LA Times Crossword Answers 24 Dec 2017, Sunday

Advertisement

[ad_above_grid]

Constructed by: Paul Coulter
Edited by: Rich Norris

Advertisement

Advertisement

Today’s Theme: Magnetism

  • 113A. Maxim that applies to pairs hiding together in the answers to starred clues : OPPOSITES ATTRACT
  • 22A. *Criminal justice supervisor : PROBATION OFFICER (hiding “on/off”)
  • 33A. *”Hail to thee, blithe spirit!” poet : PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (hiding “he/she”)
  • 53A. *Get worse, with no way to stop : SPIN OUT OF CONTROL (hiding “in/out”)
  • 80A. *Nero Wolfe title that plays on the start of an old adage : WHERE THERE’S A WILL (hiding “here/there”)
  • 96A. *1985 #1 hit for Paul Young : EVERYTIME YOU GO AWAY (hiding “me/you”)

Bill’s time: 16m 32s

Bill’s errors: 0

Advertisement

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. 16th-century date : MDL

The year 1550 is written as MDL in Roman numerals.

4. Big name in shoes : MCAN

Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

17. Rail commonly found in water? : SORA

The sora is a waterbird, sometimes called the sora rail or sora crake. Soras can be found in breeding season in marshes across most of North America.

18. Perry of fashion : ELLIS

Perry Ellis was a fashion designer from Portsmouth, Virginia. Ellis was noted for his sportswear creations.

20. Kind of acid in proteins : AMINO

Amino acids are essential to life in many ways, not least of which is their use as the building blocks of proteins.

21. Any minute, old-style : ANON

“Anon” originally meant “at once” and evolved into today’s meaning of “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

25. Saturn vehicles? : UFOS

Unidentified flying object (UFO)

30. Wrinkly dog : SHAR-PEI

The Shar-Pei breed of dog is that one with the wrinkly face and really dark tongue. The breed originated in China, with “Shar-Pei” being the British spelling of the Cantonese name.

33. *”Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!” poet : PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (hiding “he/she”)

Percy Bysshe Shelley was an English Romantic poet. Shelley had strong views on vegetarianism. He was dedicated to the cause of all sentient beings, believing that the slaughter of animals by humans for the use of food was a barbaric practice. He wrote a famous essay on the subject called “A Vindication of Natural Diet” in 1813.

“To a Skylark” is an 1820 poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley. The opening line “Hail to thee, blithe Spirit” is the inspiration used by Noël Coward for the title of his famous comic play called “Blithe Spirit”.

41. __ Dictionary : URBAN

Urban Dictionary is a website that was founded in 1999 by a computer science student at Cal Poly. The site contains definitions of mainly slang terms, and is maintained by the site’s members.

44. Arles assents : OUIS

Quite a few years ago now, I had the privilege of living just a short car-ride from the beautiful city of Arles in the South of France. Although Arles has a long and colorful history, the Romans had a prevailing influence over the city’s design. Arles has a spectacular Roman amphitheater, arch, circus as well as old walls that surround the center of the city. In more modern times, it was a place Vincent van Gogh often visited, and was where he painted many of his most famous works, including “Cafe Terrace at Night” and “Bedroom in Arles”.

47. Delhi wrap : SARI

The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

New Delhi is the capital city of India. New Delhi resides within the National Capital Territory of Delhi (otherwise known as the metropolis of Delhi). New Delhi and Delhi, therefore, are two different things.

48. A little lower? : CALF

The cattle are lowing …

50. Paper size: Abbr. : LTR

Letter (ltr.)

51. Anime cousin : MANGA

The Japanese word “manga” means “whimsical pictures” and is an apt term to describe the Japanese style of comic book. Manga publications are more diverse than American comic books and have a larger audience. Manga cover many subjects including romance, sports, business, horror, and mystery.

62. Notched, as a maple leaf : EROSE

An edge that is erose is irregularly notched or indented.

65. 1965 King arrest site : SELMA

The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day.

67. Shortened, as a dict. : ABR

Abridged (Abr.)

68. Ballade’s final stanza : ENVOI

An envoy (also “envoi”) is a short closing stanza in some works of poetry.

73. Assume as fact : POSIT

To posit is to assume as fact, to lay down as a “position”.

79. Israel’s Golda : MEIR

Golda Meir was known as the “Iron Lady” when she was Prime Minister of Israel, long before that sobriquet came to be associated with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Golda Meir was born Golda Mabovitch in Kiev (in modern-day Ukraine), and when she was a young girl she moved with her family to the United States and settled in Milwaukee. As a teenager she relocated to Denver where she met and married Morris Meyerson, at the age of 19. She and her husband joined a kibbutz in Palestine in 1921, when she was in her twenties. Meir had been active in politics in the US, and continued her political work in Palestine. She was very influential during WWII, and played a leading role in negotiations after the war leading to the setting up of the state of Israel. By the time she was called on to lead the country, Meir had already retired, citing exhaustion and ill health. But serve she did, and led Israel during turbulent times (e.g. the massacre at the Munich Olympics, and the Yom Kippur War). She eventually resigned in 1974, saying that was what the people wanted.

80. *Nero Wolfe title that plays on the start of an old adage : WHERE THERE’S A WILL (hiding “here/there”)

“Where There’s a Will” is a 1940 novel by Rex Stout that features his crime-fighting character Nero Wolfe. The “will” in the title is the last will and testament of a wealthy college president who leaves nothing but a piece of a fruit to his sisters.

87. Oral health org. : ADA

American Dental Association (ADA)

88. Dovetail : MESH

In the world of carpentry, a dovetail joint is one using a “pin” cut into the end of one piece of wood mating with a “tail” cut into another. That shape of that “tail” is said to resemble the tail of a dove, hence the name.

89. In the Aegean : ASEA

The Aegean Sea is that part of the Mediterranean that lies between Greece and Turkey. Within the Aegean Sea are found the Aegean Islands, a group that includes Crete and Rhodes.

90. “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” newsman : TED

Ted Knight was the actor best known for playing the slow-witted news anchor Ted Baxter on “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”. Knight’s most famous role on the big screen was Judge Elihu Smails in the 1980 comedy “Caddyshack”.

91. Word coined by writer Capek : ROBOT

Karel Čapek was a Czech writer noted for his works of science fiction. Čapek’s 1920 play “R.U.R.” is remembered in part for introducing the world to the word “robot”. The words “automaton” and “android” were already in use, but Capek gave us “robot” from the original Czech “robota” meaning “forced labor”. The acronym “R.U.R.”, in the context of the play, stands for “Rossum’s Universal Robots”.

95. Tube, so to speak : TV SET

Television (TV, teevee, the tube, the boob tube)

96. *1985 #1 hit for Paul Young : EVERYTIME YOU GO AWAY (hiding “me/you”)

“Everytime You Go Away” is a 1980 song composed by Daryl Hall that was first recorded by Hall & Oates. However, it was the 1985 cover version by Paul Young that was the big hit.

102. Bit of work : ERG

An erg is a unit of mechanical work or energy. It is a small unit, as there are 10 million ergs in one joule. it has been suggested that an erg is about the amount of energy required for a mosquito to take off. The term comes from “ergon”, the Greek word for work.

107. Poetic foot : DACTYL

In poetry, a dactyl is a foot consisting of a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables. Example of words with such a meter are “inn-o-cent” and “fab-u-lous”.

110. __-up: hybrid musical piece : MASH

Mashups are relatively new phenomena, and are songs created by blending elements of two songs to create another. Usually this involves overlaying the vocals of one song over the instrumental track of a second song.

112. Wrinkly fruit : UGLI

The ugli fruit is a hybrid of an orange and a tangerine that was first discovered growing wild in Jamaica where most ugli fruit comes from today. “UGLI” is a trademark name that is a variant of “ugly”, a nod to the fruits unsightly wrinkled rind.

117. Like Beethoven, late in life : DEAF

Famously, and tragically, composer Ludwig van Beethoven started to lose his hearing in his late 20s, and was basically deaf for the last ten years of his life. As a result of his deafness, Beethoven was forced to use conversation books in which others communicated to the composer, while he generally responded verbally. 136 of those books survive, and provide some detailed insight into Beethoven’s life.

119. Composer of the short piano pieces “Le Yachting” and “Le Golf” : SATIE

“Sports et divertissements” (Sports and Pastimes) is a work by French composer Erik Satie that comprises 21 short pieces for piano. Those pieces are indeed short, as all 21 pieces can be performed in less than 15 minutes. Some of the “divertissements” that Satie includes are:

  • “La Chasse” (Hunting)
  • “Colin-Maillard” (Blind Man’s Buff)
  • “La Pêche” (Fishing)
  • “Le Yachting” (Yachting)
  • “Le Golf” (Golf)
  • “Le Flirt” (Flirting)

120. Hockey’s Bobby et al. : ORRS

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking.

122. Goes up and down : YO-YOS

The first yo-yos date back to at least 500 BC. There is even an ancient Greek vase painting that shows a young man playing with a yo-yo. Centuries later Filipinos were using yo-yos as hunting tools in the 1500s. “Yo-yo” is a Tagalog (Filipino) word meaning “come-come” or simply “return”.

124. Inquisitive-sounding letter : WYE

The letter Y (wye) sounds like “why?”

Down

3. Sensation before a delivery : LABOR PAIN

The normal gestation period for humans is 280 days, a little over 9 months. The gestation period can be a little shorter, or longer. Back in 1945, a pregnancy was confirmed at 375 days, which is just over 12 months.

4. Specialty : METIER

“Métier” is the French for “trade, profession”.

7. “Delta of Venus” author : NIN

“Delta of Venus” is a collection of short stories by Anais Nin that was published in 1977, not long after the author’s passing. The stories were originally written on commission for a private collector in the 1940s.

9. Author Martin : AMIS

I suppose the successful English novelist Martin Amis must have writing in his blood. Martin is the son of the respected author Kingsley Amis, a Booker Prize winner.

10. [Not a typo] : SIC

[Sic] indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

12. Company whose German pronunciation has two syllables : PORSCHE

Porsche was founded in 1931 in Stuttgart, Germany by Professor Ferdinand Porsche. The company didn’t produce cars at first, but worked on design and development. The first big job awarded to the company was from the German government, to design a car for the people. The result was the Volkswagen Beetle. Yep, the Beetle/Bug is a Porsche design.

13. Victory symbol : LAUREL

In the Ancient Olympic Games, the winner of an event was awarded an olive wreath. When the games were revived in 1896, the winners were originally given a silver medal and an olive branch, with runners-up receiving a bronze medal and a laurel branch. The tradition of giving gold, silver and bronze medals began at the 1904 Summer Olympic Games held in St. Louis, Missouri.

14. Dope : INFO

Our use of the word “dope” to mean “inside information” probably comes from horse racing. The idea is that a better might have information about which horse has been drugged (doped) to influence its performance.

16. Massachusetts motto opener : ENSE

The motto of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is “Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem”, a Latin phrase that can be translated as “By the sword we seek peace, but peace only under liberty”. The quotation is from a passage written by English politician Algernon Sidney who was executed for treason by King Charles II.

19. André Previn’s adopted daughter : SOON-YI

Soon-Yi Previn is the adopted daughter of actress Mia Farrow and pianist/conductor André Previn. After Farrow and Previn divorced, Farrow started seeing famed movie director Woody Allen. That relationship ended when Farrow discovered that Allen was having an affair with her daughter Soon-Yi. Woody Allen and Soon-Yi Previn were married in 1997.

23. Quaker in the woods : ASPEN

The “quaking” aspen tree is so called because the structure of the leaves causes them to move easily in the wind, to “tremble, quake”.

29. Heat unit : THERM

A therm is a unit of heat energy. One therm is equivalent to 100,000 British thermal units (BTUs).

32. 2017 World Series champ : ASTRO

The Houston baseball team changed its name to the Astros (sometimes “’Stros”) from the Colt .45s in 1965 when they started playing in the Astrodome. The Astrodome was so called in recognition of the city’s long association with the US space program. The Astros moved from the National League to the American League starting in the 2013 season.

34. Texter’s “seize the day” : YOLO

You only live once (YOLO)

35. Devotee : BUFF

A “buff”, “fiend” or a “nut” is one who is extremely enthusiastic and knowledgeable about a subject, someone who is a devotee.

36. Sword handles : HILTS

The hilt of a sword consists of a grip and a guard (sometimes “bell guard”). One grasps the sword with the grip, and the guard is a metal shell that is designed to protect the fingers.

37. It’s usually just before dessert : ENTREE

“Entrée” means “entry” in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in”, an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the “entry” to the meal, the first course. I found it very confusing to order meals when I first came to America!

38. Tilter’s tool : LANCE

Tilting is the most recognized form of jousting. Jousting can involve the use of a number of different weapons, but when lances are used the competition is called tilting.

39. Knighted English composer : ELGAR

Sir Edward Elgar was the quintessential English composer. He is inextricably associated with his “Pomp and Circumstance” marches (including “Land of Hope and Glory”) and the “Enigma Variations”.

41. Cold War initials : USSR

The term “Cold War” was coined by the novelist George Orwell in a 1945 essay about the atomic bomb. Orwell described a world under threat of nuclear war as having a “peace that is no peace”, in a permanent state of “cold war”. The specific use of “cold war” to describe the tension between the Eastern bloc and the Western allies is attributed to a 1947 speech by Bernard Baruch, adviser to Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

43. Cracker topper : BRIE

Brie is a soft cheese, named after the French region in which it originated. Brie is similar to the equally famous (and delicious) Camembert.

48. Long-billed wader : CURLEW

The curlew is a wading bird with a distinctive long, slender and down-curving bill. Curlews use those bills when searching for worms in mud or soft ground.

52. Stop on the Turin-Genoa railway : ASTI

The Turin-Genoa railway was built between 1845 and 1853. The line crosses the Apennines, which required the construction of the Giovi Tunnel. At the time of construction, the Giovi was the longest tunnel in the world.

54. Upper, in Ulm : OBER

“Ober” is the German word for “above”. “Ober” often appears in German place names, such as “Oberhausen” and “Ober-Ramstadt”.

56. Comet’s path : ORBIT

Comets and asteroids are similar, both being relatively small celestial bodies orbiting the sun. Comets differ from asteroids in that they have a coma or tail, especially when they are close enough to the sun. The coma and tail are temporary fuzzy atmospheres that develop due to the presence of solar radiation. Comets are sometimes referred to as “dirty snowballs”, a reference to their composition: rock, dust, water ice and frozen gases.

57. Needle point? : NORTH

The Earth’s magnetic field has a north pole and a south pole, both of which change in location over time and which are different from the planet’s geographic poles. Also, because the Earth’s magnetic field is slightly asymmetric, the north and south magnetic poles are not exactly opposite each other.

66. Tarzan’s realm : APEDOM

In the stories by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes was actually Englishman John Clayton, Viscount Greystoke.

69. Dundee disagreements : NAES

The city of Dundee lies on the north bank of the Firth of Tay in Scotland. The origins of the name “Dundee” are a little obscure, although the omnipresent “dùn” in place names all over Scotland and Ireland is the Celtic word for “fort”.

70. Ham it up : EMOTE

The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is apparently a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

71. Israeli desert : NEGEV

The Negev is a desert region in southern Israel. The largest city in the Negev is Beersheba. The Negev covers about 4,700 square miles, which is about 55% of Israel’s landmass.

72. Piña colada garnish? : TILDE

The tilde (~) diacritical mark is very much associated with the Spanish language. We use the name “tilde” in English, taking that name from Spanish. Confusingly, the word “tilde” in Spanish is used more generally to mean “accent mark, diacritic”, of which a “~” is just one. What we call a “tilde” in English is usually referred to as a “virgulilla” or “tilde de la eñe” in Spanish.

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term which translates into “strained pineapple”. The Piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

74. Declaim : ORATE

To declaim is to speak forcefully and passionately, often in a formal setting.

77. Sheltered in the Aegean : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

The Aegean Sea is that part of the Mediterranean that lies between Greece and Turkey. Within the Aegean Sea are found the Aegean Islands, a group that includes Crete and Rhodes.

82. Slate or Salon : EMAG

“Slate” is an online magazine founded in 1996. “Slate” was originally owned by Microsoft and was part of the MSN online offering. The magazine has been available for free since 1999 (it is ad-supported) and has been owned by the Washington Post Company since 2004.

Salon.com is a popular online magazine, one of the first “ezines” ever published. “Salon” focuses on American politics and current affairs, but also has articles about books, music and films. The magazine was launched in 1995, and managed to survive many loss-making years. Most of Salon’s content is free, but it does make money by offering a premium service with extra content, and by selling ad space.

86. How Steven Wright jokes are spoken : DRYLY

Steven Wright is a remarkably droll comedian from Cambridge, Massachusetts. Wright is very, very quotable:

  • What’s another word for Thesaurus?
  • If a word in the dictionary were misspelled, how would we know?
  • I intend to live forever. So far, so good.
  • When I was a little kid we had a sand box. It was a quicksand box. I was an only child… eventually.

92. Ear specialist’s science : OTOLOGY

Otology is a branch of medicine dealing with the ear. The prefix “oto-” means “pertaining to the ear”.

93. Trunks : TORSI

“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

95. “Be silent,” in music : TACET

“Tacet” is a musical direction meaning “be silent”. It is typically written on a score to instruct a particular voice or instrument to remain silent for a whole movement. “Tacet” is Latin for “it is silent”.

98. Baking supplies : YEASTS

Yeasts are unicellular microorganisms in the Fungi kingdom. The species of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for centuries in the making of wine and beer, and in breadmaking. Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide and alcohol in the process of fermentation. When making beer and wine, the carbon dioxide and alcohol may be captured by the liquid. When making bread, the carbon dioxide and alcohol is driven off by heat.

105. Yves’ ink : ENCRE

“Encre” is French for “ink”.

107. “My man!” : DUDE!

Our term “dude” arose as slang in New York City in the 1880s, when it was used to describe a fastidious man. In the early 1900s, the term was extended to mean “city slickers”, Easterners who vacationed in the West. The first use of the term “dude ranch” was recorded in 1921.

110. Like early Elvis albums : MONO

Monophonic sound (“mono”) is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

116. Suffix with Caesar : -EAN

The story that Julius Caesar was born via a Caesarean section seems be unfounded. Although such procedures were indeed carried out in Ancient Rome, there are no reports of the mother surviving (and Julius Caesar’s mother did raise her child).

Advertisement

[ad_below_googlies]

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. 16th-century date : MDL
4. Big name in shoes : MCAN
8. Batted : WAS UP
13. See 2-Down : … LINE
17. Rail commonly found in water? : SORA
18. Perry of fashion : ELLIS
20. Kind of acid in proteins : AMINO
21. Any minute, old-style : ANON
22. *Criminal justice supervisor : PROBATION OFFICER (hiding “on/off”)
25. Saturn vehicles? : UFOS
26. Placing side by side : APPOSING
27. Cries of support : OLES
28. Golf shot : STROKE
30. Wrinkly dog : SHAR-PEI
31. Common conjunction : NOR
32. Hanker : ACHE
33. *”Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!” poet : PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY (hiding “he/she”)
41. __ Dictionary : URBAN
44. Arles assents : OUIS
45. Bury : INTER
46. Amber __ : ALE
47. Delhi wrap : SARI
48. A little lower? : CALF
50. Paper size: Abbr. : LTR
51. Anime cousin : MANGA
53. *Get worse, with no way to stop : SPIN OUT OF CONTROL (hiding “in/out”)
59. Do serious damage to : SCAR
60. Hwy. : RTE
61. “My man!” : BRO!
62. Notched, as a maple leaf : EROSE
63. Back in the bay : ASTERN
65. 1965 King arrest site : SELMA
67. Shortened, as a dict. : ABR
68. Ballade’s final stanza : ENVOI
70. Complete : ENTIRE
73. Assume as fact : POSIT
75. Assist : AID
76. Eats or drinks : HAS
79. Israel’s Golda : MEIR
80. *Nero Wolfe title that plays on the start of an old adage : WHERE THERE’S A WILL (hiding “here/there”)
85. Looked like a wolf? : OGLED
87. Oral health org. : ADA
88. Dovetail : MESH
89. In the Aegean : ASEA
90. “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” newsman : TED
91. Word coined by writer Capek : ROBOT
93. Creek croaker : TOAD
95. Tube, so to speak : TV SET
96. *1985 #1 hit for Paul Young : EVERYTIME YOU GO AWAY (hiding “me/you”)
101. All the time : A LOT
102. Bit of work : ERG
103. Pretenses : FACADES
107. Poetic foot : DACTYL
110. __-up: hybrid musical piece : MASH
111. Church contribution : OFFERING
112. Wrinkly fruit : UGLI
113. Maxim that applies to pairs hiding together in the answers to starred clues : OPPOSITES ATTRACT
117. Like Beethoven, late in life : DEAF
118. Agree to : GRANT
119. Composer of the short piano pieces “Le Yachting” and “Le Golf” : SATIE
120. Hockey’s Bobby et al. : ORRS
121. Go around in circles : EDDY
122. Goes up and down : YO-YOS
123. Once uncool sort who’s now sort of cool : NERD
124. Inquisitive-sounding letter : WYE

Down

1. Transmute : MORPH
2. With 13-Across, write (to) : DROP A …
3. Sensation before a delivery : LABOR PAIN
4. Specialty : METIER
5. Medical center : CLINIC
6. Sleep like __ : A LOG
7. “Delta of Venus” author : NIN
8. Symbols of thinness : WAFERS
9. Author Martin : AMIS
10. [Not a typo] : SIC
11. Arles article : UNE
12. Company whose German pronunciation has two syllables : PORSCHE
13. Victory symbol : LAUREL
14. Dope : INFO
15. Cozy corner : NOOK
16. Massachusetts motto opener : ENSE
17. Healthful retreats : SPAS
19. André Previn’s adopted daughter : SOON-YI
23. Quaker in the woods : ASPEN
24. Dentist’s directive : FLOSS
29. Heat unit : THERM
32. 2017 World Series champ : ASTRO
34. Texter’s “seize the day” : YOLO
35. Devotee : BUFF
36. Sword handles : HILTS
37. It’s usually just before dessert : ENTREE
38. Tilter’s tool : LANCE
39. Knighted English composer : ELGAR
40. Thirst (for) : YEARN
41. Cold War initials : USSR
42. Deeply engrossed : RAPT
43. Cracker topper : BRIE
48. Long-billed wader : CURLEW
49. Elementary particle : ATOM
52. Stop on the Turin-Genoa railway : ASTI
54. Upper, in Ulm : OBER
55. Break off : CEASE
56. Comet’s path : ORBIT
57. Needle point? : NORTH
58. Deluxe : LAVISH
64. Pop : SODA
65. Many a retired racehorse : SIRE
66. Tarzan’s realm : APEDOM
69. Dundee disagreements : NAES
70. Ham it up : EMOTE
71. Israeli desert : NEGEV
72. Piña colada garnish? : TILDE
74. Declaim : ORATE
76. Boo relative : HISS
77. Sheltered in the Aegean : ALEE
78. Bed board : SLAT
81. Hard thing to kick : HABIT
82. Slate or Salon : EMAG
83. Change the decor of : REDO
84. Winding-road sign image : WAVY ARROW
86. How Steven Wright jokes are spoken : DRYLY
92. Ear specialist’s science : OTOLOGY
93. Trunks : TORSI
94. Moral obligations : OUGHTS
95. “Be silent,” in music : TACET
97. Formally approve : RATIFY
98. Baking supplies : YEASTS
99. Fling : AFFAIR
100. Drifted gently : WAFTED
104. Book with a lock : DIARY
105. Yves’ ink : ENCRE
106. PD ranks : SGTS
107. “My man!” : DUDE!
108. Kept in barrels, maybe : AGED
109. Decked out : CLAD
110. Like early Elvis albums : MONO
111. Bone head? : OSTE-
114. Adept : PRO
115. Wages : PAY
116. Suffix with Caesar : -EAN

Advertisement

[ad_below_clue_list]