LA Times Crossword Answers 25 Sep 12, Tuesday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Kurt Mueller
THEME: EVIL WOMAN … Each of the theme answers is an EVIL WOMAN in the world of entertainment or literature:

41A. Rock gp. known for its symphonic sound ELO
31A. With 42-Across, a 1975 hit for 41-Across EVIL
42A. See 31-Across WOMAN

17A. 31/42-Across in a 1967 Dustin Hoffman film MRS ROBINSON
23A. 31/42-Across in a Ken Kesey novel NURSE RATCHED
51A. 31/42-Across in a 1961 Disney animated film CRUELLA DE VIL
64A. 31/42-Across in a Shakespeare tragedy LADY MACBETH

COMPLETION TIME: 8m 06s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Spell starter ABRA
The incantation “abracadabra” has a long history. It was used as far back as the 2nd century AD in Ancient Rome when the word was prescribed by a physician to be worn on an amulet to help his emperor recover from disease. “Abracadabra” is Aramaic, and roughly translates as “I will create as I speak”.

11. “Viva __ Vegas!” LAS
“Viva Las Vegas” is an Elvis Presley movie released in 1964, considered to be one of his best films. The good reception for the movie was at least in part due to the performance of the female lead, Ann-Margret.

15. Muscat natives OMANIS
Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the OAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. The capital city of Muscat has a strategic location on the Gulf of Oman and has a history of invasion and unrest. Centuries of occupation by the Persians ended in 1507 when the Portuguese took the city in a bloody attack. The Portuguese held Muscat for much of the next one hundred years until finally ousted by local Omani forces in 1648. A Yemeni tribe invaded the area in 1741 and set up a monarchy that has been in place in Oman ever since.

17. 31/42-Across in a 1967 Dustin Hoffman film MRS ROBINSON
When Mike Nichols was making the 1967 film “The Graduate” he apparently became obsessed with the music of Simon and Garfunkel, who were just coming into the limelight. Nichols made a deal with Paul Simon to write three songs that he could use on the soundtrack of his new movie. Simon and Garfunkel were touring constantly around that time, so Nichols had to badger Simon to hold up his end of the bargain. When Nichols was ready to lay down the film’s soundtrack there was only one commissioned song available, so Nichols had to basically beg Paul Simon for anything. Simon mentioned that he was finishing up one new song, but it wasn’t written for the film. It was more a celebration former times, with lyrics about baseball great Joe DiMaggio and former First Lady, Mrs. Roosevelt. Nichols informed Simon that the song was no longer about Mrs. Roosevelt, and it was about Mrs. Robinson …

19. Detroit labor org. UAW
The United Auto Workers (UAW) was founded to represent workers in auto plants in the Detroit area in 1935. Nowadays its membership extends into the aerospace, agriculture and other industries.

22. Shrek, e.g. OGRE
Before “Shrek” was a successful movie franchise and Broadway musical, it was a children’s picture book called “Shrek!” authored and illustrated by William Steig. The title “Shrek!” came from the German/Yiddish word Schreck, meaning “fear” or “terror”.

23. 31/42-Across in a Ken Kesey novel NURSE RATCHED
Nurse Rached was the control-freak of a nurse who ran the ward in the Ken Kesey novel “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”. In the 1975 movie of the same name, Rached was played by actress Louise Fletcher. Fletcher won an Oscar for that performance.

26. Director Craven WES
Wes Craven is a very successful film director and writer specializing in movies of the horror genre, which means I don’t watch them! Craven is responsible for “A Nightmare on Elm Street” and the “Scream” films.

29. Shar-__: wrinkly dog PEI
The Shar Pei breed of dog is that one with the wrinkly face and really dark tongue. The breed originated in China, with “Shar Pei” being the British spelling of the Cantonese name.

30. Seashell seller SHE

She sells sea-shells on the sea-shore.
The shells she sells are sea-shells, I’m sure.
For if she sells sea-shells on the sea-shore
Then I’m sure she sells sea-shore shells.

31. With 42-Across, a 1975 hit for 41-Across EVIL
42. See 31-Across WOMAN
The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) recorded the song “Evil Woman” in 1975. “Evil Woman” was written by the band’s lead vocalist, Jeff Lynne, in just thirty minutes!

39. Neighbor of Chad NIGER
The Republic of Niger (often called just “Niger”) is a landlocked country in Western Africa that gets its name from the Niger River. 80% of the Republic of Niger lies within the bounds of the Sahara Desert.

41. Rock gp. known for its symphonic sound ELO
The Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) is a symphonic rock group from the north of England. The band’s manager was Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourne (wife of Ozzy).

46. Like Granny Smith apples TART
The Granny Smith apple originated in Australia, a chance propagation by Maria Ann Smith in 1868. Ms. Smith was in her late sixties at the time, so the new cultivar of apple was called a Granny Smith. We’ve only been eating Granny Smiths in the US since 1972.

48. Looney Tunes dynamo, familiarly TAZ
The carnivorous marsupial known as the Tasmanian devil is aptly named, in the sense that the only place the animal is found in the wild is on the island of Tasmania. The “little devils” are about the size of a small dog, and they have the strongest bite for their size of any known mammal.

51. 31/42-Across in a 1961 Disney animated film CRUELLA DE VIL
Cruella de Vil is the villain in the 1956 novel “The Hundred and One Dalmatians” written by Dodie Smith. Most famously perhaps, Cruella was played so ably by Glenn Close in the Disney movie adaption “101 Dalmatians”, released in 1996.

58. Actress Lupino IDA
Actress Ida Lupino was also a successful director, and that was in the days when women weren’t very welcome behind the camera. Lupino had already directed four “woman’s” shorts when she stepped in to direct the 1953 drama “The Hitch-Hiker”, taking over when the original director became ill. “The Hitch-Hiker” was the first film noir movie to be directed by a woman, and somewhat of a breakthrough for women in the industry.

64. 31/42-Across in a Shakespeare tragedy LADY MACBETH
Lady Macbeth is an evil and treacherous woman in William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. The most famous line uttered by Lady Macbeth has to be:

Out, damned spot! Out, I say!

Down
1. __ mater ALMA
The literal translation for the Latin phrase “alma mater” is “nourishing mother”. Alma mater was used in Ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one’s alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one’s last place of education.

8. Indy great Al UNSER
The Unser family seems to have racing cars in its blood. Al Unser, Sr. won the Indy 500 on four occasions. Al’s brother Jerry was the first of the Unsers to compete at Indianapolis. Al’s other brother Bobby, won the Indy three times. Al’s son, Al Junior, won the Indy twice. Al Junior’s son is also a racing driver who competes at the Indy Speedway.

10. Payroll ID SSN
The main purpose of a Social Security Number (SSN) is to track individuals for the purposes of taxation, although given its ubiquitous use, it is looking more and more like an “identity number” to me. The social security number system was introduced in 1936. Prior to 1986, an SSN was required only for persons with substantial income so many children under 14 had no number assigned. For some years the IRS had a concern that a lot of people were claiming children on their tax returns who did not actually exist. So, from 1986 onward, it is a requirement to get an SSN for any dependents over the ago of 5. Sure enough, in 1987 seven million dependents “disappeared”.

18. “Movin’ __”: “The Jeffersons” theme ON UP
The very popular sitcom called “The Jeffersons” ran from 1975 until it came to an abrupt end in 1985. CBS cancelled the show without even allowing a series finale that “wrapped things up”. In fact the lead actor, Sherman Hemsley, first learned of the show’s cancellation in the newspaper.

22. Spotted wildcat OCELOT
The ocelot is found mainly in South and Central America, although there have been sightings as far north as Arkansas. An ocelot doesn’t look too different from a domestic cat, and some have been kept as pets. Perhaps most famously, Salvador Dali had one that he carried around everywhere with him.

27. Singer/songwriter Sands EVIE
Evie Sands is a singer from Brooklyn, New York. Sands is also a noted songwriter, having penned songs that have been recorded by the likes of Barbra Streisand, Gladys Knight, Karen Carpenter, Linda Ronstadt and Dusty Springfield.

34. Corrida cheer OLE
Spanish bullfighting is known locally as “corrida de toros”, literally “race of bulls”.

36. 14-year-old Apple IMAC
The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated.

38. Sinusitis docs ENTS
Sinusitis is an inflammation of the sinuses, usually due to a viral infection. It might be treated by an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist (ENT).

45. Receptacle for preventing waste SAVE-ALL
A “save-all” is a receptacle used in manufacturing for catching waste products for recycling. New to me …

49. Metal in pennies ZINC
The official name of our smallest denomination coin is a “cent”, and our use of the word “penny” is just a colloquialism derived from the British coin of the same name. However, in the UK the plural of penny is “pence”, whereas we have “pennies” in our pockets.

55. Six-Day War leader Moshe DAYAN
Moshe Dayan had a long and distinguished military career (including command of Israeli forces during the 1956 Suez Crisis). Dayan also played a pivotal, and militarily active role as Minister for Defense during the Six-Day War of 1967. He was a very recognizable figure with a black patch over his left eye. Dayan received that injury when he was fighting for the Allies in Vichy French Lebanon during WWII. He was using a pair of binoculars that was hit by an enemy bullet, smashing metal and glass fragments into his eye.

The Six-Day War took place from June 5th to June 10th in 1967, and was fought between Israel and its neighbors Egypt, Jordan and Syria. By the time a ceasefire was signed, Israel had seized huge swaths of land formerly controlled by Arab states, namely the Gaza Strip, the Sinai Peninsula, the West Bank of the Jordan River and the Golan Heights. The overall territory under the control of Israel grew by a factor of three in just six days.

61. Midwest Native Americans OTOS
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

65. Jane Eyre portrayer Wasikowska MIA
Mia Wasikowska is an Australian actress. Wasikowska’s breakthrough role was playing the title character in Tim Burton’s “Alice in Wonderland” in 2010. The only movie I’ve seen her in though is 2011’s “Jane Eyre”, a pretty good adaptation of the Charlotte Brontë classic, I thought …

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Spell starter ABRA
5. Scours SCRUBS
11. “Viva __ Vegas!” LAS
14. Roller coaster feature LOOP
15. Muscat natives OMANIS
16. Blow away AWE
17. 31/42-Across in a 1967 Dustin Hoffman film MRS ROBINSON
19. Detroit labor org. UAW
20. “Volunteers?” ANYONE?
21. Precious stone GEM
22. Shrek, e.g. OGRE
23. 31/42-Across in a Ken Kesey novel NURSE RATCHED
26. Director Craven WES
29. Shar-__: wrinkly dog PEI
30. Seashell seller SHE
31. With 42-Across, a 1975 hit for 41-Across EVIL
33. Writes briefly (to) DROPS A LINE
39. Neighbor of Chad NIGER
41. Rock gp. known for its symphonic sound ELO
42. See 31-Across WOMAN
43. Loving feelings TENDERNESS
46. Like Granny Smith apples TART
47. “Golly!” GEE
48. Looney Tunes dynamo, familiarly TAZ
50. Injection amts. CCS
51. 31/42-Across in a 1961 Disney animated film CRUELLA DE VIL
57. Man around the Haus HERR
58. Actress Lupino IDA
59. Win the heart of ENAMOR
63. Batting stat. AVG
64. 31/42-Across in a Shakespeare tragedy LADY MACBETH
66. Take to court SUE
67. Necessarily involve ENTAIL
68. Suffix with switch -EROO
69. Septiembre, por ejemplo MES
70. Without a musical key ATONAL
71. On sale, say LESS

Down
1. __ mater ALMA
2. Brought into existence BORN
3. Like a good outlook ROSY
4. It may have strings attached APRON
5. Put all kidding aside SOBERED
6. Roman 901 CMI
7. Mountain chain RANGE
8. Indy great Al UNSER
9. Organic matter used for fuel BIOMASS
10. Payroll ID SSN
11. Cackle or chuckle LAUGH
12. Clued in AWARE
13. Put in stitches SEWED
18. “Movin’ __”: “The Jeffersons” theme ON UP
22. Spotted wildcat OCELOT
24. Police car warning SIREN
25. Winter warmer of a sort THAW
26. “They __ thataway!” WENT
27. Singer/songwriter Sands EVIE
28. Omen SIGN
32. Bookkeeper’s book LEDGER
34. Corrida cheer OLE
35. Madame’s mail POSTE
36. 14-year-old Apple IMAC
37. Drug cop NARC
38. Sinusitis docs ENTS
40. Movie roll REEL
44. Dependent RELIANT
45. Receptacle for preventing waste SAVE-ALL
49. Metal in pennies ZINC
51. Deep fissure CHASM
52. Song-and-dance program REVUE
53. Impulses URGES
54. Supplement ADD TO
55. Six-Day War leader Moshe DAYAN
56. Clothing tag LABEL
60. Piddling MERE
61. Midwest Native Americans OTOS
62. P’s on sorority sweaters RHOS
64. Meadow LEA
65. Jane Eyre portrayer Wasikowska MIA

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LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Sep 12, Monday

CROSSWORD SETTER: Adam Prince
THEME: SIDE SALAD … each of the theme answers includes a word that is associated with SALAD:

17A. Corfu or Crete GREEK ISLE (Greek salad)
25A. Salute heard at the Forum HAIL CAESAR (Caesar salad)
37A. Classic Frances Hodgson Burnett children’s novel THE SECRET GARDEN (garden salad)
45A. Once-common childhood ailment CHICKEN POX (chicken salad)
56A. Entrée go-with, or the aptly placed part of 17-, 25-, 37- or 45-Across SIDE SALAD

COMPLETION TIME: 5m 48s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
9. Holy Roman emperor crowned in CMLXII OTTO I
Otto I the Great, ruled the Holy Roman Empire in the 10th century.

17. Corfu or Crete GREEK ISLE (Greek salad)
Corfu is one of the most northerly of all the Greek Isles. Corfu plays an important role in Greek mythology and is oft-associated with god Poseidon. Nowadays, Corfu is more readily associated with tourists from mainland Europe.

21. Volkswagen sedan JETTA
The name Jetta is one in a series of names related to winds that has used by Volkswagen. Jetta comes from the German for “jet stream””, and the model name Passat comes from the German for “trade wind”.

22. Scary Nile snakes ASPS
The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

25. Salute heard at the Forum HAIL CAESAR (Caesar salad)
Tijuana is the largest city in the Mexican state of Baja California, and lies just across the US-Mexico border from San Diego. Tijuana is also the most westerly of all Mexican cities. A lot of Tijuana’s growth took place in the twenties as tourists flocked south of the border during the days of prohibition in the US. One of the many casinos and hotels that flourished at that time was Hotel Caesar’s, in the Avenida Revolución area. Hotel Caesar’s claims to be the birthplace of the now ubiquitous Caesar Salad.

27. Friend of Monica and Rachel on “Friends” PHOEBE
The character Phoebe Buffay is played on the sitcom “Friends” by the actress Lisa Kudrow. Kudrow plays the ditsy member of the troupe of friends, but I’ve always viewed her as the “smartest” of the group of actors in real life, as best I could tell. Kudrow is behind the US version of the British genealogy show “Who Do You Think You Are?” a very entertaining bit of television.

31. Snow-block home IGLOO
The Inuit word for “house” is “iglu”, which we usually write as “igloo”. The Greenlandic (yes, that’s a language) word for “house” is very similar, “igdlo”.

34. Ab __: from day one OVO
“Ab ovo” translates literally from Latin as “from the egg”, and is used in English to mean “from the beginning”.

37. Classic Frances Hodgson Burnett children’s novel THE SECRET GARDEN (garden salad)
“The Secret Garden” is a children’s novel written by Frances Hodgson Burnett, first published in serial form in 1910, and then as a complete book in 1911. The story is so popular that it has been adapted on more than one occasion for the stage, big screen, and television, and there are also numerous animated productions as well.

40. CIA precursor OSS
The Office of Strategic Services (OSS) was formed during WWII in order to carry out espionage behind enemy lines. A few years after the end of the war, the OSS functions were taken up by a new group, the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

41. Arkin and Alda ALANS
The actor Alan Arkin won his only Oscar (Best Supporting Actor) for his role in “Little Miss Sunshine” from 2006, a movie I just did not understand …

Alan Alda had a great television career, especially of course on “M*A*S*H”. But when it comes to the big screen, my favorite of his movies is the 1978 romantic comedy “Same Time, Next Year” in which he starred opposite Ellen Burstyn.

42. Queen, in France REINE
“La reine” (the queen) might sit on “le trône” (the throne), in French.

45. Once-common childhood ailment CHICKEN POX (chicken salad)
Chicken pox is a viral infection, a classic disease of childhood most commonly caught by 4-10 year olds. There is a complication that can arise later in life as the virus sometimes reactivates to cause shingles.

52. Boca __ RATON
The name of the city of Boca Raton in Florida translates from Spanish as “Mouse Mouth”. There doesn’t seem to be a definitive etymology of the name but one plausible explanation is a nautical one. “Boca”, as well as meaning “mouth” can mean “inlet”. “Ratón”, as well as meaning “mouse” was also used to describe rocks that chewed away at a ship’s anchor cable. So possibly Boca Raton was named for a rocky inlet.

55. Primitive calculators ABACI
The abacus was used as a counting frame long before man had invented a numerical numbering system. It is a remarkable invention, particularly when one notes that it is still widely used today across Africa and Asia.

56. Entrée go-with, or the aptly placed part of 17-, 25-, 37- or 45-Across SIDE SALAD
Entrée of course means “entry” in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get a “way in”, an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the “entry” to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America!

60. Spiced rice dish PILAF
Pilaf is a Persian word, and we use it to describe rice that is browned in oil and then cooked in a seasoned broth.

61. Cinque meno due TRE
Five minus two (cinque meno due) is three (tre), in Spanish.

62. Prefix with -dactyl PTERO-
The prefixes pter- and ptero- mean “pertaining to a wing, or a feather”, coming from the Greek word “pteron” (feather). Examples of use would be in pterosaur and pterodactyl.

64. IRS W-4 info SSN
The main purpose of a Social Security Number (SSN) is to track individuals for the purposes of taxation, although given its ubiquitous use, it is looking more and more like an “identity number” to me. The social security number system was introduced in 1936. Prior to 1986, an SSN was required only for persons with substantial income so many children under 14 had no number assigned. For some years the IRS had a concern that a lot of people were claiming children on their tax returns who did not actually exist. So, from 1986 onward, it is a requirement to get an SSN for any dependents over the ago of 5. Sure enough, in 1987 seven million dependents “disappeared”.

65. Saudi Arabia neighbor YEMEN
Yemen is located on the Arabian Peninsula, lying just south of Saudi Arabia and west of Oman. Yemen is the only state on the peninsula that is a republic (its official name is the Republic of Yemen). Everyone over the age of 18 gets to vote, but only Muslims can hold elected office.

Down
1. NBA scoring stat PPG
Points per game (PPG).

5. Trike rider TYKE
“Tyke” has been used playfully to describe a young child since at least 1902, but for centuries before that a tyke was a cur or mongrel, or perhaps a lazy or lower-class man.

7. __ Lama DALAI
Starting with the fifth Dalai Lama in the 17th century, the Buddhist leader used to spend the winter months in the magnificent Potola Palace in the Tibetan capital city of Lhasa. The current Dalai Lama (the 14th) had to flee Tibet when the Tibetan people rebelled against Chinese occupation in 1959. Since then, he has resided in Dharamsala in Northern India, as a guest of the Indian people.

9. Séance accessory OUIJA BOARD
The Ouija board was introduced to America as a harmless parlor game at the end of the 19th century, although variations of the board date back to 1100 BC in China, where it was apparently used to “contact” the spirit world. The name “Ouija” is relatively recent, and is probably just a combination of the French and German words for “yes” … “oui” and “ja”.

11. “__ a wrap!” THAT’S
When shooting of a film is concluded the movie is said to “wrap”, and everyone heads to the wrap party. There is one story that “wrap” is actually an acronym for “wind, reel and print”, a reference to the transition of the filming process into post-production. But, this explanation is disputed.

18. “__ Dead?”: Mark Twain play IS HE
Mark Twain’s play “Is He Dead?” was written in 1898, but it wasn’t published in print until over 100 years later, in 2003. It opened on Broadway in 2007, and ran for 105 performances.

23. Persian sovereigns SHAHS
The last Shah of Iran was Mohammed-Reza Shah Pahlavi, who was overthrown by the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

31. Pension supplement, for short IRA
I have to tell you when I first came to the US from Ireland, it was pretty confusing seeing big signs along the freeway advocating IRA contributions. Back in Ireland, that was pretty illegal (where IRA stands for the outlawed Irish Republican Army!).

32. First Bible bk. GEN
The Book of Genesis takes it name from the Greek word for “origin”.

34. Keats, notably ODIST
The poet John Keats is famous for writing a whole series of beautiful odes. The most renowned are the so-called “1819 Odes”, a collection from the year 1819 that includes famous poems such as “Ode on a Grecian Urn”, “Ode to a Nightingale” and “Ode to Psyche”.

38. Game with rooms and weapons CLUE
Clue is another board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as “Cluedo”. Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), a lead pipe (lead piping in the US) and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it’s a fabulous game, a must during the holidays …

39. Republican region, on a political map RED STATE
On political maps, red states are Republican and blue states Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties.

43. Toyota Prius, e.g. ECO-CAR
The Toyota Prius is still the most fuel-efficient, gasoline-powered car sold in the US, according to the EPA. The name “Prius” is a Latin word meaning “ahead, leading”. In the US we pronounce the name “pree-us”, but across the Atlantic it’s pronounced “pry-us”. Oh, and i drive one …

45. High roller’s game CRAPS
If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. Craps may be derived from an old English game called “hazard” also played with two dice, which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name “crapaud”, a French word meaning “toad”.

47. __-Turkish War ITALO-
The Italo-Turkish War was fought between the Ottoman Empire and the Kingdom of Italy from September 1911 and October 1912. At the end of the conflict the Ottoman Empire ceded to Italy the three provinces of Tropolitania, Fezzan and Cyrenaica, which became Italian North Africa, and ultimately the country that we know today as Libya.

50. Humorous poet Nash OGDEN
The poet Ogden Nash was well known for his light and humorous verse. Try this one:

The one-L lama,
He’s a priest.
The two-L llama,
He’s a beast.
And I would bet
A silk pajama
There isn’t any
Three-L lllama.

57. NASA moon craft LEM
In the Apollo program, the Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) was the vehicle that actually landed on the moon and returned the astronauts to the command module that was orbiting overhead. The third LEM built was named “Spider”, and it participated in the Apollo 9 mission which tested the functionality of the LEM design in space. The fourth LEM was called “Snoopy”, and it flew around the moon in the Apollo 10 mission, the dress rehearsal for the upcoming moon landing. Apollo 11’s LEM was of course called “Eagle”, and it brought Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to and from the moon’s surface.

58. “We __ the World” ARE
“We Are the World” is the 1985 charity single recorded by a whole host of celebrity singers who came together as USA for Africa. “We Are the World” was written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie, and sold over 20 million copies. The idea for the USA for Africa recording came out of the great success of the UK project, Band Aid’s “do They Know it’s Christmas?”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Sitcom’s test episode PILOT
6. Sitcom interrupters ADS
9. Holy Roman emperor crowned in CMLXII OTTO I
14. In on, with “to” PRIVY
15. Keg attachment TAP
16. “Yep” UH-HUH
17. Corfu or Crete GREEK ISLE (Greek salad)
19. Hopping mad IRATE
20. Close again, as a Ziploc bag RESEAL
21. Volkswagen sedan JETTA
22. Scary Nile snakes ASPS
25. Salute heard at the Forum HAIL CAESAR (Caesar salad)
27. Friend of Monica and Rachel on “Friends” PHOEBE
29. Dumbbell abbr. LBS
30. Selfish sort TAKER
31. Snow-block home IGLOO
34. Ab __: from day one OVO
37. Classic Frances Hodgson Burnett children’s novel THE SECRET GARDEN (garden salad)
40. CIA precursor OSS
41. Arkin and Alda ALANS
42. Queen, in France REINE
43. End of a professor’s email address EDU
44. Makes sense ADDS UP
45. Once-common childhood ailment CHICKEN POX (chicken salad)
51. Flower stalk STEM
52. Boca __ RATON
53. Young bird of prey EAGLET
55. Primitive calculators ABACI
56. Entrée go-with, or the aptly placed part of 17-, 25-, 37- or 45-Across SIDE SALAD
60. Spiced rice dish PILAF
61. Cinque meno due TRE
62. Prefix with -dactyl PTERO-
63. Keep in the warehouse STORE
64. IRS W-4 info SSN
65. Saudi Arabia neighbor YEMEN

Down
1. NBA scoring stat PPG
2. Like some reduced mdse. IRR
3. Commit perjury LIE
4. Supervises OVERSEES
5. Trike rider TYKE
6. On the ocean AT SEA
7. __ Lama DALAI
8. Wizard’s incantation SPELL
9. Séance accessory OUIJA BOARD
10. Good scores on par-fours THREES
11. “__ a wrap!” THAT’S
12. “__ sight!” OUTTA
13. “Word on the street is …” I HEAR
18. “__ Dead?”: Mark Twain play IS HE
22. Probably will, after “is” APT TO
23. Persian sovereigns SHAHS
24. Jabs in the ribs POKES
26. Thick-soled shoe CLOG
28. Serrated kitchen tool BREAD KNIFE
31. Pension supplement, for short IRA
32. First Bible bk. GEN
33. USN officers LTS
34. Keats, notably ODIST
35. Change of __: trial request VENUE
36. Early aft. hour ONE PM
38. Game with rooms and weapons CLUE
39. Republican region, on a political map RED STATE
43. Toyota Prius, e.g. ECO-CAR
44. Wheel-supporting shaft AXLE
45. High roller’s game CRAPS
46. Nun’s wear HABIT
47. __-Turkish War ITALO-
48. Homes in trees NESTS
49. Sock purchases PAIRS
50. Humorous poet Nash OGDEN
54. Catch sight of ESPY
57. NASA moon craft LEM
58. “We __ the World” ARE
59. Mafia boss DON

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