LA Times Crossword Answers 12 Sep 2017, Tuesday










Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Nameless

Each of today’s themed answers includes a synonym of “nameless”.

  • 17A. With 61-Across, dubious tabloid image : UNIDENTIFIED …
  • 61A. See 17-Across : … FLYING OBJECT
  • 25A. Call to a police hotline, possibly : ANONYMOUS TIP
  • 36A. 1972 chart-topper for the band America : A HORSE WITH NO NAME
  • 51A. Emmy-winning travel and cuisine show hosted by Anthony Bourdain : PARTS UNKNOWN

Bill’s time: 4m 58s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

15. __ Picchu : MACHU

Machu Picchu is known as “The Lost City of the Incas”, and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means “old peak”. The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cusco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

16. Female GI in WWII : WAC

The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) was formed in 1942, and the unit was converted to full status the following year to become the Women’s Army Corps (WAC). Famously, General Douglas MacArthur referred to the WACs as his “best soldiers”, saying they worked harder, complained less and were better disciplined than men. The WACs were disbanded in 1978 and the serving members were integrated into the rest of the army.

17. With 61-Across, dubious tabloid image : UNIDENTIFIED …
(61A. See 17-Across : … FLYING OBJECT)

In 1952, the USAF revived its studies of reported sightings of unidentified flying objects (UFOs) in a program called Project Blue Book. Project Blue Book ran from 1952 until it was shut down in 1969 with the conclusion that there was no threat to national security and that there were no sightings that could not be explained within the bounds of modern scientific knowledge.

Tabloid is the trademarked name (owned by Burroughs, Wellcome and Co,) for a “small tablet of medicine”, a name that goes back to 1884. The word “tabloid” had entered into general use to mean a compressed form of anything, and by the early 1900s was used in “tabloid journalism”, applied to newspapers that had short, condensed articles and stories printed on smaller sheets of paper.

20. ’50s president, initially : DDE

21. 20-Across nickname : IKE

Future US president Eisenhower was born in Denison, Texas in 1890 and given the name David Dwight, but by the time he made it to the White House he was going by the name Dwight D. Eisenhower (DDE). Growing up, his family called him Dwight, and when “Ike” enrolled in West Point he himself reversed the order of his given names.

22. The Congo, formerly : ZAIRE

The African nation once called Zaire is a neighbor of Rwanda. The genocide and war in Rwanda spilled over into Zaire in 1996, with the conflict escalating into what is now called the First Congo War. As part of the war’s fallout there was a regime change, and in 1997 Zaire became the Democratic Republic of Congo.

24. Tycoon Onassis : ARI

Aristotle Onassis was born to a successful Greek shipping entrepreneur in Smyrna in modern-day Turkey. However, his family lost its fortune during WWI and so Aristotle worked with his father to build up a new business empire centered on the importation of tobacco. In 1957, Aristotle founded the Greek national airline, what is today called Olympic Air, and he also got into the business of shipping oil around the world. He married Athina Livanos in 1946, the daughter of a wealthy shipping magnate. They couple had two children together, with one being the famous Christina Onassis. Livanos divorced Onassis on discovering him in bed with the opera singer Maria Callas. Onassis ended his affair with Callas in order to marry Jackie Kennedy in 1968.

29. Hits the tarmac : LANDS

The terms “tarmac” and “macadam” are short for “tarmacadam”. In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as “macadam”. Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The “tar-penetration macadam” is the basis of what we now call tarmac.

36. 1972 chart-topper for the band America : A HORSE WITH NO NAME

“A Horse with No Name” is a fabulous song from the early seventies that was released by the band America. The song was originally banned by some radio stations in the US, due to claims that the “horse” in the title is a reference to the drug heroin.

43. Storyteller __ Christian Andersen : HANS

The wonderful storyteller Hans Christian Andersen became very successful in his own lifetime. In 1847 he visited England for the summer and made a triumphal tour of English society’s most fashionable drawing rooms. There Andersen met with the equally successful Charles Dickens, and the two seemed to hit it off. Ten years later Andersen returned to England and stayed for five weeks in Dickens’ home as his guest. Dickens published “David Copperfield” soon after, and supposedly the less than lovable character Uriah Heep was based on Dickens’ house guest Hans Christian Andersen. That wasn’t very nice!

44. Key of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony : D MINOR

Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony is his wonderful “Choral” symphony. When it was composed in 1824 it was the first time that a major composer had used voices in a symphony. By the time of the Ninth’s premier, Beethoven was essentially deaf. He insisted on sharing the stage with the musical director (who was conducting), and was visibly counting out time but was off by quite a few measures. When the last notes were played there was enthusiastic applause, although Beethoven was still conducting. The lead contralto had to walk over to Beethoven, stop him, and turn him to the audience to receive his adulation.

49. Train cos. : RRS

Railroad (RR)

51. Emmy-winning travel and cuisine show hosted by Anthony Bourdain : PARTS UNKNOWN

Anthony Bourdain is a chef, author and television personality from New York City. Bourdain’s celebrity came with the publication of his book “Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly” in 2000. Bourdain moved on to host the television shows “Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations” and “Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown”.

56. Canon SLR camera : EOS

I’ve been using Canon EOS cameras for decades now, and have nothing but good things to say about both the cameras and the lenses. The EOS name stands for Electro-Optical System, and was chosen because it evokes the name of Eos, the Titan goddess of dawn from Greek mythology.

58. “If you ask me,” briefly : IMO

In my opinion (IMO)

59. Like this crossword ans. : ACR

Across (acr.)

60. Hole in __ : ONE

One well-documented hole in one (ace) was during a round of the British Open in 1973. American golfer Gene Sarazen achieved the feat that day, at the age of 71. A less well-documented series of holes in one was reported by the North Korean press in a story about the Korean leader Kim Jong-il. The report was that Kim Jong-il scored 11 holes in one in his one and only round of golf.

67. ATM maker : NCR

NCR is an American company that has been in business since 1884, and was originally called the National Cash Register Company. The company has done well in a market where new technologies seem to be constantly disrupting the status quo.

Down

1. Sch. with a Tempe campus : ASU

Arizona State University (ASU) has a long history, and was founded as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory in 1885. The athletic teams of ASU used to be known as the Normals, then the Bulldogs, and since 1946 they’ve been called the Sun Devils.

2. She plays Dr. Cristina Yang in “Grey’s Anatomy” : SANDRA OH

The Canadian actress Sandra Oh is very much associated these days with the role of Dr. Cristina Yang on “Grey’s Anatomy”. However, my favorite of Oh’s performances are in the movies “Under the Tuscan Sun” and “Sideways”.

3. Stirred up a cloud of dust at, as a base : SLID INTO

That would be baseball.

6. Bolshevik leader : LENIN

At the second party congress of the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party in 1903, a split developed. The faction with the most support was led by Vladimir Lenin, and as they were in the majority, they became known as the Bolsheviks, derived from the Russian word for “more” or “majority”. Lenin and the Bolsheviks led the October Revolution of 1917, as a result of which Lenin came to power. He headed the new Soviet State during it’s formative years.

7. Battle of Britain fliers: Abbr. : RAF

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the oldest independent air force in the world (i.e. the first air force to become independent of army or navy forces). The RAF was formed during WWI on 1 April 1918, a composite of two earlier forces, the Royal Flying Corps (part of the Army) and the Royal Naval Air Service. The RAF’s “finest hour” has to be the Battle of Britain when the vastly outnumbered British fighters fought off the might of the Luftwaffe causing Hitler to delay his plan to cross the English Channel. This outcome prompted Winston Churchill to utter the memorable words

Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

10. Invasive Japanese vine : KUDZU

Kudzu is a climbing vine that is native to southern Japan and southeast China. “Kudzu” is derived from the Japanese name for the plant, “kuzu”. Kudzu is a vigorously growing weed that chokes other plants by climbing all over them and shielding them from light. Kudzu was brought to the US from Asia for the Japanese pavilion in the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. It was marketed as an ornamental, especially in the southeast of the country, and now is all over the region. Kudzu earned itself the nickname “the vine that ate the South”.

12. Poll founder Louis : HARRIS

The market research firm known as “The Harris Poll” was founded in 1963 by Louis Harris with the specific aim of conducting polls for political candidates. Louis Harris had worked privately for the successful 1960 presidential campaign of John F. Kennedy.

15. Personal bearing : MIEN

One’s mien is one’s bearing or manner. “Mien” shares the same etymological root as our word “demeanor”.

18. Ring ref’s decision : TKO

Technical knockout (TKO)

23. Snake that bit Cleopatra : ASP

The asp is a venomous snake found in the Nile region of Africa. It is so venomous that the asp was used in ancient Egypt and Greece as a means of execution. Cleopatra observed such executions noting that the venom brought on sleepiness without any painful spasms. When the great queen opted to commit suicide, the asp was therefore her chosen method.

24. Thomas __ Edison : ALVA

Thomas Alva Edison (TAE) was nicknamed “The Wizard of Menlo Park” by a newspaper reporter, a name that stuck. He was indeed a wizard, in the sense that he was such a prolific inventor. The Menlo Park part of the moniker recognizes the location of his first research lab, in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

26. Irish poet : YEATS

Irish poet and dramatist William Butler Yeats won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1923 for “inspired poetry” that gave “expression to a whole nation”. Yeats was Ireland’s first Nobel laureate.

27. Cloth-eating insect : MOTH

The larvae of several types of moth are noted for eating fabrics made from natural fibers such as wool or cotton. Many people store woolens in cedar chests believing that the scent of the wood prevents a moth infestation. In fact, the only known effective repellent is the naphthalene found in mothballs, which might be a health concern for humans. One way to kill moth larvae in fabric is to freeze the garment for several days at a temperature below 8 degrees centigrade.

30. German article : DER

The definite article in German is der, die or das, for masculine, feminine and neuter nouns. The indefinite article is ein, eine or ein, again depending on the gender of the noun. A further complication, relative to English, is that the masculine form (and only the masculine form) of the article changes when used in the accusative case, when used with the object of a sentence. The accusative forms are “den” and “einen”.

34. Jacket style named for an Indian leader : NEHRU

A Nehru jacket is very like a regular suit jacket, except that the collar buttons at the neck. It was originally created in the 1940s in India, and then marketed as the Nehru jacket in the west in the sixties. The name Nehru was lifted from Jawaharlal Nehru, the prime minister of India from 1947 to 1964.

35. Capital of Belarus : MINSK

Minsk is the capital of Belarus, formerly known as the Belorussian Soviet Socialist Republic. One of Minsk’s more infamous residents was Lee Harvey Oswald, who lived there from 1960 to 1962.

38. Arabian Sea nation : OMAN

The Arabian Sea is an arm of the Indian Ocean that lies off the south coasts of Oman, Yemen, Pakistan and Iran, and is bounded in the west by Somalia, and in the east by India.

42. Love god : EROS

As always seems to be the case with Greek gods, Eros and Aphrodite have overlapping spheres of influence. Aphrodite was the goddess of love between a man and a woman, and Eros was the god who stirred the passions of the male. The Roman equivalent of Aphrodite was Venus, and the equivalent of Eros was Cupid.

47. Blood carrier : ARTERY

Arteries are vessels that carry blood away from the heart, and veins are vessels carrying blood to the heart.

52. The third letter of 13-Down (but not the second) : SOFT C
(13D. Receive willingly : ACCEPT)

The first letter C in the word “accept” is a hard C, and second is a soft C.

54. Texter’s “Crikey!” : OMG

OMG is text-speak for “Oh My Gosh!” “Oh My Goodness!” or any other G-words you might think of …

“Crikey” is an exclamation, and is probably a euphemism for “Christ”.

64. Web access co. : ISP

Internet service provider (ISP)

66. NFL scores : TDS

Touchdown (TD)

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Attack vigorously : ASSAIL

7. Insurance company’s concern : RISK

11. “Now I get it!” : AHA!

14. Dry-eyes solution : SALINE

15. __ Picchu : MACHU

16. Female GI in WWII : WAC

17. With 61-Across, dubious tabloid image : UNIDENTIFIED …

19. Curved line : ARC

20. ’50s president, initially : DDE

21. 20-Across nickname : IKE

22. The Congo, formerly : ZAIRE

24. Tycoon Onassis : ARI

25. Call to a police hotline, possibly : ANONYMOUS TIP

29. Hits the tarmac : LANDS

31. Very long time : EON

32. Attention-getting whisper : PSST!

33. Elect to office : VOTE IN

35. Spouse : MATE

36. 1972 chart-topper for the band America : A HORSE WITH NO NAME

43. Storyteller __ Christian Andersen : HANS

44. Key of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony : D MINOR

45. Relaxing venues : SPAS

49. Train cos. : RRS

50. Likely will, after “is” : APT TO

51. Emmy-winning travel and cuisine show hosted by Anthony Bourdain : PARTS UNKNOWN

56. Canon SLR camera : EOS

57. Get the better of : OUTDO

58. “If you ask me,” briefly : IMO

59. Like this crossword ans. : ACR

60. Hole in __ : ONE

61. See 17-Across : … FLYING OBJECT

67. ATM maker : NCR

68. Poke fun at : TEASE

69. Thingamabob : DOODAD

70. Bashful : SHY

71. Sleep in a tent, say : CAMP

72. Dries out, with “up” : SOBERS

Down

1. Sch. with a Tempe campus : ASU

2. She plays Dr. Cristina Yang in “Grey’s Anatomy” : SANDRA OH

3. Stirred up a cloud of dust at, as a base : SLID INTO

4. Staff helper : AIDE

5. Suffix with hero : -INE

6. Bolshevik leader : LENIN

7. Battle of Britain fliers: Abbr. : RAF

8. Here, to Henri : ICI

9. Female pronoun : SHE

10. Invasive Japanese vine : KUDZU

11. Anticipates : AWAITS

12. Poll founder Louis : HARRIS

13. Receive willingly : ACCEPT

15. Personal bearing : MIEN

18. Ring ref’s decision : TKO

23. Snake that bit Cleopatra : ASP

24. Thomas __ Edison : ALVA

25. Tag sale words : AS IS

26. Irish poet : YEATS

27. Cloth-eating insect : MOTH

28. Upright : ON END

30. German article : DER

34. Jacket style named for an Indian leader : NEHRU

35. Capital of Belarus : MINSK

37. Say “Watch it” to : WARN

38. Arabian Sea nation : OMAN

39. Little bite : NIP

40. Go before : ANTECEDE

41. Auto, to a Brit : MOTORCAR

42. Love god : EROS

45. Cereal utensils : SPOONS

46. Beer gut : PAUNCH

47. Blood carrier : ARTERY

48. Criterion: Abbr. : STD

52. The third letter of 13-Down (but not the second) : SOFT C

53. Work starting hour : NINE

54. Texter’s “Crikey!” : OMG

55. Forest : WOODS

59. “This is __ for Superman!” : A JOB

62. Grassy expanse : LEA

63. Candied veggie : YAM

64. Web access co. : ISP

65. Scarer’s shout : BOO!

66. NFL scores : TDS

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LA Times Crossword Answers 13 Feb 17, Monday










Constructed by: Kurt Krauss

Edited by: Rich Norris

Quicklink to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Quicklink to comments

Theme: Teammates

Today’s themed answers start with a word that is often MATED with, follows, the word TEAM:

  • 61A. Players on the same side … and what the starts of the answers to starred clues can be : TEAMMATES
  • 17A. *Track event with batons : RELAY RACE (giving “relay team”)
  • 25A. *Romantic outing for four : DOUBLE DATE (giving “double-team”)
  • 36A. *Romantic ideal : DREAM GIRL (giving “dream team”)
  • 51A. *Machinist’s hole maker : DRILL PRESS (giving “drill team”)

Bill’s time: 5m 10s

Bill’s errors: 0




Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies

Across

4. Barton of the Red Cross : CLARA

Clara Barton was deeply disturbed by her experiences caring for the wounded during the Civil War. She dedicated herself after the war towards American recognition of the International Committee of the Red Cross. The American Red Cross was inevitably formed, in 1881, and Barton was installed as its first president.

9. The Congo, formerly : ZAIRE

The African nation once called Zaire is a neighbor of Rwanda. The genocide and war in Rwanda spilled over into Zaire in 1996, with the conflict escalating into what is now called the First Congo War. As part of the war’s fallout there was a regime change, and in 1997 Zaire became the Democratic Republic of Congo.

14. Martinique, par exemple : ILE

In French, Martinique “par exemple” (for example) is an “île” (island).

The island of Martinique in the eastern Caribbean is actually a part of France, and is referred to as an “overseas department”. As such, Martinique is part of the European Union and even uses the euro as its currency. The island is fully represented in the French National Assembly and Senate, just like any department within France. It’s sort of like the status of Hawaii within the US.

19. Night, in Naples : NOTTE

Naples (“Napoli” in Italian) is the third largest city in Italy. The name “Napoli” comes from the city’s Ancient Greek name, which translates as “New City”. That’s a bit of a paradox as today Naples is one of the oldest continuously-inhabited cities in the world.

20. Congregational “Absolutely!” : AMEN!

The word “amen” translates as “so be it”. “Amen” is said to be of Hebrew origin, but it is likely to be also influenced by Aramaic and Arabic.

21. “__ beaucoup” : MERCI

“Merci beaucoup” is French for “thank you very much”.

27. “Romanian Rhapsodies” composer : ENESCO

George Enescu (aka Georges Enesco) was a Romanian composer and performer. Enescu’s most popular works are two “Romanian Rhapsodies” (1901-2) and the opera “Oedipe” (1936).

30. John, Paul and George: Abbr. : STS

Saints (sts.)

31. Under-the-sink fitting : P TRAP

Most sinks in a home have a P trap in the outlet pipe that empties into the sewer line. This P trap has at its heart a U-bend that retains a small amount of water after the sink is emptied. This plug of water serves as a seal to prevent sewer gases entering into the home. By virtue of its design, the U-bend can also capture any heavy objects (like an item of jewelry) that might fall through the plughole. But the “trapping” of fallen objects is secondary to the P-traps main function of trapping sewer gases.

39. Farmland measure : ACRE

At one time, an acre was defined as the amount of land a yoke of oxen could plow in a day. This was more precisely defined as a strip of land “one furrow long” (i.e. one furlong) and one furlong wide. The length of one furlong was equal to 10 chains, or 40 rods. A area of one furlong times 10 rods was one rood.

42. Steinway or Yamaha : PIANO

Steinway & Sons is supplier of handmade pianos based in New York City and in Hamburg, Germany. The company was founded in Manhattan in 1853 by German immigrant Henry E. Steinway. One element of Steinway’s business model is to offer a “piano bank” service. Performing artists can “borrow” a particular piano from the bank for a particular concert or tour. About 400 pianos are in the bank, and are located over the world. The value of the bank’s collection of pianos is estimated at over $25 million.

The Japanese company Yamaha started out way back in 1888 as a manufacturer of pianos and reed organs. Even though the company has diversified since then, Yamaha’s logo still reflects it musical roots. Even on Yamaha motorcycles you can see a logo made up of three intersecting tuning forks.

46. Yellow Teletubby : LAA-LAA

“Teletubbies” is a children’s television show produced by the BBC in the UK and shown over here on PBS. The show attracted a lot of attention in 1999 when Jerry Falwell suggested that one of the Teletubbies characters (Tinky Winky) was a homosexual role model for children.

49. Meditative music genre : NEW-AGE

New-Age music is created to provide a relaxing and stress-free atmosphere. The New Age movement is often said to have begun with the release of an album called “Spectrum Suite” by Steven Halpern in 1975.

56. Announcer Hall : EDD

Edd Hall is most famous as the former announcer for Jay Leno on “The Tonight Show”. Hall replaced Ed McMahon when Johnny Carson retired from the show.

58. What aces may count as : ONES

In the card game called Blackjack, an ace has the point value of one or eleven. When one of the two cards dealt to a player is an ace, the hand is called “soft”. This means that the player cannot go bust by taking another card, as the ace can be revalued at “one” if necessary in order to stay under 21.

59. Black, in Burgundy : NOIRE

The Burgundy region of France is famous for its wine production. If you’re looking at a label that isn’t translated into English though, you’ll see Burgundy written in French, namely “Bourgogne”.

65. The “I” in IV : INTRA-

One might see intravenous drips (IVs) in an intensive care unit (ICU).

66. High season on the Riviera : ETE

In French, the season of “été” (summer) starts in “juin” (June).

The Côte d’Azur is on the Mediterranean coast of France and stretches from Saint Tropez in the west and to the Italian border in the east. In English we often refer to the area as “the French Riviera”. It’s a little crowded for me (okay, “expensive”), especially in the summer.

67. Grain disease : ERGOT

Ergot is a fungus, or actually a group of fungi, that cause disease in rye and related plants. If human eat ergot-contaminated grain, a condition called ergotism can result. Ergotism is the result of consumption of alkaloids produced by the fungi, alkaloids that can cause seizures and manic behavior. It has even been suggested that the hysteria exhibited by the Salem “witches” was perhaps caused by the ingestion of ergot-contaminated rye.

68. Ruby Dee’s husband Davis : OSSIE

Ossie Davis was a very successful African-American actor, but also a director, poet, playwright and social activist. One of Davis’s better known performances was in the 1993 movie “Grumpy Old Men”, in which he played the owner of the bait shop by the lake.

Ruby Dee was an actress and civil rights activist. On the big screen she is perhaps best remembered for co-starring in “A Raisin in the Sun” alongside Sidney Poitier, in “Do the Right Thing” alongside her husband Ossie Davis, and in “American Gangster” in which she played Denzel Washington’s mother.

Down

2. Periodic table listing : ELEMENT

Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist. When Mendeleev classified elements according to their chemical properties, he noticed patterns and was able to group elements into his famous 1869 Periodic Table. So powerful was his table that he actually predicted the properties of some elements that had not even been discovered in 1869. Element number 101 is mendelevium and was named after Mendeleev.

3. Fax forerunners : TELEXES

Telex grew out of the world of the telegraph. What Telex brought to telegraphy was the ability to route messages. Instead of having to talk to an operator to route a particular message to the intended party, the user of a telex could route the message directly to another telex machine by way of a rotary dial, very similar to that on a telephone.

5. The Once-__: “The Lorax” character : LER

“The Lorax” is a children’s book written by Dr. Seuss. It is an allegorical work questioning the problems created by industrialization, and in particular its impact on the environment. At one point in the story, the Lorax “speaks for the trees, for the trees have no tongues”. “The Lorax” was adapted into an animated film that was released in 2012, with Danny DeVito voicing the title character.

6. Mission to remember : ALAMO

The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718 and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna’s camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry “Remember the Alamo!”.

7. Houston sch. : RICE U

Rice University is a private school in Houston, Texas. William Marsh Rice had made a will endowing the funds for the establishment of the school at the time of his death. When he was found dead one morning in his bed, his lawyer announced that his will had been changed, with the bulk of Rice’s estate actually going to the lawyer making the announcement. Upon investigation, it was discovered that the lawyer had paid Rice’s valet to murder his employer using chloroform and a fake will was written. Eventually, the original will was deemed valid and the funds were disbursed so that the school could be built.

8. Biting, as criticism : ACERB

“Acerb” is a variant of “acerbic”, meaning sour or bitter-tasting, acidic.

9. More wacky : ZANIER

Something described as “zany” is clownish and bizarre. “Zany” can also be a noun, a term used for a clown or a buffoon. The original noun was “Zanni”, a Venetian dialect variant of Gianni, short for Giovanni (John). Zanni was a character who appeared in comedy plays of the day, and was someone who aped the principal actors.

10. Period with 365 días : ANO

In Spanish, there are 365 “días” (days) in a “año” (year).

18. Aardvark fare : ANTS

The aardvark is the oddest looking of creatures, a nocturnal burrowing animal, native to Africa. Even though it is sometimes called the African ant bear, the name “aardvark” is Afrikaans for “earth pig”. Aardvarks are noted, among other things, for their unique teeth. Their teeth have no enamel and wear away quite readily, but continuously regrow. The aardvark feeds mainly on ants and termites.

22. The NFL’s Browns, on sports tickers : CLE

The Cleveland Browns football team was a charter member of the All-American Football Conference, formed in 1946. Cleveland is the only NFL city that has never hosted nor sent a team to the Super Bowl.

28. EMT procedure : CPR

An emergency medical technician (EMT) might administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

33. Parisian pal : AMI

A male friend in France is “un ami”, and a female friend is “une amie”.

34. Ryder Cup org. : PGA

The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

The Ryder Cup trophy was donated to the game of golf by Samuel Ryder, an English entrepreneur. Ryder made his money selling garden seeds in small packets. He only took up golf when he was in his fifties but became quite the enthusiast and eventually donated the trophy in 1927, when it was valued at 100 guineas. The Ryder Cup is a biennial tournament played between teams from the US and Europe.

36. Big name in computers : DELL

Dell, the computer manufacturer, is named after the company’s founder Michael Dell. Michael Dell started his company in his dorm room at college, shipping personal computers that were customized to the specific needs of his customers. He dropped out of school in order to focus on his growing business, a decision that I doubt he regrets. Michael Dell is now one of the richest people in the world.

37. Holiday and Days : INNS

The first Holiday Inn hotel was opened in 1952. The name for the hotel chain was inspired by the 1942 movie “Holiday Inn” starring Bing Crosby and Fred Astaire.

The Days Inn hotel chain was founded in 1970 by a real estate developer called Cecil B. Day. One of the features of a Days Inn hotel in those early days was an on-site gas pump, which dispensed gasoline at discount prices.

38. Caviar : ROE

“Caviar” is the roe of a large fish that has been salted and seasoned, and especially the roe of a sturgeon. Beluga caviar comes from the beluga sturgeon, found primarily in the Caspian Sea. It is the most expensive type of caviar in the world. 8 ounces of US-farmed beluga caviar can be purchased through Amazon.com for just over $850, in case you’re feeling peckish …

39. Firm, as pasta : AL DENTE

The Italian expression “al dente” literally means “to the tooth” or “to the bite” and is used to describe not only pasta, but also vegetables that are cooked so that they are tender and yet still crisp.

47. L.A. Angels’ division : AL WEST

The Anaheim Angels are today more correctly called the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (LAA). The “Angels” name dates back to 1961 when the team was founded in the “City of Angels”, Los Angeles. When the franchise moved to Anaheim in 1965 they were known as the California Angels, then the Anaheim Angels, and most recently the Los Angeles Angels at Anaheim.

48. Big galoot : APE

“Galoot” is an insulting term meaning an awkward or boorish man, an ape. “Galoot” comes from the nautical world, where it was originally what a sailor might call a soldier or marine.

50. Stagecoach driver’s “Stop!” : WHOA!

Although the stagecoach is very much associated with the Wild West, the vehicle originated in England in the 16th century. Stagecoaches provided transportation for travellers and goods over long distances. The rest points for the travellers were known as “stages”, and later “stations”, hence the name “stagecoach”.

60. Classic car : REO

The REO Motor Company was founded by Ransom Eli Olds (hence the name REO). The company made cars, trucks and buses, and was in business from 1905 to 1975 in Lansing, Michigan. Among the company’s most famous models were the REO Royale and the REO Flying Cloud.

62. CAT scan cousin : MRI

An MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) machine uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn’t like the term “nuclear” because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it’s just called MRI.

63. Fannie or Ginnie follower : MAE

A CT (or “CAT”) scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three-dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful, causing damage that is cumulative over time.

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Complete List of Clues and Answers

Across

1. Show affection to, as a dog : PET

4. Barton of the Red Cross : CLARA

9. The Congo, formerly : ZAIRE

14. Martinique, par exemple : ILE

15. Archaeological find : RELIC

16. Bother : ANNOY

17. *Track event with batons : RELAY RACE (giving “relay team”)

19. Night, in Naples : NOTTE

20. Congregational “Absolutely!” : AMEN!

21. “__ beaucoup” : MERCI

23. Lab rodent : RAT

24. Schoolbook, or much of its contents : TEXT

25. *Romantic outing for four : DOUBLE DATE (giving “double-team”)

27. “Romanian Rhapsodies” composer : ENESCO

29. Wears away : ERODES

30. John, Paul and George: Abbr. : STS

31. Under-the-sink fitting : P TRAP

35. For fear that : LEST

36. *Romantic ideal : DREAM GIRL (giving “dream team”)

39. Farmland measure : ACRE

42. Steinway or Yamaha : PIANO

43. Crone : HAG

46. Yellow Teletubby : LAA-LAA

49. Meditative music genre : NEW-AGE

51. *Machinist’s hole maker : DRILL PRESS (giving “drill team”)

55. Ache : HURT

56. Announcer Hall : EDD

57. Use a loom : WEAVE

58. What aces may count as : ONES

59. Black, in Burgundy : NOIRE

61. Players on the same side … and what the starts of the answers to starred clues can be : TEAMMATES

64. Hues : TONES

65. The “I” in IV : INTRA-

66. High season on the Riviera : ETE

67. Grain disease : ERGOT

68. Ruby Dee’s husband Davis : OSSIE

69. Period, e.g. : DOT

Down

1. High seas bandits : PIRATES

2. Periodic table listing : ELEMENT

3. Fax forerunners : TELEXES

4. Bawl : CRY

5. The Once-__: “The Lorax” character : LER

6. Mission to remember : ALAMO

7. Houston sch. : RICE U

8. Biting, as criticism : ACERB

9. More wacky : ZANIER

10. Period with 365 días : ANO

11. For services rendered instead of cash : IN TRADE

12. Revolves : ROTATES

13. Driver’s license requirement : EYE TEST

18. Aardvark fare : ANTS

22. The NFL’s Browns, on sports tickers : CLE

25. Pour affection (on) : DOTE

26. Sweetie pie : DOLL

28. EMT procedure : CPR

32. Knock hard : RAP

33. Parisian pal : AMI

34. Ryder Cup org. : PGA

36. Big name in computers : DELL

37. Holiday and Days : INNS

38. Caviar : ROE

39. Firm, as pasta : AL DENTE

40. It’s usually locked after parking : CAR DOOR

41. Attacking, as the fridge : RAIDING

43. Full of ghosts : HAUNTED

44. Go along with : AGREE TO

45. Prepares : GETS SET

47. L.A. Angels’ division : AL WEST

48. Big galoot : APE

50. Stagecoach driver’s “Stop!” : WHOA!

52. 4:1, e.g. : RATIO

53. Alternative to odds : EVENS

54. Theater chairs : SEATS

60. Classic car : REO

62. CAT scan cousin : MRI

63. Fannie or Ginnie follower : MAE

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