LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Oct 12, Monday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Don Gagliardo & C.C. Burnikel
THEME: A Little Spot … each of the theme answers ends with a word that could be called “a little spot”:

20A. Do-or-die moment : (CRITICAL) POINT
38A. When the Brontës wrote : (VICTORIAN) PERIOD
59A. Precisely : (RIGHT ON THE) DOT

COMPLETION TIME: 07m 41s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
4. Gemologist’s weight : CARAT
A karat (also “carat”, the spelling outside of North America) is a measure of the purity of gold alloys, with 24-karat representing pure gold.

15. Single-celled critter : AMEBA
An ameba (or “amoeba” as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

16. Bo’s’n’s “Hold it!” : AVAST!
Avast is a nautical term, used to tell someone to stop or desist from what they are doing. The word comes from the Dutch “hou vast” meaning “hold fast”.

18. Rocky, for one : BOXER
In the “Rocky” series of films, Rocky Balboa was given the ring name “The Italian Stallion”. Rocky’s first real opponent was Apollo Creed, known in the ring as “The Master of Disaster”.

23. “Para __, oprima numero dos”: customer service option : ESPANOL
For Spanish, press two …

38. When the Brontës wrote : VICTORIAN PERIOD
The Brontë family lived in the lovely village of Haworth in Yorkshire, England. The three daughters all became recognised authors. The first to achieve success was Charlotte Brontë when she published “Jane Eyre”. Then came Emily with “Wuthering Heights” and Anne with “The Tenant of Wildfell Hall”.

43. Cannes crony : AMI
A male friend in France is “un ami”, and a female friend is “une amie”.

Cannes is a city on the French Riviera, noted as host of the Cannes Film Festival. The idea of the annual film festival was adopted by the city just before WWII. However, the festival had to wait for the end of the war for its launch in 1946.

44. Arrow-shooting god : EROS
As always seems to be the case with Greek gods, Eros and Aphrodite have overlapping spheres of influence. Aphrodite was the goddess of love between a man and a woman, and Eros was the god who stirred the passions of the male.

45. Prez before Jack : IKE
There doesn’t seem to be any good reason why President Eisenhower was called “Ike”. However, it is known that the nickname dates back to his childhood as his parents called him “Ike” as well as “Dwight”.

62. Cheer for a diva : BRAVA
“Diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean “goddess” or “fine lady”, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

64. Fragrant compound : ESTER
Esters are very common chemicals. The smaller, low-molecular weight esters are usually pleasant smelling and are often found in perfumes. At the other end of the scale, the higher-molecular weight nitroglycerin is a nitrate ester and is very explosive, and polyester is a huge molecule and is a type of plastic.

65. Game based on crazy eights : UNO
In my youth I remember being taught a great card game by a German acquaintance of mine called Mau Mau. Years later I discovered that Uno is basically the same game, but played with a purpose-printed deck instead of the regular deck of playing cards that’s used for Mau Mau. I hear that Mau Mau is derived from the game called Crazy Eights.

67. Underground Railroad traveler : SLAVE
The Underground Railroad was the name given to the network of people who helped slaves escape from the South to the free states in the North and Canada. The name was also used for the network of safe houses where the slaves could hide out en route. Some suggest that about 100,000 men, women and children were able to escape from slavery using the “Railroad”.

68. Fort Worth sch. : TCU
Texas Christian University (TCU) is a private school in Fort Worth, Texas. TCU used to be called AddRan Male & Female, named after an AddRan Clark, the son of Addison Clark who died at the age of 3-years-old from diphtheria. Poor young AddRan was named after his father and his brother, Addison and Randolph.

Down
3. Bon Appétit offering : RECIPE
“Bon appétit” is French for “enjoy your meal”. “Bon Appétit” is also a monthly magazine about food and entertaining that has been around since 1956 and is published in New York City.

5. BP merger partner : AMOCO
Amoco is an abbreviation for the American Oil Company. Amoco was the first oil company to introduce gasoline tanker trucks and drive-through filling stations. I wonder did they know what they were starting …?

BP is an oil and gas company headquartered in London, UK. BP started out as the Anglo-Persian Oil Company in 1909 with the remit of exploiting oil discovered in Iran. The company name was changed to British Petroleum in 1954, and today the name used is simply “BP”.

6. Drugstore name derived from the prescription symbol : REXALL
Rexall was a chain of drugstores in North America which started out in 1902 as a retailers’ cooperative called United Drug Stores. The name “Rexall” was derived from the “Rx” abbreviation used for prescriptions. Rexall used a very interesting marketing concept in 1936. The company sent “The Million Dollar Rexall Streamlined Convention Train” on a tour all over the US. The train had 12 cars which included product displays, convention facilities and a dining car. The idea was to allow local druggists to attend a convention without having the cost of travel, and of course to promote products and the brand.

7. Genesis sibling : ABEL
The story of Cain and Abel not only appears in the Christian and Hebrew Bibles, it also features in the Qur’an. In the Muslim account the brothers are named Kabil and Habil.

8. Infield protection : TARP
Originally, tarpaulins were made from canvas covered in tar that rendered the material waterproof. The word “tarpaulin” comes from “tar” and “palling”, with “pall” meaning “heavy cloth covering”.

11. Deli meat : PASTRAMI
In the US, pastrami was originally called “pastrama”, a dish brought to America by Jewish immigrants from Romania in the second half of the the nineteenth century. The original name may have evolved from the Turkish word “pastirma” meaning “pressed”. “Pastrama” likely morphed into “pastrami”, influenced by the name of the Italian sausage called salami.

13. Many USMA grads : LT’s
The United States Military Academy (USMA) accepts about 1,300 cadets each year, of which about 1,000 graduate, each with a bachelor of science degree. The graduates are then commissioned with the rank of second lieutenant. The first female candidates entered the USMA in 1976, and today about 15% of all new cadets are women.

21. Card worth a fortune? : TAROT
Tarot cards have been around since the mid-1400s, and for centuries were simply used for entertainment in games. It has only been since the late 1800s that the cards have been used by fortune tellers to predict the future.

34. “Sex for Dummies” author, familiarly : DR RUTH
Dr. Ruth Westheimer is a German sex therapist who made a name for herself as a media personality. Westheimer is the daughter of Orthodox Jews and was sent away from Germany by her family just before WWII. She ended up in Palestine and participated in the 1948 Palestine War serving as a scout and sniper. Westheimer was seriously wounded, and spent several months unable to walk. She moved to France in 1950, and soon after arrived in the US. It was in the US where she did her training as a sex therapist.

36. “__War”: Shatner novel : TEK
The “Tekwar” series of science-fiction novels was co-authored by Ron Goulart and the actor William Shatner, although it’s only Shatner’s name who appears on the covers. The stories center around the microchip “drug” called “tek” which dominates the Tekwar universe.

40. Wide-screen technique introduced in the ’50s : CINERAMA
Cinerama is a widescreen format that was introduced in some theaters in the fifties. A Cinerama screen is very curved, and it takes three movie projectors operating simultaneously to provide the full image.

41. Island in the Aegean : IOS
The Cyclades are a group of islands in the Aegean Sea lying southeast of the Greek mainland. There are about 200 islands in the group, almost all of which are the peaks of a submerged mountain range. Ios is one of the larger islands, 11 miles long and 6 miles wide.

42. CSA general : R.E. LEE
Robert E. Lee is of course renowned as a southern officer in the Civil War. Lee was a somewhat reluctant participant in the war in that he opposed the secession of his home state of Virginia from the Union. At the beginning of the war, President Lincoln invited him to take command of the whole Union Army but Lee declined, choosing instead to stay loyal to his home state.

47. Antipasto tidbits : OLIVES
Antipasto is the first course of a meal in Italy. “Antipasto” translates as “before the meal”.

52. Wall-mounted candleholder : SCONCE
A sconce is a light fixture that today uses electric bulbs, but in the past used candles and torches. The defining feature of a sconce is that it is supported by a wall and does not have a base that stands on the ground. Usually the light is indirect, projected upwards towards the ceiling.

57. “Date Night” actor Carell : STEVE
The actor Steve Carell has achieved great success on both television and in movies. On the small screen he came to prominence on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” and then of course as the lead of the US version of “The Office”. On the big screen he starred in “The 40-Year-Old Virgin”, “Evan Almighty” and my personal favorite, ”Dan in Real Life”, starring opposite the wonderful Juliette Binoche.

“Date Night” is a fairly entertaining action comedy movie starring Tina Fey and Steve Carell, released in 2010. It’s all about a married couple who decide to try a little harder on their routine weekly “date night” and end up in all sorts of adventures. As I said, it’s quite entertaining but I suppose I was expecting complete hilarity with such a great pairing of lead actors.

60. Miss Trueheart of “Dick Tracy” : TESS
Glenne Headly is an actress from New London, Connecticut. One of Headly’s most famous roles was playing Tess Trueheart in the film “Dick Tracy” opposite Warren Beatty. Off the stage, Headly was married for a few years to fellow actor John Malkovich.

61. Nobel Peace Prize city : OSLO
The Peace Prize is the most famous of the five prizes bequeathed by Alfred Nobel. The others are for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine and Literature. There is also a Nobel Prize in Economics that is awarded along with the original five, but it is funded separately and is awarded “in memory of Alfred Nobel”. Four of the prizes are awarded by Swedish organizations (Alfred Nobel was a Swede) and so the award ceremonies take place in Stockholm. The Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and that award is presented in Oslo.

62. Painter’s deg. : BFA
The degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts is primarily designed for students intent on pursuing a career in the visual or performing arts.

63. Caribbean liquor : RUM
Rum was first distilled by slaves on the sugarcane plantations of the Caribbean in the 1800s, with the tradition being that the very first production came from Barbados.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Golf pros regularly break it : PAR
4. Gemologist’s weight : CARAT
9. Force back : REPEL
14. “__ had it up to here!” : I’VE
15. Single-celled critter : AMEBA
16. Bo’s’n’s “Hold it!” : AVAST!
17. Blink of an eye : SEC
18. Rocky, for one : BOXER
19. Midterms and finals : TESTS
23. “Para __, oprima numero dos”: customer service option : ESPANOL
24. Woos : COURTS
27. Crystal ball consulter : SEER
28. Bringing up the rear : LAST
31. Cut back : PARE
32. Offbeat : ODD
35. Cowboy’s footwear : BOOT
37. Pieces on a board : MEN
43. Cannes crony : AMI
44. Arrow-shooting god : EROS
45. Prez before Jack : IKE
46. Prefix with second : NANO-
48. Computer operator : USER
50. Bottom-line concern : LOSS
54. Hole for a shoelace : EYELET
56. Heart, soul, or heart and soul : ESSENCE
62. Cheer for a diva : BRAVA
64. Fragrant compound : ESTER
65. Game based on crazy eights : UNO
66. Seethed : FUMED
67. Underground Railroad traveler : SLAVE
68. Fort Worth sch. : TCU
69. Stockpile : AMASS
70. Repaired, as a shoe : SOLED
71. “But then again …” : YET

Down
1. The Fishes of the zodiac : PISCES
2. Opposed (to) : AVERSE
3. Bon Appétit offering : RECIPE
4. Mountain retreat : CABIN
5. BP merger partner : AMOCO
6. Drugstore name derived from the prescription symbol : REXALL
7. Genesis sibling : ABEL
8. Infield protection : TARP
9. Betting odds, e.g. : RATIO
10. Bring into balance : EVEN UP
11. Deli meat : PASTRAMI
12. Body shop quote: Abbr. : EST
13. Many USMA grads : LT’s
21. Card worth a fortune? : TAROT
22. Squid relatives : OCTOPI
25. Palm smartphone : TREO
26. Mail out : SEND
29. Belittle : ABASE
30. Trinity member : SON
33. Deer mom : DOE
34. “Sex for Dummies” author, familiarly : DR RUTH
36. “__War”: Shatner novel : TEK
38. Rooftop rotator : VANE
39. Uncertain response : I MAY
40. Wide-screen technique introduced in the ’50s : CINERAMA
41. Island in the Aegean : IOS
42. CSA general : R.E. LEE
47. Antipasto tidbits : OLIVES
49. Beach house, maybe : RENTAL
51. At one’s post : ON DUTY
52. Wall-mounted candleholder : SCONCE
53. Embark : SET OUT
55. “Holy moly!” : EGADS!
57. “Date Night” actor Carell : STEVE
58. Destroy, as documents : SHRED
60. Miss Trueheart of “Dick Tracy” : TESS
61. Nobel Peace Prize city : OSLO
62. Painter’s deg. : BFA
63. Caribbean liquor : RUM

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LA Times Crossword Answers 28 Oct 12, Sunday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: Having the Last Laugh … all of today’s theme answers end with -HA:

21A. Imposing WWI weapon BIG BERT(HA)
27A. Kim’s “Sex and the City” role SAMANT(HA)
39A. “The Impossible Dream” musical MAN OF LA MANC(HA)
53A. Barista’s chocolaty creation CAFE MOC(HA)
65A. Bumbling fictional spies BORIS AND NATAS(HA)
83A. “Righto!” YOU BETC(HA)
97A. Warren Buffett’s nickname ORACLE OF OMA(HA)
105A. Longfellow hero HIAWAT(HA)
119A. Lover of 105-Across MINNE(HAHA)

COMPLETION TIME: 18m 20s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … TIME-LAGS (time logs!!!), RAHAL (Rohal)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Islands with giant tortoises GALAPAGOS
The Galápagos Islands lie over 500 miles west of Ecuador. The Galápagos owe their celebrity to the voyage of HMS Beagle which landed there in 1835, with Charles Darwin on board. It was Darwin’s study of various species on the islands that inspired him to postulate his Theory of Evolution.

15. Big Ten sch. PSU
The athletic teams of Pennsylvania State University (PSU) are called the Nittany Lions, or in the case of the female teams, the Lady Lions. The Nittany Lion was introduced as a mascot way back in 1904 and is modeled after mountain lions that used to roam Mount Nittany located near the school’s campus.

19. Blues legend Smith BESSIE
The singer Bessie Smith had the nickname “The Empress of the Blues”. Smith was the most popular blues singer in the twenties and thirties.

20. Batting material, perhaps WOOL
Batting is a fiber material that is used for stuffing furniture and mattresses.

21. Imposing WWI weapon BIG BERT(HA)
Big Bertha was a very large-bore howitzer developed for the German military just prior to WWI. The shell that the gun fired weighed over 1800 lbs.

24. In __: actually ESSE
The Latin term “in esse” is used to mean “actually existing”, and translates as “in being”.

25. 1985 Chevy Chase film FLETCH
The 1985 comedy film “Fletch” is based on novels written by Gregory Mcdonald. “Fletch” tells the story of an investigative reporter, with Chevy Chase in the title role.

27. Kim’s “Sex and the City” role SAMANT(HA)
The HBO series “Sex and the City” is based on a book of the same name by Candace Bushnell. Apparently there is a spin-off series in the offing called “The Carrie Diaries”.

Kim Cattrall is a Canadian-English actress, best known for playing Samantha Jones on HBO’s “Sex and the City”. I saw Cattrall playing an Englishwoman recently, in the excellent 2010 film “The Ghost Writer”.

34. Scraps for Lassie ORTS
Orts are small scraps of food left after a meal. “Ort” comes from Middle English, and originally described scraps left by animals.

We owe the character Lassie to one Eric Knight who wrote a short story that he expanded into a novel called “Lassie Come Home”, published in 1940. “Lassie Come Home” was turned into a movie three years later, the first of a very successful franchise. The original Lassie (a female) was played by a male dog called Pal. In fact all of the dogs that played Lassie over the years were males because they looked better on camera, retaining a thick coat even during the summer months.

39. “The Impossible Dream” musical MAN OF LA MANC(HA)
“Man of La Mancha” is a musical based on “Don Quixote” by Miguel de Cervantes. The musical was first staged in 1965 on Broadway, when it ran for 2,328 performances. The show is also famous for the song “The Impossible Dream” which has become a classic.

44. Sam who employed Diane and Carla MALONE
The wonderful sitcom “Cheers” ran for eleven seasons on NBC, from 1982 to 1993. “Cheers” spawned an equally successful spin-off show called “Frasier”, which also ran for eleven seasons and often featured guest appearances of characters from the original “Cheers”. The Cheers bar was styled on the Bull & Finch Pub in Boston (in which I’ve had a pint of Guinness two!). The owner of the Bill & Finch cleverly agreed to the initial interior and exterior shots, charging only one dollar. Since then he has made millions from selling “Cheers” memorabilia, and also from increased trade.

47. Part of Chagall’s theater work MURAL
The artist Marc Chagall created works in many different media, everything from book illustrations to stage sets.

Marc Chagall was a Russian-French artist, one of the most successful of the 20th century. Unlike so many painters, Chagall was able to achieve wealth and notoriety for his work during his own lifetime. It did help that Chagall lived to a ripe old age though. He passed away in 1985, when he was 97 years young.

48. Turner autobiography I, TINA
“I, Tina” is the 1986 autobiography of Tina Turner. The book was so successful it was adapted into a movie called “What’s Love Got to Do With It?” The film version was released in 1993 and starring Angela Bassett as Tina Turner.

Tina Turner is actually a stage name used by Anna Mae Bullock, the “Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll”. Turner has always loved Europe and moved there in the eighties. She now splits her time between her homes in England, France and Switzerland.

50. “Body of Proof” network ABC
“Body of Proof” is a medical drama that has been airing on ABC since 2011. Star of the show is Dana Delany who plays a medical examiner in Philadelphia.

53. Barista’s chocolaty creation CAFE MOC(HA)
Mocha is a port city in Yemen on the Red Sea, once the principal port for the capital city of Sana’a. Mocha was the major marketplace in the world for coffee until the 1600s, giving the name to the Mocha coffee bean.

The person who serves coffee in a coffee shop is often called a “barista”. “Barista” is the Italian for “bartender”.

55. U.K. defense gp. RAF
The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the oldest independent air force in the world (i.e. the first air force to become independent of army or navy forces). The RAF was formed during WWI on 1 April 1918, a composite of two earlier forces, the Royal Flying Corps (part of the Army) and the Royal Naval Air Service. The RAF’s “finest hour” has to be the Battle of Britain when the vastly outnumbered British fighters fought off the might of the Luftwaffe causing Hitler to delay his plan to cross the English Channel. This outcome prompted Winston Churchill to utter these memorable words:

Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

59. IOC part: Abbr. INTL
The International Olympic Committee was founded in 1894, and has its headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

64. Explosive stick TNT
TNT is an abbreviation for trinitrotoluene. The chemical was first produced by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand in 1863, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

65. Bumbling fictional spies BORIS AND NATAS(HA)
Boris and Natasha are two characters on the animated television series “The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show”.

70. Otto’s “Oh!” ACH
The German exclamation “ach!” is usually translated into English as “oh!”

76. “Space Ghost” cartoonist Alex __ TOTH
Alex Toth was a cartoonist who did a lot of work for Hanna-Barbera. Included in the list of series he created were “Super Friends”, “Space Ghost”, “The Herculoids” and “Birdman”.

86. Half an attention-getter YOO-
Yoo-hoo!

91. Modern data units BYTES
In the world of computers, a “bit” is the basic unit of information. A bit has a value of 0 or 1. A “byte” is a small collection of bits (usually 8), the number of bits needed to uniquely identify a character of text.

97. Warren Buffett’s nickname ORACLE OF OMA(HA)
Warren Buffett is one of my heroes. Despite being the third wealthiest man in the world, Buffet lives a relatively frugal and modest life. He also has a very Jeffersonian attitude towards the role his wealth plays within his family. He has set up his estate so that his children get enough money to be independent, but the vast majority of his assets are going to charity both before and after he dies.

100. Square root of nove TRE
In Italian, three (tre) is the square root of nine (nove).

102. Haydn sobriquet PAPA
Josef Haydn was an Austrian composer, often called the “Father of the Symphony” due to his prolific output of symphonies that helped define the form. Haydn was also the father figure among “the big three” composers of the Classical Period: Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Hayden was a good friend to Mozart, and a teacher of Beethoven.

105. Longfellow hero HIAWAT(HA)
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was famous for his own work of course, like “Paul Revere’s Ride” and “The Song of Hiawatha”, but he was also the first American to translate Dante’s epic poem called the “Divine Comedy”.

115. Land in el mar ISLA
In Spanish, an island (isla) is found in the sea (el mar).

119. Lover of 105-Across MINNE(HAHA)
Minnehaha is a character featured in “The Song of Hiawatha”, the epic poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, published in 1855. The name Minnehaha translates in the Dakota language into “waterfall” or “rapid water”, and not into “laughing water” as is oft-quoted.

123. “The Accidental Tourist” author ANNE TYLER
“The Accidental Tourist” is a novel by Anne Tyler, first published in 1985. The book was famously adapted into a 1988 movie starring William Hurt, Kathleen Turner and Geena Davis (who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance).

125. Miata maker MAZDA
I’ve always liked the looks of the Mazda Miata, probably because it reminds me so much of old British sports cars. The Miata is built in Hiroshima, Japan.

Down
2. Licorice-flavored liqueur ANIS
Anis is a Spanish liqueur, equivalent to what’s called anisette in other countries (in France, for example). It has a licorice taste as it is produced by distilling the seeds of the anis plant. Like all anis-type drinks, it is usually mixed with water and turns a milky white color when the water is added.

4. French clerics ABBES
“Abbé” is the French word for an abbot.

7. Larry of country GATLIN
The country singer/songwriter Larry Gatlin is known for his work with his brothers, performing as Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers.

13. Fillable bread PITA
Pita is a lovely bread in Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. It is usually round, and has a “pocket” in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools. The pockets were a big hit in the seventies when someone came up with the idea of using them for fillings hence creating pita sandwiches or “pita pockets”.

15. One may follow a signature POSTSCRIPT
One adds a PS (post scriptum, or simply “postscript”) at the end of a letter. A second postscript is a post post scriptum, a PPS.

17. Forearm bone ULNA
The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinkie-side”.

28. Composer Khachaturian ARAM
Aram Khachaturian was a Soviet-Armenian composer who created many works that were influenced by Armenian culture. Khachaturian’s most famous piece of music is the frenetic “Saber Dance” from the ballet “Gayane”. My favorite composition though is the “Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia”. It was used as the theme for a BBC drama called “The Onedin Line” and will always evoke for me images of tall ships and vast oceans.

33. Bay Area airport letters SFO
San Francisco International Airport (SFO) is the maintenance hub for United Airlines, and is the principal base for Virgin America.

39. “The Social Network” actress Rooney __ MARA
The actress Rooney Mara is noted for her role in the 2010 film “The Social Network” and more recently for the title role in the 2011 hit movie “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo”. Mara has American Football in her blood. Her mother’s family founded the Pittsburgh Steelers and her father’s family founded the New York Giants.

41. Priest’s robe ALB
The alb is the white, neck-to-toe vestment worn by priests, usually with a rope cord around the waist. The term alb comes from “albus”, the Latin word for “white”.

42. “Jump” band Van __ HALEN
Van Halen is a heavy metal band formed in Pasadena, California back in 1972. Brothers Eddie and Alex Van Halen originally called the band Mammoth, changing the name to Van Halen in 1974 when they found out there was another Mammoth playing the circuit. Early on, the brothers were renting a sound system from David Lee Roth, and they decided to save some money by bringing him into the band and saving on the rental fee!

46. Santa’s favorite snack cakes? HO HOS
Ho Hos snack cakes were first produced in San Francisco in 1967; not the best thing to come out of the sixties I’d say …

49. Adam’s favorite fast food sandwich? MCRIB
The McDonald’s McRib sandwich is based on a pork patty. There isn’t any pork rib in the patty though. It is primarily made up of pork shoulder meat reconstituted with tripe, heart and stomach tissue. Enjoy …

54. Sweet Rosie of song O’GRADY
“Sweet Rosie O’Grady” was a hit song for Maude Nugent, way back in the 1890s.

62. Manhattan’s __ Drive FDR
The full name of FDR Drive in New York City is the Franklin D. Roosevelt East River Drive. The FDR is a parkway that runs along the East River for almost ten miles through Manhattan. A large portion of the road is built on rubble that came from Bristol, England during WWII. The rubble from the bombed city was loaded as ballast on ships returning to the US after having delivered war supplies to England.

63. Two-faced deity JANUS
Janus is a Roman god, usually depicted with two heads, one looking to the past and the other to the future. As such, as a god Janus is often associated with time.

66. Flamenco concert shout OLE
Flamenco is a style of Spanish music and dance. The origin of the word “flamenco” isn’t clearly understood, but the explanation that seems most credible to me is that it comes from Flanders in Northern Europe. Given that “flamenco” is the Spanish word for “Flemish” and Flanders is home to the Flemish people, it makes perfect sense, doesn’t it?

67. Legal gp. ABA
The American Bar Association (ABA) was founded back in 1878 and is a voluntary association for lawyers and law students. The ABA focuses on setting academic standards for law schools and setting ethical codes for the profession.

68. Bugs and Elmer, e.g. TOONS
The word “cartoon” was originally used for a “drawing on strong paper”, a durable drawing used as a model for another work. The term comes from the French word “carton” meaning “heavy paper, pasteboard”. Cartoons have been around a long time, with some of the most famous having being drawn by Leonardo da Vinci.

70. Elroy Jetson’s dog ASTRO
“The Jetsons” is an animated show from Hanna-Barbera that had its first run in 1962-1963, and then was recreated in 1985-1987. When it was debuted in 1963 by ABC, “The Jetsons” was the network’s first ever color broadcast.

72. “3 Alarm” candies HOT TAMALES
Hot Tamales are a cinnamon candy made by Just Born. They look like red versions of the other Just Born candy called Mike and Ike. That’s no coincidence, as Hot Tamales were developed as a way to make use of rejected Mike and Ike candy. The dark red color and intense cinnamon flavor were added to the Mike and Ike rejects, masking the original flavor and color.

78. “A League of __ Own” THEIR
“A League of Their Own” is a comedy drama film released in 1992 that tells a tale about the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League active during WWII. The lead actors were Tom Hanks and Geena Davis. The film spawned one of the most famous quotes in movie history: “There’s no crying in baseball!”

82. Salon creation COIF
A coif is a hairdo. The term “coif” comes from an old French term “coife” used for a skull-cap that was worn under a helmet back in the late 13th century.

83. Stretching discipline YOGA
In the West we tend to think of yoga as a physical discipline, a means of exercise that uses specific poses to stretch and strengthen muscles. While it is true that the ancient Indian practice of yoga does involve such physical discipline, the corporeal aspect of the practice plays a relatively small part in the whole philosophy. Other major components are meditation, ethical behavior, breathing and contemplation.

84. WWII saver’s purchase E BOND
Series E Savings Bonds were introduced in 1941, just before the start of WWII, as ‘defense bonds”. After the attack on Pearl Harbor they became known as “war bonds”.

7. Plains Indian OTO
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

90. 1986 Indy 500 winner Bobby RAHAL
Bobby Rahal is an auto racing driver and team owner. Rahal won the 1986 Indianapolis 500 as a driver, and won the 2004 Indianapolis 500 as a team owner (the driver was Buddy Rice).

93. Big name in lingerie OLGA
Olga is a lingerie brand name.

99. Richard of “The Flamingo Kid” CRENNA
Actor Richard Crenna’s most recognized role was probably that of Colonel Trautman in the first three “Rambo” movies. Crenna wasn’t the first person hired to play Trautman. Kirk Douglas accepted the role but walked off the set on the first day of shooting.

“The Flamingo Kid” is a 1984 comedy starring Matt Dillon, about a young working class boy working a summer at a beach resort. “The Flamingo Kid” was the first film to be given a PG-13 rating.

104. __ alcohol ETHYL
Ethyl alcohol is more usually known as ethanol. It is the alcohol found in intoxicating beverages, and nowadays is also used as a fuel for cars.

106. Fertility goddess ISIS
Isis was the ancient Egyptian goddess of fertility, as well as the protector of the dead and the goddess of children.

107. Hilo dance HULA
Hula is the name of the Polynesian dance. The chant or song that the dance illustrates, that’s known as the mele.

Hilo is the largest settlement on the big island of Hawai’i, with a population of over 43,000 (that’s not very many!). I love the Big Island …

108. Painted Desert st. ARIZ
The Painted Desert in Arizona is a beautiful area noted for colorful rock formations.

110. Barbra’s “Funny Girl” co-star OMAR
I’ve always wondered if the Fanny Brice from Jane Austen’s “Mansfield Park” was somehow related to the Fanny Brice that Barbra Streisand played in “Funny Girl”. Fanny Brice of musical fame was a real person (although I hadn’t heard of her). Brice was a theater and film actress, and “Funny Girl” is very loosely based on her life story. Fanny Brice was born into a Hungarian Jewish family in New York City, with the real name of Fania Borach.

112. Tourist haven east of Java BALI
Bali is the most important tourist destination in Indonesia, and is an island lying east of Java. In recent years, Bali’s tourist industry has been badly hit in the aftermath of two terrorist bombings. The first one, in 2002, killed 202 people, mainly foreign tourists in a nightclub.

113. “George of the Jungle” elephant SHEP
The 1997 movie “George of the Jungle” stars Brendan Fraser in the title role. The original “George of the Jungle” was an animated television show that ran for only 17 episodes in 1967.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Islands with giant tortoises GALAPAGOS
10. Annual report feature GRAPH
15. Big Ten sch. PSU
18. Drunk INEBRIATE
19. Blues legend Smith BESSIE
20. Batting material, perhaps WOOL
21. Imposing WWI weapon BIG BERT(HA)
22. Thing ENTITY
23. Football fan’s channel ESPN
24. In __: actually ESSE
25. 1985 Chevy Chase film FLETCH
27. Kim’s “Sex and the City” role SAMANT(HA)
29. Step between stories STAIR
31. Air balls miss them entirely RIMS
34. Scraps for Lassie ORTS
35. Hard-rock link AS A
38. Geographical suffix -ERN
39. “The Impossible Dream” musical MAN OF LA MANC(HA)
44. Sam who employed Diane and Carla MALONE
46. Screwdriver, for one HANDTOOL
47. Part of Chagall’s theater work MURAL
48. Turner autobiography I, TINA
49. To a greater extent MORE SO
50. “Body of Proof” network ABC
52. Floor square TILE
53. Barista’s chocolaty creation CAFE MOC(HA)
55. U.K. defense gp. RAF
57. One having trouble with his sisters? LISPER
59. IOC part: Abbr. INTL
60. Garden product word -GRO
61. Give __: care A FIG
63. __ in Juliet J AS
64. Explosive stick TNT
65. Bumbling fictional spies BORIS AND NATAS(HA)
70. Otto’s “Oh!” ACH
73. Chem class component LAB
74. Stable environment? BARN
75. Switch settings ONS
76. “Space Ghost” cartoonist Alex __ TOTH
80. Not on the level SLOPED
82. Purring pet CAT
83. “Righto!” YOU BETC(HA)
85. Four: Pref. TETR-
86. Half an attention-getter YOO-
88. Leggy waders HERONS
91. Modern data units BYTES
92. 5:1, e.g. RATIO
94. Intervals between related events TIMELAGS
96. Go bananas LOSE IT
97. Warren Buffett’s nickname ORACLE OF OMA(HA)
99. Time line period: Abbr. CEN
100. Square root of nove TRE
101. RAM units MEGS
102. Haydn sobriquet PAPA
103. Stock deal TRADE
105. Longfellow hero HIAWAT(HA)
109. “Not so fast!” SLOWER
111. Butter amt. TBSP
115. Land in el mar ISLA
116. Jet-setter’s destination EUROPE
119. Lover of 105-Across MINNE(HAHA)
121. Fishing spot PIER
122. Omits in speaking ELIDES
123. “The Accidental Tourist” author ANNE TYLER
124. Flat sound SSS
125. Miata maker MAZDA
126. Sees the point of the discussion? READS LIPS

Down
1. Taunt GIBE
2. Licorice-flavored liqueur ANIS
3. Piano parts LEGS
4. French clerics ABBES
5. Beginning of school? PRE-
6. Travelocity quote AIRFARE
7. Larry of country GATLIN
8. Remaining OTHER
9. Subway commuter’s hope SEAT
10. Mil. bigwig GEN
11. 18 to 20 in a sequence RST
12. Yard sale caveat AS IS
13. Fillable bread PITA
14. Kid’s attention getter HEY MOM!
15. One may follow a signature POSTSCRIPT
16. Junior-to-be SOPH
17. Forearm bone ULNA
19. Derrieres BEHINDS
20. Flipped WENT NUTS
26. Leggy wader CRANE
28. Composer Khachaturian ARAM
30. Popular coffee hr. TEN AM
32. Stop along the highway MOTOR INN
33. Bay Area airport letters SFO
35. Friends in Rome AMICI
36. Evil guy SATAN
37. “Need __?” A LIFT
39. “The Social Network” actress Rooney __ MARA
40. Rye buy LOAF
41. Priest’s robe ALB
42. “Jump” band Van __ HALEN
43. Wide-awake ALERT
45. Hamburger order, perhaps: Abbr. ONE LB
46. Santa’s favorite snack cakes? HO HOS
49. Adam’s favorite fast food sandwich? MCRIB
51. Stock designation CLASS B
54. Sweet Rosie of song O’GRADY
56. Turkish title AGA
58. Boy chaser? -ISH
61. Cursed thing ANATHEMA
62. Manhattan’s __ Drive FDR
63. Two-faced deity JANUS
66. Flamenco concert shout OLE
67. Legal gp. ABA
68. Bugs and Elmer, e.g. TOONS
69. 67-Down mems. ATTYS
70. Elroy Jetson’s dog ASTRO
71. See-through CLEAR
72. “3 Alarm” candies HOT TAMALES
77. Large chamber music group OCTET
78. “A League of __ Own” THEIR
79. Speed HASTE
81. Mall battle PRICE WAR
82. Salon creation COIF
83. Stretching discipline YOGA
84. WWII saver’s purchase E BOND
87. Plains Indian OTO
89. Goes by ELAPSES
90. 1986 Indy 500 winner Bobby RAHAL
93. Big name in lingerie OLGA
95. Clean, in a way MOP
96. Found out LEARNED
98. Hold in high regard ESTEEM
99. Richard of “The Flamingo Kid” CRENNA
103. Tie that binds TWINE
104. __ alcohol ETHYL
105. Swinging joints? HIPS
106. Fertility goddess ISIS
107. Hilo dance HULA
108. Painted Desert st. ARIZ
110. Barbra’s “Funny Girl” co-star OMAR
112. Tourist haven east of Java BALI
113. “George of the Jungle” elephant SHEP
114. What many players shoot for PARS
117. Unmatched ODD
118. Stew veggie PEA
120. UFO drivers, ostensibly ETS

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