who regularly performed on Broadway at the start of the 20th century. The Castles have been credited with creating or at least popularizing the Fox Trot.

42. De bene __: provisionally ESSE
“De bene esse” is a legal term used to mean “conditionally, provisionally”. The literal translation from Latin is “of well being”.

43. “Mask” actor STOLTZ
Eric Stoltz is an actor from Whittier, California who is best known for playing the disfigured Rocky Dennis in the 1985 movie “Mask” opposite Cher.

44. Bow parts with anchor cable openings HAWSES
The hawse is that part of the bow of a ship containing the hawserholes, holes through which hawsers can be passed. Hawsers are thick cables or ropes used in mooring or towing.

46. Physical responses AHS
One might be asked to say “ah” by a doctor when undergoing a physical examination.

47. Six-Day War statesman EBAN
Abba Eban was an Israeli diplomat and politician, born Aubrey Solomon Meir Eban in Cape Town, South Africa. While working at the United Nations after WWII he changed his name to “Abba”, the Hebrew word for “father”, reportedly as he could see himself as the father of the nation of Israel.

The Six-Day War took place from June 5th to June 10th, 1967, and was fought between Israel and its neighbors Egypt, Jordan and Syria. By the time the ceasefire was signed, Israel had seized huge swaths of land formerly controlled by Arab states, namely the Gaza Strip, the Sinai Peninsula, the West Bank of the Jordan River and the Golan Heights. The overall territory under the control of Israel grew by a factor of three in just six days.

48. Say “cap’n,” e.g. ELIDE
To elide is to pass over, omit or slur a syllable when speaking.

51. “The boy you trained, gone he is” speaker YODA
Yoda is one of the most beloved characters in the “Star Wars” series of films. Yoda’s voice was provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of “Muppets” fame.

55. Chartres cleric ABBE
Abbé is the French word for an abbot.

Chartres is a town in north-central France, lying about 60 miles southwest of Paris.

56. First ballplayer to hit 50 home runs before the end of August ROGER MARIS
Roger Maris (whose real name was Roger Maras) was the son of Croatian immigrants. It was Maris’s single-season record of 61 home runs that Mark McGwire broke in 1998 (hitting 70 that season). Maris’s own record of 61 runs (from 1961) beat the previous record of 60 set in 1927 by Babe Ruth.

59. Titular guys in a 1993 Spin Doctors hit TWO PRINCES
Spin Doctors is a New York City alternative rock band. That’s about all I know …

Down
2. Veterinary patient of Dr. Liz Wilson ODIE
Odie is Garfield’s best friend and is a slobbery beagle, a character in Jim Davis’s comic strip.

3. League of Women Voters organizer CATT
Carrie Chapman Catt founded the League of Women Voters and the International Alliance of Women. She was also very close to Susan B. Anthony and succeeded Anthony as head of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.

4. Magazine that excerpted Stephen King’s “Firestarter” OMNI
I used to enjoy reading the magazine “OMNI”, a very entertaining yet interesting read. It was founded in 1978 by Kathy Keeton, wife of Bob Guccione the publisher of “Penthouse”. The print magazine folded in 1995, and a web version continued for a few years, until Keeton passed away in 1998.

Stephen King’s novel “Firestarter” was adapted into a movie of the same name in 1984 starring Drew Barrymore.

5. Enzyme ending -ASE
Enzymes are basically catalysts, chemicals that act to increase the rate of a particular chemical reaction. For example, starches will break down into sugars over time, especially under the right conditions. However, in the presence of the enzyme amylase (found in saliva) this production of sugar happens very, very quickly.

7. Scanner brand EPSON
Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official time keeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

8. Manhunt initiators, briefly APBS
An All Points Bulletin (APB) is a broadcast from one US law enforcement agency to another.

11. Marshland tract SWALE
A swale is a narrow tract of low-lying land that is usually wet or marshy. It can be naturally occurring or man made. One might create a swale to help manage drainage of adjacent land.

12. “Doctor Who” subject TIME TRAVEL
The iconic science-fiction television show “Doctor Who” was first aired in 1963, and relaunched in 2005 by the BBC. The relaunched series is produced in-house by the BBC in Cardiff in Wales, and this is the setting of the successful “Doctor Who” spin-off called “Torchwood”. The new show is about the Cardiff branch of the Torchwood Institute which investigates incidents involving extraterrestrials.

14. She played Spike Lee’s girlfriend in “Do the Right Thing” ROSIE PEREZ
Rosie Perez is an American actress born in New York City of Puerto Rican descent. As well as pursuing her acting career, Perez is an activist promoting Puerto Rican rights, and was arrested in 2000 at a rally to protest US Navy weapons-training off the coast of Puerto Rica.

“Do the Right Thing” is a Spike Lee movie, released in 1989. Much of the action in the film is centered on a local pizzeria called “Sal’s” owned by Italian-American Salvatore Frangione (played by Danny Aiello).

26. Devious General Mills spokescritter TRIX RABBIT
Trix is a corn-based breakfast cereal that has been around since 1954, produced by General Mills. Ads for the cereal featured Trix Rabbit, who would try hard to get hold of bowls of the cereal. He would always get caught though, and be admonished with, “Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!” With 46% sugar content, the rabbit probably wouldn’t have liked it anyway …

29. “Rolling in the Deep” singer ADELE
The English singer Adele Adkins goes by the stage name “Adele”. Adele describes her musical style as “heartbroken soul”.

30. Lacking pep LOGY
Something that is “logy” is dull and heavy. “Logy” might come from the Dutch word “log” that means “heavy, dull”.

34. “__ nome”: “Rigoletto” aria CARO
“Rigoletto” is one of Giuseppe Verdi’s most famous and oft-performed operas. The storyline comes from the Victor Hugo play “Le roi s’amuse” (usually translated as “The King’s Fool”). Rigoletto is the king’s fool, the jester.

43. Shepherd of “The View” SHERRI
Sherrie Shepherd is a comedienne and television personality, best known these days as one of the five co-hosts of the talk show “The View”. Shepherd is often invited to appear as a guest on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show”, and has appeared more often with Ellen than any other person.

49. Eponymous hardware store founder Lucius LOWE
Lucius S. Lowe opened the first Lowe’s hardware store in 1921, in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina. Lucius only knew the one store, as it was family who expanded the company after he passed away in 1940.

50. “__ Stripes”: Cash song I GOT
I must admit that I am not a big country music fan, but who doesn’t love Johnny Cash? The man had such a unique voice, and indeed unique songs. I think that his biopic, “Walk the Line”, is very cool, as is the title song itself. Recorded back in 1956, “Walk the Line” is relatively creative for “popular” music. The basic rhythm of the song emulates the sound of a freight train, the “boom-chicka-boom” sound. Cash’s guitar has a unique tone to it as it plays this rhythm, achieved by threading a piece of paper between the guitar strings giving the rhythm a bit of a “buzz”. Above the rhythm line, each of the five verses is sung in different keys. You can actually hear Cash hum a note signifying the key change at the start of each verse. With all these modulations, the final verse is sung a full octave lower that the first. A remarkable tune …

51. Masculine principle YANG
The yin and the yang can be explained using many different metaphors. In one, as the sun shines on a mountain, the side in the shade is the yin and the side in the light is the yang. The yin is also regarded as the feminine side, and the yang the masculine. The yin can also be associated with the moon, while the yang is associated with the sun.

52. Middle-earth soldiers ORCS
According to Tolkien, Orcs are small humanoids that live in his fantasy world of Middle-earth. They are very ugly and dirty, and are fond of eating human flesh.

54. The Y, e.g.: Abbr. ASSN
The YMCA is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of “a healthy spirit, mind and body”. The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Florida city with an I Dream of Jeannie Lane COCOA BEACH
11. Ado STIR
15. An orator’s may rise and fall ADAM’S APPLE
16. Skid row denizen WINO
17. Where a barrister’s questions are answered WITNESS BOX
18. Matadors of the ’70s AMCS
19. Alien-hunting org. SETI
20. Shade-loving plant HOSTA
21. Pope before Hilarius LEO I
22. Game pieces MEN
23. “The Sorrows of Young Werther” author GOETHE
25. “Birdman of Alcatraz” Robert __ STROUD
29. Diamond family name ALOU
31. One curl, say REP
32. Some racing teams CREWS
33. “No difference” I DON’T CARE
35. Fix firmly RIVET
36. Thanksgiving serving LEG
37. Have doubts WAVER
38. WWII propaganda nickname AXIS SALLY
40. Castle on Broadway IRENE
41. Eminent leader? PRE-
42. De bene __: provisionally ESSE
43. “Mask” actor STOLTZ
44. Bow parts with anchor cable openings HAWSES
46. Physical responses AHS
47. Six-Day War statesman EBAN
48. Say “cap’n,” e.g. ELIDE
51. “The boy you trained, gone he is” speaker YODA
55. Chartres cleric ABBE
56. First ballplayer to hit 50 home runs before the end of August ROGER MARIS
58. Eye-popping profit PILE
59. Titular guys in a 1993 Spin Doctors hit TWO PRINCES
60. Poll closure? -STER
61. Part of a typical Western ending SETTING SUN

Down
1. Field calls CAWS
2. Veterinary patient of Dr. Liz Wilson ODIE
3. League of Women Voters organizer CATT
4. Magazine that excerpted Stephen King’s “Firestarter” OMNI
5. Enzyme ending -ASE
6. Denounced BASHED
7. Scanner brand EPSON
8. Manhunt initiators, briefly APBS
9. Small, tight group CLOT
10. Its internal angles total 720 degrees HEXAGON
11. Marshland tract SWALE
12. “Doctor Who” subject TIME TRAVEL
13. Hard to follow INCOHERENT
14. She played Spike Lee’s girlfriend in “Do the Right Thing” ROSIE PEREZ
22. Thing not to miss MUST-SEE
24. Gets the jump on OUTWITS
25. Dumps SCRAPHEAPS
26. Devious General Mills spokescritter TRIX RABBIT
27. Like home runs nowadays REVIEWABLE
28. Is short OWES
29. “Rolling in the Deep” singer ADELE
30. Lacking pep LOGY
33. Reformers’ targets ILLS
34. “__ nome”: “Rigoletto” aria CARO
39. Maintains ASSERTS
43. Shepherd of “The View” SHERRI
45. Twisted look SNEER
46. Crackerjack ADEPT
49. Eponymous hardware store founder Lucius LOWE
50. “__ Stripes”: Cash song I GOT
51. Masculine principle YANG
52. Middle-earth soldiers ORCS
53. Almighty, to a 55-Across DIEU
54. The Y, e.g.: Abbr. ASSN
57. Short time? MIN

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LA Times Crossword Answers 21 Sep 12, Friday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Neville L. Fogarty
THEME: Something’s Fishy … I SMELL A RAT in this puzzle. All of the theme answers are well-known terms with the word RAT inserted:

17A. One who illegally brings home the bacon? PORK PI(RAT)E from PORK PIE
25A. Mistakes in Dickens, say? VICTORIAN ER(RAT)A from VICTORIAN ERA
42A. When to send an erotic love note? R-(RAT)ED LETTER DAY from RED LETTER DAY
56A. “Something’s fishy,” and a hint to this puzzle’s theme I SMELL A RAT

COMPLETION TIME: 12m 31s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
5. Tilting tool LANCE
Tilting is the most recognized form of jousting. Jousting can involve the use of a number of different weapons, but when lances are used the competition is called “tilting”.

14. Apple application no longer in use ALAR
The chemical name for Alar, a plant growth regulator and color enhancer, is daminozide. Alar was primarily used on apples but was withdrawn from the market when it was linked to cancer.

15. Eponymous William’s birthplace OCCAM
Ockham’s Razor (also Occam’s Razor) is a principle in philosophy and science that basically states that the simplest explanation is usually the correct one. This explanation is a corollary to the more exact statement of the principle, that one shouldn’t needlessly use assumptions in explaining something. The principle was developed by 14th-century logician and Franciscan Friar William of Ockham (or “Occam” in Latin). The principle is dubbed a “razor” as it is used as a philosophical tool used to cut out absurd and spurious reasoning in an argument.

16. Gospel writer LUKE
The Gospel According to Luke is the longest of the four Gospels in the Bible. Some well-known stories are unique to Luke, and do not appear in the Gospels of Matthew, Mark nor John. A couple of examples would be “The Prodigal Son” and “The Good Samaritan”. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts of the Apostles”.

19. God in both Eddas ODIN
In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. His wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English “Friday” (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin’s son was Thor, and his name gave us “Thursday”.

The Poetic Edda and Prose Edda are two ancient works that are the source for much of Norse mythology.

23. Uno e due TRE
In Spanish, one and two (uno e due) is three (tre).

25A. Mistakes in Dickens, say? VICTORIAN ER(RAT)A from VICTORIAN ERA
Charles Dickens was an English novelist who achieved great notoriety in his own time, and is still regarded as perhaps the greatest novelist of the Victorian period. Many of his novels explored the plight of the poor in Victorian society, perhaps driven by his own experiences as a child. Dickens had to leave school to work in a factory after his father was thrown into a debtor’s prison. As a result, Dickens had to educate himself, and did so with great success. He is said to have pioneered the serial publication of narrative fiction, with his first success coning with the 1835 serial publication of “Pickwick Papers”. And everyone’s favorite has to be his 1843 novella, “A Christmas Carol”.

33. Sound, perhaps INLET
Ships might travel through a sound, a wide channel connecting two bodies of water, or an ocean inlet.

35. Rapper __ Jon LIL
Lil Jon is a rapper, with the real name Jonathan Mortimer Smith. That’s all I know …

39. “__ American Cousin,” play Lincoln was viewing when assassinated OUR
“Our American Cousin” is play by Englishman Tom Taylor. The play is a farce, and was very popular. There is a line in Act III that always gets the biggest laugh:

“Don’t know the manners of good society, eh? Well, I guess I know enough to turn you inside out, old gal — you sockdologizing old man-trap.”

It was when the audience were laughing at this line in Ford’s Theater in Washington in 1865 that John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln. It is thought that Booth hoped t
he sound of the laughter would drown out the sound of the gunshot.

41. Linney of “The Big C” LAURA
“The Big C” is a Showtime series about a suburban woman who is dealing with cancer. Stars of the show are the wonderful Laura Linney and Oliver Platt.

42A. When to send an erotic love note? R-(RAT)ED LETTER DAY from RED LETTER DAY
A red letter day is a special day for some reason. The term comes from the illuminated manuscripts of Medieval times. In such documents, initial letters were often written in red ink, so-called red letters.

46. Ottoman title AGA
“Aga”, or “agha”, is a title that was used by both civil and military officials in the Ottoman Empire.

Osman I was the man who established the Ottoman Dynasty, with “Ottoman” coming from the name “Osman”. The “Ottoman Empire” came about with the conquest of Constantinople, but that didn’t happen until almost 130 years after Osman I died.

55. Big-screen format IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

58. Pantheon feature DOME
The Pantheon was built as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome. Even though the Pantheon was built almost two thousand years ago, the dome at its center is the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome.

59. “Fear Street” series author STINE
The author R. L. Stine is sometimes referred to as the Stephen King of children’s literature as he writes horror stories for young people.

61. Tools for ancient Egyptian executions ASPS
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

62. 16th-century English architectural style TUDOR
Anyone wanting to see a lot of example of magnificent buildings in the Tudor style of architecture might visit the English university towns of Oxford and Cambridge.

63. Zombie’s sound MOAN
A zombie is a corpse that has been brought back to life by some mystical means. Our modern use of the term largely stems from the undead creatures featured in the 1968 horror movie called “Night of the Living Dead”. Now that film, I haven’t seen and probably never will …

Down
1. Andy of comics CAPP
The cartoonist Al Capp’s real name was Alfred Gerald Caplin. His most famous strip is “Li’l Abner”, but he also wrote “Abbie an’ Slats” and “Long Sam”.

2. Soothing agent ALOE
Aloe vera has a number of alternate names that are descriptive of its efficacy as a medicine. These include the First Aid plant, Wand of Heaven, Silent Healer and Miracle Plant.

4. ’70s TV teacher MR KOTTER
“Welcome Back, Kotter” is a sitcom from the the late seventies. The title character is a teacher at Buchanan High, one Gabe Kotter who himself had attended the school as a student. Kotter is played by Gabe Kaplan. One of the prominent students in his class is a young John Travolta, playing a role that launched his film career. In recent years you might have seen Gabe Kaplan as co-host of the popular show “High Stakes Poker” on GSN.

7. Sports gp. with divisions NCAA
The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) dates back to the Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. When his son broke his nose playing football at Harvard, President Roosevelt turned his attention to the number of serious injuries and even deaths occurring in college sports. He instigated meetings between the major educational institutions leading to the formation of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS) in 1906, which was given the remit of regulating college sports. The IAAUS became the NCAA in 1910.

8. Garfield, for one CAT
“Garfield” is a comic strip drawn by Jim Davis since 1978. Garfield is an orange tabby cat. Davis named his hero Garfield after his own grandfather.

11. European wheels AUDI
The Audi name has an interesting history. The Horch company was founded by August Horch in 1909, but soon after Horch was forced out of his own business. He set up a new company and continued to use his own name as a brand. The old company sued him for using the Horch name so a meeting was held to choose something new. Horch’s young son was studying Latin in the room where the meeting was taking place. He pointed out that “Horch” was German for “hear”, and he suggested “Audi” as a replacement, the Latin for “listen”.

18. 1996 Reform Party candidate PEROT
Ross Perot graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1953, as president of his class. He served his 4-year commitment but then apparently resigned his commission, being somewhat disillusioned with the navy.

The Reform Party of the USA was founded in 1995 by Ross Perot with the intent of creating an alternative to the Republican and Democratic Parties. The Reform Party’s biggest success was the election of Jesse Ventura as Governor of Minnesota.

27. Nurse Barton CLARA
Clara Barton was deeply disturbed by her experiences caring for the wounded during the Civil War. She dedicated herself after the war towards American recognition of the International Committee of the Red Cross. The American Red Cross was inevitably formed, in 1881, and Barton was installed as its first president.

31. Papal topper TIARA
“Triregnum” is the Latin name for the papal tiara that has been worn by Roman Catholic popes since the 8th century. The crown has three tiers, so it is also known as the triple tiara. “Triregnum” is Latin for “three crowns”.

43. Prehistoric predators T REXES
The Tyrannosaurus rex (usually written T. rex) was a spectacular looking dinosaur. Tyrannosaurus comes from the Greek words “tyrannos” (tyrant) and “sauros” (lizard), and the “rex” is of course Latin for “king”. They were big boys, measuring 42 feet long and 13 feet tall at the hips, and weighing 7.5 tons.

44. Like Everest, vis-à-vis K2 TALLER
K2 is the second highest mountain on the planet (at 28, 251 ft), with Mount Everest being higher by over 700 feet. K2 is known the “Savage Mountain” as it is relatively difficult to climb, having claimed 1 in 4 mountaineers who have attempted to reach the summit. It has never been climbed in winter. The name K2 dates back to what was called the Great Trigonometric Survey, a British survey of the geography of India carried out during the 19th century. Included in this survey were the heights of many of the Himalayan peaks, including Everest. The original surveyor, a Thomas Montgomerie, included two peaks he first called K1 and K2. He discovered later that the locals called K1 Masherbrum (the 22nd highest mountain in the world), but the remote K2 had no local name that he could find, so it was christened Mount Godwin-Austen. This name was rejected by the Royal Geographic Society although it does still appear on maps. So, the most common name used is K2, that original note in a surveyor’s notebook.

47. Musical with the song “Another Pyramid” AIDA
The rock musical “Aida” is based on Giuseppe Verdi’s original opera. It premiered in 1998 and is still performed today. Music is by Elton John and lyrics are by Tim Rice.

48. Hebrew prophet AMOS
Amos is one of the twelve minor prophets in the Hebrew Bible. Before becoming a prophet, Amos was sheep herder and a fig farmer.

51. TV host with a large car collection LENO
Jay Leno was born James Leno, in New Rochelle, New York. Jay’s father was the son of Italian immigrants, and his mother was from Scotland. Leno grew up in Andover, Massachusetts and actually dropped out of school on the advice of a high school guidance counsellor. However, years later he went to Emerson college and earned a Bachelor’s degree in speech therapy. Leno also started a comedy club at Emerson college in 1973. Today Jay Leno is a car nut, and owns about 200 vehicles of various types. You can check them out on his website, www.jaylenosgarage.com.

52. Circular treat OREO
The Oreo was the best-selling cookie in the 20th century, and almost 500 billion of them have been sold since they were introduced in 1912 by Nabisco. In those early days the creme filling was made with pork fat, but today vegetable oils are used instead. If you take a bite out of an Oreo sold outside of America you might notice a difference from the homegrown cookie, as coconut oil is added in the overseas version to give a different taste.

53. Bupkis NADA
“Bupkis” is a word that means “absolutely nothing, nothing of value”, and is of Yiddish origin.

“Nada” is the Spanish word for “nothing”.

54. David Cameron’s alma mater ETON
The world-famous Eton College is just a brisk walk from Windsor Castle, which itself is just outside London. Eton is noted for producing many British leaders including David Cameron who took power in the last UK general election. The list of Old Etonians also includes Princes William and Harry, the Duke of Wellington, George Orwell, and the creator of James Bond, Ian Fleming (as well as 007 himself as described in the Fleming novels).

57. Early Beatle bassist Sutcliffe STU
Stu Sutcliffe was one of the original four members of The Silver Beatles (as The Beatles were known in their early days), along with Lennon, McCartney and Harrison. Sutcliffe apparently came up with name “Beatles” along with John Lennon, as a homage to their hero Buddy Holly who was backed by the “Crickets”. By all reports, Sutcliffe wasn’t a very talented musician, and was more interested in painting. He went with the group to Hamburg, more than once, but he eventually left the Beatles and went back to art school, actually studying for a while at the Hamburg College of Art. In 1962, in Hamburg, he collapsed with blinding headaches. He died in the ambulance on the way to hospital, his death attributed to cerebral paralysis.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Collected CALM
5. Tilting tool LANCE
10. Swift FAST
14. Apple application no longer in use ALAR
15. Eponymous William’s birthplace OCCAM
16. Gospel writer LUKE
17. One who illegally brings home the bacon? PORK PIRATE
19. God in both Eddas ODIN
20. The orange kind is black PEKOE TEA
21. Tape deck button REWIND
23. Uno e due TRE
24. Fairy tale baddie OGRE
25. Mistakes in Dickens, say? VICTORIAN ERRATA
33. Sound, perhaps INLET
34. Insect-eating singers WRENS
35. Rapper __ Jon LIL
36. Lasting impression SCAR
37. Just a bit wet MOIST
38. Stove filler COAL
39. “__ American Cousin,” play Lincoln was viewing when assassinated OUR
40. Go green, in a way REUSE
41. Linney of “The Big C” LAURA
42. When to send an erotic love note? R-RATED LETTER DAY
45. English class assignment word READ
46. Ottoman title AGA
47. Remote insert AA CELL
50. By oneself ALL ALONE
55. Big-screen format IMAX
56. “Something’s fishy,” and a hint to this puzzle’s theme I SMELL A RAT
58. Pantheon feature DOME
59. “Fear Street” series author STINE
60. Modernize REDO
61. Tools for ancient Egyptian executions ASPS
62. 16th-century English architectural style TUDOR
63. Zombie’s sound MOAN

Down
1. Andy of comics CAPP
2. Soothing agent ALOE
3. Bird symbolizing daybreak LARK
4. ’70s TV teacher MR KOTTER
5. Idle LOITER
6. Farm unit ACRE
7. Sports gp. with divisions NCAA
8. Garfield, for one CAT
9. Budding EMERGENT
10. Blossom FLOWER
11. European wheels AUDI
12. Crispy roast chicken part SKIN
13. Take care of TEND
18. 1996 Reform Party candidate PEROT
22. Messes up ERRS
24. Short tennis match ONE SET
25. Biker helmet feature VISOR
26. Provoke INCUR
27. Nurse Barton CLARA
28. Willing words I WOULD
29. Stand ARISE
30. Not just mentally ALOUD
31. Papal topper TIARA
32. Soothe ALLAY
37. Lauded Olympian MEDALIST
38. One might keep you awake at night CAR ALARM
40. Fishing gear REEL
41. By the book LEGAL
43. Prehistoric predators T REXES
44. Like Everest, vis-à-vis K2 TALLER
47. Musical with the song “Another Pyramid” AIDA
48. Hebrew prophet AMOS
49. Pitch a tent, maybe CAMP
50. Enclosed in AMID
51. TV host with a large car collection LENO
52. Circular treat OREO
53. Bupkis NADA
54. David Cameron’s alma mater ETON
57. Early Beatle bassist Sutcliffe STU

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