LA Times Crossword Answers 27 Sep 12, Thursday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alex Boisvert
THEME: HIDDEN BALL TRICK … there are groups of circled letters in the grid that all spell out words that can go with BALL:

7D. Diamond gambit, or a hint to this puzzle’s circles HIDDEN BALL TRICK

17A. America’s most popular dining-out occasion (MOTH)ER’S DAY (mothball)
28A. Place setting item DIN(NER F)ORK (Nerf Ball)
33A. Last chance in court CLOSING AR(GUM)ENT (gumball)
42A. Where some plates are made S(TEE)L MILLS (tee-ball)
58A. Political propagandist S(PIN) DOCTOR (pinball)

COMPLETION TIME: 9m 24s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Map site ATLAS
We call a book of maps an “atlas” after a collection of maps published by the famous Flemish geographer Gerhadus Mercator. Mercator’s collection contained a frontispiece with an image of Atlas the Titan from Greek mythology holding up the world on his shoulders, giving us our term “atlas”.

6. Senate figure WHIP
In the world of politics, the party whip is the “heavy”, the person whose job it is to ensure that party members vote according to party policy. “Whip” comes from “whipping in”, a term used in hunting. Any hounds tending to stray from the pack were “whipped in” to prevent them wandering off.

14. Winner of the 2005 Best Picture Oscar CRASH
The 2004 Oscar-winning movie “Crash” is a clever piece of work, with several interweaving stories that use a fine cast of characters. Having said that, the fact that “Crash” won the Academy Award in 2005 was very unexpected, as the film had not won any of the other major awards for Best Film that year. The critics’ favorite in 2005 was “Brokeback Mountain”.

15. Verdi title princess AIDA
“Aida” is the famous opera by Giuseppe Verde, actually based on a scenario written by a French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette, who also designed the costumes and stages for the opening performance. The opera was first performed in 1871 in an opera house in Cairo. In the storyline Aida is an Ethiopian princess brought into Egypt as a slave. Radames is an Egyptian commander who falls in love with her, and then of course, complications arise!

16. Rapier cousin EPEE
The French word for sword is épée. In competitive fencing the épée is connected to a system that records an electrical signal when legal contact is made on an opponent’s body.

17. America’s most popular dining-out occasion (MOTH)ER’S DAY (mothball)
Note the official punctuation in “Mother’s Day”, even though one might think it should be “Mothers’ Day”. President Wilson, and Anna Jarvis who created the tradition, specifically wanted Mother’s Day to honor the mothers within each family and not just “mothers” in general, so they went with the “Mother’s Day” punctuation.

22. Heaven-sent food MANNA
According to the Book of Exodus, manna was a food eaten by the Israelites as they traveled out of Egypt. Manna “fell” to Earth during the night for six days a week, and was gathered in the morning before it had time to melt.

23. Academy freshman PLEBE
Plebe is a slang term for a freshman in the US military and naval academies. Plebe is probably short for “plebeian”, the name given to someone of the common class in ancient Rome (as opposed to a Patrician). “Pleb” is a shortened version of plebeian, and is a term used outside of the military schools.

25. Chess announcement MATE
In the game of chess, when the king is under immediate threat of capture, it is said to be “in check”. If the king cannot escape from check, then the game ends in “checkmate” and the player in check loses. In the original Sanskrit game of chess, the king could actually be captured. Then a rule was introduced requiring that a warning be given if capture was imminent (today we announce “check!”) so that an accidental, early ending to the game doesn’t occur.

28. Place setting item DIN(NER F)ORK (Nerf Ball)
Nerf is the name given to the soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

40. Semitic deity BA’AL
Ba’al can actually refer to any god, and sometimes even human officials as it can also be used as an honorific title. Ba’al can also be known as Hada, a god of rain, thunder, agriculture and fertility.

48. Vodka in a blue bottle SKYY
Skyy Vodka is produced in the US, although the operation is own by the Campari Group headquartered in Italy. Skyy first hit the shelves in 1992 when it was created by an entrepreneur from San Francisco, California.

57. Old stage line? REIN
One controlled the horses pulling a stagecoach using lines called reins.

58. Political propagandist S(PIN) DOCTOR (pinball)
Our modern game of pinball evolved from an earlier table game called bagatelle which used balls, pins and holes (and I remember playing bagatelle as boy in a pub in Ireland). The first “pinball” machine was made by a British inventor who settled in Cincinnati, Ohio. He modified the game of bagatelle, adding a coiled spring and a plunger to introduce balls at the end of the table, a device that is still in use today. From there, manufacturers developed coin-operated versions of pinball that became popular during the depression as they provided a little entertainment for just a few pennies. One distributor of the coin-operated pinball machines started manufacturing them himself as he couldn’t source new games fast enough. He called his pinball game Ballyhoo, and eventually named his company Bally, a brand name well known in the gambling industry to this day.

60. Department store founder Rowland Hussey __ MACY
The original Macy’s store was opened by Rowland Hussey Macy in Haverhill, Massachusetts in 1851. This store, and several others that Macy opened, all failed. Macy picked himself up though, and started over again in New York City. Those early stores all focused on the sale of dry goods, but added departments quickly as the clientele grew. The Macy’s “star” logo has been around since the company was first established. Macy chose the star because it mimicked the star tattoo that he got as a teenager when he was working on a whaling ship out of Nantucket.

65. Swing era dance LINDY
The Lindy Hop is a dance based on the Charleston and dates back to the twenties and thirties. The name Lindy is a homage to the famous 1927 flight across the Atlantic by Charles Lindbergh.

Down
1. Fictional corporation that sells earthquake pills and portable holes ACME
The Acme Corporation is a fictional company used mainly by Looney Tunes, and within the Looney Tunes empire it was used mostly in the “Road Runner” cartoons. Wile E. Coyote was always receiving a new piece of gear from Acme designed to finally capture the Road Runner, but the equipment always led to his downfall instead.

2. Hector’s home TROY
As described in Homer’s “Iliad”, Hector was a Trojan prince and a great fighter. During the war with the Greeks, in order avoid a bloody battle, Hector challenged any one of the Greek warriors to a duel. Ajax was chosen by the Greeks, and the two fought for an entire day before they declared a stalemate.

5. Yellow-and-red gas station symbol SHELL
Royal Dutch Shell is the largest energy company in the world and is headquartered in the Hague, in the Netherlands. The company was formed in 1907 with the merger of the Royal Dutch Petroleum Company and Shell Transport and Trading company of the UK. The two companies merged in order to compete globally with the biggest US oil company of the day, John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil. Shell Oil Company is a US-based subsidiary of Royal Dutch Shell that is headquartered in Houston, Texas.

6. Sushi condiment WASABI
Sometimes called Japanese horseradish, wasabi is the root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

7. Diamond gambit, or a hint to this puzzle’s circles HIDDEN BALL TRICK
The hidden ball trick has been used over 300 times with success in the Major Leagues. The idea is to fool a runner into thinking the ball is elsewhere, while it is actually hidden on a player’s person. When a runner heads off to the next base, the ball is revealed and used to tag out the deceived player.

8. Lupino and others IDAS
Actress Ida Lupino was also a successful director, in the days when women weren’t very welcome behind the camera. Lupino had already directed four “women’s” short films when she stepped in to direct the 1953 drama “The Hitch-Hiker”, taking over when the original director became ill. “The Hitch-Hiker” was the first film noir movie to be directed by a woman, and represented somewhat of a breakthrough for women in the industry.

12. Loewe’s partner LERNER
Frederick Loewe was a composer best known for his collaborations with the lyricist Alan Jay Lerner, the most famous of which were “My Fair Lady” and “Camelot”.

24. __ shui FENG
Feng shui is the ancient Chinese tradition of arranging objects, buildings and other structures in a manner that is said to improve the lives of the individuals living in or using the space. “Feng shui” translates as “wind-water”, a reference to the belief that positive and negative life forces ride the wind and scatter, but are retained when they encounter water.

25. Scot’s nickname, maybe MAC
The prefix “mac” in a Scottish or Irish family name means “son of”.

26. Tide rival ALL
Tide and All are laundry detergents.

29. “__ any drop to drink”: Coleridge NOR
The line “water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink” is from Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”.

35. Moo goo __ pan GAI
Moo goo gai pan is an American version of a traditional Cantonese dish. In Cantonese “moo goo” means “button mushroom”, “gai” is “chicken” and “pan” is “slices”.

37. Caribou cousin ELK
The elk (also known as the wapiti) is the one of the largest species of deer in the world, with only the moose being bigger. Early European settlers were used to seeing the smaller red deer back in their homelands, so when they saw the “huge” wapiti they assumed it was a moose, and gave it the European name for a moose, namely “elk”. The more correct term then is “wapiti”, the Shawnee name for the animal, which means “white rump”. It’s all very confusing …

44. Kennedy who married Sargent Shriver EUNICE
Sargent Shriver was the running mate of George McGovern, the Democratic nominee for US President in the 1972 race. Shriver was a member of the Kennedy clan, as he was married to Eunice Kennedy, sister to President John F. Kennedy.

45. Euclid, vis-à-vis geometry EPONYM
An eponym is a name for something derived from the name of a person, as in Euclidean geometry named for the mathematician Euclid.

Euclid of Alexandria was a Greek mathematician who was active around 300 BC, and who is often referred to as the “Father of Geometry”. Euclid wrote a famous book called “Elements” on the subject of mathematics, a book that was so enduring that it was used as the main textbook for the subject right up to the late 19th century.

46. __ Tunes LOONEY
The cartoon series known as “Looney Tunes” was produced by Warner Bros. “Looney Tunes” were introduced in 1930 as a competitor to the Disney series called “Silly Symphonies”.

47. Road safety gp. SADD
Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) was founded in Massachusetts in 1981. SADD’s aim is to prevent road traffic accidents by urging students to avoid potentially destructive decisions (such as driving under the influence of alcohol).

51. Han River capital SEOUL
Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

56. Airport south of Paris ORLY
Orly is on the outskirts of Paris, to the south of the city. It is home of course to the Paris-Orly Airport, the second busiest international airport for the city, after the more recently built Charles de Gaulle Airport. Orly is still home to more domestic flights though.

58. __ Lanka SRI
The name Sri Lanka translates from Sanskrit into English as “venerable island”. Before 1970, Sri Lanka was known as Ceylon, a name given to the country during British rule. The lion on the country’s national flag symbolizes the fight against British colonialism.

59. TV franchise since 2000 CSI
I’m told that the TV show “CSI” gets a lot of razzing by law enforcement professionals for its unrealistic portrayal of the procedures and science of criminal investigation. I don’t care though, as I just think it’s fun television. The original “CSI” set in Las Vegas seems to have “gone off the boil”, but the addition of Sela Ward to the cast of “CSI: NY” has really, really raised the level of the sister show centered around New York City.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Map site ATLAS
6. Senate figure WHIP
10. Brash BOLD
14. Winner of the 2005 Best Picture Oscar CRASH
15. Verdi title princess AIDA
16. Rapier cousin EPEE
17. America’s most popular dining-out occasion (MOTH)ER’S DAY (mothball)
19. Flavorful plant HERB
20. Spot EYE
21. Shows the way LEADS
22. Heaven-sent food MANNA
23. Academy freshman PLEBE
24. Give way FALTER
25. Chess announcement MATE
28. Place setting item DIN(NER F)ORK (Nerf Ball)
30. One way to sing ALONG
32. Smack on the head BONK
33. Last chance in court CLOSING AR(GUM)ENT (gumball)
40. Semitic deity BA’AL
41. Frigid POLAR
42. Where some plates are made S(TEE)L MILLS (tee-ball)
48. Vodka in a blue bottle SKYY
49. Rug often groomed TOUPEE
50. Honor, in a way TOAST
52. “… but I could be wrong” OR NOT
53. Wear slowly ERODE
54. __-mo video SLO
57. Old stage line? REIN
58. Political propagandist S(PIN) DOCTOR (pinball)
60. Department store founder Rowland Hussey __ MACY
61. Asian staple RICE
62. Standard USUAL
63. Arise STEM
64. Gross ICKY
65. Swing era dance LINDY

Down
1. Fictional corporation that sells earthquake pills and portable holes ACME
2. Hector’s home TROY
3. Behind schedule LATE
4. Flooring wood ASH
5. Yellow-and-red gas station symbol SHELL
6. Sushi condiment WASABI
7. Diamond gambit, or a hint to this puzzle’s circles HIDDEN BALL TRICK
8. Lupino and others IDAS
9. Salary PAY
10. Sake BEHALF
11. Not against trying OPEN TO
12. Loewe’s partner LERNER
13. Get off at the pier DEBARK
18. Clarinetist’s need REED
22. Retail price component MARKUP
23. Writers PENS
24. __ shui FENG
25. Scot’s nickname, maybe MAC
26. Tide rival ALL
27. As well TOO
29. “__ any drop to drink”: Coleridge NOR
31. Kind of gravy GIBLET
34. Tag information NAME
35. Moo goo __ pan GAI
36. Lion’s share MOST
37. Caribou cousin ELK
38. Disagreeing word NAY
39. Give it a go TRY
42. Leaves in a huff, with “out” STORMS
43. Attacked eagerly, as a wrapped gift TORE AT
44. Kennedy who married Sargent Shriver EUNICE
45. Euclid, vis-à-vis geometry EPONYM
46. __ Tunes LOONEY
47. Road safety gp. SADD
51. Han River capital SEOUL
53. Large in scope EPIC
54. Floor STUN
55. Truck filler? LOAD
56. Airport south of Paris ORLY
58. __ Lanka SRI
59. TV franchise since 2000 CSI

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LA Times Crossword Answers 26 Sep 12, Wednesday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Wechsler
THEME: Lots of Letters … each of the theme answers includes a “letter”, in the plural form:

18A. “Gotta hit the hay” I NEED SOME ZS
23A. Elementary school fundamentals THE THREE RS
37A. Mom’s behavior warning MIND YOUR PS AND QS
49A. Marks to brag about STRAIGHT AS
57A. Canned pasta brand SPAGHETTI OS

COMPLETION TIME: 8m 39s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Stir-fry additive MSG
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring (and non-essential) amino acid called glutamic acid. MSG is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

14. Baba of folklore ALI
There is some controversy about the story “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves” in that it has been suggested it was not part of the original collection of Arabic tales called “One Thousand and One Nights”. The suggestion is that the Ali Baba tale was added by one of the Europeans who translated “One Thousand and One Nights”.

15. Bindle carrier HOBO
No one seems to know for sure how the term “hobo” originated, although there are lots of colorful theories. My favorite is that “hobo” comes from the first letters in the words “ho-meward bo-und”, but it doesn’t seem very plausible. A kind blog reader tells me that according to Click and Clack from PBS’s “Car Talk” (a great source!), “hobo” comes from “hoe boy”. Hoe boys were young men with hoes looking for work after the Civil War. Hobos differed from “tramps” and “bums”, in that “bums” refused to work, “tramps” worked when they had to, while “hobos” traveled in search of work.

“Bindle” is the name given to that bag or sack that the stereotypical hobo carried on a stick over his shoulder. “Bindle” is possibly a corruption of “bundle”.

17. Diarist Anaïs NIN
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for the journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. She also wrote highly regarded erotica, citing D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration.

23. Elementary school fundamentals THE THREE RS
The “three Rs” are Reading, ‘Riting and ‘Rithmetic.

30. Swift means of attack? SATIRE
Jonathan Swift was an Irish author and cleric. Swift is most famous perhaps for his 1726 novel “Gulliver’s Travels”, but we Irishmen remember him also as the Dean of St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Dublin. He was renowned for his wit and satire.

33. Poe’s “ungainly fowl” RAVEN
“The Raven” is a narrative poem by Edgar Allen Poe that tells of a student who has lost the love of his life, Lenore. A raven enters the student’s bedchamber and perches on a bust of Pallas. The raven can talk, to the student’s surprise, but says nothing but the word “nevermore”. As the student questions all aspects of his life, the raven taunts him with the same comment, “nevermore”. Finally the student decides that his soul is trapped beneath the raven’s shadow and shall be lifted “nevermore” …

36. D.C. athlete NAT
The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005, becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series; one is the Mariners, and the other the Nats.

37. Mom’s behavior warning MIND YOUR PS AND QS
There isn’t really a clear derivation of the phrase “mind your Ps and Qs”, an expression meaning “mind your manners”, or “mind your language”. One story that I like is that it originated in the wonderful pubs of England. Innkeepers would watch how much their thirsty patrons consumed, recording each pint (P) and quart (Q) that was downed on a board using Ps and Qs as shorthand. The more rowdy drinkers would be asked to “mind their Ps and Qs”.

41. __ of Good Feelings ERA
The Era of Good Feelings lasted from about 1816 to 1824, during the administration of President James Monroe. The term described the feeling of bipartisanship that permeated politics at that time, largely due to President Monroe deliberately downplaying differences between the parties in Washington. One can only dream …

43. Rap’s __ Wayne LIL
Here’s yet another rapper (oh, joy!). Lil Wayne’s real name is … Dwayne Carter, Jr.

44. With-the-grain woodworking technique RIP CUT
In woodworking, a cut across the grain is known as a cross cut. A cut along the grain is called a rip cut. Most saws are designed to perform the best cross cuts, but there is a special rip saw that more easily cuts straight lines along the grain.

46. Theater sections LOGES
In most theaters today the loge is the name given to the front rows of a mezzanine level. It can also be the name given to box seating.

48. Canadian pump sign ESSO
The brand name Esso has its roots in the old Standard Oil company, as it uses the initial letters of “Standard” and “Oil” (ESS-O). The Esso brand was replaced by Exxon in the US but ESSO is still used in many other countries.

57. Canned pasta brand SPAGHETTIOS
Spaghettios were developed by the Campbell Soup Company in 1965. Campbell’s wanted a pasta dish that could be marketed as being more “kid-friendly” and “less messy for kids”.

61. “Characters welcome” network USA
The USA Network cable television channel has been around since 1971. Back in 1971 it was called the Madison Square Garden Network, becoming USA in 1979.

63. South American country at 0 degrees lat. ECUA
“Ecuador” is the Spanish word for “equator”, which gives the country its name.

64. Looney Tunes collectible CEL
In the world of animation a cel is a transparent sheet on which objects and characters are drawn. In the first half of the 20th century the sheet was actually made of celluloid, giving the “cel” its name.

Down
1. “The Balcony” painter MANET
“The Balcony” is an oil by Édouard Manet painted in 1868. You can see “The Balcony” in the Musée d’Orsay the next time you’re in Paris …

The French painter 
Édouard Manet is responsible for many great works including the famous “Le déjeuner sur l’herbe”, a work much praised by novelist Emile Zola.

3. Cookies with a bite GINGER SNAPS
“Ginger snap cookies” are known as “ginger nut biscuits” back in Ireland where I come from …

4. Chi preceder PHI
Phi is the 21st letter of the Greek alphabet.

6. Beyond zaftig OBESE
A woman who is “zaftig” has a full and shapely figure. “Zaftig” comes from the Yiddish word “zaftik” meaning “juicy”. I am not going to touch that one …

7. Baudelaire, par exemple POETE
Charles Baudelaire was a French poet, noted not only for his own work but also for translating the work of American poet Edgar Allen Poe.

9. Quark’s locale ATOM
The three nuclear particles that we all learned about at school are protons, electrons and neutrons. The “big” particles, the protons and neutrons, are known collectively as nucleons. Nucleons aren’t fundamental particles, in the sense that nucleons are made up of three smaller particles called quarks. Protons are made from two “up quarks” and one “down quark”, while neutrons are composed of one “up quark” and two “down quarks”.

10. Global networking pioneer COMSAT
COMSAT (the Communications Satellite Corporation) is a telecommunication enterprise noted for its satellite communication services. COMSAT started out in 1963 as a public company, one that was federally funded and government regulated. The government’s intent in creating COMSAT was to develop an international commercial satellite network to facilitate global communications.

12. Gossipy Smith LIZ
Liz Smith is a gossip columnist, with the nickname “The Grand Dame of Dish”.

13. OCS grads, usually LTS
Officer Candidate School (OCS) graduates a lot of lieutenants.

19. “__ Rosenkavalier” DER
“Der Rosenkavalier” is a comic opera composed by Richard Strauss, with the title translating as “The Knight of the Rose”.

26. Reader with a sensitive screen KINDLE TOUCH
The fourth generation of Amazon’s Kindle e-book reader included a touchscreen for the first time, and so was given the name “Kindle Touch”.

27. Modern site of Mesopotamia IRAQ
Mesopotamia was the land that lay between two rivers, the Tigris and the Euphrates, that flow through modern-day Iraq. The name “Mesopotamia” means “between the rivers”.

31. Like Big Ben ANALOG
This clue is misleading, I think. First of all, “Big Ben” is a bell and not a clock. Secondly, given that Big Ben is in London then the clock connected to the bell would be described there as “analogue” and not “analog”. But maybe I am just being picky …

33. Big chunk of Eur. RUS
Russia makes up a big chunk of Europe, as well as a big chunk of Asia. The eastern side of the Ural Mountains in Russia is generally regarded as the natural divide between the continents of Europe and Asia.

38. Eye part IRIS
The iris is the colored part of the eye with an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

40. Elie Wiesel work NIGHT
Elie Wiesel is a holocaust survivor, best known for his book “Night” which tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald.

45. Large eel CONGER
Conger eels can grow to be very, very large, perhaps up to 10 feet in length.

46. Took it on the lam LIT OUT
To be “on the lam” is to be in flight, to have escaped from prison. “On the lam” is American slang that originated at the end of the 19th century. The word “lam” also means to “beat” or “thrash”, as in “lambaste”. So “on the lam” might derive from the phrase “to beat it, to scram”.

47. Grandchild of Japanese immigrants SANSEI
There are some very specific terms used to describe the children born to Japanese immigrants in their new country. The immigrants themselves are known as “Issei”. “Nisei” are second generation Japanese, “Sansei” the third generation (grandchildren of the immigrant), and “Yonsei” are fourth generation.

53. Elite Navy group SEALS
SEAL is an acronym used by the US Navy’s SEa, Air and Land teams. The SEALs were born out of the Navy’s special warfare groups from WWII, like the Underwater Demolition Teams and the Motor Torpedo Boat Squadrons. The Navy SEAL unit was established soon after President Kennedy’s speech in which he announced the plan to put a man on the moon, as in the same speech the president allocated $100m of funding to strengthen special operations forces. The Navy used some of this money to set up guerrilla and counter-guerrilla units, which soon became the SEALs.

55. Kent State’s home OHIO
Kent State University’s main campus is located in Kent, Ohio. Kent State will forever be associated with the student activism and opposition to the Vietnam War in the late sixties and early seventies. The fateful day was May 4, 1970, when members of the Ohio National Guard opened fire on students, killing four protesters and wounding nine.

60. Airline to Oslo SAS
SAS was formerly known as Scandinavian Airlines System and is the flag carrier of three countries: Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Stir-fry additive MSG
4. [frog lands in pond] PLOP
8. Remote control battery AA CELL
14. Baba of folklore ALI
15. Bindle carrier HOBO
16. “Zip your lip!” STOW IT
17. Diarist Anaïs NIN
18. “Gotta hit the hay” I NEED SOME ZS
20. Future snakes, perhaps EGGS
22. Regards highly ESTEEMS
23. Elementary school fundamentals THE THREE RS
25. Cut from the same cloth AKIN
29. Lemon and lime TREES
30. Swift means of attack? SATIRE
32. Put into words SAY
33. Poe’s “ungainly fowl” RAVEN
36. D.C. athlete NAT
37. Mom’s behavior warning MIND YOUR PS AND QS
41. __ of Good Feelings ERA
42. Gives the heave-ho OUSTS
43. Rap’s __ Wayne LIL
44. With-the-grain woodworking technique RIP CUT
46. Theater sections LOGES
48. Canadian pump sign ESSO
49. Marks to brag about STRAIGHT AS
54. “Why bother?” NO POINT
56. Color property TONE
57. Canned pasta brand SPAGHETTI OS
61. “Characters welcome” network USA
62. Receive, as a radio signal TUNE IN
63. South American country at 0 degrees lat. ECUA
64. Looney Tunes collectible CEL
65. Structural threat for many a house DRY ROT
66. Gels SETS
67. Towel lettering HIS

Down
1. “The Balcony” painter MANET
2. Insult SLIGHT
3. Cookies with a bite GINGER SNAPS
4. Chi preceder PHI
5. Solitary sorts LONERS
6. Beyond zaftig OBESE
7. Baudelaire, par exemple POETE
8. Evaluates ASSESSES
9. Quark’s locale ATOM
10. Global networking pioneer COMSAT
11. Girl in a pasture EWE
12. Gossipy Smith LIZ
13. OCS grads, usually LTS
19. “__ Rosenkavalier” DER
21. Bed or home ending STEAD
24. “Over here!” HEY, YOU!
26. Reader with a sensitive screen KINDLE TOUCH
27. Modern site of Mesopotamia IRAQ
28. Keeps after taxes NETS
31. Like Big Ben ANALOG
33. Big chunk of Eur. RUS
34. Framed work ART
35. No. twos VPS
37. Nothing more than MERE
38. Eye part IRIS
39. Surpassed in extravagance OUTSPENT
40. Elie Wiesel work NIGHT
45. Large eel CONGER
46. Took it on the lam LIT OUT
47. Grandchild of Japanese immigrants SANSEI
50. Little one TOT
51. Traditional doings RITES
52. “That has __ ring to it” A NICE
53. Elite Navy group SEALS
55. Kent State’s home OHIO
57. Norm: Abbr. STD
58. Water filter brand PUR
59. Whichever ANY
60. Airline to Oslo SAS

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