LA Times Crossword Answers 14 Jan 2018, Sunday

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Constructed by: Matt McKinley
Edited by: Rich Norris

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Today’s Theme: Plush Material

Themed answers are common phrases with a letter H added, i.e. PLUS H:

  • 23A. Tolerate shrubland? : STAND THE HEATH (stand the heat + H)
  • 45A. .3 rings? : CIRCUS TENTH (circus tent + H)
  • 71A. Texas team’s fair exhibit? : COWBOY BOOTH (cowboy boot + H)
  • 99A. Loyalty from a farm bird? : TURKEY TROTH (turkey trot + H)
  • 123A. Successful religious conversion? : FAITH ACCOMPLI (fait accompli + H)
  • 17D. Apparatus that breeds laziness? : SLOTH MACHINE (slot machine + H)
  • 65D. Sound from a dying fire? : HEARTH MURMUR (heart murmur + H)

Bill’s time: 22m 39s

Bill’s errors: 0

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Across

13. Bobbing refuse : FLOTSAM

“Flotsam” and “jetsam” are both terms used to describe garbage in the ocean. Flotsam is floating wreckage from a ship or its cargo. Jetsam is similar to flotsam, except that it is part of a ship or cargo that is deliberately cast overboard, perhaps to lighten a vessel.

20. Word with man or dope : INSIDE …

Our use of the word “dope” to mean “inside information” probably comes from horse racing. The idea is that a better might have information about which horse has been drugged (doped) to influence its performance.

21. Like typical laundromats : COIN-OP

If you go looking for a laundromat in the UK or Ireland, folks will likely know what you’re talking about. However, the local name for such a facility is “launderette” or sometimes “laundrette”.

22. Affluent San Diego community : LA JOLLA

The name of the city of La Jolla is often said to be a corruption of the Spanish “La Joya” meaning “the jewel”, giving rise to the city’s nickname “Jewel City”. Scholars dispute this etymology, but it makes for good marketing.

26. Ancient queen, familiarly : CLEO

Cleopatra was the last pharaoh to rule Egypt. After she died, Egypt became a province in the Roman Empire.

27. Pot for paella : OLLA

An olla is a traditional clay pot used for the making of stews. “Olla” was the Latin word used in Ancient Rome to describe a similar type of pot.

28. Sicilian six : SEI

In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the the ball being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

37. MLB set a season record for them in 2017 : HRS

Home run (HR)

42. Office supply quantity : REAM

A ream is 500 sheets of paper. As there were 24 sheets in a quire, and 20 quires made up a ream, there used to be 480 sheets in a ream. Ever since the standard was changed to 500, a 480-sheet packet of paper has been called a “short ream”. We also use the term “reams” to mean a great amount, evolving from the idea of a lot of printed material.

48. Doctor’s orders : X-RAYS

X-rays were first studied comprehensively by the German physicist Wilhelm Röntgen (also “Roentgen”), and it was he who gave the name “X-rays” to this particular type of radiation. Paradoxically, in Röntgen’s native language of German, X-rays are routinely referred to as “Röntgen rays”. In 1901, Röntgen’s work on X-rays won him the first Nobel Prize in Physics that was ever awarded.

51. Receiver of many letters : SANTA

Canada Post has an official Santa Claus letter-response system that it introduced in 1983. Those wishing to write to Santa can address the envelope with the special post code H0H 0H0 (rewritten as H0 H0 H0). Canada Post answers about a million letters a year, each of them in the language of the sender. My hat is off to Canada Post, and to the volunteer workers at the Montreal post office that started the tradition of answering letters to Santa back in 1974 …

53. Actress Kathryn : ERBE

The actress Kathryn Erbe is best known for playing Det. Alexandra Eames on the TV show “Law & Order: Criminal Intent”. Paradoxically perhaps, Erbe’s other noted role is as Shirley Bellinger in the HBO series “Oz”, in which she plays a death row inmate.

54. Pocket breads : PITAS

Pita is a lovely bread from Middle-Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines. Pita is usually round, and has a “pocket” in the center. The pocket is created by steam that puffs up the dough during cooking leaving a void when the bread cools.

56. BCS org. : NCAA

The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) was the ranking system used to match up the top ten ranked NCAA football teams for five bowl games. The BCS was abandoned in 2014 with the introduction of the College Football Playoff tournament.

57. Franklin’s 1936 opponent : ALF

Alf Landon was the Governor of Kansas from 1933-37, and was the Republican Party’s nominee against FDR in the 1936 Presidential election. Landon is remembered as the candidate who “disappeared” after winning the nomination. He rarely traveled during the campaign, and made no appearances at all in its first two months. FDR famously won by a landslide, with Landon only winning the states of Maine and Vermont. Landon wasn’t even able to carry his home state of Kansas.

59. Spanish coin : EURO

The Euro is the official currency of most of the states in the European Union, but not all. The list of states not using the Euro includes the UK, Denmark, Sweden and Norway.

61. Local pic shower : NABE

“Nabe” is a familiar term for a neighborhood, or for a local movie theater.

67. Pres. after USG : RBH

Rutherford B. Hayes (RBH) was the 19th president of the US. Long before we had to endure the dispute over the 2000 Presidential election, Rutherford Hayes found himself president after a disputed election in 1876. President Hayes came into office having lost the popular vote to his opponent Samuel Tilden as he was voted into office by one electoral college vote. Hayes was awarded the election in the end because of an informal deal struck between Democrats and Republicans called the Compromise of 1877. Democrats allowed Rutherford to occupy the White House in exchange for removal of federal troops occupying some of the southern states.

Ulysses S. Grant (USG) had been a career soldier when he was elected as the 18th president of the US, and had risen to commander of all the Union armies by the end of the Civil War. Grant served two terms as president, and also made a failed bid for a third term. Grant’s reputation was tarnished by his apparent tolerance of corruption in his administration. On the other hand, Grant worked hard to protect African Americans during Reconstruction after the Civil War, and pursued peaceful relations with Native Americans.

68. Langley org. : CIA

The CIA headquarters is located in Langley, Virginia in a complex called the George Bush Center for Intelligence. The facility was named for former Director of the CIA and US President George H. W. Bush.

69. Online exchange, briefly : IMS

Instant message (IM)

70. Troon turndowns : NAES

Troon is a town located on the west coast of Scotland just north of Glasgow. One of Troon’s claims to fame is the Royal Troon golf course, which regularly hosts the British Open Golf Championship.

71. Texas team’s fair exhibit? : COWBOY BOOTH (cowboy boot + H)

The Dallas Cowboys play in the National Football Conference of the NFL. The Cowboys are famous for a lengthy streak of 20 consecutive winning seasons, from 1966 to 1985. They are the highest-valued sports franchise in the country. The only team in the world that’s worth more money is the UK’s Manchester United soccer team.

75. Basie’s “__’Clock Jump” : ONE O

“One O’Clock Jump” is a 1938 jazz instrumental written by Count Basie that became the theme song for the Count Basie Orchestra.

76. Director DuVernay : AVA

Ava DuVernay is a filmmaker who became the first African-American woman to win the Best Director Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, a feat she achieved in 2012 for her feature film “Middle of Nowhere”. “Middle of Nowhere” tells the story of a woman who drops out of medical school to focus on husband when he is sentenced to 8 years in prison. DuVernay also directed the 2014 film “Selma” about the 1965 voting rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

77. Actor Vigoda : ABE

Abe Vigoda played Detective Sergeant Phil Fish in television’s “Barney Miller” in the seventies, and even got his own spinoff show called “Fish”. On the big screen, Vigoda played Sal Tessio in “The Godfather” and Grandpa Ubriacco in “Look Who’s Talking”.

79. Lumber mill workers : SAWYERS

A sawyer is someone who saws wood for a living.

81. BOLO target : PERP

A BOLO is a police alert, with the acronym standing for “be on the look-out”. A BOLO can also be called an APB, an “all-points bulletin”.

87. “__ me ae spark o’ Nature’s fire”: Burns : GIE

The quoted line is from the 1785 poem “Epistle To J. Lapraik, An Old Scottish Bard” by Robert Burns.

88. London’s __ Modern : TATE

The museum known as “the Tate” is actually made up of four separate galleries in England. The original Tate gallery was founded by Sir Henry Tate as the National Gallery of British Art. It is located on Millbank in London, on the site of the old Millbank Prison, and is now called Tate Britain. There is also the Tate Liverpool in the north of England located in an old warehouse, and the Tate St. Ives in the west country located in an old gas works. My favorite of the Tate galleries is the Tate Modern which lies on the banks of the Thames in London. It’s a beautiful building, a converted power station that you have to see to believe.

89. Some Deco works : ERTES

“Erté” was the pseudonym of French (Russian born) artist and designer Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials “R.T.” Erté’s diverse portfolio of work included costumes and sets for the “Ziegfeld Follies” of 1923, productions of the Parisian cabaret show “Folies Bergère”, as well as the 1925 epic movie “Ben-Hur”. Erté’s most famous work by far is an image titled “Symphony in Black”. It depicts a tall and slender woman dressed in black, holding a black dog on a leash.

93. Maestro Georg : SZELL

The marvelous American conductor George Szell was born in Hungary. He came to the US in 1939 with the outbreak of WWII in Europe. Famously, Szell took over the Cleveland Orchestra in 1946 and developed it into one of the world’s most respected orchestras.

103. Grammy winner Jason : MRAZ

Jason Mraz is a singer-songwriter from Mechanicsville, Virginia. Jason is of Czech descent, and his name “Mraz” translates as “frost”.

108. East Lansing sch. : MSU

Michigan State University (MSU) is located in East Lansing, Michigan. MSU has the largest study-abroad program of any single-campus university in the US. Programs are offered on all continents of the world, including Antarctica. The MSU athletic teams are known as the Spartans.

113. Office supplies, or, minus a letter, a supplier of them : STAPLERS

Staples is an office supply chain store based in Framingham, Massachusetts. Some of the company’s stores have a Staples EasyTech department that provides computer repair and upgrade services.

115. Nashville attraction : OPRY

The Tennessee city of Nashville was founded in 1779 near a stockade in the Cumberland River valley called Fort Nashborough. Both the settlement and the fort were named for General Francis Nash, a war hero who died in combat during the American Revolution.

118. Howard’s wife, to the Fonz : MRS C

In the great sitcom “Happy Days”, the Fonz liked to address Richie Cunningham’s mother as “Mrs. C”. In turn, Mrs. Marion Cunningham addressed the Fonz as “Arthur”.

120. Letters before a view : IMHO

In my humble opinion (IMHO)

121. Half of nothing new? : SAME OLD

Same old, same old.

123. Successful religious conversion? : FAITH ACCOMPLI (fait accompli + H)

“Fait accompli” is a French term that translates literally as “accomplished fact”. It is used in English to mean “a done deal”.

128. Peru neighbor : ECUADOR

“Ecuador” is the Spanish word for “equator”, which gives the country its name.

129. “The Wind in the Willows” croaker : MR TOAD

“The Wind in the Willows” is a classic children’s novel first published in 1908. Featured in the story are characters such as Mole, Ratty, Mr. Toad and Mr. Badger. The story’s author was Kenneth Grahame, a man who held the exalted position of Secretary of the Bank of England.

132. Blouse partners : SKIRTS

A blouse is a loose-fitting shirt, particularly one worn by women or children. The term “blouse” is French, and originally described a peasant’s smock.

Down

1. “‘__ some visitor,’ I muttered … “: Poe : ‘TIS

The first verse of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” is:

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore-
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—
Only this and nothing more.”

3. TV awareness-raiser : PSA

Public service announcement (PSA)

6. Teenage Russian emperor (1727-1730) : PETER II

Peter II was the son of Peter I and Emperor of Russia. Peter II took over as Emperor on the death of Catherine I, wife of Peter I.

8. Acronymic NYC neighborhood : NOHO

NoHo is short for North of Houston (street), and is the equivalent area to SoHo, South of Houston, both of which are in New York City.

12. N.T. book : EPH

It seems that the Epistle of Paul to the Ephesians (Eph.) is now regarded by scholars as written “in the style of Paul” by someone who was influenced by Paul’s thought.

13. Paper under a wiper : FLIER

Fliers are notices that are circulated. The original fliers (also “flyers”) were police bulletins that were “scatter-broadcast”.

14. Man-made Georgia lake : LANIER

Lake Lanier is a reservoir on the Chattahoochee River in northern Georgia that was created in the mid-1950s with the construction of Buford Dam. The lake is named for poet Sidney Lanier, who used the Chattahoochee as a subject for one his poems.

15. Screwdriver parts, for short : OJS

The cocktail called a screwdriver is a mix of fresh orange juice with vodka. Apparently the drink originated with a group of engineers in the late forties who used to spike small cans of orange juice with vodka, and then stir it in with their screwdrivers.

17. Apparatus that breeds laziness? : SLOTH MACHINE (slot machine + H)

“Sloth”, meaning “indolence, sluggishness”, comes from the Middle English word “slowe”, the same root for our contemporary word “slow”. The animal, the sloth, is so named as it exhibits slow-moving behavior.

19. Spinnaker holders : MASTS

A spinnaker is a sail used when a sailboat is sailing off the wind. It is a bulbous sail that balloons out when it fills with wind. Spinnakers might be said to resemble parachutes as they use similar light fabric, and both are often very colorful in design.

24. Writer __ de Balzac : HONORE

Honoré de Balzac was a French novelist and playwright from the 19th century. Balzac wrote a huge collection of related novels called “La Comédie humaine” (The Human Comedy). The work includes 91 stories, novels and essays, written from 1815 to 1848. Balzac also left 46 unfinished works as part of the collection.

31. Nike competitor : AVIA

The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as “avia” is the Latin word for “to fly”, and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

33. Bolivian capital : SUCRE

Sucre is the constitutional capital of Bolivia (La Paz is the administrative capital and seat of the government). It is named for independence leader Antonio José de Sucre, who was the second president of Bolivia as well as the fourth president of Peru.

35. Red Square honoree : LENIN

Lenin’s Tomb is mausoleum in which lie the embalmed remains of Vladimir Lenin. The tomb lies just outside the walls of the Kremlin in Red Square. Lenin died in 1924, after which his body was housed in a wooden structure in Red Square for viewing by mourners. The current marble and granite structure was completed in 1930. The body has rested there on display ever since, except for the years of WWII when there was a perceived danger of Moscow falling to the Germans. The body was evacuated to Tyumen in Siberia for the war years.

43. Ponte Vecchio’s river : ARNO

The Ponte Vecchio is the oldest bridge that spans the Arno River in Florence, Italy. The bridge dates back to medieval times, and indeed the name “Ponte Vecchio” translates as “Old Bridge”. Famously, there are two rows of shops built on either side of the roadway crossing the bridge.

52. New Mexico art hub : TAOS

The town of Taos, New Mexico is named for the Native American village nearby called Taos Pueblo. Taos is famous for its art colony. Artists began to settle in Taos in 1899, and the Taos Society of Artists was founded in 1915.

55. Witch enemy of Popeye : SEA HAG

The Sea Hag is Popeye’s archenemy, and sails the seas with her pet vulture Bernard on her boat called “The Black Barnacle”.

64. Admonition : CAVEAT

A caveat is a warning or a qualification. “Caveat” is the Latin for “let him beware”.

66. Stack seen on-screen : ROBERT

The actor Robert Stack appeared in many Hollywood films, but is best known for his TV appearances. Stack played the lead in the crime series “The Untouchables” and was the host of “Unsolved Mysteries”.

75. Court cry : OYEZ!

“Oyez” is an Anglo-French word traditionally called out three times, with the meaning “hear ye!”

84. Country singer Gibbs : TERRI

Terri Gibbs is a country music singer. Gibbs had thirteen singles that made the Billboard country singles charts in the eighties. Gibbs was born blind.

94. Sommer of “The Prize” : ELKE

Elke Sommer is a German-born actress who was at the height of her success on the silver screen in the sixties. Sommer won a Golden Globe as Most Promising Newcomer Actress for her role opposite Paul Newman in 1964’s “The Prize”. She also sings and has released several albums. Now Sommer focuses on painting, producing artwork that is strongly influenced by the work of Marc Chagall.

96. Hosp. personnel : LPNS

Licensed practical nurse (LPN)

100. Academic retirees : EMERITI

“Emeritus” (female form “emerita”, plural “emeriti”) is a term in the title of some retired professionals, particularly those from academia. Originally an emeritus was a veteran soldier who had served his time. The term comes from the Latin verb “emerere” meaning to complete one’s service.

104. Gung-ho type : ZEALOT

“Kung ho” is a Chinese expression meaning “work together, cooperate”. The anglicized version “gung-ho” was adopted by a Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

107. 10-time Gold Glove winner Roberto : ALOMAR

Roberto Alomar is a former Major League Baseball player, considered by many to be the greatest ever second baseman. Alomar won 10 Gold Glove awards in his career, which is more than any other second baseman in history.

108. Early receiver of tablets : MOSES

According to the Book of Exodus, God inscribed the Ten Commandments on two stone tablets and gave them to Moses on Mount Sinai.

109. __ bar : SPACE

In early typewriters, the “space bar” was indeed a bar. It was a metal bar that stretched across the full width of the keyboard.

111. Netman Agassi : ANDRE

Retired tennis professional Andre Agassi has been married to fellow player Steffi Graf since 2001. Agassi wrote an autobiography called “Open”, published in 2009. An amazing revelation in the book is that Agassi’s famous head of hair was actually a wig for much of his playing career. Can you imagine how hard it must have been to play tennis at his level with a rug stuck on?

112. Fur tycoon : ASTOR

John Jacob Astor was the patriarch of the famous American Astor dynasty. He was the country’s first multi-millionaire, making his fortune in the trade of fur, real estate and opium. In today’s terms, it has been calculated that by the time of his death he has accumulated a fortune big enough to make him the fourth wealthiest man in American history (in the company of the likes of Andrew Carnegie, Cornelius Vanderbilt, Bill Gates, Henry Ford and John D. Rockefeller).

114. Suffix with xeno- : PHOBE

The Greek combining form “xeno-” means “strange, foreign”, as in “xenophobia”, a fear of foreigners.

122. “Ghost” psychic __ Mae Brown : ODA

Oda Mae Brown is the psychic medium in the movie “Ghost”, and is played by Whoopi Goldberg.

125. Big Ten sch. : PSU

Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was founded in 1855 as the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania. Penn State is listed as one of the “Public Ivies”, a public university that offers a quality of education comparable to that of the Ivy League.

126. Novelist Deighton : LEN

I used to walk my dog right past author Len Deighton’s house years ago, as we lived in the same village in Ireland (probably my only claim to “fame”). Deighton wrote the excellent espionage thriller “The IPCRESS File”, made into a 1965 movie starring Michael Caine.

127. Picks out of a mug book : IDS

A mugshot is a photograph of a person’s face, often taken for a police record.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. “I’m waiting … ” : TAP TAP …
7. “Volunteers?” : ANYONE?
13. Bobbing refuse : FLOTSAM
20. Word with man or dope : INSIDE …
21. Like typical laundromats : COIN-OP
22. Affluent San Diego community : LA JOLLA
23. Tolerate shrubland? : STAND THE HEATH (stand the heat + H)
25. Crowd-drawing bars : IN SPOTS
26. Ancient queen, familiarly : CLEO
27. Pot for paella : OLLA
28. Sicilian six : SEI
29. Sports figure : STAT
30. Sewer needs : PATTERNS
34. Hates : DEPLORES
37. MLB set a season record for them in 2017 : HRS
38. Times to call, in ads : EVES
39. Markers : IOUS
41. Submerged threat : REEF
42. Office supply quantity : REAM
44. Term in wrestling or bowling : PIN
45. .3 rings? : CIRCUS TENTH (circus tent + H)
48. Doctor’s orders : X-RAYS
51. Receiver of many letters : SANTA
53. Actress Kathryn : ERBE
54. Pocket breads : PITAS
56. BCS org. : NCAA
57. Franklin’s 1936 opponent : ALF
59. Spanish coin : EURO
61. Local pic shower : NABE
62. Distress signal? : OH MY
63. One who’s learned : SCHOLAR
67. Pres. after USG : RBH
68. Langley org. : CIA
69. Online exchange, briefly : IMS
70. Troon turndowns : NAES
71. Texas team’s fair exhibit? : COWBOY BOOTH (cowboy boot + H)
75. Basie’s “__’Clock Jump” : ONE O
76. Director DuVernay : AVA
77. Actor Vigoda : ABE
78. Bard’s dusk : E’EN
79. Lumber mill workers : SAWYERS
81. BOLO target : PERP
83. It can be hammered out : DENT
85. Runway adornment : SASH
87. “__ me ae spark o’ Nature’s fire”: Burns : GIE
88. London’s __ Modern : TATE
89. Some Deco works : ERTES
91. Sea, with “the” : DEEP
93. Maestro Georg : SZELL
97. Different : OTHER
99. Loyalty from a farm bird? : TURKEY TROTH (turkey trot + H)
102. Overtake in a race, in a way : LAP
103. Grammy winner Jason : MRAZ
105. Schoolmarmish : PRIM
106. One given to forward looks : SEER
107. Similar : AKIN
108. East Lansing sch. : MSU
110. “How clever of you!” : NEAT IDEA!
113. Office supplies, or, minus a letter, a supplier of them : STAPLERS
115. Nashville attraction : OPRY
117. Spanish 116-Down : ANO
118. Howard’s wife, to the Fonz : MRS C
120. Letters before a view : IMHO
121. Half of nothing new? : SAME OLD
123. Successful religious conversion? : FAITH ACCOMPLI (fait accompli + H)
128. Peru neighbor : ECUADOR
129. “The Wind in the Willows” croaker : MR TOAD
130. Shamed : ABASED
131. Saw-toothed : SERRATE
132. Blouse partners : SKIRTS
133. Already-seen fare : RERUNS

Down

1. “‘__ some visitor,’ I muttered … “: Poe : ‘TIS
2. __ farm : ANT
3. TV awareness-raiser : PSA
4. Colors : TINCTS
5. Confuse : ADDLE
6. Teenage Russian emperor (1727-1730) : PETER II
7. Pitching staff leader : ACE
8. Acronymic NYC neighborhood : NOHO
9. Give in : YIELD
10. Ready : ON ALERT
11. “Shh!” : NOT A PEEP!
12. N.T. book : EPH
13. Paper under a wiper : FLIER
14. Man-made Georgia lake : LANIER
15. Screwdriver parts, for short : OJS
16. Best : TOPS
17. Apparatus that breeds laziness? : SLOTH MACHINE (slot machine + H)
18. Union setting : ALTAR
19. Spinnaker holders : MASTS
24. Writer __ de Balzac : HONORE
28. Tortilla treat : SOFT TACO
30. Livens (up) : PEPS
31. Nike competitor : AVIA
32. N.C. neighbor : TENN
33. Bolivian capital : SUCRE
35. Red Square honoree : LENIN
36. __ roles : SEX
40. Literally, “under city” : SUBURB
43. Ponte Vecchio’s river : ARNO
45. See the bet : CALL
46. __-Croatian : SERBO
47. They’re hard to break : HABITS
49. Whine : YAMMER
50. Decision makers have them : SAY-SOS
52. New Mexico art hub : TAOS
55. Witch enemy of Popeye : SEA HAG
58. False front : FACADE
60. “Without a doubt” : OH YES
63. Acknowledge the brass : SNAP TO
64. Admonition : CAVEAT
65. Sound from a dying fire? : HEARTH MURMUR (heart murmur + H)
66. Stack seen on-screen : ROBERT
72. Approached : WENT UP TO
73. Small and glittering, like eyes : BEADY
74. Beginnings : ONSETS
75. Court cry : OYEZ!
80. Something made on a star? : WISH
82. Jury member : PEER
84. Country singer Gibbs : TERRI
86. Glass-raised word : HERE’S
90. Accident investigation clue : SKID MARK
92. __ license : POETIC
94. Sommer of “The Prize” : ELKE
95. Animal house : LAIR
96. Hosp. personnel : LPNS
98. Headed up : RAN
100. Academic retirees : EMERITI
101. Ore carrier : TRAM CAR
104. Gung-ho type : ZEALOT
107. 10-time Gold Glove winner Roberto : ALOMAR
108. Early receiver of tablets : MOSES
109. __ bar : SPACE
111. Netman Agassi : ANDRE
112. Fur tycoon : ASTOR
114. Suffix with xeno- : PHOBE
116. English 117-Across : YEAR
119. Series of 69-Across : CHAT
122. “Ghost” psychic __ Mae Brown : ODA
123. Radio settings : FMS
124. Reasons for some sportscast split screens : ADS
125. Big Ten sch. : PSU
126. Novelist Deighton : LEN
127. Picks out of a mug book : IDS

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12 thoughts on “LA Times Crossword Answers 14 Jan 2018, Sunday”

  1. Probably one of the worst excuses for a puzzle that I have ever worked.

    This puzzle is full of crossword puzzle constructor NoNos!!!

    Not even sure how the editors allowed this in print.

    The constructor reached so far with way to many clues and the number of names of people, etc. is over the top.

    Please do not allow this constructor in print again. If you do please edit the puzzle back to reality.

    I got the opinion this constructor thought he was cuter (he thinks smarter) than the solvers.

    Thanks for the wasted Sunday

  2. Dear Bil, while reading the ‘world news headlines’, I came across a miracle plane accident, wherein a Boeing 737 skid off the runway and fell, down a crevice/cliff, almost into the sea. No deaths or injuries – thank god.

    The most interesting thing is the name of the airport, where this accident took place … Trabzon, in northern Turkey. You might remember Johm Smith, the slave, and lover, of the princess (of ) Tragabigzanda, whose name was on a Cape, now Cape Ann, Gloucester, Mass. Well, that place in Turkey, is now called Trabzon, in modern times.

    I thought of you and your blog, immediately.
    Have a nice weekend, all.

  3. LAT: 30:02, no errors. Newsday: 16:51, no errors.

    @Vidwan. Thanks for the link. As I may have mentioned here before, my oldest brother (whom I visited last week) was in the USAF Security Service and was stationed in Trabzon for some time in the early 60’s.

    @Steve … I think you did a completely different puzzle than I did … ?

    And my back is improving! … ?

  4. 49:59 (which sounds 10 minutes faster than 50 minutes…) with 1 square incorrect: I had LANsER/SEs instead of LANIER/SEI. I guess I need to learn more EYE-talian… One of very few times I looked at the title before starting the puzzle, I kind of knew what to expect beforehand. I then leaned on the theme heavily to solve this one. Very tough indeed. MRAZ ans SZELL in the same grid? Diabolical, but I managed.

    Did not know they moved LENIN’s body during the war, but it makes sense. I was lucky enough to view his body while in Moscow (the tomb is open and not open on an unscheduled and unpredictable basis). Maybe it’s all the preservatives, but that did NOT look like a real human body. It looked more like something from Madame Toussads. He also must have been about 4’11” as he looked very small. They keep you moving in there – probably so you don’t get too good of a look.

    I knew Troon as I played there….the course in Scottsdale (Troon North), not Scotland. I had a very nice golf shirt from there as a memento…that of course was destroyed by the flood…Guess I need to go back.

    @Dave –
    When did you get the weak back? About a week back? (Old Three Stooges line). Hope it gets better. Those are debilitating.

    @Steve – I see you’re undecided on this puzzle. Please get back to us when you make a determination whether you liked it or not….

    Best –

  5. I’ve never seen the word “nabe” anywhere but in a crossword puzzle and I haven’t seen it at all in quite some time. I think its usage elsewhere must have been pretty limited.

  6. This one is for the “constructor” and all his colleagues who don’t make a distinction between the Spanish letters “n” and “ñ.” Thus, the solution for 117-A comes out as “ano” (English “anus”) and not as “año” (English “year”). This is a mistake frequently found in crosswords in the USA.

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