LA Times Crossword 23 Oct 18, Tuesday

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Constructed by: Mark McClain
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Steak Dinner

Themed answers each start with a kind of STEAK that one might have for DINNER:

  • 61A. Meal suggested by the starts of four long answers : STEAK DINNER
  • 18A. Controversial coal-extraction method : STRIP MINING
  • 24A. Dues-paying participant : CLUB MEMBER
  • 40A. Broadside accidents : T-BONE COLLISIONS
  • 50A. Format for some tournaments : ROUND ROBIN

Bill’s time: 5m 43s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

4. Light brown pear : BOSC

Bosc is a cultivar of the European pear grown in the northwest of the United States. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck. I always seem to use the potato as my point of reference. How Irish am I …?

8. Hillary Clinton, née __ : RODHAM

Hillary Rodham was born in Chicago, Illinois to Hugh Rodham (a businessman in the textile industry) and Dorothy Howell (a homemaker). Hillary was raised in a conservative home, and she campaigned for Republican candidate Barry Goldwater in the 1964 US presidential election. The following year, she served as president of the Young Republicans at Wellesley College. Our former First Lady left the Republican Party expressing disappointment at what she witnessed at the 1968 Republican National Convention in Miami, citing “veiled” racist messages prevalent at that time.

14. Horace’s “__ Poetica” : ARS

The full name of Horace’s work is “Ars Poetica, Epistula ad Pisones” (The Art of Poetry, Letters to Piso). The work describes the technical aspects of poetry in Ancient Rome, and the term “ars poetica” has come to mean the poetry of that period.

15. “The Mammoth Hunters” author Jean : AUEL

As Jean Auel prepared her first book in the “Earth’s Children” series, she did a lot of research about the Ice Age, the setting for her stories. She went as far as taking a survival course in cold conditions, learning to build an ice cave and how to make fire, tan leather and knap stone.

17. Big wheel, briefly : VIP

Very important person (VIP)

18. Controversial coal-extraction method : STRIP MINING

Strip mining is a process used to mine minerals that are relatively close to the surface. A long strip of overlying soil and rock is first removed, and then the ore beneath is excavated. Once each long strip has been excavated then the overlying soil and rock is redeposited. Strip mining wouldn’t be most environmentally friendly practice …

20. Wine lover’s prefix : OENO-

In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oeno-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

22. Sport shown on TV Japan : SUMO

Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in Japan, the country of its origin. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of the organization’s aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

TV Japan is television channel owned by Japan’s national public broadcaster NHK. TV Japan’s target audience is the Japanese-speaking community in North America.

31. Isle of Arthurian legend : AVALON

Avalon is a legendary island featured in the Arthurian legends. The name Avalon probably comes from the word “afal”, the Welsh word for “apple”, reflecting the fact that the island was noted for its beautiful apples. Avalon is where King Arthur’s famous sword “Excalibur” was forged, and supposedly where Arthur was buried.

33. Woodland deity : SATYR

The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the “rude” male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

36. Developmental insect stage : LARVA

The larva is an intermediate stage in the development of an insect. All four stages are embryo, larva, pupa and imago.

40. Broadside accidents : T-BONE COLLISIONS

A broadside collision between two cars is also known as a right-angle or t-bone collision. The side of one vehicle is impacted by the front of another, often leaving the vehicles locked in a T-formation.

43. A, in Augsburg : EIN

Augsburg is a city in Bavaria, Germany. Augsburg was founded in 15 BC, making it the third oldest city in the whole country.

46. “__ Fideles”: carol : ADESTE

The lovely Christmas hymn “Adeste Fideles” (entitled “O Come, All Ye Faithful” in English) was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time. A kind blog reader pointed out to me that the English translation is in fact a little “off”. The term “adeste” best translates from Latin as “be present, attend”, rather that “come”. The verb “come” appears later in the lyrics in “venite adoremus”, meaning “come, let us worship”.

49. Macy’s section, e.g.: Abbr. : DEPT

The original Macy’s store was opened by Rowland Hussey Macy in Haverhill, Massachusetts in 1851. This store, and several others that Macy opened, all failed. Macy picked himself up though, and started over again in New York City. Those early New York stores all focused on the sale of dry goods, but added departments quickly as the clientele grew. The Macy’s “star” logo has been around since the company was first established. Macy chose the star because it mimicked the star tattoo that he got as a teenager when he was working on a whaling ship out of Nantucket.

50. Format for some tournaments : ROUND-ROBIN

The original use of the term “round-robin” was in signing documents. The idea was that multiple signatures were added to a controversial document in an arrangement that disguised the name of the “ring leader” of those endorsing the letters contents.

57. “__ y Plata”: Montana motto : ORO

“Oro y Plata” means “gold and silver”, and is the state motto of Montana. The motto was written in Spanish, solely because “it had a nice ring to it”.

60. Opal of the comics, to Earl Pickles : WIFE

“Pickles” is a comic strip by Brian Crane that made its debut in 1990. It’s all about retired couple Earl and Opal Pickles who are trying to enjoy their golden years, but are facing a few challenges.

65. Deli salmon : LOX

Lox is brine-cured salmon fillet that is finely sliced. The term “lox” comes into English via Yiddish, and derives from the German word for salmon, namely “Lachs”.

66. Philadelphia campus : TEMPLE

Temple University in Philadelphia was founded in 1888, and started out as a night school offering classes to people of limited means who had to hold down jobs during the day. These students earned themselves the nickname of “night owls”, leading to the use of “Owls” for Temple’s athletic teams.

68. __-ray Disc : BLU

A CD player reads the information on the disc using a laser beam. The beam is produced by what’s called a laser diode, a device similar to a light-emitting diode (LED) except that a laser beam is emitted. That laser beam is usually red in CD and DVD players. Blu-ray players are so called as they use blue lasers.

69. Volkswagen family car : PASSAT

“Passat” is one in a series of model names related to winds that has been used by Volkswagen. “Jetta” comes from the German for “jet stream”, and the model name “Passat” comes from the German for “trade wind”.

71. Some ER cases : ODS

Someone taking an overdose (OD) often ends up in an emergency room (ER).

Down

1. Wreaked condition : HAVOC

Havoc is a great damage or destruction. The term comes from the Anglo-French phrase “crier havok”, which was an order given in the late 1500s to soldiers, instructing them to seize plunder.

2. One of the archangels : URIEL

Uriel is one of the archangels in the Jewish and Christian traditions. Uriel makes a few notable appearances in literature, in John Milton’s epic poem “Paradise Lost” and in Ralph Waldo Emerson’s poem “Uriel”.

3. College sports channel : ESPNU

ESPNU (short for “ESPN Universities”) is a sports channel focused on college athletics.

4. Music majors’ degs. : BAS

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

6. Blood bank supply : SERUM

Blood serum (plural “sera”) is the clear, yellowish part of blood i.e. that part which is neither a blood cell or a clotting factor. Included in blood serum are antibodies, the proteins that are central to our immune system. Blood serum from animals that have immunity to some disease can be transferred to another individual, hence providing that second individual with some level of immunity. Blood serum used to pass on immunity can be called “antiserum”.

10. “Gracias” response : DE NADA

In Spanish, one can respond to “gracias” (thank you) with “de nada” (it’s nothing).

11. Common people : HOI POLLOI

“Hoi polloi” is a Greek term, literally meaning “the majority, the many”. In English, “hoi polloi” has come to mean “the masses” and is often used in a derogatory sense.

12. Raggedy doll : ANN

Raggedy Ann is a rag doll that was created by Johnny Gruelle in 1915 for his daughter, Marcella. He decided to name the doll by combining the titles of two poems by James Whitcomb Riley, “The Raggedy Man” and “Little Orphan Annie”. Gruelle introduced Raggedy Ann in a series of books three years later. Sadly, Marcella died at 13 years of age with her father blaming a smallpox vaccination she was given at school. Gruelle became very active in the movement against mass vaccination, for which Raggedy Ann became a symbol.

13. Eldest of the “Little Women” : MEG

“Little Women” is a novel written by American author Louisa May Alcott. The quartet of little women is Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March. Jo is a tomboy and the main character in the story, and is based on Alcott herself.

19. Author of eerie stories : POE

Edgar Allan Poe lived a life of many firsts. Poe is considered to be the inventor of the detective-fiction genre. He was also the first notable American author to make his living through his writing, something that didn’t really go too well for him as he was always financially strapped. In 1849 he was found on the streets of Baltimore, delirious and in dire need of medical help. Poe died a few days later in hospital at 39 years of age.

21. Delivery MD : OB/GYN

Obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN)

26. Shankar on the sitar : RAVI

Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous virtuoso (to us Westerners) from the world of Indian classical music, and was noted for his sitar playing. Shankar was the father of the pop singer Norah Jones.

29. Ouzo flavoring : ANISE

Ouzo is an apéritif from Greece that is colorless and flavored with anise. Ouzo is similar to French pastis and Italian sambuca.

32. Poughkeepsie campus : VASSAR

Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York is now a coeducational school, after over a century of operating as a women’s college since its founding in 1861. The school was officially declared co-ed in 1969, although it had accepted a handful of male students on the GI Bill after WWII.

The city of Poughkeepsie served as New York’s second state capital after New York City was occupied by the British during the Revolutionary War. The name “Poughkeepsie” comes from a Wappinger word meaning “the reed-covered lodge by the little-water place”.

35. Symphonic stories : TONE POEMS

Franz Liszt was the original creator of the single-movement work known as a symphonic or tone poem. A symphonic poem is a musical piece usually based on another work, perhaps a play, story or poem. Liszt wrote the tone poem “Hamlet” in 1858, which was intended to be an introduction to Shakespeare’s play.

36. British john : LOO

It has been suggested that the British term “loo” comes from “Waterloo” (water closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo”, in which the pot was called the loo!

The use of “john” as a slang term for a toilet is peculiar to North America. “John” probably comes from the older slang term of “jack” or “jakes” that had been around since the 16th century. In Ireland, in less polite moments, we still refer to a toilet as “the jacks”.

37. European peak : ALP

There are eight Alpine countries:

  • Austria
  • Slovenia
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Liechtenstein
  • Germany
  • Monaco
  • Italy

38. Dr. Jekyll creator’s monogram : RLS

Robert Louis Stevenson (RLS) was a Scottish author. He was most famous for his novels “Treasure Island”, “Kidnapped” and “The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”.

Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella “The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” was published in 1886. There are many tales surrounding the writing of the story including one that the author wrote the basic tale in just three to six days, and spent a few weeks simply refining it. Allegedly, Stevenson’s use of cocaine stimulated his creative juices during those few days of writing.

41. “Burlesque” co-star : CHER

“Cher” is the stage name used by Cherilyn Sarkisian. Formerly one half of husband-wife duo Sonny & Cher, she is often referred to as the Goddess of Pop. In her acting career, Cher was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Oscar of 1984 for her performance in “Silkwood”. She went further in 1988 and won the Best Actress Oscar for playing Loretta Castorini in “Moonstruck”.

“Burlesque” is a 2010 musical film starring Cher and Christina Aguilera. Aguilera plays a singer who finds work in a Neo-Burlesque club in Los Angeles, where she meets a former dancer who becomes her mentor (played by Cher).

“Burlesque” came into English from French, although the word is rooted in the Italian “burla”, the word for a joke, or mockery. A burlesque is work of literature, drama or music that is intended to amuse and cause laughter. Burlesques in the US took on a variety show format and were popular in the US from the 1860s. Over time, the variety acts started to include female striptease, and the term “burlesque” has come to be mainly associated with such entertainment. The derivative verb “to burlesque” means “to imitate mockingly”.

51. Maker of Cajun Shrimp nail polish : OPI

Opi is a manufacturer of nail polish based in North Hollywood, California. One of Opi’s marketing coups was the introduction of a line of Legally Blonde 2 polishes, which featured in the film.

52. Like the “funny bone” nerve : ULNAR

The ulnar nerve runs alongside the ulna (one of the bones in the lower arm). The ulnar nerve is the largest unprotected (not surrounded by muscle or bone) nerve in the human body. The nerve can be touched under the skin at the outside of the elbow. Striking the nerve at this point causes and an electric-type shock, known as hitting one’s “funny bone” or “crazy bone”.

53. Never, in Nogales : NUNCA

Nogales (properly called “Heroica Nogales”) is a city in the Mexican State of Sonora. Nogales lies right on the Mexico-US border, opposite the city of Nogales, Arizona.

54. “The Hobbit” hero : BILBO

In J. R. R. Tolkien’s fantasy novel “The Hobbit”, the title character is Bilbo Baggins. He is a hobbit who stumbles across a magical ring and then embarks on a series of adventures.

55. Bluffed-out words, perhaps : I FOLD

That would be poker.

56. Connection : NEXUS

A nexus is a means of connection, or a center where many connections come together. “Nexus” is a Latin word meaning “that which ties or binds together”. The Latin “nexus” is the past participle of the verb “nectere” meaning “to bind”.

58. Sooner St. : OKLA

The 1889 Indian Appropriations Act officially opened up the so called Unassigned Lands, land in Oklahoma on which no Native American tribes had settled. Once the Act was signed, those lands became available for settlement. Those people that settled the same lands illegally, prior the date specified, they were termed “Sooners” as their situation was defined in the “sooner clause” of the Act. “Sooner State” is now a nickname for Oklahoma.

61. Car care brand : STP

STP is a brand name for automotive lubricants and additives. The name “STP” is an initialism standing for “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

63. Police rank: Abbr. : DET

Detective (Det.)

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Colorist’s concern : HUE
4. Light brown pear : BOSC
8. Hillary Clinton, née __ : RODHAM
14. Horace’s “__ Poetica” : ARS
15. “The Mammoth Hunters” author Jean : AUEL
16. Low-scoring tie : ONE-ONE
17. Big wheel, briefly : VIP
18. Controversial coal-extraction method : STRIP MINING
20. Wine lover’s prefix : OENO-
22. Sport shown on TV Japan : SUMO
23. Beer extraction gadget : TAP
24. Dues-paying participant : CLUB MEMBER
27. Spanish lady : DONA
30. Acquire : GET
31. Isle of Arthurian legend : AVALON
33. Woodland deity : SATYR
36. Developmental insect stage : LARVA
39. Luau accessory : LEI
40. Broadside accidents : T-BONE COLLISIONS
43. A, in Augsburg : EIN
44. Small stores : SHOPS
45. Rather nasty : SNIDE
46. “__ Fideles”: carol : ADESTE
48. Corrode, with “away” : EAT
49. Macy’s section, e.g.: Abbr. : DEPT
50. Format for some tournaments : ROUND ROBIN
57. “__ y Plata”: Montana motto : ORO
59. Bit of talk show self-promotion : PLUG
60. Opal of the comics, to Earl Pickles : WIFE
61. Meal suggested by the starts of four long answers : STEAK DINNER
65. Deli salmon : LOX
66. Philadelphia campus : TEMPLE
67. Building lot unit : ACRE
68. __-ray Disc : BLU
69. Volkswagen family car : PASSAT
70. Rough file : RASP
71. Some ER cases : ODS

Down

1. Wreaked condition : HAVOC
2. One of the archangels : URIEL
3. College sports channel : ESPNU
4. Music majors’ degs. : BAS
5. First stage : OUTSET
6. Blood bank supply : SERUM
7. Upward trek : CLIMB
8. Film genre prefix with com : ROM-
9. Words after work or sleep : ON IT
10. “Gracias” response : DE NADA
11. Common people : HOI POLLOI
12. Raggedy doll : ANN
13. Eldest of the “Little Women” : MEG
19. Author of eerie stories : POE
21. Delivery MD : OB/GYN
25. Least : MEREST
26. Shankar on the sitar : RAVI
28. Interminably : NO END
29. Ouzo flavoring : ANISE
32. Poughkeepsie campus : VASSAR
33. Place : STEAD
34. Put up with : ABIDE
35. Symphonic stories : TONE POEMS
36. British john : LOO
37. European peak : ALP
38. Dr. Jekyll creator’s monogram : RLS
41. “Burlesque” co-star : CHER
42. Being hauled to the garage : IN TOW
47. Sundress features : STRAPS
48. Lawn maintenance tools : EDGERS
51. Maker of Cajun Shrimp nail polish : OPI
52. Like the “funny bone” nerve : ULNAR
53. Never, in Nogales : NUNCA
54. “The Hobbit” hero : BILBO
55. Bluffed-out words, perhaps : I FOLD
56. Connection : NEXUS
58. Sooner St. : OKLA
61. Car care brand : STP
62. Pot contents : TEA
63. Police rank: Abbr. : DET
64. Weight-training unit : REP

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