LA Times Crossword Answers 3 Dec 2017, Sunday

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Constructed by: Nora Pearlstone
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: Movers

Each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase in which a letter R has been moved, i.e. we MOVE Rs:

  • 23A. Screwballs in the hayloft? : BARN FLAKES (from “bran flakes”)
  • 25A. Where crooks learn their trade? : PERP SCHOOL (from “prep school”)
  • 43A. Cookie cooks? : DISC BAKERS (from “disc brakes”)
  • 83A. Dealt with unproductive mollusks? : FIRED CLAMS (from “fried clams”)
  • 102A. Restaurant reservation for fish? : CARPS TABLE (from “craps table”)
  • 104A. Result of Uncle Sam frequenting Papa John’s? : PIZZA BEARD (from “pizza bread”)
  • 36D. Like surfers? : BOARD-MINDED (from “broad-minded”)
  • 39D. Group of body shop specialists? : BUMPER CORPS (from “bumper crops”)
  • Bill’s time: 19m 42s

    Bill’s errors: 0

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    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    10. Manhattan sch. : CCNY

    The City College of New York (CCNY) is a college of the City University of New York. The City College was founded as the Free Academy of the City of New York in 1847, and was the first free public institution of higher education in the whole country.

    19. Primer sequence : AEIOU

    The vowels are A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y.

    A primer is a textbook used to teach the alphabet and basic reading. When “primer” is used in this sense in the US, it is pronounced with a short letter I (giving “primmer”). I’ve never understood why such a pronunciation would be used …

    22. Actress Thomas : MARLO

    Marlo Thomas’s most famous role was playing the title character in the television sitcom “That Girl”. Thomas is also well known as a spokesperson for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

    25. Where crooks learn their trade? : PERP SCHOOL (from “prep school”)

    Perpetrator (perp)

    27. Enjoying a wilderness vacation, maybe : ON SAFARI

    “Safari” is a Swahili word meaning “journey” or “expedition”.

    28. Two-mile-high city : LHASA

    Lhasa is the capital city of Tibet, with the name “Lhasa” translating as “place of the gods”. However, Lhasa used to be called Rasa, a name that translates into the less auspicious “goat’s place”. Lhasa was also once called the “Forbidden City” due to its inaccessible location high in the Himalayas and a traditional hostility exhibited by residents to outsiders. The “forbidden” nature of the city has been reinforced since the Chinese took over Tibet in the early 1950s as it has been difficult for foreigners to get permission to visit Lhasa.

    32. Pouch occupants : JOEYS

    In Australia, male kangaroos are known by several names including bucks, boomers, jacks or old men. Females are called does, flyers, or jills. There seems to be just the one name for young kangaroos, i.e. joeys. A group of kangaroos might be called a mob, troop or court.

    34. Picasso, for one : CUBIST

    In the art movement known as Cubism, objects which are the subject of a painting are broken up and reassembled in an abstract form. The pioneers of the Cubist movement were Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque.

    42. Live-income filler : … ON ONE …

    Live on one income.

    43. Cookie cooks? : DISC BAKERS (from “disc brakes”)

    The drum brake was invented in 1902 by Louis Renault (founder of Renault, the automobile company). In a drum brake, there is a set of brake shoes that usually presses on the inner surface of the drum to slow down rotation. Nowadays, the disc brake system is more popular, a design which uses brake pads instead of brake shoes.

    46. Cosmonaut Gagarin : YURI

    The Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space when his spacecraft Vostok I made a single orbit of the Earth in 1961. Sadly, Gagarin died only seven years later in a plane crash.

    47. Film-rating org. : MPAA

    The Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) film-rating system (PG-13, R, etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

    48. Elec. instrument : SYNTH

    In the sixties, Robert Moog invented the Moog Synthesizer, an electronic device that he used to produce music. I used to own a few of his albums, including a Moog version of Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition”. What a great performance that was …

    50. “The Simpsons” character Sideshow __ : MEL

    Krusty the Clown is a character on the TV show “The Simpsons”, one voiced by Dan Castellaneta. Krusty has a sidekick named Sideshow Mel, a character also voiced by Castellaneta.

    51. Faller of 2001 : MIR

    The Russian Mir Space Station was a remarkably successful project, with the station still holding the record for the longest continuous manned presence in space, at just under ten years. Towards the end of the space station’s life however, the years began to take their toll. There was a dangerous fire, multiple system failures, and a collision with a resupply ship. The Russian commitment to the International Space Station drained funds for repairs, so Mir was allowed to reenter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up in 2001. “Mir” is a Russian word meaning “peace” or “world”.

    53. Northumbrian monk, briefly : ST BEDE

    The Venerable Bede was a monk in the north of England in the eighth century AD. Saint Bede is mainly known as an author and scholar, publisher of “The Ecclesiastical History of the English People”. In his writings, Bede struggled with the two common ways of referring to dates at that time. Bede turned to the anno domini dating method that had been devised by Dionysius Exiguus in 525. Bede’s writings of circa 730 were extremely influential and helped popularize the the “anno domini” method.

    Northumbria was an Anglian kingdom during the Middle Ages, in what is now northern England and south-eastern Scotland. Part of Northumbria became the contemporary county of Northumberland, although the Northumbria name persists as a geographic term and in the names of several institutions and businesses.

    55. __ facto : IPSO

    “Ipso facto” is Latin, meaning “by the fact itself”. Ipso facto describes something that is a direct consequence of particular act, as opposed to something that is the result of some subsequent event. For example, my father was born in Dublin and was an Irish citizen ipso facto. My son was born in California and is an Irish citizen by virtue of being the son of an Irish citizen (i.e. “not” ipso facto).

    56. Slowish movement : ANDANTE

    The tempo of a piece of music is usually designated with an Italian word on the score. For example, “grave” is slow and solemn, “andante” is at a walking pace, and “allegro” is fast, quickly and brightly.

    58. Leafstalks : PETIOLES

    The petioles of a plant are the stalks that attach the leaf blades to the stem.

    61. Mickey and Jerry : MICE

    Walt Disney’s iconic cartoon character Mickey Mouse, was introduced to the public in 1928 in the cartoon “Steamboat Willie”. Mickey was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1978, making him the first cartoon character to be so honored. Walt Disney had some nice words to say in Disneyland in 1954:

    I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing – that it was all started by a mouse.

    “Tom and Jerry” is a series of cartoons produced by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera starting in 1940. These short films feature Tom Cat and Jerry Mouse who are always going at it, with Jerry usually emerging victorious.

    65. “… dark, __ the blaze of noon”: Milton : AMID

    Here are some lines from a 1671 drama by John Milton:

    O dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon,
    Irrecoverábly dark, total eclipse
    Without all hope of day!

    69. Feline named for an island : MANX CAT

    I’ve seen Manx cats by the dozen on their native island. They’re found all over the Isle of Man (hence the name “Manx”) that is located in the middle of the Irish Sea. Manx cats have just a stub of a tail, and hence are called “stubbins” by the locals.

    74. Team across the state from the Marlins : RAYS

    The Tampa Bay Rays are a relatively young franchise, having been formed in 1998. The initial name of the franchise was the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. While known as the Devil Rays, the team finished last in the league in almost every year. The name was changed to the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008, and I am told the Rays started into a streak of winning seasons soon after.

    75. Artist Yoko : ONO

    Yoko Ono is an avant-garde artist. Ono actually met her future husband John Lennon for the first time while she was preparing her conceptual art exhibit called “Hammer a Nail”. Visitors were encouraged to hammer in a nail into a wooden board, creating the artwork. Lennon wanted to hammer in the first nail, but Ono stopped him as the exhibition had not yet opened. Apparently Ono relented when Lennon paid her an imaginary five shillings to hammer an imaginary nail into the wood.

    77. Zany Martha : RAYE

    Martha Raye was a comic actress as well as a singer. Raye was famous for the size of her mouth, something that she used to her own advantage. As her nickname was “The Big Mouth”, she made a little money appearing in commercials for the Polident denture cleaner in the eighties. Her line was, “So take it from the Big Mouth: new Polident Green gets tough stains clean!”

    78. They’re heavier than foils : EPEES

    The sword known as an épée has a three-sided blade. The épée is similar to a foil and sabre, both of which are also thrusting weapons. However, the foil and saber have rectangular cross-sections.

    80. Villain named Julius : DR NO

    “Dr. No” may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you’ve read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you’ll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. Julius No and Fu Manchu.

    81. Russian city : OREL

    Orel (also Oryol) is a city lying on the Oka River, just over 200 miles SSW of Moscow. Orel was one of the cities occupied by Germany during WWII. It was liberated in 1943, but had been almost completely destroyed.

    91. Bar, at the bar : ESTOP

    The term “estop” means to block or stop by using some legal device. The word “estop” comes from Old French, in which “estopper” means “to stop up” or “to impede”.

    94. Rabbitlike rodent : AGOUTI

    The term “agouti” is used for some rodents in Central and south America who have fur with bands of light and dark pigmentation.

    102. Restaurant reservation for fish? : CARPS TABLE (from “craps table”)

    Carp are freshwater fish that are used as food around the world, although they aren’t very popular in North American kitchens. The ornamental fish that we know as goldfish and koi are all types of carp.

    If one considers earlier versions of craps, then the game has been around for a very long time and probably dates back to the Crusades. It may have been derived from an old English game called “hazard” also played with two dice, which was mentioned in Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” from the 1300s. The American version of the game came here courtesy of the French and first set root in New Orleans where it was given the name “crapaud”, a French word meaning “toad”.

    104. Result of Uncle Sam frequenting Papa John’s? : PIZZA BEARD (from “pizza bread”)

    The Uncle Sam personification of the United States was first used during the War of 1812. The “Uncle Sam” term was so widely accepted that even the Germans used it during WWII, choosing the codeword “Samland” for “America” in intelligence communiques.

    Papa John’s is the third largest takeout and delivery pizza chain in the US, with Pizza Hut and Domino’s taking the top spots.

    107. Banned for a rules infraction, informally : DQ’ED

    “DQ” is short for “disqualify”.

    109. Kate’s sitcom pal : ALLIE

    The sitcom “Kate & Allie” ran from 1984 to 1989, starring Susan Saint James as Kate, and Jane Curtin as Allie. Jane Curtin won two Emmy awards for her work on the series, while Susan Saint James … did not.

    110. Above it all : ALOOF

    I suppose one might guess from the “feel” of the word “aloof” that is has nautical roots. Originally “aloof” meant “to windward” and was the opposite of “alee”. A helmsman might be instructed to stay aloof, to steer the boat into the weather to keep a distance from a lee-shore. It is from this sense of maintaining a distance that aloof came to mean “distant” in terms of personality. Interesting, huh …?

    111. Old pol. divisions : SSRS

    The former Soviet Union (USSR) was created in 1922, not long after the Russian Revolution of 1917 that overthrew the Tsar. Geographically, the new Soviet Union was roughly equivalent to the old Russian Empire, and comprised fifteen Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs).

    112. Toon explorer : DORA

    “Dora the Explorer” is a cartoon series shown on Nickelodeon. Part of Dora’s remit is to introduce the show’s young viewers to some Spanish words and phrases.

    113. Window insert : GLASS

    Our term “window” comes from the Old Norse word “vindauga” meaning “wind eye”.

    Down

    1. Mexican resort, familiarly : CABO

    Cabo San Lucas is a major tourist destination at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico. “Cabo” is sometimes referred to as the “Fort Lauderdale of Mexico”.

    4. Clementi composition : SONATINA

    A cantata is a piece of music that is sung, as opposed to a sonata, which is a piece that is played on some instrument, often a piano. A sonatina is in effect a sonata that has been labelled as something lighter and shorter.

    Muzio Clementi was an Italian-born composer who lived most of his adult life in Britain. As well as composing, Clementi was a music publisher, piano manufacturer and professional pianist. He participated in a piano competition with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1781, when both composers were in their twenties.

    7. User-edited site : WIKI

    A wiki is a website in which users are allowed to create and edit content themselves. The term “wiki” comes from the name of the first such site, introduced in 1994 and called WikiWikiWeb. “Wiki” is a Hawaiian word for “quick”, and is used because comprehensive content is created very quickly a there are so many collaborators contributing to the site.

    12. Dragsters’ org. : NHRA

    The sport of drag racing is administered by the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA).

    15. Former name of Benin : DAHOMEY

    The Republic of Benin is a country in West Africa. Benin used to be a French colony, and was known as Dahomey. Dahomey gained independence in 1975, and took the name Benin after the Bight of Benin, the body of water on which the country lies.

    16. 74-Across’ stadium, casually, with “The” : TROP

    Tropicana Field is home to the Tampa Bay Rays of Major League Baseball.

    26. Many : SCADS

    The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear. That said, “scads” was used to mean “dollars” back in the mid-1800s.

    29. Rosemary, e.g. : HERB

    The herb known as rosemary is reputed to improve the memory. As such, rosemary has been used as a symbol of remembrance, especially in Europe and Australia. For example, mourners might throw sprigs of rosemary into graves, symbolically remembering the dead. The character Ophelia in William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” utters the line “There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance”. The name of the herb comes from the Latin “ros marinus” which means “dew of the sea”. The idea is that rosemary can in fact grow in some arid locations with only the moisture that is carried by a sea breeze.

    34. Run-on sentence’s lack, probably : COMMA

    Our word “comma” comes into English via Latin from the Greek “komma” meaning “clause in a sentence”.

    37. El __ : NINO

    When the surface temperature of much of the Pacific Ocean rises more that half a degree centigrade, then there is said to be an El Niño episode. That small temperature change in the Pacific has been associated with climatic changes that can stretch right across the globe. El Niño is Spanish for “the boy” and is a reference to the Christ child. The phenomenon was given this particular Spanish name because the warming is usually noticed near South America and around Christmas-time.

    38. Stimulating leaves : BETELS

    The betel nut is something that is chewed, especially in parts of Asia. “Betel nut” is a bit of misnomer, as the nut in question is actually an Areca nut from the Areca palm. For chewing, the Areca nut is wrapped in betel leaves and the whole thing is called a “betel nut”.

    43. 10 micronewtons : DYNE

    A dyne is a unit of force. The name “dyne” comes from the Greek “dynamis” meaning “power, force”. Ergs and dynes are related to each other in that one erg is the amount of energy needed to move a force of one dyne over a distance of one centimeter.

    Newtons are units of force. The newton is named for Sir Isaac Newton, the English physicist and mathematician.

    45. Cookout fare on sticks : KABOBS

    The term “kebab” (also “kabob”) covers a wide variety of meat dishes that originated in Persia. In the West, we usually use “kebab” when talking about shish kebab, which is meat (often lamb) served on a skewer. “Shish” comes from the Turkish word for “skewer”.

    48. “Fiddler on the Roof” village : SHTETL

    The Yiddish word for “town” is “shtot”, and so “shtetl” is the diminutive form meaning “small town”. The fictional shtetl featured in the musical in “Fiddler on the Roof” is called Anatevka, which is also the title of my favorite song from the show.

    The enduring musical “Fiddler on the Roof” is based on a collection of stories by Sholem Aleichem about Tevye, a milkman living in Tsarist Russia. The musical version of the tales first opened on Broadway in 1964. “Fiddler on the Roof” had such a long run that it became the first musical to reach 3,000 performances.

    52. The Tar Heels of the NCAA : UNC

    “Tar Heel” is a nickname for anyone living in, or from, the state of North Carolina. As such, it is the nickname also of the athletic teams of the University of North Carolina (UNC). No one seems to know for sure where the term “Tar Heel” originated, but it is thought to be related to the historical importance of the tar, pitch and turpentine industries that thrived in the state due to the presence of vast forests of pine trees.

    54. Much of Lamb’s legacy : ESSAYS

    Charles Lamb was an essayist and poet from England. Lamb’s best-known works are “Essays of Elia” (1823) and “Tales from Shakespeare”, an 1807 children’s book that he co-authored with his sister Mary Lamb.

    55. High-resolution film format : IMAX

    The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

    57. Help on the Hill : AIDE

    Washington D.C.’s designer Pierre L’Enfant chose the crest of a hill as the site for the future Congress House. He called the location “Jenkins Hill” and “Jenkins Heights”. Earlier records show the name as “New Troy”. Today we call it “Capitol Hill”.

    58. Character who uses “yam” as a verb : POPEYE

    “I yam what I yam …” are words oft spoken by Popeye.

    62. __ public : NOTARY

    A notary public is a public officer licensed to perform specific legal actions in non-contentious legal matters. The main duties are to administer oaths, take affidavits and witness the execution of documents.

    66. Like about 15% of New Zealanders : MAORI

    The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. They are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting some time in the late 13th century. The word “māori” simply means “normal”, distinguishing the mortal human being from spiritual entities. The Māori refer to New Zealand as “Aotearoa”.

    69. Fannie __: securities : MAES

    The Federal National Mortgage Association is commonly called “Fannie Mae”, a play on the initialism FNMA. Fannie Mae was founded in during the Great Depression as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal.

    70. Musical in which FDR is a character : ANNIE

    The Broadway musical “Annie” is produced in more than one version. There is an “Annie Jr.” that has been edited down to a shortened version more suitable for young performers and audiences. An even shorter version that lasts only 30 minutes is called “Annie KIDS”, and is meant for performers still in elementary school.

    74. __ Martin Cognac : REMY

    Remy Martin is my favorite brand of cognac (remember that when it’s my birthday!). In China, the name Remy Martin is not used, but rather the more colorful moniker “man-headed horse” which describes the centaur logo on the bottle.

    79. Crab’s sensor : PALP

    Palps are appendages found near the mouth of many invertebrates, including mollusks, crustaceans and insects. They are used to help in feeding, but can also assist in locomotion.

    80. Hammett who created Nick and Nora : DASHIELL

    Dashiell Hammett was an American author known for his detective fiction. Hammett was the creator of such enduring characters as Sam Spade from “The Maltese Falcon” as well as Nick and Nora Charles from “The Thin Man”. Outside of writing, Hammett was also politically active and serves as the president of a group the Civil Rights Congress (CRC) after WWII. The CRC was deemed to be a Communist front group and was listed as a subversive organization by the US government. At one point, he even served time in jail for contempt of court, after refusing to answer some questions in a trial in which the CRC was involved.

    84. Roman statesman : CATO

    Cato the Elder was a Roman statesman, known historically as “the elder” in order to distinguish him from his great-grandson, Cato the Younger. Cato the Elder’s ultimate position within Roman society was that of Censor, making him responsible for maintaining the census, and for supervising public morality.

    89. Perennial NCAA football powerhouse : BAMA

    The athletic teams of the University of Alabama (“Bama”) are nicknamed the Crimson Tide, a reference to the team colors of crimson and white.

    91. Conger catcher : EELER

    Conger eels can grow to be very, very large, perhaps up to 10 feet in length.

    93. “Zoom-Zoom” sloganeer : MAZDA

    “Zoom-zoom” is a catchphrase used by the automaker Mazda. Mazda is based in the Hiroshima Prefecture in Japan. The ballpark where the Hiroshima baseball team play was for many years known as the MAZDA Zoom-Zoom Stadium.

    94. Official records : ACTA

    Actum (plural “acta”) is the Latin word for “deed”. “Acta” is used in English to describe many official records, including minutes, proceedings etc.

    96. Sandwich cookie : OREO

    How the Oreo cookie came to get its name seems to have been lost in the mists of time. One theory is that it comes from the French “or” meaning “gold”, a reference to the gold color of the original packing. Another suggestion is that the name is the Greek word “oreo” meaning “beautiful, nice, well-done”.

    98. Mogul : CZAR

    The term “czar” (also tsar) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. “Czar” is derived from the word “Caesar”, which was synonymous with “emperor” at that time.

    A mogul is a person with power. The term comes from the Mughal emperors of India and South Asia.

    99. Simba’s mate : NALA

    In “The Lion King”, Nala is a lioness and the childhood friend of Simba. By the end of the story, Nala and Simba become wedded. “The Lion King” is inspired by William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet”, with Simba representing the title character, and Nala representing Hamlet’s love interest Ophelia.

    100. Speaker of Cooperstown : TRIS

    Tris Speaker was a Major League Baseball player, the holder of the record for the most doubles hit in a career. He led the Boston Red Sox to two World Series championships, in 1912 and 1915.

    Cooperstown is a village in New York that is famous as the home to the Baseball Hall of Fame. The village was named for Judge William Cooper, the founder of Cooperstown and the father of the noted writer James Fenimore Cooper.

    105. Midori on the ice : ITO

    Midori Ito is a Japanese figure skater. Ito was the first woman to land a triple/triple jump and a triple axel in competition. In fact, she landed her first triple jump in training when she was only 8 years old.

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    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1. ___ act : CLASS
    6. Graceful bird : SWAN
    10. Manhattan sch. : CCNY
    14. Baggage check requirement : ID TAG
    19. Primer sequence : AEIOU
    20. Trillionth: Pref. : PICO-
    21. Surprised greeting : OH HI!
    22. Actress Thomas : MARLO
    23. Screwballs in the hayloft? : BARN FLAKES (from “bran flakes”)
    25. Where crooks learn their trade? : PERP SCHOOL (from “prep school”)
    27. Enjoying a wilderness vacation, maybe : ON SAFARI
    28. Two-mile-high city : LHASA
    30. Caged, with “up” : COOPED
    31. Very long tooth : TUSK
    32. Pouch occupants : JOEYS
    33. Fronded tree : PALM
    34. Picasso, for one : CUBIST
    37. Med. prefix : NEUR-
    38. Income statement write-offs : BAD DEBTS
    42. Live-income filler : … ON ONE …
    43. Cookie cooks? : DISC BAKERS (from “disc brakes”)
    46. Cosmonaut Gagarin : YURI
    47. Film-rating org. : MPAA
    48. Elec. instrument : SYNTH
    49. “Later” : TA-TA
    50. “The Simpsons” character Sideshow __ : MEL
    51. Faller of 2001 : MIR
    52. “Hmm … don’t think so” : UH … NO
    53. Northumbrian monk, briefly : ST BEDE
    55. __ facto : IPSO
    56. Slowish movement : ANDANTE
    58. Leafstalks : PETIOLES
    60. Interfere (with) : MESS
    61. Mickey and Jerry : MICE
    62. Strict diet restriction : NO CARBS
    63. Blacken : SEAR
    65. “… dark, __ the blaze of noon”: Milton : AMID
    67. Prizes in a case : TROPHIES
    69. Feline named for an island : MANX CAT
    72. Sensible : SANE
    73. Tardy with : LATE ON
    74. Team across the state from the Marlins : RAYS
    75. Artist Yoko : ONO
    76. Decked : KO’D
    77. Zany Martha : RAYE
    78. They’re heavier than foils : EPEES
    80. Villain named Julius : DR NO
    81. Russian city : OREL
    83. Dealt with unproductive mollusks? : FIRED CLAMS (from “fried clams”)
    85. Easy putt : TAP-IN
    86. Faithfulness : FIDELITY
    88. Showing skill : ABLY
    89. Order givers : BOSSES
    90. Ending with ortho- : DOXY
    91. Bar, at the bar : ESTOP
    93. Algebra, e.g. : MATH
    94. Rabbitlike rodent : AGOUTI
    97. Arctic temperature word : BELOW
    98. Inherited : CAME INTO
    102. Restaurant reservation for fish? : CARPS TABLE (from “craps table”)
    104. Result of Uncle Sam frequenting Papa John’s? : PIZZA BEARD (from “pizza bread”)
    106. Link with : TIE TO
    107. Banned for a rules infraction, informally : DQ’ED
    108. Marginally : A TAD
    109. Kate’s sitcom pal : ALLIE
    110. Above it all : ALOOF
    111. Old pol. divisions : SSRS
    112. Toon explorer : DORA
    113. Window insert : GLASS

    Down

    1. Mexican resort, familiarly : CABO
    2. Not fatty : LEAN
    3. Above-it-all attitude : AIRS
    4. Clementi composition : SONATINA
    5. Fill, as with light : SUFFUSE
    6. Lively quality : SPARK
    7. User-edited site : WIKI
    8. Top performer : ACE
    9. Pretty darn good : NO SLOUCH
    10. Patient share : COPAY
    11. Game with capturing : CHESS
    12. Dragsters’ org. : NHRA
    13. Shelter sound : YIP
    14. “Brr!” : I’M COLD!
    15. Former name of Benin : DAHOMEY
    16. 74-Across’ stadium, casually, with “The” : TROP
    17. Burn soother : ALOE
    18. Top prize : GOLD
    24. Bottom position : LAST
    26. Many : SCADS
    29. Rosemary, e.g. : HERB
    32. Fun : JEST
    33. Celebratory procession : PARADE
    34. Run-on sentence’s lack, probably : COMMA
    35. Remove, as a brooch : UNPIN
    36. Like surfers? : BOARD-MINDED (from “broad-minded”)
    37. El __ : NINO
    38. Stimulating leaves : BETELS
    39. Group of body shop specialists? : BUMPER CORPS (from “bumper crops”)
    40. Long lock : TRESS
    41. Storage cylinders : SILOS
    43. 10 micronewtons : DYNE
    44. Wear : ATTIRE
    45. Cookout fare on sticks : KABOBS
    48. “Fiddler on the Roof” village : SHTETL
    52. The Tar Heels of the NCAA : UNC
    53. Spray ‘n Wash target : STAIN
    54. Much of Lamb’s legacy : ESSAYS
    55. High-resolution film format : IMAX
    57. Help on the Hill : AIDE
    58. Character who uses “yam” as a verb : POPEYE
    59. Repeated : ECHOED
    62. __ public : NOTARY
    64. USN rank : ENS
    65. Require from : ASK OF
    66. Like about 15% of New Zealanders : MAORI
    68. It’s unlikely : RARITY
    69. Fannie __: securities : MAES
    70. Musical in which FDR is a character : ANNIE
    71. 58-Down et al. : TOONS
    74. __ Martin Cognac : REMY
    78. Skateboarder’s protection : ELBOW PAD
    79. Crab’s sensor : PALP
    80. Hammett who created Nick and Nora : DASHIELL
    82. Was a factor in : LED UP TO
    83. Handy “Mr.” : FIXIT
    84. Roman statesman : CATO
    85. Reward for a donation, maybe : TOTE BAG
    87. Beaucoup : LOTS OF
    89. Perennial NCAA football powerhouse : BAMA
    91. Conger catcher : EELER
    92. Snow-covered hill sights : SLEDS
    93. “Zoom-Zoom” sloganeer : MAZDA
    94. Official records : ACTA
    95. Windy-sounding woman’s name : GAIL
    96. Sandwich cookie : OREO
    97. Some fam. meals : BBQS
    98. Mogul : CZAR
    99. Simba’s mate : NALA
    100. Speaker of Cooperstown : TRIS
    101. Poems of honor : ODES
    103. Spots on the tube : ADS
    105. Midori on the ice : ITO

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