LA Times Crossword Answers 29 Oct 2017, Sunday

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Constructed by: Bruce Haight
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: Urbanagrams

Each of today’s themed answers is a US city, followed by an anagram of that city name:

  • 23A. A few bars in the West? : SAN DIEGO SONG IDEA
  • 37A. Ticketholder’s entitlement in the Southwest? : SANTA FE FAN SEAT
  • 51A. Stage handles in the West? : SACRAMENTO ACTOR NAMES
  • 72A. Complex papers for a pad in the West? : LOS ANGELES LONG LEASES
  • 86A. Do stuff in the Southeast? : RALEIGH HAIR GEL
  • 102A. Heavyweights in the Midwest? : COLUMBUS SUMO CLUB

Bill’s time: 22m 56s

Bill’s errors: 2

  • MORES (modes!)
  • AESIR (Aesid!!!)

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5. Van Gogh setting : ARLES

Quite a few years ago now, I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city’s design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and was where he painted many of his most famous works, including “Cafe Terrace at Night” and “Bedroom in Arles”.

15. Jazz trumpeter Jones : THAD

Thad Jones was a jazz trumpeter and bandleader from Pontiac, Michigan. Thad came from a very musical family. His older brother was Hank Jones the jazz pianist, and his younger brother was Elvin Jones the jazz drummer.

19. Collectible fossil : SHARK TOOTH

Originally, the term “fossil” described anything that was unearthed, dug up. We tend to define the term more narrowly today, reserving it for the geological remains of a plant or animal. “Fossil” comes from the Latin “fossilis” meaning “dug up”.

22. Hamburger man : HERR

In Germany, a “Mr.” (Herr) is married to a “Mrs.” (Frau), and they live together in a house (Haus).

Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany (after Berlin), and the third largest port in Europe (after Rotterdam and Antwerp).

23. A few bars in the West? : SAN DIEGO SONG IDEA

The name of the California city of San Diego dates back to 1602, when Spanish explorer Sebastián Vizcaíno named the area after the Catholic Saint Didacus. Saint Didacus was more commonly referred to as San Diego de Alcalá.

25. First name in household humor : ERMA

Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years, producing more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns describing her home life in suburbia.

27. Twinkle __: Skechers brand : TOES

Skechers is a manufacturer of shoes that was founded in 1992, initially offering utility boots and skate shoes. Since then, the company is perhaps best known for its trendy athletic, casual and dress shoes. I don’t own any …

28. The palm and olive of Palmolive : OILS

Palmolive is a brand of soap and related products. The first product was a soap made from palm oil and olive oil, and introduced in 1898.

29. Reason to use litmus paper : PH TEST

Litmus is a mixture of naturally-occurring dyes that responds to acidity by changing color. Litmus was probably first used around 1300 by the Spanish alchemist Arnaldus de Villa Nova, who extracted the blue dye from lichens. One suggestion is that the term “litmus” comes from the Old Norse “litmose” meaning “lichen for dyeing”. Litmus is often absorbed onto filter paper, creating “litmus paper” or “pH paper”.

33. iPad model : MINI

The iPad mini is line of smaller iPads that was introduced by Apple in 2012. The iPad mini has a screen size of 7.9 inches, whereas the regular iPad’s screen is 9.7 inches.

34. Lumber mill fixtures : RIP SAWS

In woodworking, a cut across the grain is known as a cross cut. A cut along the grain is called a rip cut. Most saws are designed to perform the best cross cuts, but there is a special rip saw that more easily cuts straight lines along the grain.

37. Ticketholder’s entitlement in the Southwest? : SANTA FE FAN SEAT

Santa Fe is New Mexico’s capital, and the fourth most-populous city in the state (after Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Rio Rancho). Sitting at 7,199 feet above sea level, Santa Fe is the highest state capital in the US. The city’s name translates from Spanish as “Holy Faith”. The full name of the city when it was founded in 1607 was “La Villa Real de la Santa Fe de San Francisco de Asís”, meaning “the Royal Town of the Holy Faith of Saint Francis of Assisi”. It became the capital of the province Santa Fe de Nuevo México in 1610, making Santa Fe the oldest state capital in the US.

45. Priestly garment : ALB

An alb is a white, neck-to-toe vestment worn by priests, usually with a rope cord around the waist. The term alb comes from “albus”, the Latin word for “white”.

47. Puma competitor : AVIA

The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as “avia” is the Latin word for “to fly”, and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

48. Place to get off: Abbr. : STA

Station (sta.)

51. Stage handles in the West? : SACRAMENTO ACTOR NAMES

Sacramento, California’s state capital, was named for the Sacramento River. The river was named by a Spanish explorer, who called it “Rio de los Sacramentos”. This translates as “River of the Blessed Sacrament”.

57. Wearer of a “Y” sweatshirt : ELI

Elihu Yale was a wealthy merchant born in Boston in 1649. Yale worked for the British East India Company, and for many years served as governor of a settlement at Madras (now Chennai) in India. After India, Yale took over his father’s estate near Wrexham in Wales. It was while resident in Wrexham that Yale responded to a request for financial support for the Collegiate School of Connecticut in 1701. He sent the school a donation, which was used to erect a new building in New Haven that was named “Yale” in his honor. In 1718, the whole school was renamed to “Yale College”. To this day, students of Yale are nicknamed “Elis”, again honoring Elihu.

58. Feathered indoor flier : DART

Darts is a wonderful game that’s often played in English and Irish pubs, even over here in America. The scoring in a traditional game of darts is difficult to describe in a sentence or two, but the game of darts called “Round the Clock” is simply hitting the numbers 1 through 20 in sequence.

60. Nabokov novel : ADA

“Ada” is a 1969 novel by Vladimir Nabokov. The story takes place in the 1800s on Antiterra, an Earth-like planet that has a history similar to ours but with interesting differences. For example, there is a United States, but that country covers all of North and South America. What we call eastern Canada is a French-speaking province called “Canady”, and western Canada is a Russian-speaking province called “Estody”. The storyline is about a man called Van Veen who, when 14 years old, meets for the first time his cousin, 11-year-old Ada. The two cousins eventually have an affair, only to discover later that they are in fact brother and sister.

61. Pot cover : TEA COZY

A tea cozy is an insulated cover for a teapot, something to keep the tea hot. I don’t know what I’d do without my tea cosy/cozy …

63. Saturn’s largest moon : TITAN

Titan is the largest moon of Saturn. Titan is unusual in many ways, including the fact that it is the only known satellite in the solar system that is has its own atmosphere (our own moon does not, for example). Titan is the second largest moon in the solar system, after Ganymede that orbits Jupiter. Titan is so large that it has a greater volume than Mercury, the solar system’s smallest planet.

68. “I’m close to winning!” game cry : UNO!

In my youth I remember being taught a great card game, by a German acquaintance of mine, called Mau Mau. Years later I discovered that Uno is basically the same game, but played with a purpose-printed deck instead of the regular deck of playing cards that’s used for Mau Mau. I hear that Mau Mau is derived from the game called Crazy Eights.

71. Frat house “H” : ETA

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

72. Complex papers for a pad in the West? : LOS ANGELES LONG LEASES

The California city of Los Angeles (L.A.) is the second most populous city in the country, after New York. L.A. was established in 1781 as a pueblo named “El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula”, which translates as “The Town of Our Lady the Queen of Angels of the Porciúncula River”. This name evolved into “Los Angeles”, and the Porciúncula River is now called the Los Angeles River.

77. First of 12 popes : PIUS I

Pope Saint Pius I was one of the very early Bishops of Rome, governing the Roman Catholic church around 150 AD. One of his decrees was that Easter should only be celebrated on a Sunday.

78. Ref. updated quarterly : OED

Oxford English Dictionary (OED)

80. “High-__!” : FIVE

The celebratory gesture that we call a “high five” is said to have been invented by former baseball players Dusty Baker and Glenn Burke when they were both playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the later 1970s.

81. Mtn. stat : ALT

The height of an object is how tall it is, and is measured from the object’s base to its apex. Altitude is a measurement of height above sea level.

85. Social conventions : MORES

Mores are the moral attitudes and binding customs of a particular group. Mores are generally not binding in the sense that a law is binding, however social mores often dictate the nature of laws adopted by a society.

86. Do stuff in the Southeast? : RALEIGH HAIR GEL

Raleigh is North Carolina’s second largest city (behind Charlotte), but it is the state’s capital. Chartered in 1792, the city is named for Sir Walter Raleigh, the Elizabethan explorer who founded the Lost Colony of Roanoke.

90. Old Prizm maker : GEO

Geos were small vehicles manufactured by General Motors mainly in the nineties. Geos were designed to compete head-to-head with the small imports that were gaining market share at the time in the US. Some Geo models that you might remember are the Metro, the Prizm and the Storm. The cars were actually built as joint-ventures with Japanese manufacturers. The Prizm was a GM/Toyota project, the Metro was GM/Suzuki, and the Storm was GM/Isuzu.

91. Yoga move named for a pet : CAT POSE

“Asana” is a Sanskrit word literally meaning “sitting down”. The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose called “padmasana”.

99. Fancy cracker spread : PATE

Pâté is a rich spreadable paste made up of a mixture of ground meat and fat, to which various vegetables, herbs and spices may be added. The most famous version of the paste is pâté de foie gras, made from the fattened livers of geese (“foie gras” means “fat liver” in French).

100. Flurry : ADO

Our word “flurry” ultimately comes from the Middle English word “flouren”, meaning “to sprinkle”, as with flour.

101. Actress Moreno : RITA

The Puerto Rican singer, dancer and actress Rita Moreno is one of the few performers to have won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and Tony. Moreno got her big break, and won her Oscar, for playing Anita in the 1961 screen adaption of “West Side Story”.

102. Heavyweights in the Midwest? : COLUMBUS SUMO CLUB

The city of Columbus, Ohio is a “purpose-built” state capital. The state legislature selected the location for Ohio’s new capital in 1812, choosing dense forestland with no significant settlement, largely due to its strategic location in the center of the state. The name was chosen in honor of the explorer Christopher Columbus.

Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in Japan, the country of its origin. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of the organization’s aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

108. Aardwolf relative : HYENA

Hyenas have the reputation of being cowardly scavengers. That said, the spotted hyena that lives in Sub-Saharan Africa actually kills about 95% of its food and a pack of spotted hyenas are capable of driving off leopards or lionesses before they can consume their kill.

An aardwolf is a small hyena native to Eastern and Southern Africa. Aardwolf is an Afrikaans name meaning “earth wolf”.

109. Daytona 500, e.g. : NASCAR RACE

The coastal city of Daytona Beach in Florida is known for hard-packed sand on the beach. This makes a good surface for driving motorized vehicles, and resulted in Daytona Beach becoming a center for motorsports. The Daytona 500 is the event with the largest purse on the NASCAR calendar.

Down

1. Indian state bordering Bangladesh : ASSAM

The world’s longest international borders are:

  1. Canada – United States: 5,525 miles
  2. Russia – Kazakhstan: 4,254 miles
  3. Argentina – Chile: 3,293 miles
  4. China – Mongolia: 2,906 miles
  5. India – Bangladesh: 2,518 miles

2. Two-mile-high capital : LHASA

Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet, with the name “Lhasa” translating as “place of the gods”. However, Lhasa used to be called Rasa, a name that translates into the less auspicious “goat’s place”. Lhasa was also once called the “Forbidden City” due to its inaccessible location high in the Himalayas and a traditional hostility exhibited by residents to outsiders. The “forbidden” nature of the city has been reinforced since the Chinese took over Tibet in the early 1950s as it has been difficult for foreigners to get permission to visit Lhasa.

3. Loses on purpose : TANKS

Apparently, the first use of the verb “to tank” to mean “to lose or fail” can be pinpointed quite precisely. Tennis great Billie Jean King used the verb in that sense in an interview with “Life” magazine in 1967, with reference to male players. A more specific use of “tanking” in recent years is “deliberately losing” a contest.

4. Chicago airport code : ORD

O’Hare International is the fourth busiest airport in the world. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII.

6. “Copy that” : ROGER

The term “roger”, meaning “yes” or “acknowledged”, comes from the world of radiotelephony. The British military used a phonetic alphabet in the fifties that included “Roger” to represent the letter “R”. As such, it became customary to say “Roger” when acknowledging a message, with R (Roger) standing for “received”.

7. Heads of Parliament? : LOOS

It has been suggested that the British term “loo” comes from Waterloo (water-closet … water-loo), but no one seems to know for sure. Another suggestion is that the term comes from the card game of “lanterloo”, in which the pot was called the loo!

8. Sci-fi staples : ETS

Extraterrestrial (ET)

10. “Without a Trace” actor Anthony La__ : PAGLIA

Anthony LaPaglia is an Australian actor who is perhaps best known in North America for playing the lead role of Special Agent Jack Malone in the TV crime drama “Without a Trace”. LaPaglia is an accomplished soccer player, and sometimes turns out for the amateur team Hollywood United.

11. Wilder’s “The Bridge of San __ Rey” : LUIS

“The Bridge of San Luis Rey” is a 1927 novel by American author Thornton Wilder that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1928. The title refers to an Inca rope bridge in Peru that collapses, causing several people to perish. A friar who witnesses the incident then embarks on a quest to discover why those particular individuals had to die. He inquires into the lives of the victims, piecing together the events that led to their being on the bridge that fateful day.

14. S.O.S, for one : SOAP PAD

S.O.S is a brand name of scouring pads made from steel wool impregnated with soap. The product was invented as a giveaway by an aluminum pot salesman in San Francisco called Ed Cox. His wife gave it the name “S.O.S” as an initialism standing for “Save Our Saucepans”. Note the punctuation! There is no period after the last S, and that is deliberate. When Cox went to register the trademark, he found that “S.O.S.” could not be a trademark because it was used as an international distress signal. So he dropped the period after the last S, and I hope made a lot of money for himself and his wife.

15. Sorority letters : THETAS

The Greek letter theta is the one that looks like the number zero with a horizontal line across the middle.

20. Writers of bad checks : KITERS

Check kiting is illegal. The idea behind kiting is to write a check, even though there are insufficient funds to cover the amount. The con artist then writes another check, also with insufficient funds, from another bank’s account to cover the original check. I am not sure it would work nowadays, but then I am as honest as the day is long! Oh, and I think the term “kiting” comes from the older phrase “go fly a kite”, the idea being that the bad check is floated on air (non-existent funds).

24. Inning often not finished : NINTH

That would be baseball.

30. QVC competitor : HSN

The Home Shopping Network (HSN) was the first national shopping network, and was launched locally as the Home Shopping Club in Florida in 1982.

The QVC shopping channel was founded in 1986 in West Chester, Pennsylvania. The company now has operations not only in the US but also in the UK, Germany, Japan and Italy. That means QVC is reaching 200 million households. The QVC initialism stands for Quality, Value and Convenience.

32. Mythical forest flutist : SATYR

The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the “rude” male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

33. Corday victim : MARAT

Jean-Paul Marat was a prominent figure in the French Revolution. Marat was famously murdered in his bath by a young woman named Charlotte Corday, who was a Royalist. The gruesome event was immortalized in a celebrated painting by Jacques-Louis David called “The Death of Marat”.

37. Epitome of virtue : SAINT

The more common meaning of “epitome” is “perfect example of a group, quality, type”. An epitome is also an abstract or summary of a book or article.

39. NCAA Final Four broadcaster : TBS

In the NCAA Division I Basketball Championship, the teams remaining at various stages of the tournament are known as:

  • The “Sweet Sixteen” (the regional semi-finalists)
  • The “Elite Eight” (the regional finalists)
  • The “Final Four” (the national semi-finalists)

41. Bluesy Memphis street : BEALE

Beale Street in downtown Memphis, Tennessee is a major tourist attraction. In 1977, by act of Congress, the street was officially declared the “Home of the Blues” due to its long association with the musical genre. Apparently “Beale” is the name of some forgotten military hero.

42. No longer working for The Company : EX-CIA

The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is the successor to the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) formed during WWII. The CIA was chartered by the National Security Act of 1947. The organization is often referred to familiarly as “the Company”.

43. Animator Tex : AVERY

Tex Avery was a cartoon animator and voice actor in Hollywood. Avery was the man who created Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck. It was Avery who gave Bugs Bunny the line “What’s up, doc?” Apparently it was a phrase that was common in his native Texas and one that became a bit of a catchphrase at North Dallas High School, which Avery attended in the twenties.

47. Online retail giant : AMAZON

Amazon.com is the largest online retailer in the world. The company was founded in 1994 by Jeff Bezos, in his garage in Bellevue, Washington. I’m a big fan of Amazon’s approach to customer service …

50. Apple since 1998 : IMAC

The iMac is a desktop computer platform from Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

56. Fleshy “buttons” : NAVELS

The navel is basically a scar left behind when the umbilical cord is removed from a newborn baby. One interesting use of the umbilicus (navel, belly button) is to differentiate between identical twins, especially when they are very young.

64. Painter of ballerinas : DEGAS

Edgar Degas was a French artist who was famous for both his paintings and his sculptures. Some of Degas’ most beautiful works feature female ballet dancers, and others depict women bathing.

65. Norse pantheon : AESIR

The gods and goddesses of Norse mythology generally belong to either the Aesir tribe or the Vanir tribe. Most of the Norse gods with which we are familiar belong to Aesir, including Odin, Thor, Frigg and Tyr. Examples of the Vanir gods are Freya and Njord. The Aesir live in Asgard, and the Vanir in Vanaheim. The Aesir and Vanir eventually united into one pantheon after the Aesir-Vanir War.

A pantheon is the set of all gods in a particular religion or mythology. The term comes from the Greek “pan” (all) “theon” (of gods). “Pantheon” is also the name given to a temple dedicated to all deities.

66. Jobs in the tech industry : STEVE

Steve Jobs certainly was a business icon in Silicon Valley. I don’t think it is too surprising to learn that the brilliant Jobs didn’t even finish his college education, dropping out of Reed College in Oregon after only one semester. Steve Jobs co-founded Apple in 1976, but in 1985 he was basically fired from his own company during the computer sales slump of the mid-eighties. Jobs then founded NeXT Computer, a company focused on supplying workstations to the higher education and business markets. Apple purchased NeXT in 1996, and that’s how Jobs found himself back with his original company.

72. 1928 Gary Cooper romance in which a bouquet plays a vital role : LILAC TIME

“Lilac Time” is a 1928 silent film starring Gary Cooper as a young American pilot fighting for Britain during WWI.

74. Invaders of ancient Rome : GOTHS

The East Germanic tribe called the Goths had two main branches, called the Ostrogoths and the Visigoths. The Visigothic capital was the city of Toulouse in France, whereas the Ostrogoth capital was the Italian city of Ravenna just inland of the Adriatic coast. It was the Visigoths who sacked Rome in 410 CE, heralding the fall of the Western Roman Empire.

77. What one never is on a golf course : PAR

Although a golfer might occasionally score a hole-in-one, one is never “par for the course”.

83. Only speck of food the Grinch left in each Who’s house : CRUMB

And the one speck of food That he left in the house,
Was a crumb that was even too small for a mouse.
Then He did the same thing To the other Whos’ houses
Leaving crumbs Much too small For the other Whos’ mouses!

85. Shower component : METEOR

A meteoroid is a small rocky or metallic body travelling through space. Once in the atmosphere, the meteoroid is referred to as a “meteor” or “shooting star”. Almost all meteoroids burn up, but if one is large enough to survive and reach the ground then we call it a meteorite. The word “meteor” comes from the Greek “meteōros” meaning “high in the air”.

87. Flammable gas : ETHANE

Ethane is the second largest component of natural gas, after methane. Ethane’s main use is in the production of ethylene, a compound that is widely used in the chemical industry.

88. NYSE news : IPO

An initial public offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)

93. Hooch : SAUCE

In the Klondike gold rush, a favorite tipple of the miners was “Hoochinoo”, a liquor made by the native Alaskans. Soon after “hooch” (also “hootch”) was adopted as a word for cheap whiskey.

94. Old NBC legal drama : LA LAW

“L.A. Law” ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network’s most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful “Hill Street Blues” in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, “E.R.” The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

95. Draw forth : EDUCE

To educe is to draw out, although the term can also have a meaning similar to “deduce”.

97. __-Z: classic Camaro : IROC

The IROC-Z is a model of Camaro that was introduced by Chevrolet in 1978. The IROC-Z takes its name from a famous stock car race, the International Race of Champions.

98. Moon goddess : LUNA

“Luna” is the Latin word for “moon”, and is the name given to the Roman moon goddess. The Greek equivalent of Luna was Selene. Luna had a temple on the Aventine Hill in Rome but it was destroyed during the Great Fire that raged during the reign of Nero.

105. __ Paulo : SAO

São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil. It is also the city with the highest number of helicopters in the world. This is partly driven by the horrendous traffic jams in São Paulo, but also by the wealthy having a very real fear of being kidnapped on the city’s streets.

106. HUN neighbor, to the IOC : CRO

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) uses its own set of three-letter abbreviations for country names, e.g. HUN (Hungary) and CRO (Croatia).

The Republic of Croatia is a Balkan country. The Croats declared independence from Yugoslavia in 1991. Croatia became a member of NATO in 2009, and a member of the European Union in 2013.

Hungary is a country in Central Europe that has become a popular tourist destination since the collapse of the Eastern Bloc in 1989. Hungarians refer to themselves as “Magyars”.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Choir voice : ALTO
5. Van Gogh setting : ARLES
10. They might be hatched : PLOTS
15. Jazz trumpeter Jones : THAD
19. Collectible fossil : SHARK TOOTH
21. Sound : AUDIO
22. Hamburger man : HERR
23. A few bars in the West? : SAN DIEGO SONG IDEA
25. First name in household humor : ERMA
26. “Don’t __” : ASK
27. Twinkle __: Skechers brand : TOES
28. The palm and olive of Palmolive : OILS
29. Reason to use litmus paper : PH TEST
31. Rubber? : MASSEUR
33. iPad model : MINI
34. Lumber mill fixtures : RIP SAWS
36. Gallery works : ART
37. Ticketholder’s entitlement in the Southwest? : SANTA FE FAN SEAT
40. Helps plan a job, maybe : ABETS
43. Cry of exasperation : AARGH!
44. Crushed, as a test : ACED
45. Priestly garment : ALB
46. Hot : SEXY
47. Puma competitor : AVIA
48. Place to get off: Abbr. : STA
49. Horse fathers : SIRES
51. Stage handles in the West? : SACRAMENTO ACTOR NAMES
57. Wearer of a “Y” sweatshirt : ELI
58. Feathered indoor flier : DART
59. Less contaminated : PURER
60. Nabokov novel : ADA
61. Pot cover : TEA COZY
63. Saturn’s largest moon : TITAN
64. Media holder : DVD CASE
68. “I’m close to winning!” game cry : UNO!
69. “__ what?”: “What next?” : SO NOW
70. Capsizing deterrent : KEEL
71. Frat house “H” : ETA
72. Complex papers for a pad in the West? : LOS ANGELES LONG LEASES
77. First of 12 popes : PIUS I
78. Ref. updated quarterly : OED
79. Dress like, for the costume party : GO AS
80. “High-__!” : FIVE
81. Mtn. stat : ALT
82. Wee : ITTY
83. Matches a bet : CALLS
85. Social conventions : MORES
86. Do stuff in the Southeast? : RALEIGH HAIR GEL
90. Old Prizm maker : GEO
91. Yoga move named for a pet : CAT POSE
92. Trading post wares : FURS
93. Colonist : SETTLER
97. Summer line : IT’S HOT
98. Extended rental? : LIMO
99. Fancy cracker spread : PATE
100. Flurry : ADO
101. Actress Moreno : RITA
102. Heavyweights in the Midwest? : COLUMBUS SUMO CLUB
107. Eclipse, maybe : OMEN
108. Aardwolf relative : HYENA
109. Daytona 500, e.g. : NASCAR RACE
110. Give up : CEDE
111. Test for purity : ASSAY
112. Lavished attention (on) : DOTED
113. Wasn’t square with : OWED

Down

1. Indian state bordering Bangladesh : ASSAM
2. Two-mile-high capital : LHASA
3. Loses on purpose : TANKS
4. Chicago airport code : ORD
5. Dined at a restaurant, say : ATE OUT
6. “Copy that” : ROGER
7. Heads of Parliament? : LOOS
8. Sci-fi staples : ETS
9. Driving away : SHOOING
10. “Without a Trace” actor Anthony La__ : PAGLIA
11. Wilder’s “The Bridge of San __ Rey” : LUIS
12. Unmatched : ODD
13. Make, as a knot : TIE
14. S.O.S, for one : SOAP PAD
15. Sorority letters : THETAS
16. “This is our stop” : HERE WE ARE
17. Weaponry transfers : ARMS SALES
18. “Darn it!” : DRAT!
20. Writers of bad checks : KITERS
24. Inning often not finished : NINTH
30. QVC competitor : HSN
32. Mythical forest flutist : SATYR
33. Corday victim : MARAT
34. Parish head : RECTOR
35. Lead-in to bad news : I FEAR …
37. Epitome of virtue : SAINT
38. Buckle or button : FASTEN
39. NCAA Final Four broadcaster : TBS
40. Selling point : ASSET
41. Bluesy Memphis street : BEALE
42. No longer working for The Company : EX-CIA
43. Animator Tex : AVERY
47. Online retail giant : AMAZON
49. Seat at the racetrack : SADDLE
50. Apple since 1998 : IMAC
52. God, in Hebrew : ADONAI
53. Sound off : OPINE
54. Rush hour glut : AUTOS
55. Rush hour pace : CRAWL
56. Fleshy “buttons” : NAVELS
62. Talk a blue streak? : CUSS
63. “Ha! I was right!” : TOLD YA!
64. Painter of ballerinas : DEGAS
65. Norse pantheon : AESIR
66. Jobs in the tech industry : STEVE
67. Soothes : EASES
69. Boil : SEETHE
70. Round mound : KNOLL
72. 1928 Gary Cooper romance in which a bouquet plays a vital role : LILAC TIME
73. Went longer than : OUTLASTED
74. Invaders of ancient Rome : GOTHS
75. More than checks out : OGLES
76. In progress : AFOOT
77. What one never is on a golf course : PAR
82. Prankster’s cry : I GOTCHA!
83. Only speck of food the Grinch left in each Who’s house : CRUMB
84. Beached : AGROUND
85. Shower component : METEOR
87. Flammable gas : ETHANE
88. NYSE news : IPO
89. “Let me just interject … ” : IF I MAY …
90. Blow a gasket : GET MAD
93. Hooch : SAUCE
94. Old NBC legal drama : LA LAW
95. Draw forth : EDUCE
96. Covered in court : ROBED
97. __-Z: classic Camaro : IROC
98. Moon goddess : LUNA
99. Vocal nudge : PSST!
103. Yiddish laments : OYS
104. French article : LES
105. __ Paulo : SAO
106. HUN neighbor, to the IOC : CRO

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