LA Times Crossword Answers 18 Feb 13, Monday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Dan Schoenholz
THEME: Happy Presidents Day! … each of today’s themed clues is the family name of a US president, and is also the first name of another famous person. The themed answers are pairs of names: the first name of the president followed by the family name of the second celebrity:

20A. Jefferson THOMAS OR DAVIS (Thomas Jefferson or Jefferson Davis)
27A. Washington GEORGE OR IRVING (George Washington or Washington Irving)
43A. Jackson ANDREW OR BROWNE (Andrew Jackson or Jackson Browne)
51A. Truman HARRY OR CAPOTE (Harry Truman or Truman Capote)

COMPLETION TIME: 6m 42s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
14. Skid row sort WINO
The term “skid row” is used to describe a run-down urban neighborhood. “Skid row” appears to have originated in the Pacific Northwest where a “skid road” was a wooden pathway used for “skidding” logs through forests and over bogs. The terms “skid road” and “skid row” came to be used for logging camps and mills, and then somehow was applied to run-down areas in cities up and down the west coast of North America.

15. River joining the Missouri near Jefferson City OSAGE
Much of the Osage River in Missouri is now taken up by two large reservoirs created behind two dams that provide power for St. Louis and the surrounding area. The two reservoirs are the Truman Reservoir and the Lake of the Ozarks.

17. Skating maneuver LOOP
A toe loop is a relatively simple jump in figure skating (not that I could do one!). In a toe loop, the skater uses the toe pick on the skate to lift off on a backward outside edge, landing on the same backward outside edge.

19. Strauss of blue jeans LEVI
Levi Strauss was the founder of the first company in the world to manufacture blue jeans. Levi Strauss & Co. opened in 1853 in San Francisco. Strauss and his business partner were awarded a patent in 1873 for the use of copper rivets to strengthen points of strain on working pants.

20. Jefferson THOMAS OR DAVIS (Thomas Jefferson or Jefferson Davis)
Thomas Jefferson was a very close friend of John Adams, a friendship dating back to the time of the Second Continental Congress. Jefferson and Adams developed differing views on important subjects and had many debates, both directly and in correspondence. They also had an “up and down” relationship, with long periods of coolness. The two former presidents both died on the same day, in 1826. If that isn’t an amazing enough coincidence, they passed away on July 4th, Independence Day.

The Confederate States of America (CSA) set up government in 1861 just before Abraham Lincoln took office. Jefferson Davis was selected as President of the CSA at its formation and retained the post for the life of the government.

23. Hibachi residue ASH
The traditional hibachi in Japan is a heating device, often a ceramic bowl or box that holds burning charcoal. This native type of hibachi isn’t used for cooking, but rather as a space heater (a brazier). Here in the US we use the term hibachi to refer to a charcoal grill used as a small cooking stove, which in Japanese would be called a “shichirin”.

27. Washington GEORGE OR IRVING (George Washington or Washington Irving)
The famous story about George Washington cutting down a cherry tree as a child has been shown to be fiction. He supposedly was confronted by his father after taking an axe to a tree and confessed with the words, “I’m sorry father, I cannot tell a lie”. Not true …

Washington Irving was an author from New York City. Irving’s most famous works are the short stories: “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle”.

33. Singer Brickell who’s married to Paul Simon EDIE
Edie Brickell is a singer-songwriter from Dallas, Texas. Brickell has been married to fellow singer Paul Simon since 1991.

34. “You got that right, brother!” AMEN!
The word “amen” is translated as “so be it”. “Amen” is said to be of Hebrew origin, but it is likely to be also influenced by Aramaic and Arabic.

42. Chicago airport O’HARE
O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Edward O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII. As an aside, Edward O’Hare’s father was a lawyer for Al Capone who helped get the famous gangster convicted on tax evasion.

43. Jackson ANDREW OR BROWNE (Andrew Jackson or Jackson Browne)
Like many of the earlier US presidents, Andrew Jackson was a career military man. Jackson distinguished himself as commander of American forces during the War of 1812, particularly in the defense of New Orleans. He had a reputation of being fair to his troops, but strict. It was during this time that he was described as “tough as old hickory”, giving rise to the nickname “Old Hickory” that stuck with him for life.

Jackson Browne is an American singer-songwriter, although he was born in Heidelberg, Germany while his father was stationed there with the US Army.

51. Truman HARRY OR CAPOTE (Harry Truman or Truman Capote)
Harry Truman wanted to go to West Point having served with the Missouri Army National Guard on active duty in WWI, but he couldn’t get in because of his poor eyesight. Young Truman didn’t have the money to pay for college anywhere else. He did manage to study for two years towards a law degree at the Kansas City Law School in the twenties, but he never finished his schooling. So, Harry S. Truman was the last US President (out of a list of ten) who did not have a college degree.

The larger than life Truman Capote was a celebrated author and comedian. Capote is perhaps most associated with his novella “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and his true crime novel “In Cold Blood”. Truman Capote grew up in Monroeville, Alabama. There he met, and became lifelong friends with, fellow novelist Harper Lee. Capote was the inspiration for the character “Dill” in Lee’s celebrated work “To Kill a Mocking Bird”. In turn, Harper Lee was the inspiration for the character “Idabel” in Capote’s “Other Voices, Other Rooms”.

61. It ebbs and flows TIDE
Tides of course are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon on the oceans. At neap tide, the smaller gravitational effect of the sun cancels out some of the moon’s effect. At spring tide, the sun and the moon’s gravitational forces act in concert causing more extreme movement of the oceans.

62. Kauai and Tahiti, for two ISLES
Because the island of Kauai is one of the wettest places on earth, all the rainfall has helped to carve out magnificent canyons that now have superb waterfalls. Kauai is used as a common backdrop for movies.

Although Captain Cook landed in Tahiti in 1769, he wasn’t the first European to do so. However, Cook’s visit was the most significant in that it heralded a whole spate of European visitors, who brought with them prostitution, venereal disease and alcohol. Paradoxically, they also brought Christianity. Included among the subsequent visitors was the famous HMS Bounty under the charge of Captain Bligh.

63. Read bar codes on SCAN
UPC stands for Universal Price Code or Universal Product Code. The first UPC-marked item to get scanned in a store was on June 26, 1974 at 08:01 a.m. at Marsh’s supermarket in Troy, Ohio. It was a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum …

64. Large amount SCAD
The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear, although back in the mid-1800s “scads” was used to mean “dollars”.

66. Number picker’s casino game KENO
The name “Keno” has French or Latin roots, with the French “quine” being a term for five winning numbers, and the Latin “quini” meaning “five each”. The game originated in China and was introduced into the West by Chinese immigrants who were working on the first Transcontinental Railroad in the 1800s.

Down
2. Brazilian port, for short RIO
“Rio de Janeiro” translates as “January River”. The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Years Day in 1502.

4. Frosh, next year SOPH
The term “sophomore” has been used for a student in the second year of university since the 1680’s. The original meaning of the word was “arguer”. The term has Greek roots, from two Greek words that have been artificially combined in English. The Greek “sophos” means “wise”, and “moros” means “foolish”.

“Frosh” is a slang term for a college freshman. We call them “freshers” back in Ireland …

5. Christina Crawford’s “__ Dearest” MOMMIE
“Mommie Dearest” is a memoir written by Christian Crawford, the daughter of actress Joan Crawford. The book did not paint Joan in a good light, with claims of alcoholism and neglect of her four children.

6. Italian cheese region ASIAGO
Asiago is a crumbly cheese, named after the region in northeastern Italy from where it originates.

8. “Simply delicious” waffle maker EGGO
Eggo is the brand name of a line of frozen waffles made by Kellogg’s. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name “Eggo” was chosen to promote the “egginess” of the batter. “Eggo” replaced the original name chosen, which was “Froffles”, created by melding “frozen” and “waffles”.

10. Deli meat in round slices SALAMI
Salame (note the “e” at the end) is an Italian sausage that is traditionally associated with the peasant classes. The meat in the sausage is preserved with salt, and it can be hung and stored for maybe as long as ten years. The name “salame” comes from “sale”, the Italian word for salt, and “-ame”, a suffix indicating a collective noun. Our English word “salami” is actually the Italian plural for “salame”.

11. Dreaded business chapter? ELEVEN
In the US Bankruptcy Code, Chapter 11 allows for a company or individual to reorganize affairs in the event that debts become so cumbersome that they cannot be cleared. Should the reorganization be unsuccessful, then Chapter 7 of the code might apply, which covers the sale of assets and distribution of proceeds to creditors.

13. Deli cheese SWISS
Swiss cheese is a relatively generic term and is a type of cheese produced in various countries and not necessarily in Switzerland. What the cheeses all have in common is a resemblance to the original Swiss Emmental.

23. Taj Mahal city AGRA
The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the third wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple’s 14th child.

37. Comedian Margaret CHO
Margaret Cho is a very successful stand-up comedian, but she is also a fashion designer with her own line of clothing. Cho also acts, and you might have seen her in the John Travolta/Nicholas Cage movie “Face/Off” in which she played John Travolta’s FBI colleague.

38. “Sons and Lovers” novelist LAWRENCE
D. H. Lawrence was very much a reactionary novelist, in the sense that his work tended to decry the social impact of the industrial revolution. His novels were also criticized for their erotic content, so much so that Lawrence was publicly labelled as a pornographer by the end of his days. His most famous novels are “Sons and Lovers”, “The Rainbow”, “Women in Love” and “Lady Chatterley’s Lover”.

39. Florence’s river ARNO
The Arno is the principal river in the Tuscany region of Italy, passing through the cities of Florence and Pisa. Famously the Arno flooded in 1966, the worst flood in the region for centuries. There were numerous deaths and extensive destruction of priceless art treasures, particularly in Florence.

40. Crab grass, e.g. WEED
Crab grass may be considered a weed and a scourge of the lawn-loving population, but it has its uses. In Africa, the seeds of some species of crabgrass are toasted and ground into a flour that is used to make porridge, or better still, to make beer.

42. Black-and-white cookie OREO
The Oreo was the best-selling cookie in the 20th century, and almost 500 billion of them have been sold since they were introduced in 1912 by Nabisco. In those early days the creme filling was made with pork fat, but today vegetable oils are used instead. If you take a bite out of an Oreo sold outside of America you might notice a difference from the homegrown cookie, as coconut oil is added in the overseas version to give a different taste.

44. 1971 Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo NERUDA
Pablo Neruda was the pen name, and eventually the legal name, used by Chilean writer Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Basoalto chose the name as a homage to Czech poet Jan Neruda.

52. Spunkmeyer of cookie fame OTIS
Otis Spunkmeyer is a company noted for producing muffins and cookies. Kenneth Rawlings founded the company in 1977 in Oakland, California. “Otis Spunkmeyer” isn’t a real person, and instead is a name that was made up by Rawlings’ 12-year-old daughter.

54. Auto racer Yarborough CALE
Cale Yarborough is a former NASCAR driver and owner. Yarborough was the first NASCAR driver to appear on the cover of “Sports Illustrated”.

59. “The Da Vinci Code” author Brown DAN
Dan Brown is a somewhat controversial author, best known for his 2003 novel “The Da Vinci Code”. I’ve read all of Brown’s books and must say that his early ones were awful. Having said that I loved “Angels and Demons”, and found “The Da Vinci Code” to be a great read.

60. John’s Yoko ONO
John Lennon and Yoko Ono married at the height of the Vietnam War in 1969. The couple decided to use the inevitable publicity surrounding their wedding and honeymoon to promote peace in the world. They honeymooned in the Presidential Suite of the Amsterdam Hilton, inviting the world’s press to join them and to witness their “bed-in”. They spent the week talking about peace, and an end to war. The marriage and bed-in is chronicled by the Beatles in their song “The Ballad of John and Yoko”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Old flatboats ARKS
5. Stag party attendees MALES
10. Fixes with thread SEWS
14. Skid row sort WINO
15. River joining the Missouri near Jefferson City OSAGE
16. “Is there __ against that?” A LAW
17. Skating maneuver LOOP
18. Gnatlike insect MIDGE
19. Strauss of blue jeans LEVI
20. Jefferson THOMAS OR DAVIS (Thomas Jefferson or Jefferson Davis)
23. Hibachi residue ASH
25. 18-wheeler RIG
26. Black cats, to some OMENS
27. Washington GEORGE OR IRVING (George Washington or Washington Irving)
32. Baton-passing event RELAY
33. Singer Brickell who’s married to Paul Simon EDIE
34. “You got that right, brother!” AMEN!
35. In first place ON TOP
37. Crab’s grabber CLAW
41. Impressionist APER
42. Chicago airport O’HARE
43. Jackson ANDREW OR BROWNE (Andrew Jackson or Jackson Browne)
48. Coffee lightener CREAM
49. Word with popper or dropper EYE
50. Fishing stick ROD
51. Truman HARRY OR CAPOTE (Harry Truman or Truman Capote)
56. Bump up against ABUT
57. Jeweled headpiece TIARA
58. Reverse, as a computer operation UNDO
61. It ebbs and flows TIDE
62. Kauai and Tahiti, for two ISLES
63. Read bar codes on SCAN
64. Large amount SCAD
65. Gets things growing SEEDS
66. Number picker’s casino game KENO

Down
1. Leatherwork tool AWL
2. Brazilian port, for short RIO
3. Lumber blemish KNOTHOLE
4. Frosh, next year SOPH
5. Christina Crawford’s “__ Dearest” MOMMIE
6. Italian cheese region ASIAGO
7. Youngsters LADS
8. “Simply delicious” waffle maker EGGO
9. Tea leaves reader, e.g. SEER
10. Deli meat in round slices SALAMI
11. Dreaded business chapter? ELEVEN
12. Greeting from a distance WAVING
13. Deli cheese SWISS
21. Wild revelry ORGY
22. Went off the high board DOVE
23. Taj Mahal city AGRA
24. Come across as SEEM
28. Competed in a 10K RAN
29. Back in style RETRO
30. Altar vow I DO
31. Pants seam problem RIP
35. Not shut, in verse OPE
36. Just out of the box NEW
37. Comedian Margaret CHO
38. “Sons and Lovers” novelist LAWRENCE
39. Florence’s river ARNO
40. Crab grass, e.g. WEED
41. Military force ARMY
42. Black-and-white cookie OREO
43. Middle East language ARABIC
44. 1971 Nobel Prize-winning poet Pablo NERUDA
45. Scooted DARTED
46. Brought to maturity REARED
47. Cardiac surgery technique BYPASS
48. Chews the fat CHATS
52. Spunkmeyer of cookie fame OTIS
53. Get out of bed RISE
54. Auto racer Yarborough CALE
55. Elephant’s incisor TUSK
59. “The Da Vinci Code” author Brown DAN
60. John’s Yoko ONO

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LA Times Crossword Answers 17 Feb 13, Sunday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Mike Peluso
THEME: Begone! … each of today’s themed answers is a well-known phrase with a letter “B gone”, a letter B missing:

23A. Garden tool for unexpected situations? EMERGENCY RAKE (from “emergency brake”)
35A. Hardly ever laugh? LACK HUMOR (from “black humor”)
51A. Reason for a few nicks? SHAVING RUSH (from “shaving brush”)
69A. Plumber’s assessment? LEAK OUTLOOK (from “bleak outlook”)
84A. Panama Canal bash? LOCK PARTY (from “block party”)
102A. Highland scoundrel? SCOTTISH ROGUE (from “Scottish brogue”)
3D. Loud parties in Georgia? ATLANTA RAVES (from “Atlanta Braves”)
57D. Vulcanized rubber inventor’s unsteady gait? GOODYEAR LIMP (from “Goodyear Blimp”)

COMPLETION TIME: 20m 58s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … CRS (cts), CLARO (clato)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
8. Nice woman FEMME
“Femme” is the French word for “woman”.

The city of Nice lies on the Mediterranean coast of France, not far from the Italian border. Although it is only the fifth most populous city, Nice has the second busiest airport in the country (after Paris) thanks to the vast number of jet-setting tourists that flock to the French Riviera.

20. Connecticut town on Long Island Sound DARIEN
The town of Darien, Connecticut is home to the only ambulance service in the nation that is manned by high school students. Darien EMS – Post 53 is actually a scouting unit, but it still provides emergency care at no cost to patients and is funded by private donations. High school students can legally provide the service because the state of Connecticut permits emergency medical technicians to be certified at the age of 16.

25. Escargot SNAIL
“Escargot” is the French word for “snail”.

In order to eat snails, apparently they have to be “purged” before killing them. That means starving them or feeding them on something “wholesome” for several days before cooking them up. Ugh …

27. NBA one-pointers FTS
Free throws (FTs).

28. Ayres who played Dr. Kildare LEW
The Hollywood actor Lew Ayres got his big break in “All Quiet On the Western Front”, and famously played Dr. Kildare in several movies. Ayres’ private life wasn’t too dull. He was married three times, Lola Lane and Ginger Rogers being wives one and two. Ayres was also the man for whom actress Jane Wyman left her husband Ronald Reagan, although that relationship did not go very far.

29. Barone’s superior CONTE
“Conte” is Italian for “count”, with “contessa” translating as “countess”.

34. N.Y. neighbor ONT
The Canadian province of Ontario takes its name from the Great Lake. In turn, Lake Ontario’s name is thought to be derived from “Ontari:io”, a Huron word meaning “great lake”. Ontario is home to the nation’s capital of Ottawa as well as Toronto, Canada’s most populous city (and the capital of the province).

37. PowerShot maker CANON
The Japanese company called Canon is noted mainly in the US for producing quality cameras. The company started out as Precision Optical Industry Laboratory in 1937 making camera bodies. The name was changed in 1947 to Canon.

42. Elite school IVY
The term “Ivy League” originally defined an athletic conference, but now it is used to describe a group of schools of higher education that are associated with both a long tradition and academic excellence. The eight Ivy League Schools are: Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale.

48. Mentalist Geller URI
Uri Geller’s most famous performance is perhaps his uncomfortable failure on “The Tonight Show” with Johnny Carson in 1973. Carson “hi-jacked” Geller on live television by providing him with spoons to bend and watches to start, none of which had been available to Geller before the show aired. Clever!

54. Some sopranos DIVAS
“Diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean “goddess” or “fine lady”, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

56. Runs amok RAMPAGES
The phrase “to run amok” (sometimes “to run amuck”) has been around since the 1670s and is derived from the Malay word for “attacking furiously”, “amuk”. The word “amok” was also used as a noun to describe Malay natives who were “frenzied”. Given Malaya’s troubled history, the natives probably had good reason for that frenzy …

64. Al Green genre SOUL
Al Green is a gospel and soul music singer. Green was born in Arkansas, where he started out as a gospel singer and moved into R&B. In 1974, he was assaulted by a girlfriend who burned him badly on much of his body by pouring boiling grits over him (and then she committed suicide). The incident changed Green’s life and he turned to the church, becoming a pastor in Memphis in 1976. He continued to record music, but never really enjoyed the same success that he had in the early seventies with hits like “Let’s Stay Together” and “I’m Still In Love With You”.

67. Apples, e.g. POMES
The Latin word for “fruit” is “pomum”, which gives us the botanical term “pome” used for a group of fleshy fruits, including apples and pears.

72. Closely watched index THE DOW
Dow Jones & Company was founded as a publishing house in 1882 by three newspaper reporters, Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. Today, the company’s most famous publication has to be “The Wall Street Journal”. In 1884, Charles Dow started reporting the average dollar value of the stock of eleven companies, an index which spawned a whole host of metrics that carry the Dow Jones name to this day, including the renowned Dow Jones Industrials.

76. AMEX adjustments CRS
I am not sure about this one … conversion rates? Credit ratings? Simply credits?

Amex is short for American Express. In dollar terms, there are more transactions conducted in the US using the Amex card than any other card.

79. Golfer Garcia SERGIO
Sergio Garcia is a professional golfer from Spain, and a very colorful character.

82. Scandinavian capital KRONE
“Krone” translates into English as “crown”, and was the name given to coins that bore the image of the monarch. Today, the krone is the name given to the currency of Norway and of Denmark. Some of the Norwegian and Danish kroner have holes in the middle, giving them a “doughnut” or “torus” shape.

83. Suave competitor PRELL
Prell shampoo was introduced by Procter & Gamble in 1947, and was originally a clear green concentrate sold in a tube (like toothpaste).

84. Panama Canal bash? LOCK PARTY (from “block party”)
The Panama Canal was predated by the Panama Railway. The railway’s route actually determined the eventual route of the canal. The impetus to build a canal was spurred on by the success of the Suez Canal which opened in 1869. Work on the Panama Canal started in 1881, but things did not go smoothly at all. Companies involved in the project went bankrupt, one after the other. Eventually the US government bought its way into the project with President Roosevelt handing over millions of dollars to the country of Panama. The canal was finally completed in 1914. All in all, about 27,500 workers died during construction.

89. Capp and Kaline ALS
The cartoonist Al Capp’s real name was Alfred Gerald Caplin. Capp’s most famous strip is “Li’l Abner”, but he also wrote “Abbie an’ Slats” and “Long Sam”.

Al Kaline is a former Major League Baseball player. Kaline played his whole career with the Detroit Tigers, and then became a sportscaster for the team when he retired. He now works as a front office official for Detroit. Given the years that Kaline has devoted to the same team, it’s perhaps not surprising that he has the nickname “Mr. Tiger”.

92. Joey’s mom ROO
“Joey” is the name given to all infant marsupials, not just kangaroos. No one really seems to know for sure what the etymology is of the term “joey”.

93. __ Mawr BRYN
I used to live not far from Bryn-mawr (also “Brynmwar”) in Wales, the town with the highest elevation in the country. Appropriately enough, “bryn mawr” is Welsh for “big hill”. There is also a Bryn Mawr in Pennsylvania (note the different capitalization) that is named after its Welsh counterpart. At the Pennsylvania location there’s a Brynn Mawr college, a private women’s school that was the first American university to offer graduate degrees to women.

96. Amoxicillin target STREP
Streptococcus bacteria multiply and divide along a single axis so that they form linked chains. That behavior gives the genus of bacteria its name, as “streptos” is Greek for “easily twisted, like a chain”. I had a battle with streptococcal pharyngitis (strep throat) not too long ago and it was not at all pleasant, I must say. Another species of streptococcus is responsible for that terrible “flesh-eating” infection that makes the news from time to time.

98. Alliance formed under HST OAS
The Organization of American States (OAS) has its headquarters in Washington, D.C. All the independent states in the Americas are members of the group except Honduras, which had its membership suspended after the country’s 2009 coup.

Harry Truman wanted to go to West Point having served with the Missouri Army National Guard on active duty in WWI, but he couldn’t get in because of his poor eyesight. Young Truman didn’t have the money to pay for college anywhere else. He did manage to study for two years towards a law degree at the Kansas City Law School in the twenties, but he never finished his schooling. So, Harry S. Truman was the last US President (out of a list of ten) who did not have a college degree.

99. Great Basin cap. SLC
Salt Lake City (SLC) was of course founded by Brigham Young, in 1847. The city takes its name from the Great Salt Lake on which it sits, and indeed was known as “Great Salt Lake City” up until 1868.

100. His name is Spanish for “fox” ZORRO
The character Zorro was created by Johnston McCulley in 1919 for a series of stories and pulp fiction. The name “Zorro” is the secret identity of a Spanish colonial nobleman called Don Diego de la Vega. “Zorro” is Spanish for “fox”.

110. Author Prosper __ who wrote “Carmen,” on which the opera is based MERIMEE
Prosper Mérimée was a French dramatist and writer. Mérimée is best known for his novella “Carmen”, which was used by Georges Bizet as the basis for his famous 1875 opera of the same name.

111. Old cinemas ODEONS
In Ancient Greece an odeon was like a small theater, with “odeon” literally meaning “building for musical competition”. Odea were used in both Greece and Rome for entertainments such as musical shows and poetry readings.

112. Orchard Field, nowadays O’HARE
O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Edward O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII. As an aside, Edward O’Hare’s father was a lawyer for Al Capone who helped get the famous gangster convicted on tax evasion.

Down
1. Giants’ home, familiarly FRISCO
You won’t hear anyone around here (I live in the Bay Area) calling San Francisco “Frisco”. To locals it is “the city” or maybe “the city by the bay”.

2. “The Lawrence Welk Show” sisters’ surname LENNON
The Lennon sisters are a singing group from Los Angeles who appeared regularly on “The Lawrence Welk Show”. The Lennon Sisters had their debut on the show in 1955, and they are still singing together today (although the lineup has changed over the decades).

3. Loud parties in Georgia? ATLANTA RAVES (from “Atlanta Braves”)
The Atlanta Braves are the only team to have won baseball’s World Series in three different home cities. They won as the Boston Braves in 1914, the Milwaukee Braves in 1957 and the Atlanta Braves in 1995.

7. Eternally, to Blake E’ER
William Blake was an English poet and artist, considered now have been a powerful force in his fields during the Romantic Age. One of Blake’s more famous poems is “The Tyger”, which has the celebrated lines:

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

9. 1974 hit sung entirely in Spanish ERES TU
We have a big event across Europe every year called the Eurovision Song Contest. Each nation enters one song in competition with each other, and then voters across the whole continent decide on the winner. That’s how ABBA got their big break when they won in 1974 with “Waterloo”. In 1972, Spain’s entry was “Eres tu” (the Spanish for “You Are”) sung by the band Mocedades. “Eres tu” came second in the competition, but should have won in my humble opinion.

14. It’s Dreyer’s west of the Rockies EDY’S
Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dryer and Joseph Edy.

15. SFO info ARR
San Francisco International Airport (SFO) is the maintenance hub for United Airlines, and is the principal base for Virgin America.

18. Fish-eating duck SMEW
The smew is a beautiful-looking species of duck found right across northern Europe and Asia.

20. She was the ten in “10” DEREK
Actress Bo Derek’s most famous role is in the comedy from 1979 titled “10”, in which she stars opposite Dudley Moore.

30. Leonardo’s co-star in “The Aviator” CATE
Cate Blanchett is a great Australian actress, and winner of an Academy Award for playing Katherine Hepburn in “The Aviator”. Winning for that role made Blanchett the first person to win an Academy Award for playing an actor (Hepburn) that had also won an Oscar. Now that, that is trivial information …

31. Halloween gathering? COVEN
“Coven” is an old Scottish word meaning simply “gathering”. The first known application of the word to witchcraft came during the trial of a Scotswoman in 1662 accused of being a witch. At that time, “coven” came to mean a group of 13 witches.

33. Pennzoil letters SAE
The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) sets standards for motor oils, especially with regard to an oil’s viscosity.

38. Pres. advisory team NSC
The National Security Council (NSC) was created by President Harry S. Truman in 1947. The NSC is chaired by the sitting president and meets in the White House Situation Room.

40. Controversial baby food ingredient TUNA OIL
Apparently, the addition of tuna oil to baby food is driven by the belief that fish oil helps in brain development. The controversy arises because tuna oil is a fish that is relatively high in the food chain and so contains high levels of mercury, which is not a good thing,

45. Party enforcer WHIP
In the world of politics, the party whip is the “heavy”, the person whose job it is to ensure that party members vote according to party policy. “Whip” comes from “whipping in”, a term used in hunting. Any hounds tending to stray from the pack are “whipped in” to prevent them wandering off.

47. OR hangers IVS
Intravenous drips (IVs) might be set up the operating room (OR).

48. Eurasian range URALS
The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

52. A mystery, metaphorically GREEK
It’s all Greek to me …

57. Vulcanized rubber inventor’s unsteady gait? GOODYEAR LIMP (from “Goodyear Blimp”)
There is an important difference between a “blimp” (like “The Goodyear Blimp”) and an airship (like a Zeppelin). An airship is a rigid structure with an internal framework that helps maintain the shape of the airbag, whereas a blimp uses the pressure of the helium gas inside the airbag to give it shape. Also, blimps are usually heavier than air and so will float naturally to the ground. They maintain their lift with forward motion and by raising the nose slightly.

58. Guilder replacements EUROS
The guilder was the currency used in the Netherlands until it was replaced by the euro at the start of 2002. One-and-a-half guilder used to be called a dalder (or thaler). It is “dalder/thaler” that gave us our word “dollar”.

61. Light cigar wrapper CLARO
A claro is mild cigar made with light-colored tobacco. The name “claro” comes from the Spanish for “clear”.

66. Five-time MLB All-Star Cooper CECIL
Cecil Cooper is a former Major League Baseball player who turned out for the Boston Red Sox and the Milwaukee Brewers. Cooper also managed the Houston Astros from 2007 to 2009.

67. Oslo Accords signer: Abbr. PLO
The Oslo Accords grew out of secret negotiations between the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel in a residence in Oslo in the early nineties. The delegates shared the same house while they conducted 14 meetings. While eating all their meals together at the same table, the negotiators came to respect one another and apparently friendships developed.

70. Author Sinclair UPTON
Upton Sinclair was a prolific American author, with almost 100 books to his name. Sinclair’s most famous work is probably “The Jungle”, a 1906 novel about the meat packing industry. Revelations in “The Jungle” contributed to the Meat Inspection Act being passed by Congress a few months after the book was published. Sinclair also wrote “Oil”, published in 1927, which was the basis of the 2007 film “There Will Be Blood”, starring Daniel Day-Lewis.

71. Gillette razor word TRAC
Gillette introduced the Trac II in 1971, the world’s first twin-blade razor.

72. Parliament member TORY
The reference is to the Conservative (Tory) Party in the UK, or perhaps to the Conservative (Tory) Party of Canada.

75. Piling coating CREOSOTE
“Creosote” is the name given to chemicals obtained by the distillation of tar. Creosote has two main uses, as an antiseptic and as a wood preservative. The term “creosote” comes from the Greek for “flesh preserver”.

80. Day-__ GLO
“Dayglo” is a registered trademark used for an ink or paint that glows when exposed to a black light in a darkened room. When Dayglo paint is viewed in daylight the colors can look particularly vivid because they respond to the UV light that is present in sunlight.

85. Cincinnati-based retailer KROGER
The Kroger supermarket chain is the largest grocery store company in the US. Kroger is also the second largest retailer in the country, after Walmart, and the fifth largest retailer in the world. The company was founded in 1883 in Cincinnati, Ohio by one Barney Kroger.

87. Octagonal road sign, in Arles ARRET
“Arrêt” is the French word for “stop”.

A few years ago I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city’s design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and where he painted his famous “Cafe Terrace at Night”, as well as “Bedroom in Arles”.

88. El Amazonas, por ejemplo RIO
In Spanish, the Amazon, for example (ell Amazonas, por ejemplo) is a river (rio).

90. Actress Sobieski LEELEE
Leelee Sobieski is a film and television actress from New York City. Sobieski is a fluent French speaker, having learned from her father who is a painter and former actor from France.

96. What a slash may mean in some scores SPARE
Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

98. City served by Gardermoen Airport OSLO
Gardermoen Airport is the main airport serving the Norwegian capital of Oslo. Gardermoen was established as a military camp/base way back in 1740, and some military flights from the base started in 1912. It was Nazi Germany who developed Gardermoen as a proper airport, and these facilities were taken over by the Norwegian Air Force at the end of the war.

100. Writer __ Neale Hurston ZORA
Zora Neale Hurston was an American author, most famous for her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”. Like the author, the main character in the novel is an African American woman, a part played by Halle Berry in a television movie adaptation that first aired in 2005.

103. Chicken general? TSO
General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

104. “Veep” network HBO
“Veep” is a political satire sitcom on HBO that is a remake of the British show “The Thick of It”. “Veep” is set in the office of a fictional Vice President of the United States played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Charge for unlimited use, say FLAT FEE
8. Nice woman FEMME
13. Dines lavishly FEASTS
19. Go back over RETRACE
20. Connecticut town on Long Island Sound DARIEN
21. “It was all __” A DREAM
22. About to deliver IN LABOR
23. Garden tool for unexpected situations? EMERGENCY RAKE (from “emergency brake”)
25. Escargot SNAIL
26. Start the day ARISE
27. NBA one-pointers FTS
28. Ayres who played Dr. Kildare LEW
29. Barone’s superior CONTE
30. Ridge CREST
31. Pvts.’ superiors CPLS
33. Start of many California city names SAN
34. N.Y. neighbor ONT
35. Hardly ever laugh? LACK HUMOR (from “black humor”)
37. PowerShot maker CANON
39. Up AT BAT
42. Elite school IVY
43. Welcomes at the door GREETS
44. Drive aimlessly CRUISE
45. Annoy with complaints WHINE
48. Mentalist Geller URI
49. “Just a __!” SEC
50. Nickels and dimes CHANGE
51. Reason for a few nicks? SHAVING RUSH (from “shaving brush”)
54. Some sopranos DIVAS
55. Spies on, in a way TAILS
56. Runs amok RAMPAGES
60. Thought: Pref. IDEO-
61. “Tales From the __”: ’50s horror comic CRYPT
62. Small toy? WHELP
64. Al Green genre SOUL
65. Blisters VESICLES
67. Apples, e.g. POMES
68. “What __!”: “Yawn!” A BORE
69. Plumber’s assessment? LEAK OUTLOOK (from “bleak outlook”)
72. Closely watched index THE DOW
73. Abbr. usually preceded by a comma ETC
76. AMEX adjustments CRS
77. Tenured coll. employees PROFS
78. Walks casually MOSEYS
79. Golfer Garcia SERGIO
81. Sch. fundraising gp. PTA
82. Scandinavian capital KRONE
83. Suave competitor PRELL
84. Panama Canal bash? LOCK PARTY (from “block party”)
89. Capp and Kaline ALS
92. Joey’s mom ROO
93. __ Mawr BRYN
95. Equip anew RERIG
96. Amoxicillin target STREP
98. Alliance formed under HST OAS
99. Great Basin cap. SLC
100. His name is Spanish for “fox” ZORRO
101. Punt navigator POLER
102. Highland scoundrel? SCOTTISH ROGUE (from “Scottish brogue”)
106. At a moment’s notice READILY
108. Relents LETS UP
109. Most exposed BAREST
110. Author Prosper __ who wrote “Carmen,” on which the opera is based MERIMEE
111. Old cinemas ODEONS
112. Orchard Field, nowadays O’HARE
113. Surprise success SLEEPER

Down
1. Giants’ home, familiarly FRISCO
2. “The Lawrence Welk Show” sisters’ surname LENNON
3. Loud parties in Georgia? ATLANTA RAVES (from “Atlanta Braves”)
4. Blue eyes, e.g. TRAIT
5. It has a moral FABLE
6. Green prefix ECO-
7. Eternally, to Blake E’ER
8. Starve, to Shakespeare FAMISH
9. 1974 hit sung entirely in Spanish ERES TU
10. Muddy area MIRE
11. Bit of computer memory MEG
12. Omaha-to-Milwaukee dir. ENE
13. Statistical input FACTS
14. It’s Dreyer’s west of the Rockies EDY’S
15. SFO info ARR
16. Routes for liners SEA LANES
17. Show particular interest TAKE NOTE
18. Fish-eating duck SMEW
20. She was the ten in “10” DEREK
24. Broncos’ org. NFL
26. Pie slice feature ARC
30. Leonardo’s co-star in “The Aviator” CATE
31. Halloween gathering? COVEN
32. Snoop PRY
33. Pennzoil letters SAE
35. Do surgery, in a way LASE
36. __ golf MINI
37. Invigorating, as air CRISP
38. Pres. advisory team NSC
40. Controversial baby food ingredient TUNA OIL
41. Major leagues, in baseball lingo BIGS
43. Crotchety sort GRUMP
44. Rebuke CHIDE
45. Party enforcer WHIP
46. Stop HALT
47. OR hangers IVS
48. Eurasian range URALS
50. Early 5th-century year CDIV
51. Authority SAY-SO
52. A mystery, metaphorically GREEK
53. Aging pro, maybe HAS-BEEN
55. Arduous journeys TREKS
57. Vulcanized rubber inventor’s unsteady gait? GOODYEAR LIMP (from “Goodyear Blimp”)
58. Guilder replacements EUROS
59. Ton SLEW
61. Light cigar wrapper CLARO
62. Response from Fido WOOF
63. Ins. plans HMOS
66. Five-time MLB All-Star Cooper CECIL
67. Oslo Accords signer: Abbr. PLO
68. “I get it,” wryly AH SO
70. Author Sinclair UPTON
71. Gillette razor word TRAC
72. Parliament member TORY
73. Seer’s alleged gift ESP
74. Like many apartments TERRACED
75. Piling coating CREOSOTE
78. Business sch. major MKTG
80. Day-__ GLO
81. Thickness PLY
85. Cincinnati-based retailer KROGER
86. Look over PERUSE
87. Octagonal road sign, in Arles ARRET
88. El Amazonas, por ejemplo RIO
90. Actress Sobieski LEELEE
91. More like a spring chicken SPRYER
93. Dots that may beep BLIPS
94. Some colas RCS
96. What a slash may mean in some scores SPARE
97. “It’s __ for!” TO DIE
98. City served by Gardermoen Airport OSLO
99. Dumbfound STUN
100. Writer __ Neale Hurston ZORA
103. Chicken general? TSO
104. “Veep” network HBO
105. Cheer word RAH
106. Apt. divisions RMS
107. Sushi fish EEL

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