LA Times Crossword Answers 18 Nov 2017, Saturday

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Constructed by: Ed Sessa
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 9m 22s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8. Places of rapid growth : HOTBEDS

In gardening terms, a hotbed is area where decaying matter makes it warmer than its surroundings. The heat is generated by the activity of the organisms responsible for decomposition. The term “hotbed” is used figuratively in describing an environment that incubates some sort of growth or development, as in “a hotbed of activity”.

20. Former Defense secretary who wrote “Worthy Fights” : PANETTA

Leon Panetta was Chief of Staff under President Clinton, and took over as CIA Director in 2009 in the Obama administration. From 2011 to 2013 he also served as Secretary of Defense. Panetta has long been interested in protecting the world’s oceans. As an example, he wrote the legislation that created the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.

21. __ scan : CAT

A CT (or “CAT”) scan produces (via computer manipulation) a three-dimensional image of the inside of an object, usually the human body. It does so by taking a series of two dimensional x-ray images while rotating the camera around the patient. The issue with CT scans is that they use x-rays, and high doses of radiation can be harmful, causing damage that is cumulative over time.

22. Pronoun not heard as often as it should be : WHOM

The pronoun “who” is used when referring to either male or female humans. The objective form of “who” is “whom”, and the possessive is “whose”.

24. 2016 presidential candidate : RUBIO

Marco Rubio became the junior US Senator for Florida in 2011. Famously, Rubio ran for the Republican nomination for president in the 2016 race, losing out to future president Donald Trump.

25. British art house : TATE

The museum known as “the Tate” is actually made up of four separate galleries in England. The original Tate gallery was founded by Sir Henry Tate as the National Gallery of British Art. It is located on Millbank in London, on the site of the old Millbank Prison, and is now called Tate Britain. There is also the Tate Liverpool in the north of England located in an old warehouse, and the Tate St. Ives in the west country located in an old gas works. My favorite of the Tate galleries is the Tate Modern which lies on the banks of the Thames in London. It’s a beautiful building, a converted power station that you have to see to believe.

26. Player over 21, perhaps : LOSER

The card game known as “twenty-one” was first referred to in a book by Cervantes, the author famous for writing “Don Quixote”. He called the game “ventiuna” (Spanish for “twenty-one”). Cervantes wrote his story just after the year 1600, so the game has been around at least since then. Twenty-one came to the US but it wasn’t all that popular so bonus payments were introduced to create more interest. One of the more attractive bonuses was a ten-to-one payout to a player who was dealt an ace of spades and a black jack. This bonus led to the game adopting the moniker “Blackjack”.

28. Common base : TEN

Our base-10 numeral system is also known as the decimal (sometimes “denary”) numeral system. Another common numeral system is base-2, also known as the binary system.

29. __ Hebrides : OUTER

The Hebrides is a group of islands just off the west coast of Scotland. The Hebrides are divided into two main groups: the Inner and Outer Hebrides.

30. Large beer mugs : SEIDELS

A seidel is a large glass for beer, and is originally a German term.

32. Ones in their 40s, e.g. : GEN-XERS

The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

42. Chekov’s first name on “Star Trek” : PAVEL

Walter Koenig played Pavel Chekov in the original “Star Trek” series. Mr Chekov was a Russian character although Koenig himself was born in Chicago, the son of Jewish immigrants from Lithuania.

43. #4 at Boston Garden : ORR

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking.

Boston Garden was an arena that opened in 1928, closed in 1995, and was demolished in 1995. “The Garden” hosted home games for the NBA’s Boston Celtics and the NHL’s Boston Bruins.

45. “__ Got Mail” : YOU’VE

“You’ve Got Mail” is a 1998 romantic comedy film starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, directed by Nora Ephron. The film is an adaptation of the Miklos Laszlo play “Parfumerie”. The storyline of “Parfumerie” was also used for the movies “The Shop Around the Corner” (from 1940 starring James Stewart and Margaret Sullivan) and “In the Good Old Summertime” (from 1949 starring Van Johnson and Judy Garland).

47. Monty Python product : SPOOF

The word “spoof” came into the language in the 1880s with the meaning “hoax, deception”. The term was coined by British comedian Arthur Roberts, when it used it as the name for a card game he invented that involved trickery and nonsense. The verb “to spoof” came to mean “to satirize gently” starting in the 1920s.

The zany comedy show called “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” first aired in 1969 on the BBC. The show ran for four seasons and finished up soon after John Cleese decided to leave the team and move onto other projects.

50. Kricfalusi cartoon canine : REN

“The Ren & Stimpy Show” is an animated television show created by Canadian animator John Kricfalusi, and which ran on Nickelodeon from 1991 to 1996. The title characters are Marland “Ren” Höek, a scrawny Chihuahua, and Stimpson J. Cat, a rotund Manx cat. Not my cup of tea …

53. Sign at a popular play : SRO

Standing room only (SRO)

54. Foil-wrapped treats : CHOCOLATE KISSES

The Hershey Company produces over 80 million chocolate Kisses each day, and has been making them since 1907.

57. Winner of the Breaking News Reporting Pulitzer for 2016, briefly : LA TIMES

The “Los Angeles Times” won the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting for its coverage of the 2015 shooting in San Bernardino and the subsequent terror investigation. The attack was perpetrated by a married couple from the city of Redlands, California and resulted in the death of 14 people.

59. Exam involving reading letters : EYE TEST

The commonly used eye chart (that starts with the letters “E FP TOZ LPED”) is called a Snellen chart. The test is named after its developer Herman Snellen, who introduced it way back in 1862.

Down

2. Ballerina’s footwear : TOE SHOE

“Pointe” is the name given to ballet dancing on the tips of the toes, and is a French term. A ballerina wears pointe shoes (sometimes “toe shoes”) to perform this delightful-looking, albeit unhealthy feat (pun!).

4. IRA options : CDS

A certificate of deposit (CD) is like a less-flexible and higher-paying savings account. Instead of depositing money into a savings account and earning interest periodically, one can open a CD. With a CD one deposits a minimum amount of money but must leave it there for a specified length of time. In return for committing the funds for a fixed period, one is given a higher interest rate than a savings account and can redeem that interest and the initial deposit when the term has expired. CDs are relatively low-risk investments as they are FDIC insured, just like savings accounts.

5. Surgeon general under Reagan : KOOP

C. Everett Koop was Surgeon General from 1982-89, appointed by President Reagan. Koop was a somewhat controversial character and one who brought the position of Surgeon General into the spotlight more than was historically the case. Partly this was due to his pro-life position, his anti-tobacco stance and the fact that AIDS became a prominent issue while he was in office.

6. __ nerve : ULNAR

The ulnar nerve runs alongside the ulna (one of the bones in the lower arm). The ulnar nerve is the largest unprotected (not surrounded by muscle or bone) nerve in the human body. The nerve can be touched under the skin at the outside of the elbow. Striking the nerve at this point causes and an electric-type shock, known as hitting one’s “funny bone” or “crazy bone”.

7. A toy piano is often seen in it : PEANUTS

Schroeder is a favorite character of mine in the comic strip “Peanuts”. He is young boy who constantly plays on a toy piano, especially pieces by Beethoven. Schroeder is also the subject of an extreme infatuation by young Lucy van Pelt, who often leans on his piano and looks at him adoringly as he plays.

13. Con, half the time : DEBATER

One might debate the pros and cons.

14. They may be Irish : SETTERS

An Irish setter is someone from Ireland who sets crosswords …
… or a breed of dog!

18. Neuwirth of “Cheers” : BEBE

Bebe Neuwirth is a wonderful actress and dancer who famously played Dr. Lilith Sternin, the wife of Dr. Frasier Crane on “Cheers” and “Frasier”. Neuwirth is a fabulous dancer, having studied ballet at Juilliard. In more recent years she has had starring roles on Broadway, and in 2010 played opposite Nathan Lane in “The Addams Family”. Neuwirth also plays a leading role on the show “Madame Secretary”.

23. Got the gold, say : MEDALED

In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

25. Black-tie wear : TUXEDOS

The style of men’s evening dress called a “tuxedo” was apparently first worn to a country club event in 1886 in New York. The use of a dark dinner jacket without tails became fashionable at the club with the members, and the tradition spread from there. The country club was located in Tuxedo Park, New York, giving the style of dress its name.

36. Trivia quiz website : SPORCLE

Sporcle.com is a trivia quiz website. The name is derived from the word “oracle” apparently. I like the web site’s mission statement: “We actively and methodically search out new and innovative ways to prevent our users from getting any work done whatsoever.”

37. What some do while the sun shines? : MAKE HAY

Make hay while the sun shines … seize the opportunity.

38. Rigging support : TOPMAST

Before the advent of steel masts, the masts of larger sailing ship were not made of one piece of wood. Instead, the mast was divided into sections, with each section having its own set of rigging lines. The lower section was known as the mainmast, foremast or mizzenmast, depending on its location fore and aft on the vessel. The topmast was located above the lower mast. If there was a section above the topmast, it was known as a topgallant or royal mast.

40. Hillary’s conquest : EVEREST

Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepalese sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

47. Two-time US Open winner : SELES

Monica Seles has a Hungarian name as she was born to Hungarian parents, in former Yugoslavia. Seles was the World No. 1 professional tennis player in 1991 and 1992 before being forced from the sport when she was stabbed by a spectator at a match in 1993. She did return to the game two years later, but never achieved the same level of success.

48. Hindu ascetic : FAKIR

A fakir (also “faqir”) is an ascetic in the Muslim tradition. The term “fakir” is derived from “faqr”, an Arabic word for “poverty”.

51. Cooking apple named for an Ohio township : ROME

A Rome apple is a cooking apple. Supposedly, the first Rome apple was planted by Alanson Gillett in 1817 on the banks of the Ohio River near the Rome Township. Originally called “Gillett’s Seedling”, it was eventually given the name “Rome Beauty”.

52. Minute parasites : LICE

Lice (singular “louse”) are small wingless insects of which there are thousands of species, three of which are human disease agents. The three kinds of lice affecting humans are head lice, body lice and pubic lice. Most lice feed on dead skin found on the body of the host animal, although some feed on blood. Ick …

55. Op. __ : CIT

Op. cit. is short for “opus citatum”, Latin for “the work cited”. Op. cit. is used in footnotes to refer the reader to an earlier citation. It is similar to “ibid”, except that ibid refers the reader to the last citation, the one immediately above.

56. Doo-wop syllable : SHA

Doo-wop developed in the 1940s and can be described as a vocal-based R&B music. Even though the style has been around since the forties, the name doo-wop wasn’t introduced until the early sixties.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Buy in quantity : STOCK UP
8. Places of rapid growth : HOTBEDS
15. Commiserate : CONDOLE
16. One taking the prize : AWARDEE
17. Evidential standard : REASONABLE DOUBT
19. Old Egyptian symbol of royalty : ASP
20. Former Defense secretary who wrote “Worthy Fights” : PANETTA
21. __ scan : CAT
22. Pronoun not heard as often as it should be : WHOM
24. 2016 presidential candidate : RUBIO
25. British art house : TATE
26. Player over 21, perhaps : LOSER
28. Common base : TEN
29. __ Hebrides : OUTER
30. Large beer mugs : SEIDELS
32. Ones in their 40s, e.g. : GEN-XERS
34. Crime scene barrier : TAPE
35. Squeezed (out) : EKED
36. Greet warmly : SMILE AT
39. One convinced by a drive : PLEDGER
42. Chekov’s first name on “Star Trek” : PAVEL
43. #4 at Boston Garden : ORR
45. “__ Got Mail” : YOU’VE
46. Said yes to : OK’ED
47. Monty Python product : SPOOF
49. Trickle : SEEP
50. Kricfalusi cartoon canine : REN
51. Taking away : REMOVAL
53. Sign at a popular play : SRO
54. Foil-wrapped treats : CHOCOLATE KISSES
57. Winner of the Breaking News Reporting Pulitzer for 2016, briefly : LA TIMES
58. Most loaded : RICHEST
59. Exam involving reading letters : EYE TEST
60. Chicken requests : BREASTS

Down

1. Hard-to-read words : SCRAWLS
2. Ballerina’s footwear : TOE SHOE
3. Happy way to end : ON A POSITIVE NOTE
4. IRA options : CDS
5. Surgeon general under Reagan : KOOP
6. __ nerve : ULNAR
7. A toy piano is often seen in it : PEANUTS
8. Uncertain : HALTING
9. Have because of : OWE TO
10. Cry with a flourish : TADA!
11. Main man : BRO
12. More than just stabs : EDUCATED GUESSES
13. Con, half the time : DEBATER
14. They may be Irish : SETTERS
18. Neuwirth of “Cheers” : BEBE
23. Got the gold, say : MEDALED
25. Black-tie wear : TUXEDOS
27. Turn back : REPEL
29. In tune : ON KEY
31. Pastoral expanse : LEA
33. Sea scavenger : EEL
36. Trivia quiz website : SPORCLE
37. What some do while the sun shines? : MAKE HAY
38. Rigging support : TOPMAST
39. Words of wisdom : PROVERB
40. Hillary’s conquest : EVEREST
41. Announces again, in a way : REPOSTS
44. Heart : ROOT
47. Two-time US Open winner : SELES
48. Hindu ascetic : FAKIR
51. Cooking apple named for an Ohio township : ROME
52. Minute parasites : LICE
55. Op. __ : CIT
56. Doo-wop syllable : SHA

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